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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 UF student Erica Der elected to...
 Reducing the incidence of dark...
 Food safety gets beef producer...
 Internet video offers overview...
 Probability of calves sired by...
 Effects of limit feeding of grain...
 Feedlot cattle getting fatter in...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. January 2006.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00013
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. January 2006.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: January 2006
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    UF student Erica Der elected to national FFA position
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Reducing the incidence of dark cutting in junior livestock shows
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Food safety gets beef producer backing through Serv-Safe
        Page 6
    Internet video offers overview of Checkoff Program
        Page 7
    Probability of calves sired by terminal versus maternal breed of bulls
        Page 7
    Effects of limit feeding of grain and added fat on reproductive performance
        Page 8
    Feedlot cattle getting fatter in the wrong places
        Page 8
Full Text
















In This Issue...
Beef Management Calendar..
LIF Student Enca Dei Elected To National FFA
Position
Rcdluciig the Incidence of Dark Cutting Beef in Junior
Lix stock Sliho s ... ..... ... .... .. .. 4
Food Safet\ Gets Beef Producer Backing Throtui h
Ser\ -Safe 60
Intermet Video Offers O\er ic\\e of Checkoff
Pro ram ................. ........ .... 7
Profitabilit ofCal\ es Sired b\ Terminal Versus
Maternal Breeds of Bulls 7
Effects of Limit Feeding of Grain and Added Fat on
Reproducti\ e Pcrfto mancc .... ... .... .... ....
Feedlot Cattil Getting Fatter in the \\rong Places .... S




Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

+ J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: GR. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
EG Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
M.J. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
*: T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
o W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/ .......... Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
o T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


Dates to Remember


January

I I C'i. "ir' i ).,.
7 All Black Classic (Sim/Angus) Southern Cattle
Company Cambellton, FL
7 \V v l. tu hII'.J. ,l_,.,!t.,il 4 -1Iii i ,' l!i.i,.t j _,t .' L h.' -I -
i ) ir L. L I
7 Western National 4-H Meats Judging Contest -
Ft. Collins, CO
III i .l.1 il. -:i l Silk I k i .i .. I I
16 Hog & Ham Workshop Gainesville, FL
18 i i'.'uri e f1.ii .ri'_n'Tci l .iJ I l .Illi .r l .i r I i.r1, C -
i l M. cFi i i
19 FL Cattlemen's Institute & Allied Trade Show -
Kissimmee, FL
2 1 I 1, 1. 1 I J:.ll l .' i h Ir [. i.i%!!,] i i
26 57th Annual Homestead Championship Rodeo and
Frontier Day Homestead, FL
3 1 -1 '' ln, d,, i 1.1n i ,nln I li.i'n i n ii a. ni', i.ii.in -
l '. il Il



February

I I I-r' I,'i 1 n'in t I'hu.i ltl, n ir, : '' -
I ll'l,.'" Il' l 'l i
2 Northwest Florida Beef Conference & Trade Show -
Marianna, FL
2 i I,,idl l I .'.'! i,11.1. ll -ll i'tI,, .t,.v l 't,, t I trL r l lll!.!i, .
I I
3-5 American Youth Horse Council
Youth Horse Leadership Symposium Gainesville, FL
II i I,1 Jd ., i. 1 l.ll i i, r & i,. .. .'. L .i,.Ldy '_ -
l jnil |l i 1-i
28 Pasture Renovation & Management for Cattle &
Horses Ft. Myers, FL




wwC


* r


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.


MW'"~


--





2


40


Beef Management
Calendar


January
0 Apply lime for summer crops.
0 Check for lice and treat if necessary.
0 Control weeds in cool season pastures.
0 Begin grazing winter clover pastures when
approximately 6 inches high. Rye should be 12-18
inches high.
0 Check mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out for October calving season.
0 Make up breeding herd lists if using single sire herds.
0 Watch for calf scours.
0 Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in
condition for breeding season.
0 Make sure cow herd has access to adequate fresh
water.
0 Buy only performance tested bulls with superior
records.
1 Get taxes filed.
0 Discuss herd health with you veterinarian and outline
a program for the year.
0 Review herd health program with your veterinarian
regularly.
0 Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained
placentas, difficult calvings and other data.
0 Observe cow herd for calving difficulties.
0 Watch for grass tetany on winter pastures.
0 Increase magnesium levels in mineral mixes if grass
tetany has been previous problem (if you are not
already using a high magnesium mineral).
0 Examine bulls for breeding soundness and semen
quality prior to the breeding season.
0 Vaccinate cows and heifers against vibriosis and
leptospirosis prior to the breeding season.

