• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 In this issue
 Beef management calendar
 Johanns announces results of investigation...
 Beef Checkoff announces 2006 summer...
 Date set for boxed-beef price
 Eyeing a test for barber pole...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. March 2006.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00015
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. March 2006.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: March 2006
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00015
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Johanns announces results of investigation into ineligible veal shipment to Japan
        Page 5
    Beef Checkoff announces 2006 summer grilling campaign
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Date set for boxed-beef price
        Page 8
    Eyeing a test for barber pole worm
        Page 8
Full Text







































4aJJ Dates to Remember


March

I Horida & Georuia Dai\ Road Sho\\ Nla.\o. FL
2-5 Adult Horsemanship School Welaka, FL
3 Hlonlda & Geo'ria DiiI\ Road Sho\\ Chiplle. FL
4 NFBFG Spring Pasture & Hayfield Weed Control
Workshop Joe Hendricks Farm
4 Small ainrmn L\ eCtock ConfCerence II B.ruto\\. L
7 Florida & Georgia Dairy Road Show Tifton, GA
9 l Honda Beef )uailin Pioducer Prog:iiam Oceola Co.
Extclliio (O)ffice
10-18 Sumter County Fair Bushnell, FL
10-19 Hefiehter'.s Indian Ri\ec Count\ [a.i Veo Beach.
FL
11-12 Okeechobee Rodeo Okeechobee, FL
11-17 Polk Counrm Youth Fair BIl>to\\, FL
14 FCA / FCW Legislative Quarterly Meeting -
Tallahassee, FL


I6-
Apr 2


liaini-Dade CouLnt Fair E\psio.lion Nliami. FL


In This Issue...


BeefN lanauement Calendar
55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course
Johanns Announces Results of In estimation Into
Ineli-ible Veal Shipment to Japan
Beet'Checkoff Announces 2000 Summer Grilling
Campaign 6
Date Set for Boxed-Beef Price Trial 8
E\ei ng a Test for Barber Pole Worm 8


18 12th Annual Circle A Ranch Red & Black Bull Sale -
Iberia, FL
18 Small F.aum Lit\csock Coinlciernce II LaBelle. FL
21 Farm Bureau Day Tallahassee, FL
24 4-11 & FFA Steel Cl('iaca Conl.es1 BradIord CoUnl\
Fa iiito intls
25 State 4-11 Ilipp~olo r Conltes Orland.o FL
25-30 National 4-11 Conference \\ a.lhington. D.C.
28-30 2i"' Annual RepioducIl\ M NIanagicment School Polk
COulnt\ .A- -Center Barto\\ FL
28-31 NCBA Sprin Coniference \\ a.sliington DC


April

I State 4-11 & FF.A L'n ec.ock .Jludg'i (ConiCe.t -
Gaine., illc. FL
8 State 4-H & FFA Horse Judging Contest -
Gainesville, FL
10 Panhandle (Catlemen'.s As..ociation Nleetini -
(Cret\ i\\,. FL
20 2006 Alachua County Master Cattlemen Program -
Gainesville, FL
20 Golt. Sheep &f Rfiuminiint Piodticionl \\ ork'lhop -
Ft. N\ie-. FL
21-22 Escambia County GCA & NRA Spring Livestock
Show Escambia County 4-H Center
23-28 FC'A Y oungi Cattleinen'.' Tour Kil.iinince. FL
27 2006 Alachua County Master Cattlemen Program -
Gainesville, FL
29 State 4-11 & FF.A El lcat..lJudwing ConlteC -
G iines ille, FL


a ~ C7 I


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.


I _


I








40


Beef Management
Calendar


March
0 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
0 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and
rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
0 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1 st for external
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear
tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1 st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.

ADril
0 Plant warm season annual pastures.
0 Plant corn for silage.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Check dust bags or apply treated ear tags.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if necessary.
0 Observe cows for repeat breeders.
0 Deworm cows as needed if not done in March.
0 Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3
months of age and before 12 months of age.
0 Market cull cows and bulls.
0 Update market information and refine market strategy
for calves.

May
0 Remove bulls.
0 Harvest hay from cool season crops.
0 Plant warm season perennial pastures.
0 Fertilize warm season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for spittlebugs and treat if necessary.
0 Apply spot-on agents for grub and louse control.


