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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 Florida land boom
 Aid for agricultural producers...
 Johanns: no sign other countries...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. February 2006.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00014
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. February 2006.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: February 2006
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Florida land boom
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Aid for agricultural producers affected by hurricanes of 2006
        Page 7
    Johanns: no sign other countries will ban U.S. beef
        Page 8
Full Text
















































Prepared by Extension Specialists in

Animal Sciences

+ J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: GR. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
EG Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
M.J. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
*: T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
: E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
: R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/ .......... Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


Dates to Remember


February


I I 1,1 I 1.,-, ,i ,'111 I 'll IIIlII.,I -'l. I.. I .
1-4 NCBA Annual Convention Denver, CO
_2 i i i ull I I|. 1 I ii i I
2 Northwest Florida Beef Conference & Trade Show Marianna, FL
2 I.,, 11 ,,- ,, I ,,,I, P., ,, .. l ,,,ll .
2-5 American Youth Horse Council Youth Horse Leadership Symposium -
Gainesville, FL
\ 11 iL ,C-,.I B ill 1.,h. t -I .,t,.lI J 1
3-5 American Youth Horse Council Youth Horse Leadership Symposium -
Gainesville, FL

9-20 Florida State Fair Tampa, FL
9-20 Florida State Fair Tampa, FL


Ill-In
10-19
III-211
11
I'-20
18-26
211-25
20-26
24-
.Iar 5
26-
Mar 4
28
28


I .l ..l *,,t IIl I i, -' hl .'' ,_
Osceola County Fair Kissimmee, FL

Florida State Fair Horse & Livestock Judging Tampa, FL
, 1h u l,,ii ,,u! i I j',, Ih il,1Il i i
Southeastern Youth Fair Ocala, FL

Pasco County Fair Dade City, FL
-, r11 1 ti l. C II .I I I LJ & j. 1 'I U 1 i .

Chalo Nitka Festival / Glades County Youth Livestock Show & Frontier
Days Rodeo Moore Haven, FL

Florida & Georgia Dairy Road Show Okeechobee, FL


March


I
2-5

7
9
10-18
11- 19
11-12
11-17
16-
Apr 2


2.


l.-1.1I,,-i.,_.,,[u 1 [-',,,I'll,,,;II Y '..1.. I I
Adult Horsemanship School Welaka, FL
S1, I-,,.I. & I -, -Il.-. 1"., t P ..j. I N. ., hl 'I, C- i i.
Florida & Georgia Dairy Road Show Tifton, GA
i I- cI .lj i ~I-t u. ',I %l.l uiC I u i'i. 'l _i I ..- i \. l IM 'l. I1 nIL1
Sumter County Fair Bushnell, FL

Okeechobee Rodeo Okeechobee, FL
Polk County Youth Fair Bartow, FL
Miami-Dade County Fair & Exposition Miami, FL


24 I-' 1 lll ] w l < u3 1 ., ,i l I' ll., n n, s..,n ,l
25 State 4-H Hippoloev Contest Orlando. FL
.- i Bartow, ,, ,i FL

Bartow, FL


In This Issue...


Beef Management Calendar 2

55"' An.nual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course

Florida Land Boom New UIF SIure\ Show\-s Florida
Farmland Values Increased by 50 Percent to 88
Percent During. Past Year 5

Aid for AUic1iltural Produicers Affected by HLuTicanes
of 2 (005

Johanns No Si.gns Other Countries \\ill Ban LI S
Beef 8




u SNEW-


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.


I _









40


Beef Management
Calendar


February
0 Top dress winter forages, if needed.
0 Check and fill mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out with breeding herd.
0 Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant,
vaccinate, etc.).
0 Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate
level of energy.
0 Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases.
0 Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
seasonally up.
0 Check for lice and treat if needed.

March
0 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
0 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and
rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
0 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1 st for external
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear
tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1 st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.

ADril
0 Plant warm season annual pastures.
0 Plant corn for silage.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Check dust bags or apply treated ear tags.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if necessary.
0 Observe cows for repeat breeders.


0 Deworm cows as needed if not done in March.
R Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3
months of age and before 12 months of age.
0 Market cull cows and bulls.
0 Update market information and refine market strategy
for calves.