February
0 Top dress winter forages, if needed.
0 Check and fill mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out with breeding herd.
0 Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant,
vaccinate, etc.).


0 Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate
level of energy.
0 Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases.
0 Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
seasonally up.
0 Check for lice and treat if needed.

March
1 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
1 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and
rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
1 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1 st for external
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear
tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1 st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.


A


UF Student Erica
Der Elected To
National FFA
Position


University of Floridajunior Erica Der has been
elected southern region vice president of The National
FFA Organization, one of the country's largest youth
groups dedicated to agricultural education.
A native of Plant City, Fla., Der was one of six
national officers elected during the FFA annual
convention in Louisville, Ky., Oct. 26-29. She received
an $8,000 scholarship as part of the honor.
Der and her five new colleagues a president,
secretary and three other vice presidents representing


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





2


40


Beef Management
Calendar


January
0 Apply lime for summer crops.
0 Check for lice and treat if necessary.
0 Control weeds in cool season pastures.
0 Begin grazing winter clover pastures when
approximately 6 inches high. Rye should be 12-18
inches high.
0 Check mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out for October calving season.
0 Make up breeding herd lists if using single sire herds.
0 Watch for calf scours.
0 Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in
condition for breeding season.
0 Make sure cow herd has access to adequate fresh
water.
0 Buy only performance tested bulls with superior
records.
1 Get taxes filed.
0 Discuss herd health with you veterinarian and outline
a program for the year.
0 Review herd health program with your veterinarian
regularly.
0 Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained
placentas, difficult calvings and other data.
0 Observe cow herd for calving difficulties.
0 Watch for grass tetany on winter pastures.
0 Increase magnesium levels in mineral mixes if grass
tetany has been previous problem (if you are not
already using a high magnesium mineral).
0 Examine bulls for breeding soundness and semen
quality prior to the breeding season.
0 Vaccinate cows and heifers against vibriosis and
leptospirosis prior to the breeding season.

February
0 Top dress winter forages, if needed.
0 Check and fill mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out with breeding herd.
0 Work calves (identify, implant with growth stimulant,
vaccinate, etc.).


0 Make sure lactating cows are receiving an adequate
level of energy.
0 Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases.
0 Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
seasonally up.
0 Check for lice and treat if needed.

March
1 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
1 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and
rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
1 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1 st for external
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear
tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1 st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.


A


UF Student Erica
Der Elected To
National FFA
Position


University of Floridajunior Erica Der has been
elected southern region vice president of The National
FFA Organization, one of the country's largest youth
groups dedicated to agricultural education.
A native of Plant City, Fla., Der was one of six
national officers elected during the FFA annual
convention in Louisville, Ky., Oct. 26-29. She received
an $8,000 scholarship as part of the honor.
Der and her five new colleagues a president,
secretary and three other vice presidents representing


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Erica Der, a University of
Floridajunior, was recently
elected southern region
vice president of The
National FFA Organization,
one of the country 's largest
youth groups. She will
promote FFA, education and
agriculture during her one-
year term in office. A native
of Plant City, FL., Der is
,, ;,i. in agricultural
communications at UFs'
Institute of Food and
(UF/IFAS photo by Josh Wickham) institute of Food and

various parts of the country -will serve one-year terms
of office, she said. They were chosen from a field of37
candidates, based on tests, essays, interviews and
previous accomplishments.

An agricultural communications major in UF's
College ofAgricultural and Life Sciences, Der will put
her studies on hold temporarily to make time for her
duties as vice president, she said. The college, part of
UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
promotes FFA activity among students.
In 2006, Der will travel more than 100,000 miles
and visit about 40 states. Her duties will include visiting
FFA members and supporters, agriculture teachers,
business leaders and elected officials.

Besides promoting FFA, agricultural education and
the agriculture industry, national officers provide
leadership and personal-growth training to FFA
members, Der said.

"I'm really looking forward to passing along some
of the things I've learned," she said. "I want to help other
young people fulfill their potential."