0 Check dustbags.
R Vaccinate and implant with growth stimulant any later
calves.
0 Reimplant calves with growth stimulant at 90-120
days, when you have herd penned.
0 Dispose of dead animals properly.
R Update market information and refine marketing
plans.
0 Remove bulls May 21 to end calving season March
1.




55th Annual Florida Beef
SCattle Short Course




The 55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course
at the University of Florida will be held on May 3-5,
2006, at the Hilton University of Florida Conference
Center in Gainesville, Florida. Beef cattle production in
Florida is a dynamic and challenging industry. Every
producer faces challenges regarding economics and
marketing, resource utilization, and management
decisions. These challenges are on-going processes that
necessitate current information for decision making. The
55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course addresses
these challenges that the beef cattle producers face on
an everyday basis. The Wednesday afternoon program
will begin at 1 pm with the focus on marketing and land
resource utilization challenges. As the cattle cycle evolves,
knowing where we are and where the market may be
headed is always pertinent. In addition, this session will
focus on a timely and important topic for the sustainability
of the beef cattle industry. The beef cattle enterprise's
land resources and the continuing issue of land use and
value in Florida will be approached on a number of
different fronts. The day will conclude with a reception
and Allied Industry Trade Show, a great chance for
cattlemen and allied industry representatives to interact
and share information. The program Thursday addresses
some of the management issues of beef cattle production.
Nutrition, cow herd management, beef products, and
beef product procurement systems will all be addressed.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








These basic issues ofbeefproduction will be approached
with improved production efficiency in mind. Lunch will
generously be sponsored by Farm Credit of North
Florida. The afternoon program moves outside to utilize
the UF/IFAS, Beef Teaching Unit to demonstrate calf
processing, cattle evaluation, and hay production
techniques. Thursday evening is capped by the annual
Cattlemen's Steak-Out, an opportunity to enjoy a prime
rib dinner and time for conversation. On Friday morning,
the program highlights the University ofFlorida's ongoing
dedication to beef cattle production. Two concurrent
sessions will showcase some of the current research
efforts in the Animal Sciences and Agronomy
departments that relate directly to the Florida beef cattle
producer. Alternatively, that morning will be an
opportunity for interested producers to attend a Florida
Beef Quality Producer training session. Securing the
ability and the resources to maintain the beef industry in
Florida will continue to be a challenge. Utilizing new and
innovative production practices to profitably produce
quality beef cattle and beef products will be an important
key to maintaining the opportunity we have to enjoy a
profession and lifestyle in the beef industry.

Registration cost is $90 per participant before April
21, and includes a copy of the Beef Cattle Short Course
proceedings, trade show, refreshments, and Steak-Out
ticket. Complete information, schedules, and registration
can be found online at http://www.animal.ufl.edu/
extension/beef/bcscIndex.shtml, or contact the University
of Florida, Department ofAnimal Sciences at (352) 392-
1916.


Agenda

"Meeting the Challenges of Preserving Our
Land, Managing Our Cattle, and Feeding Our
Consumers"

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

AM

11:00 Registration (Hilton UF Conference Center)

PM

"Marketing and Land Resource Utilization
Challenges"


Presiding: Tim Marshall, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:00 Welcome
-E Glen Hembry, Department Chairman and
Professor, Department ofAnimal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:20 Remarks
-Joe HilliardII, President, Florida
Cattlemen's Association, Clewiston, FL

1:30 Economic and Market Outlook for 2006
-DerrellPeel, Oklahoma State University,
Stillwater, OK

2:15 Land Use Rights
-Marty .Githi, Bond, Arnett, Phelan, Smith
& Craggs, P.A., Ocala, FL


3:00

3:20




4:15




5:00


Refreshment Break

Alternatives in the Presence of Urban
Encroachment
- Johnnie James, Tedder, James, Worden
and Associates, PA, Orlando, FL

Incorporation of the Value of Ranches
into Community Planning and Landscapes
- PhilLeary, AICP, Governmental Affairs
Consultant, Palatka, FL