55th Annual Florida Beef
^ Cattle Short Course




The 55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course
at the University of Florida will be held on May 3-5,
2006, at the Hilton University of Florida Conference
Center in Gainesville, Florida. Beef cattle production in
Florida is a dynamic and challenging industry. Every
producer faces challenges regarding economics and
marketing, resource utilization, and management
decisions. These challenges are on-going processes that
necessitate current information for decision making. The
55th Annual Florida Beef Cattle Short Course addresses
these challenges that the beef cattle producers face on
an everyday basis. The Wednesday afternoon program
will begin at 1 pm with the focus on marketing and land
resource utilization challenges. As the cattle cycle evolves,
knowing where we are and where the market may be
headed is always pertinent. In addition, this session will
focus on a timely and important topic for the sustainability
of the beef cattle industry. The beef cattle enterprise's
land resources and the continuing issue of land use and
value in Florida will be approached on a number of
different fronts. The day will conclude with a reception
and Allied Industry Trade Show, a great chance for
cattlemen and allied industry representatives to interact
and share information. The program Thursday addresses
some of the management issues of beef cattle production.
Nutrition, cow herd management, beef products, and
beef product procurement systems will all be addressed.
These basic issues ofbeefproduction will be approached
with improved production efficiency in mind. Lunch will
generously be sponsored by Farm Credit of North
Florida. The afternoon program moves outside to utilize
the UF/IFAS, Beef Teaching Unit to demonstrate calf
processing, cattle evaluation, and hay production
techniques. Thursday evening is capped by the annual


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Cattlemen's Steak-Out, an opportunity to enjoy a prime
rib dinner and time for conversation. On Friday morning,
the program highlights the University ofFlorida's ongoing
dedication to beef cattle production. Two concurrent
sessions will showcase some of the current research
efforts in the Animal Sciences and Agronomy
departments that relate directly to the Florida beef cattle
producer. Alternatively, that morning will be an
opportunity for interested producers to attend a Florida
Beef Quality Producer training session. Securing the
ability and the resources to maintain the beef industry in
Florida will continue to be a challenge. Utilizing new and
innovative production practices to profitably produce
quality beef cattle and beef products will be an important
key to maintaining the opportunity we have to enjoy a
profession and lifestyle in the beef industry.

Registration cost is $90 per participant before April
21, and includes a copy of the Beef Cattle Short Course
proceedings, trade show, refreshments, and Steak-Out
ticket. Complete information, schedules, and registration
can be found online at http://www.animal.ufl.edu/
extension/beef/bcscIndex.shtml, or contact the University
of Florida, Department ofAnimal Sciences at (352) 392-
1916.

Agenda

"Meeting the Challenges of Preserving Our
Land, Managing Our Cattle, and Feeding Our
Consumers"

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

AM

11:00 Registration (Hilton UF Conference Center)

PM

"Marketing and Land Resource Utilization
Challenges"

Presiding: Tim Marshall, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:00 Welcome
-E Glen Hembry, Department Chairman and
Professor, Department ofAnimal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL


1:20 Remarks
Joe HilliardII, President, Florida
Cattlemen's Association, Clewiston, FL

1:30 Economic and Market Outlook for 2006
DerrellPeel, Oklahoma State University,
Stillwater, OK


2:15



3:00

3:20




4:15




5:00


Land Use Rights
-Marty .Sith, Bond, Arnett, Phelan, Smith
& Craggs, PA., Ocala, FL

Refreshment Break

Alternatives in the Presence of Urban
Encroachment
- Johnnie James, Tedder, James, Worden
and Associates, PA, Orlando, FL

Incorporation of the Value of Ranches
into Community Planning and Landscapes
- PhilLeary, AICP, Governmental Affairs
Consultant, Palatka, FL

Panel Discussion/Response to Questions -
Land Resource Use
- Johnnie James, Tedder, James, Worden
and Associates, PA, Orlando, FL
- PhilLeary, AICP, Governmental Affairs
Consultant, Palatka, FL
-Marty .Smih, Bond, Arnett, Phelan, Smith
& Craggs, P.A., Ocala, FL


5:30 Allied Industry Trade Show and
Reception Several companies will have
exhibits and representatives to answer your
questions. Hors d'oeuvres provided
compliments of the exhibitors. A cash bar is
available for your enjoyment.