"There's going to be a lot work ahead, but also a
lot of fun," Der said. "This next year is going to be one
of the highlights of my life."

Der has always been around agriculture. Her
parents, Dennis and Lori, operate a feed and farm supply
business in Plant City, and Der grew up near an orange
grove owned by her grandparents.

She joined FFAwhile in the sixth grade and has
earned numerous awards during her nine years with the
organization. While a senior in high school, Der became
an area vice president of Florida FFA, which led to her
eligibility as a candidate for national office.

"Being elected southern region vice president is the
pinnacle of my FFA career, but the nice thing is that I've
had so many other rewarding experiences along the way,"
Der said. "I want others to know that FFA and
agricultural education can have a wonderful, positive
effect on their lives."

The presence of a national FFA officer in the UF
college will inspire other students to excel, said Chris
Vitelli, the college's director of student services.

"Erica isjust an incredible example of a student
who set goals for herself, worked hard and accomplished
what she set out to do," Vitelli said. "We're eager to
have her back on campus in 2007, and I think she's
going to be looked upon as one of the college's
outstanding student leaders."

Founded in 1928, The National FFA Organization,
previously known as Future Farmers ofAmerica, has
almost 500,000 members, hailing from all 50 U.S. states,
Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin islands.


SOURCE:


As southern region vice president, Der will represent
nine states Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina
and Tennessee as well as Puerto Rico and the U. S.
Virgin Islands.

She will attend chapter meetings and state
conferences, meet with FFA leaders throughout the
region and provide their perspective at national board
meetings.


Chris Vitelli
Phone: (352) 392-1961
Email: cvitelli@ifas.ufl.edu

By: Tom Nordlie
Phone: (352) 392-0400
UF/IFAS News
Gainesville, FL
Release November 29, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


Reducing the Incidence of Dark
Cutting Beef in Junior Livestock
Shows


4-H and FFA livestock shows place cattle in a
surrounding where they are stressed physically and
psychologically. They are exposed to physical exertion,
unfamiliar smells, tastes, sounds, people, cattle and other
animals. Owners need to understand that stress can be
reduced or eliminated with proper care and management.
Many cattle are stressed to the point where they may
even go off feed and water. Cattle may appear agitated
and exhibit abnormal behavior at the show but often a
more serious condition appears once the animal has been
sold and harvested. This is known as dark cutting beef
(DCB) and can be a serious problem injunior livestock
shows. In somejunior livestock shows, instances ofDCB
can be 10 to 20 times that of the commercial beef industry.

What Causes Dark Cutting Beef?

The pH of living muscle isjust above 7.0 in well
fed and rested cattle with glycogen concentrations from
0.8% to 1.0%. When the animal is harvested, pH in
normal muscle falls to 5.5. If the animal is stressed for
any reason then glycogen concentration can fall to less
than 0.6% and normal acidification of the muscle tissue
from lactic acid does not occur and pH will remain high
(above 6.0). This abnormally high pH (>6.0) increases
the light-absorption and water binding abilities of
postmortem muscle resulting in an undesirable, dark, firm,
and dry cut lean surface (Lister, 1988). This causes the
muscle to turn a darker color of red, hence the term
dark cutter. There also appears to be a relationship
between muscle pH and (or) muscle color and meat
tenderness (Purchas, 1990). Dark cutting beef is
undesirable because it is aesthetically unpleasant and
because it is more susceptible to microbial growth
(Lawrie, 1998). Dark cutting is an expense to the beef
industry but can be managed.

Factors Contributing to Dark Cutting Beef

Weather, growth promotants, genetics, disposition
and handling practices before harvest all may play a role
in creating the dark cutting condition (Hedrick et al.,


Figure 1. Beef carcasses with and without dark cutting
characteristics.