Panel Discussion/Response to Questions -
Land Resource Use
- Johnnie James, Tedder, James, Worden
and Associates, PA, Orlando, FL
- PhilLeary, AICP, Governmental Affairs
Consultant, Palatka, FL
-Marty .nithi, Bond, Arnett, Phelan, Smith
& Craggs, PA., Ocala, FL


5:30 Allied Industry Trade Show and
Reception Several companies will have
exhibits and representatives to answer your
questions. Hors d'oeuvres provided
compliments of the exhibitors. A cash bar is
available for your enjoyment.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


Thursday, May 4, 2006

"Management Practices to Optimize Production
Efficiency"

AM

7:00 Importance of Organic Trace Minerals in
Beef Rations
Breakfast Sponsored by Alltech, Inc.

Presiding: Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL

8:30 By-Product Feed Utilization for Forage
Diets
-MattHersom, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

9:15 Process Verification and Product Supply
Coordination of Beef
-Marcine Moldenhauer, Cargill Meat
Solutions, Wichita, KS

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:30 Cow Herd Decisions for Future Tough
Times
Ron Gill, Texas A&M University,
Department ofAnimal Science, College
Station, TX

11:15 Natural-Organic-Grass fed Beef Cattle
Definitions and Regulations
Terry Houser, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

PM

12:00 Leave for Lunch at UF/IFAS Beef
Teaching Unit (Sponsored by Farm Credit
ofNorth Florida Directions to be
provided)

Presiding: John Arthington, Range Cattle Research
and Education Center, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL and Jerry
Wasdin, Department ofAnimal Sciences, UF/IFAS,
Gainesville, FL


1:30 Demonstration and Discussion (Three one-
hour sessions repeated with refreshment break
sponsored by Helena Chemical Company)
Feeder-Finish Calf Evaluation
Tim Marshall, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL and Ron Gill, Texas
A&M University, Department ofAnimal
Science, College Station, TX
Calf Processing Techniques
Todd Thrift, Department of Animal
Sciences, Department ofAnimal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL, UF/IFAS,
Gainesville, FL
Hay Harvest and Preservation Methods
-MattHersom, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, Department ofAnimal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

5:00 Adjourn

6:30 Cattlemen's Steak-Out (Horse Teaching
Unit)

Friday, May 5, 2006

University of Florida's Ongoing Dedication to
Beef Cattle Production Two concurrent sessions
highlighting selected research at the University of
Florida pertaining to beef cattle production and
forage-grazing management. Participants may attend
either session or pick individual topics of interest.
Florida Beef Quality Producer program is an all
morning single session focusing on quality assurance
practices and record keeping.

AM

Session I

Presiding: Dwain Johnson, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

8:30 Cull Cow Finishing Performance
Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








9:00 Cull Cow Meat Quality
Alex Stelzleni, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

9:30 Johne's Disease Control
Owen Rae, College of Veterinary Medicine,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:30 Nursing Calf Deworming
Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL

11:00 Early Weaning Performance and Health
John Arthington, Range Cattle Research
and Education Center, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL

11:30 Estrus Synchronization Protocols
Joel Yelich, Department of Animal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

Session II

Presiding: Terry Houser, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

8:30 North and Central Florida Herbicide
Application
Jay Ferrell, Agronomy Department,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

9:00 South Florida Herbicide Application
Brent Sellers, Range Cattle Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL

9:30 Getting the Most out of Bahiagrass
Pasture Fertilization
CherylMackowiak, North Florida
Research and Education Center, UF/IFAS,
Marianna, FL

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:30 Grazing Programs Utilizing Florida
Forages
Lynn Sollenberger, Agronomy Department,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL


11:00 Perennial Peanut Establishment
'Ann Blount and 2Martin Adjei, 'North
Florida Research and Education Center,
UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL; 2Range Cattle
Research and Education Center, UF/IFAS,
Ona, FL

11:30 Pasture Fertilization
Jerry Sartain, Agronomy Department,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

Session III

8:00 All morning session Florida Beef Quality
Assurance Program
Todd Thrift, Department of Animal
Sciences; Max Irsik, College of Veterinary
Medicine; MattHersom, Department of
Animal Sciences; UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL;
and Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL

PM

12:00 Adjourn


SOURCE:


Matt Hersom
Phone: (352) 392-2390
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu
Dwain Johnson
Phone: (352) 392-1922
Email: johnson@animal.ufl.edu
University of Florida
Department of Animal Sciences
Gainesville, FL
http://www.animal.ufl.edu


Johanns Announces
USDA Results of Investigation

Into Ineligible Veal
Shipment to Japan

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has announced
the results of an investigation into the ineligible shipment
of veal that was sent to Japan last month. He also
released a comprehensive USDA report that details the


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


findings of the investigation and actions taken by USDA.
"The thoroughness of this report demonstratesjust
how serious we are about addressing this incident and
providing assurance to our trading partners that our
system is among the best in the world," said Johanns. "I
believe our actions fully address the facts that led to this
incident and provide added protections on a broader
scale to prevent similar problems in the future."
The report, which totals 475 pages, establishes
several facts surrounding the ineligible shipment, including
noting that it posed no risk to human health. The report
lays out the unique circumstances surrounding this
shipment: it was the first shipment of veal sent to Japan;
only two plants were certified to ship veal to Japan; and
both of them were delisted before any other shipments
were sent to Japan. In addition, veal had only recently
been added to the U.S. export agreement with Japan.
The document relayed to Japan contains two
distinct reports: an investigation by the Food Safety and
Inspection Service and an audit by the Office of the
Inspector General. In total, it contains eleven findings:
five resulting from the FSIS investigation and six from a
separate Inspector General's audit, with the findings
closely mirroring each other.
The report concludes that mistakes were made by
the plants involved with the shipment and by USDA
inspection personnel. Those mistakes resulted from a
lack of understanding of which products were eligible
for shipment to Japan. The ineligible product included
veal with the vertebral column intact and veal offal.
In addition, the report concludes that FSIS
inspection program personnel at the establishment were
not sufficiently aware of the Agricultural Marketing
Service (AMS) Export Verification program and should
not have certified or approved the shipment of ineligible
product to Japan.
USDA is taking several actions in response to the
findings of this report, in addition to the actions that were
announced on January 20, when USDA learned of the
ineligible shipment. These actions go beyond the
circumstances of this incident to incorporate further
efficiencies and protections into the U. S. export system.
These actions can be summarized as follows:
All FSIS inspectors who work in plants that are


certified to export beef are undergoing additional
mandatory training to ensure they fully understand U.S.
export agreements.
USDA will require plants to maintain a list of specific
products they are certified to ship to any country, instead
of a blanket export certification and that list will be kept
readily available to USDA inspectors.
USDA inspectors in the plants will be notified of
changes to a plant's eligibility to export at three separate
times in the certification process: when the plant applies
for certification, when the plant is audited and when a
plant is certified or delisted.
Final export certification cannot be completed until
in-plant inspectors have undergone additional training,
ensuring coordination between AMS and F SIS.
Initiating with the resumption of exports to Japan,
USDA will require a second signature on every shipment
of beef for export, unless a trading partner indicates a
second signature is not necessary for U.S. exports to
that country.
The report is available on the web at:
http://www.fsis.usda.gov. Additional appendices to the
report, which are not posted on the web, are available
by contacting USDA's Office of Communications at
(202) 720-4623 or FSIS at (202) 720-9113.


SOURCE:


Terri Teuber
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Ed Loyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
USDA
Washington, D.C.
http://www.usda.gov
Release February 17, 2006


BEEF Beef Checkoff Announces
2006 Summer Grilling
Campaign

The Beef CheckoffProgram is firing up the grill on
its annual Summer Grilling campaign to ignite strong
summer beef sales at retail.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