Thursday, May 4, 2006

"Management Practices to Optimize Production
Efficiency"

AM

7:00 Importance of Organic Trace Minerals in
Beef Rations
Breakfast Sponsored by Alltech, Inc.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


Presiding: Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL

8:30 By-Product Feed Utilization for Forage
Diets
-MattHersom, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

9:15 Process Verification and Product Supply
Coordination of Beef
Marcine Moldenhauer, Cargill Meat
Solutions, Wichita, KS

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:30 Cow Herd Decisions for Future Tough
Times
Ron Gill, Texas A&M University,
Department ofAnimal Science, College
Station, TX

11:15 Natural-Organic-Grass fed Beef Cattle
Definitions and Regulations
Terry Houser, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

PM

12:00 Leave for Lunch at UF/IFAS Beef
Teaching Unit (Sponsored by Farm Credit
ofNorth Florida Directions to be
provided)

Presiding: John Arthington, Range Cattle Research
and Education Center, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL and Jerry
Wasdin, Department ofAnimal Sciences, UF/IFAS,
Gainesville, FL

1:30 Demonstration and Discussion (Three one-
hour sessions repeated with refreshment break
sponsored by Helena Chemical Company)
Feeder-Finish Calf Evaluation
TimMarshall, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL and Ron Gill, Texas
A&M University, Department ofAnimal
Science, College Station, TX


Calf Processing Techniques
Todd Thrift, Department of Animal
Sciences, Department ofAnimal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL, UF/IFAS,
Gainesville, FL
Hay Harvest and Preservation Methods
-MattHersom, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, Department ofAnimal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

5:00 Adjourn

6:30 Cattlemen's Steak-Out (Horse Teaching
Unit)

Friday, May 5, 2006

University of Florida's Ongoing Dedication to
Beef Cattle Production Two concurrent sessions
highlighting selected research at the University of
Florida pertaining to beef cattle production and
forage-grazing management. Participants may attend
either session or pick individual topics of interest.
Florida Beef Quality Producer program is an all
morning single session focusing on quality assurance
practices and record keeping.

AM

Session I

Presiding: Dwain Johnson, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

8:30 Cull Cow Finishing Performance
Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL

9:00 Cull Cow Meat Quality
Alex Stelzleni, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

9:30 Johne's Disease Control
Owen Rae, College of Veterinary Medicine,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:30 Nursing Calf Deworming
Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







11:00 Early Weaning Performance and Health
John Arthington, Range Cattle Research
and Education Center, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL

11:30 Estrus Synchronization Protocols
Joel Yelich, Department of Animal Sciences,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

Session II

Presiding: Terry Houser, Department ofAnimal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

8:30 North and Central Florida Herbicide
Application
Jay Ferrell, Agronomy Department,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

9:00 South Florida Herbicide Application
Brent Sellers, Range Cattle Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL

9:30 Getting the Most out of Bahiagrass
Pasture Fertilization
CherylMackowiak, North Florida
Research and Education Center, UF/IFAS,
Marianna, FL

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:30 Grazing Programs Utilizing Florida
Forages
Lynn Sollenberger, Agronomy Department,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

11:00 Perennial Peanut Establishment
'Ann Blount and 2Martin Adjei, 'North
Florida Research and Education Center,
UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL; 2Range Cattle
Research and Education Center, UF/IFAS,
Ona, FL

11:30 Pasture Fertilization
Jerry Sartain, Agronomy Department,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

Session III

8:00 All morning session Florida Beef Quality
Assurance Program
Todd Thrift, Department of Animal


Sciences; Max Irsik, College of Veterinary
Medicine; MattHersom, Department of
Animal Sciences; UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL;
and Jeff Carter, North Florida Research and
Education Center, UF/IFAS, Marianna, FL

PM

12:00 Adjourn


SOURCE:


Matt Hersom
Phone: (352) 392-2390
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu


Dwain Johnson
Phone: (352) 392-1922
Email: johnson@animal.ufl.edu

University ofFlorida
Department ofAnimal Sciences
Gainesville, FL
http://www.animal.ufl.edu




t. UNIVERSITY OF


W FLORIDA


Florida Land Boom: New UF
Survey Shows Florida Farmland
Values Increased by 50 Percent
to 88 Percent During Past Year

Demand for land by developers, investors and
speculators pushed the value of agricultural land to record
levels in all regions of the state during the past year,
according to a new University of Florida survey.
Prices of agricultural land increased by 50 percent
to 88 percent across the state, and most of the farmland
is not being purchased for agricultural purposes, said
John Reynolds, a professor with UF's Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, who conducts the annual
FloridaAgricultural Land Value Survey.


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6


John Reynolds, a professor with the University of Florida '
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences in Gainesville,
says demand for land by developers, investors and speculators
pushed the value of agricultural land to record levels in all
regions of the state during the past year His annual Florida
Agricultural Land Value Survey shows that the price of
agricultural land increased by 50percent to 88 percent across
the state, and most of the farmland is not being purchasedfor
agricultural purposes.