1959; Smith et al.,Voisinet et al., 1997).
1. Weather: Heat can be a factor, especially when
temperatures are very high or when cattle are subjected
to fluctuations in temperature which occur over short
periods of time (Skanga et al., 1999). Many junior
livestock shows are held during the summer. Care should
be given to ensure that cattle have comfortable
surroundings including bedding, shade, feed and plenty
of water.
2. Growth Promoting Implants: Steers treated with
combination on-feed implants followed by combination
reimplants showed higher percentage ofDCB than steers
given on-feed estrogen type implants followed by
estrogen type re-implants. Also, as the number of days
between harvest and the last final implant increases the
incidence of DCB declines (Scanga et al., 1999). This
requires further research as we do not advocate nonuse
of growth promoting implants. Implants can positively
influence muscle growth and daily gain resulting in greater
efficiencies. However, their use must be understood and
managed so that misuse does not occur. There are many
excellent Extension publications and resources on
implants that can be obtained through interest searches
or your County Agent.
3. Physical Activity: Cattle can experience increased
activity and stress when exposed to a new environment.
Standing for long periods oftime, frequently getting up
and down, and other strenuous activity common to a
livestock show should be limited as much as possible.
Loading and unloading cattle should take place during
cooler times of the day.
4. Psychological Stress: Cattle can experience
increased stress when they are exposed to new
surroundings, people, smells, and sounds they are not
familiar with, but are typical to a livestock show. Feed
rations should not change after bringing the animal to a
livestock show. Some cattle will not drink chlorinated


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Table 1. Common Types and Brands of Growth Promoting Implants


Growth Androgen
Promotant


Synovex-H"
Implus-H
Finaplix-H/S
Heiferoid"


Estrogen


Synovex-S"
Ralgro
Implus-S
Compudosee
Steeroid


water if they are not familiar with the taste. As and
example, one year at the Box Elder County Junior
Livestock Show, more than 60% of youth (38 out of
62) reported their steer's drinking habits changed after
being brought to the show. If the calf has never been
exposed to the taste of chlorinated water, beforehand
get them familiar with the water by using it routinely prior
to the show. Make the animal's stay at the livestock show
as comfortable as possible.

5. Yield Grade: Yield grade is a strong indicator of
whether a steer may become DCB. Higher yield grade
(>3.0) steers have more finish and more energy reserves
to carry them through a stressful event like a livestock
show. Try not to select cattle with very low yield grade
characteristics.


Why Is This a Concern?

The greatest problem with dark cutting beef is
consumer rejection because of its color. Consumers
associate dark color beef with old cattle, toughness, poor
flavor and short shelf life. Although the incidence ofDCB
has declined in recent years, from 2.7% to 2.5% (NBQA
- 2000), packers must still discount DCB carcasses
between 20% and 40%. The most recent quality audit
calculated that dark cutters cost the industry $6.08 per
head on every fed steer and heifer slaughtered. The
percentage of DCB presented is for the overall beef
industry. The percentage of calves from livestock shows
that exhibit DCB often is much higher such as 25 50%
in unusual circumstances. This can vary extensively and
is a real concern for packers.


Conclusion

Raising a steer as a 4-H or FFA project provides
youth with a unique opportunity to use live animals to
develop valuable life long skills. However, youth need


Combination Estrogen
Combination
Revalor-H/S Synovex-S/
Revalore


Double
Androgen
Finaplix
Synovex-He


to understand that they are notjust raising a project for
the county fair; they are in the business of producing a
food product for the consumer. Reducing the incidence
of DCB in project beef will help ensure that youth
continue to experience this unique educational
opportunity and that the consumer is assured that the
best product possible is delivered.

References

Holmgren, L.N. 2004. Photo ofBeef Carcass. Utah
State University Extension.

Hendrick, H. B., J. B. Boillot, D. E. Brady, and H.
D. Naumann. 1959. Etiology of dark-cutting beef.
Research Bulletin 717. University MO, Agric. Exp. Stn.,
Columbia.

Lawrie, R. A. 1998. Lawrie's Meat Science. 6th
ed. Technomic Publishing Co., Lancaster, PA.

Lister, D. 1988. Muscle metabolism and animal
physiology in the dark cutting condition. In: Dark-cutting
in cattle and sheep Proceedings of an Australian
workshop. Australian

Meat & Livestock Research and Development
Corporation, Sydney South, NSW, Australia.

NBQA, Executive Summary of the 2000 National
Beef Quality Audit, Improving the quality, consistency,
competitiveness and market share of beef. National
Cattlemen's BeefAssociation.

Purchas, R. W. 1990. An assessment of the role of
pH differences in determining the relative tenderness of
meat from bulls and steers. Meat Science. 27:129-140.