Conducted on behalf of the Cattlemen's Beef
Board, the 19-week program spans from May to Labor
Day and is an integrated retail marketing effort that
features all grilling cuts of beef, including the chuck and
round, and incorporates the well-recognized tagline,
"Beef It's What's for Dinner."
"We're very excited to continue the Summer
Grilling promotion for the fifth consecutive year, and have
a variety of promotional initiatives planned to drive
consumers to the meat case," said Randy Irion, director
of retail marketing for the National Cattlemen's Beef
Association. "This collaborative effort has grown
significantly since it was first introduced in 2001, and
we're pleased to be building on the success of past years
to get Americans enthusiastic about grilling up beef this
summer."
According to FreshLook data, last year's
promotion helped drive total beef sales up nearly 4
percent on a dollar basis versus the same period in 2004,
despite a slightly reduced supply. Dollar increases in light
of a reduced supply is further indication of the strong
demand for beef.
Partnerships are integral to the annual summer
grilling promotion. Based on the successes of 2005, the
Beef Checkoff Program will again team with Kraft
Foods' A. 1. Steak Sauce and Marinades in 2006. This
year, two freestanding inserts (FSIs) on May 14 and
June 18 will offer $1 -off beef coupons with the purchase
of A. 1. Steak Sauce and Marinades. In addition, in-
store $1-off beef instant redeemable coupons will be
featured on rolling racks of A. 1. Steaks Sauces and
Marinades.
Through Labor Day, the beef industry will run
national radio advertising with retailer tags in the top 40
markets, which will reach more than 94 percent of beef s
target audience. In addition to the radio advertising and
summer promotion, two national print campaigns
focusing on beefs enjoyment and nutrition messages will
run in publications such as Food & Wine, Southern Living
and Sports Illustrated.
The annual Sutter Home Build a Better Burger
program has also returned for 2006, with continued
support from the beef checkoff. This year marks the
16t anniversary of the contest, which will feature the
"Beef. It's What's for Dinner logo. With in-store


displays in 1,600 supermarkets, the Build a BetterBurger
program will be promoted extensively and culminate in
a nationally recognized burger recipe contest on
September 30 with a cash prize of $50,000 from Sutter
Home for the best beefburger.
Other key elements of the 2006 promotion include:
* A color food page in food sections of daily
newspapers across the country, which will feature grilling
recipes and ideas and reach an estimated 10 million
readers
* Deskside visits with editors of top consumer
magazines to discuss summer grilling opportunities for
beef
As proven in past years' success, this year's
promotion will span across the entire country, yet again
extending its reach to target the nation's top markets.
To ensure all key markets are able to participate, state
beef councils will be providing significant support to
broaden the promotion throughout their respective states.
These beef retail promotions are funded by
America's Beef Producers through the $1 -per-head Beef
Checkoff Program and coordinated on behalf of the
Cattlemen's Beef Board and state beef councils by the
National Cattlemen's BeefAssociation, which serves as
one of the BeefBoard's contractors for checkoff-funded
programs.


SOURCE:


Randy Irion
Phone: (312) 670-9403
Email: ririon@beef.org
Amy Leviton
Phone: (312) 596-3506
Email: amy leviton@chi.bm.com
http://www.beef.org
Release February 14, 2006


ITS WHAT
FOR
DINNER.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Date Set for Boxed-Beef Price
Trial

A federal jury trial date has been set to consider
allegations that four of the U. S. beef industry's largest
packers misreported boxed-beef prices to the U.S.
Department ofAgriculture in 2001.
The case, to be tried on April 3, 2006, was first
filed two and a half years ago by cattle producers Herman
Schumacher, Michael Callicrate and Roger Koch, who
all sold cattle to the defendant packing companies -
Tyson Fresh Meats, Cargill Meat Solutions, Swift & Co
and National Beef Packing.
District Court Judge Charles Kommann certified
the case as a class action on behalf of all cattle producers
who sold fed cattle on the cash market, and the trial
follows motions by the defendants to have the case
dismissed, which Judge Kommann denied in January.
Under boxed-beef reporting laws, packers have
to report twice daily to USDA certain cattle-price
information. During the period in question, the packers
are alleged to have underreported the price they were
receiving for boxed beef, which had the effect of
depressing the prices cattle producers received for fed
cattle sold to the packers during the same time period.


SOURCE:


John Gregerson
Email: jgregerson@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release February 27, 2006


Eyeing a Test for Barber Pole
Worm

A test in the form of a plastic card featuring pictures
of the eyes of sheep may help thwart the spread of barber
pole worm, Haemonchus contortus, a parasite of small
ruminants that's becoming increasingly resistant to the
chemicals used to control it.