"We've seen a sharp run-up in farmland prices over
the past few years, and now we're beginning to see an
increase in land speculation by out-of-town buyers,
developers and foreign investors. And there's also a
strong demand for rural homesites," he said. "When you
consider the volatility of the stock market, coupled with
rising interest rates, land is a very attractive investment-
some people buy and flip property for quick gain."

Reynolds' 2005 survey, which measures changes
over the past year, divides the state into five regions:
south, southeast, central, northeast and northwest.
Because of the impact urbanization has on agricultural
land values, the data for the southeast region, including
Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties, are
confined to transition land values.

He said the survey indicates that the average value
of agricultural land ranges from about $2,700 per acre
for unimproved pasture and farm woods in Northwest
Florida to almost $10,000 per acre for orange groves in
Central and South Florida.

The value of grapefruit groves increased 88 percent
in the south region of the state and 81 percent in the
central region, largely because of crop loss from
hurricanes, he said. The value of orange groves increased
52 percent to 53 percent in the central and south regions.


The average value of orange groves was $9,956
per acre in the south region about $150 per acre higher
than in the central region. The estimated value of
grapefruit groves was $9,897 per acre in the south region
- about $1,705 per acre higher than in the central region.
The value of land with 5- to 7-year-old citrus plantings
was $8,944 per acre in the south region $83 per acre
higher than in the central region.

In all regions of the state, the value of other types
of cropland also increased by as much as 85 percent,
and the value ofpastureland increased by as much as 87
percent.

In the south region, the value for cropland and
pastureland increased from 66 percent to 81 percent,
respectively, Reynolds said. The largest increases were
in the Indian River area, Okeechobee County and the
Gulf Coast counties. Cropland and pastureland in other
regions also posted big increases: 78 percent to 82
percent in the central region; 69 percent to 85 percent in
the northwest region, and 69 percent to 87 percent in
the northeast region."

The value of irrigated cropland increased by 67
percent in the south region, 85 percent in the northeast
region of the state and 83 percent in the northwest region.
The value of irrigated cropland was $6,509 per acre in
the south region, $6,356 per acre in the northeast region
and $4,012 per acre in the northwest region.

The value ofnonirrigated cropland increased 69
percent in the northeast and northwest regions. The value
of nonirrigated cropland was $4,490 per acre in the
northeast region and $3,332 in the northwest region.

The value of pastureland increased about 81
percent in the south region and 78 percent to 82 percent
in the central region. The value of improved pasture
increased 85 percent to 87 percent in the northern
regions. The value of unimproved pasture increased 76
percent in the northeast and 82 percent in the northwest.

The value of improved pasture ranged from $3,337
per acre in the northwest region to $6,426 per acre in
the central region. The value unimproved pasture ranged
from $2,645 per acre in the northwest region to $4,715
per acre in the south region.

The value of farm woods increased 81 percent in


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7


the northeast region and 84 percent in the northwest
region. The lowest agricultural land values were in the
northwest region, ranging from $2,645 per acre for
unimproved pasture to $4,012 per acre for irrigated
cropland.
The survey also measures the value of transition
land acreage being converted or likely to be converted
to nonagricultural sites for homes, subdivisions and
commercial uses. Counties were divided into metropolitan
and non-metropolitan counties, and transition land values
were estimated for each region.
The value of transition land within five miles of a
maj or town in metropolitan counties increased from 31
percent to 120 percent from 2004 to 2005, Reynolds
said.
Within five miles of a major town in metro counties,
the value of transition land ranged from $18,423 per
acre to $46,481 per acre. The value of transition land
more than five miles from a maj or town in metro counties
ranged from $10,758 per acre to $23,575 per acre,
except in the southeast region where transition land values
were $66,667 per acre.
In non-metropolitan counties, the value of transition
land within five miles of a maj ortown ranged from $6,167
per acre to $17,143 per acre. Transition land values
more than five miles from a maj or town in non-metro
counties ranged from $5,333 to $10,600 per acre.
Survey respondents were also asked if they expect
agricultural land values to be higher, lower or remain
unchanged during the next 12 months. Eighty-two percent
in northern areas and 88 percent in southern areas expect
agricultural land values to increase during the next year.
The expected increases varied by region and ranged from
14 percent to 25 percent.
However, Reynolds also said that participants
should not expect large percentage increases in land
values of the past year to continue. "The market can not
sustain large double-digit increases for any extended
period of time," he said.
The UF Food and Resource Economics
Department survey, which Reynolds started in 1985, was
compiled from information provided by 185 respondents
from around the state. They included property
appraisers, farm lenders, real estate brokers, farm


managers, land investors, federal farm-assistance and
conservation staff, UF county extension agents, and
others who develop and maintain information about rural
land values.
More details on the survey, "Strong Nonagricultural
Demand Keeps Agricultural Land Values Increasing,"
are available on the UF/IFAS Electronic Data Information
Source (EDIS) Web site at: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.