Savell, J.W., Photo of Dark Cutting Beef. Texas
A&MUniversity. http://savell-j.tamu.edu/conversion.html
(permission granted)


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


Scanga, J.A., Belk, K.E., Tatum, J.D., Grandin,
T., and Smith, GC. 1998. Factors contributing to the
incidence of dark cutting beef. Journal ofAnimal Science.
1998. 76:2040-2047

Smith, GC., Tatum, J.D., Morgan, J.B. Reducing
the Incidence of Dark-Cutting Beef. Beef Cattle
Handbook. University of Wisconsin Extension. BCH-
4350.

Voisinet, B. D., T. Grandin, S. F. O'Connor, J. D.
Tatum, and M. J. Deesing. 1997a. Bos indicus- cross
feedlot cattle with excitable temperaments have tougher
meat and a higher incidence of borderline dark cutters.
Meat Science. 46:367-377.


This publication is issued in furtherance of Cooperative
Extension work. Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in
cooperation with the U.S. Department ofAgriculture, JackM.
Payne, Vice President and Director, Cooperative Extension
Service, Utah State University.


SOURCE: Lyle N. Holmgren and D.R. ZoBell
Utah State University
Logan UT
Release September 2005


Food Safety Gets Beef Producer
Backing Through Serv-Safe

About half of all beef in the U. S. is consumed away
from home, based on data obtained through the national
Beef Checkoff Program. Partnering with foodservice
operators to assure beef is wholesome when sold to
consumers. That's the concept behind a program called
ServSafe, a checkoff-supported program which
enhances the food-safety knowledge of foodservice
workers.
In fact, food safety is the primary priority for the
Joint Foodservice Committee, a group ofbeef producers
charged with providing recommendations for beef
checkoff-funded foodservice program initiatives. The
$1-per-head checkoff is administered by the Cattlemen's
Beef Board with oversight provided by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture.


"There are more than 900,000 individual
foodservice locations in this country, and most of those
serve beef," says 2005 Foodservice Committee
Chairman Sid Sumner, a Florida beef producer. "We
want to work with foodservice professionals to assure
practices that put our products in the best light. This
includes food safety training that educates and motivates
managers."
ServSafe is coordinated by the International Food
Safety Council, a division of the National Restaurant
Associational Educational Foundation (NRAEF). During
the last year, more than 300,000 managers and
employees took the course, now in use by more than 80
percent of the foodservice industry. More than 2.5 million
foodservice professionals have already been trained
through the ServSafe certification program an
important figure in an industry that at some levels has
turnover that can exceed 100 percent in any given year.
ServSafe addresses biosecurity, personal hygiene,
best practices for inspecting and receiving shipments,
storage and handling, preparation and serving, avoidance
of cross-contamination and other issues important to
optimizing food safety. The program is based on the Food
Code of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and
is firmly grounded in the real world needs and everyday
applications of the foodservice industry.
ServSafe is recognized by more federal, state and
local jurisdictions that require food safety manager
training or certification than any other program. Along
with enhancing food safety, the program helps improve
employee morale, maintain food quality and contribute
to customer satisfaction.

Professionals in the beef industry responsible for
beef presentations and promotion programs also
participate in this food safety training. Through the
NRAEF dozens of state beef council executives and
professionals at beef organizations and other groups take
the course to assure that those who demonstrate the
product are the best possible ambassadors for beef
practices.
"As founding sponsors of the ServSafe program,
America's Beef Producers are backing up their
commitment to food safety all along the beef marketing
chain through our Beef CheckoffProgram," says Sumner.
Al Svajgr, chairman of the Cattlemen's Beef Board,


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


agrees.
"We need to do everything we can to leverage
checkoff dollars in a way that ensures food safety at the
point of preparation and service, which is the last step
from farm to fork," according to Svajgr, a Nebraska
beef producer. "This is part of our commitment to provide
safe beef to consumers and to protect beef demand for
our producers."


SOURCE: Polly Ruhland
Phone: (303) 850-3394
Email: pruhland@beef.org

Diane Henderson
Phone: (303) 850-3465
Email: dhenderson@beef.org

http://www.beef.org
Centennial CO
Release December 13, 2005



SInternet Video
BEEF Offers Overview of

Checkoff Program

A video that examines the
Beef Checkoff Program from its 1986 beginning to today
is now available via the Internet.
"The BeefCheckoff- Building Beef Demand" is a
28-minute video that was launched on the RFD-TV
network in September. It takes an in-depth look at the
structure and accomplishments of the checkoff, which is
administered by the Cattlemen's Beef Promotion and
Research Board and overseen by the U. S. Department
ofAgriculture.
"Providing this information in audio-visual form is
another way of fulfilling our responsibility to inform
producers about how their checkoff dollars are spent,"
according to Beef Board Chairman Al Svajgr, a
Nebraska cattleman. Svajgr also is one ofthe producers
interviewed for the program. "The video gives viewers a
better understanding of the checkoff process and
programs," he said.