The test, called the FAMACHA eye color chart,
can help sheep and goat producers save money by
allowing them to deworm only the animals that need it,
according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) animal
scientist Joan Burke. This would slow the spread of
chemical-resistant parasites through more efficient
identification, treatment and removal of infected animals.
Barber pole worms are microscopic, blood-
sucking pests that thrive in heat and humidity and induce
fatal cases of anemia and bottlej aw" disease in animals.
The worms' increasing resistance to control
chemicals--a result of widespread use of treatments--
now threatens the entire goat and sheep population of
the eastern United States, according to Burke, at ARS'
Dale Bumpers Small Farms Research Center in
Booneville, Ark.
The test is named after its developer, SouthAfrican
livestock parasitologist Francois "Fafa" Malan. The chart
shows five high-resolution photographs that focus on
shades of redness of the inner eyelids of sheep. Pale
inner eyelids can be indicative of the parasite's presence.
Burke, who's working with the Southern
Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control
(SCSRPC) to find the most effective ways to use the
test, warned that using the actual chart, and not copies,
is essential for gaining accurate results.
The test was 92 percent accurate in a study Burke
and other collaborators conducted on sheep and goats
in Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Florida and the U.S.
Virgin Islands.
Information on obtaining the test is on SCSRPC's
website, www.scsrpc.org. Nonveterinarians can
purchase the chart only after being trained in its use.


SOURCE:


Luis Pons
Phone: (301 )504-1628
Email: lpons@ars.usda.gov
http://www.ars.usda.gov
Release February 15, 2006


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


8








Date Set for Boxed-Beef Price
Trial

A federal jury trial date has been set to consider
allegations that four of the U. S. beef industry's largest
packers misreported boxed-beef prices to the U.S.
Department ofAgriculture in 2001.
The case, to be tried on April 3, 2006, was first
filed two and a half years ago by cattle producers Herman
Schumacher, Michael Callicrate and Roger Koch, who
all sold cattle to the defendant packing companies -
Tyson Fresh Meats, Cargill Meat Solutions, Swift & Co
and National Beef Packing.
District Court Judge Charles Kommann certified
the case as a class action on behalf of all cattle producers
who sold fed cattle on the cash market, and the trial
follows motions by the defendants to have the case
dismissed, which Judge Kommann denied in January.
Under boxed-beef reporting laws, packers have
to report twice daily to USDA certain cattle-price
information. During the period in question, the packers
are alleged to have underreported the price they were
receiving for boxed beef, which had the effect of
depressing the prices cattle producers received for fed
cattle sold to the packers during the same time period.


SOURCE:


John Gregerson
Email: jgregerson@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release February 27, 2006


Eyeing a Test for Barber Pole
Worm

A test in the form of a plastic card featuring pictures
of the eyes of sheep may help thwart the spread of barber
pole worm, Haemonchus contortus, a parasite of small
ruminants that's becoming increasingly resistant to the
chemicals used to control it.


The test, called the FAMACHA eye color chart,
can help sheep and goat producers save money by
allowing them to deworm only the animals that need it,
according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) animal
scientist Joan Burke. This would slow the spread of
chemical-resistant parasites through more efficient
identification, treatment and removal of infected animals.
Barber pole worms are microscopic, blood-
sucking pests that thrive in heat and humidity and induce
fatal cases of anemia and bottlej aw" disease in animals.
The worms' increasing resistance to control
chemicals--a result of widespread use of treatments--
now threatens the entire goat and sheep population of
the eastern United States, according to Burke, at ARS'
Dale Bumpers Small Farms Research Center in
Booneville, Ark.
The test is named after its developer, SouthAfrican
livestock parasitologist Francois "Fafa" Malan. The chart
shows five high-resolution photographs that focus on
shades of redness of the inner eyelids of sheep. Pale
inner eyelids can be indicative of the parasite's presence.
Burke, who's working with the Southern
Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control
(SCSRPC) to find the most effective ways to use the
test, warned that using the actual chart, and not copies,
is essential for gaining accurate results.
The test was 92 percent accurate in a study Burke
and other collaborators conducted on sheep and goats
in Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Florida and the U.S.
Virgin Islands.
Information on obtaining the test is on SCSRPC's
website, www.scsrpc.org. Nonveterinarians can
purchase the chart only after being trained in its use.


SOURCE:


Luis Pons
Phone: (301 )504-1628
Email: lpons@ars.usda.gov
http://www.ars.usda.gov
Release February 15, 2006


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


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