SOURCE:


John Reynolds
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL
Email: johnr@nrpsforesters.com
Phone: (352) 378-8966


By: Chuck Woods
UF News Desk, Gainesville, FL
Email: cwoods@ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-0400
http://news.ufl.edu/

Release January 13, 2006


^ Aid forAgricultural
Producers Affected by
Hurricanes of 2005

On January 26, 2006, the U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA) announced $2.8 billion in aid to
assist victims of the 2005 hurricane season. USDA will
provide $1.2 billion in aid to agricultural producers;
primarily in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi,
North Carolina, and Texas. USDAwill provide disaster
payments to farmers, ranchers and others through eight
separate programs. Funding is provided through (1)
Section 32 of the Act of August 24, 1935 and (2) The
Department of Defense, Emergency Supplemental
Appropriations to Address Hurricanes in the Gulf of
Mexico, and Pandemic Influenza Act, 2006.

Programs Created with Section 32 Funds

USDAis providing $250 million for crop disaster,
livestock, tree, and aquaculture assistance from Section
32 funds. These funds will be distributed by way of five
new programs:


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8


Hurricane Indemnity Program (HIP);
Tree Indemnity Program (TIP);
Feed Indemnity Program (FIP);
Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP)'; and
Aquaculture Grants.
Producers in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana,
Mississippi, North Carolina, and Texas counties declared
primary presidential or secretarial disaster areas in 2005
because of hurricanes are eligible for the new programs.
A complete list of the counties is posted online at
www.usda.gov. Producers must also meet other eligibility
requirements.
USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA) will
administer the five programs. Sign-up dates for the new
programs (HIP, TIP, FIP, and LIP) will be announced
as soon as new regulations and software are developed.
Application procedures for aquaculture funds will be
made by governors or their designees.

For More Information

For more information about these and other USDA
disaster programs, visit http://www.usda.gov.


'LIP will provide payments to producers whose livestock
died as a direct result of the hurricanes. The payment
will be based on 75 percent of the average sales price
for each category oflivestock. Payments will be included
for contract growers of livestock, such as poultry, who
lost livestock.

SOURCE: EdLoyd
Phone: (202)720-4623
Wayne Baggett
Phone: (202)720-4623
USDA, Washington, D.C.
http://www.usda.gov
Release January 26, 2006


USDA


Johanns: No Signs Other
Countries Will Ban U.S. Beef

There are no signs so far that other countries follow
Japan's lead and close their borders to U.S. beef
following the discovery last week of vertebrae parts in
veal shipments sent from the United States to Japan,
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said Wednesday.
Japanese officials, meanwhile, have indicated they
are in no hurry to lift the ban imposed on U.S. beef last
Friday.
On Tuesday, Johanns summoned U.S. beef
exporters and meat industry representatives to
Washington, D.C., for a three-hour meeting to help
reassure Japan there would be no further shipments of
prohibited beef cuts. Agriculture officials at the meeting
provided a refresher course on export rules and how to
fill out forms, but not before Johanns issued strong words
to attendees. "We know the value of this market," he
said. "Before 2003 [it] was $1.4 billion. That's a lot of
revenue toj eopardize over a careless mistake... It would
be an understatement to say that I'm treating this incident
very, very seriously."
The company that shipped the veal rack, Brooklyn-
based Atlantic Veal & Lamb, did not attend Tuesday's
meeting. Johanns delisted the company as an exporter
to Japan on Friday.
Last week, Atlantic Veal & Lamb indicated it
shipped the veal in response to a Japanese customer's
order and had made an honest mistake. Johanns said it
appeared the government inspector involved in the case
didn't realize from the paperwork at the plant that veal
hotel rack is a cut that contains backbone. Johanns is
now requiring a second inspector to sign off on each
U.S. beef shipment to Japan.
USDA is investigating the matter, while Japan
officials await a formal report. To further reassure Japan,
Johanns has dispatched extra inspectors to U.S. meat
processing plants, and ordered unannounced inspections
of plants, among other measures.


SOURCE:


John Gregerson
Email: gregerson@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com


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