The checkoff video was broadcast on RFD-TV
Sept. 19, 20 and 25. It contains information about what
initiated the mandatory beef checkoff, what beef
producers are saying about the program today and the
impact that the checkoff has had on the beef industry in
the United States. Included are highlights from various
beef checkoff projects in promotion, research, consumer
information, foreign marketing and producer
communications.
In addition to Svajgr, seven other beef producers
who have served as chairmen of the Beef Board through
the years are interviewed for the video, including JoAnn
Smith, a Florida beef producer who served as the first
Beef Board Chairman in 1986-88. The video also
features interviews with several other producers who
have served on the Beef Board, and other checkoff
representatives.
Because of the size of the electronic file, Internet
download is recommended only from computers with
high-speed access to the Web. To access the video from
your computer, go to one of the following sites:
http://www.beefboard.org/whowbeefcheckoffinfo.aspx
or http://www.beefboard.org/checkoffprograms.aspx
For more information on the checkoff video or any
other elements of the national Beef Checkoff Program,
please contact Diane Henderson at the Cattlemen's Beef
Board, (303) 850-3465 or dhenderson@beefboard.org.


SOURCE:


http ://www.beef org
Centennial, CO
Release December 7, 2005


Profitability of Calves Sired by
Terminal Versus Maternal
Breeds of Bulls

Colorado State University scientists used 80 steer
progeny produced by mating British cross females to
one of three terminal sires (Charolais) or one of five
maternal sires (three Angus and two Red Angus-
Composites) to compare the effects of sire type (terminal
vs. maternal) on performance, carcass traits, and
profitability.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


agrees.
"We need to do everything we can to leverage
checkoff dollars in a way that ensures food safety at the
point of preparation and service, which is the last step
from farm to fork," according to Svajgr, a Nebraska
beef producer. "This is part of our commitment to provide
safe beef to consumers and to protect beef demand for
our producers."


SOURCE: Polly Ruhland
Phone: (303) 850-3394
Email: pruhland@beef.org

Diane Henderson
Phone: (303) 850-3465
Email: dhenderson@beef.org

http://www.beef.org
Centennial CO
Release December 13, 2005



SInternet Video
BEEF Offers Overview of

Checkoff Program

A video that examines the
Beef Checkoff Program from its 1986 beginning to today
is now available via the Internet.
"The BeefCheckoff- Building Beef Demand" is a
28-minute video that was launched on the RFD-TV
network in September. It takes an in-depth look at the
structure and accomplishments of the checkoff, which is
administered by the Cattlemen's Beef Promotion and
Research Board and overseen by the U. S. Department
ofAgriculture.
"Providing this information in audio-visual form is
another way of fulfilling our responsibility to inform
producers about how their checkoff dollars are spent,"
according to Beef Board Chairman Al Svajgr, a
Nebraska cattleman. Svajgr also is one ofthe producers
interviewed for the program. "The video gives viewers a
better understanding of the checkoff process and
programs," he said.


The checkoff video was broadcast on RFD-TV
Sept. 19, 20 and 25. It contains information about what
initiated the mandatory beef checkoff, what beef
producers are saying about the program today and the
impact that the checkoff has had on the beef industry in
the United States. Included are highlights from various
beef checkoff projects in promotion, research, consumer
information, foreign marketing and producer
communications.
In addition to Svajgr, seven other beef producers
who have served as chairmen of the Beef Board through
the years are interviewed for the video, including JoAnn
Smith, a Florida beef producer who served as the first
Beef Board Chairman in 1986-88. The video also
features interviews with several other producers who
have served on the Beef Board, and other checkoff
representatives.
Because of the size of the electronic file, Internet
download is recommended only from computers with
high-speed access to the Web. To access the video from
your computer, go to one of the following sites:
http://www.beefboard.org/whowbeefcheckoffinfo.aspx
or http://www.beefboard.org/checkoffprograms.aspx
For more information on the checkoff video or any
other elements of the national Beef Checkoff Program,
please contact Diane Henderson at the Cattlemen's Beef
Board, (303) 850-3465 or dhenderson@beefboard.org.


SOURCE:


http ://www.beef org
Centennial, CO
Release December 7, 2005


Profitability of Calves Sired by
Terminal Versus Maternal
Breeds of Bulls

Colorado State University scientists used 80 steer
progeny produced by mating British cross females to
one of three terminal sires (Charolais) or one of five
maternal sires (three Angus and two Red Angus-
Composites) to compare the effects of sire type (terminal
vs. maternal) on performance, carcass traits, and
profitability.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


Steers sired by terminal bulls were significantly
heavier at most stages of production, from birth to
harvest, and grew faster from birth to weaning than steers
sired by maternal bulls. Terminal-sired steers consumed
significantly more feed, but there were no differences
between sire types in feed conversion or cost of gain.
Carcasses sired by terminal bulls were significantly
heavier than those sired by maternal bulls, but other
carcass traits did not differ.
Profitability was compared using two different
marketing scenarios-selling calves at weaning or retained
ownership through harvest. If sold at weaning, terminal-
sired calves would generate $39.52 more net return than
maternal-sired calves. If retained through harvest,
terminal-sired calves would generate $83.62 more net
return than matemal-sired calves. These results suggest
that for commercial cow-calf producers who routinely
retain ownership of their calves through harvest and who
have access to a reliable source of affordable females,
the use of a terminal crossbreeding system may be a
viable strategy for enhancing profitability (Schneider et
al. 2005. Colorado State Univ. Beef Report).



Effects of Limit Feeding of Grain
and Added Fat on Reproductive
Performance

University of Georgia researchers conducted two
experiments to evaluate the effects of limit-feeding a high
concentrate diet and the addition of fat on reproductive
performance and hormone profiles of mature cows. In
Exp. 1, Angus cows (27 days post-partum) were allotted
to one of two treatments for 56 days immediately
preceding the breeding season: 1) bermudagrass hay fed
ad libitum (H); or 2) limit-fed a corn-based diet (C).
After 56 days, cows grazed bermudagrass pasture and
were exposed to bulls for 75 days. Initial body condition
scores for both groups were 5.5. Likewise, after
breeding season, condition scores for both treatments
were similar (5.4). However, body wt. loss was
significantly greater for C than for H cows (116 vs. 18
lb). Nevertheless, days to first estrus was not different
between treatments (52.9 and 52.4 for H and C,
respectively). Insulin concentrations were greater at 56
days for C than for H cows.


In Exp. 2, Angus cows (12 days post-partum) were
allotted to one of four treatments for 56 days prior to
breeding season: 1) bermudagrass hay + 4.6 lb
cottonseed meal as a source of fat (HF); 2) bermudagrass
hay + 5.5 lb corn-soybean meal mix (no fat; HNF); 3)
limit-fed corn + 4.6 lb cottonseed meal (CF); or 4) limit-
fed corn (no fat; CNF). Final body condition scores
and days to first estrus were similar among treatments.
Like Exp. 1, insulin concentration was higher at 56 days
for cows fed corn than for those fed hay. These results
show that a corn-based diet increases insulin
concentrations compared with feeding a hay-based diet.
However, overall reproductive performance was not
affected by pre-breeding energy concentration or added
dietary fat (Rossi et al. 2005. J. Anim. Sci. [Suppl. 1]
Abstract W163).



Feedlot Cattle Getting Fatter in
the Wrong Places

Cattle-FaxTM analysts recently reported that the
percent of Yield Grade 4 cattle has been increasing at a
rate of about 1 percentage point per year since 2001. In
2005, it averaged about 7%, compared to only 2% in
2001. If this rate continues, the percent of Yield Grade
4 cattle could reach 12% by 2010. Equally alarming is
the fact that the percent of Choice grade cattle has
remained relatively flat during the same 2001-2005 time
period. In other words, carcasses are getting fatter on
the outside, but marbling is not keeping pace with external
fat. Heavier carcass weights are also contributing to the
increase in Yield Grade 4's.

************ S* SI SI S SO S SO S


SOURCE:


Harlan Ritchie, Steven Rust, and
Daniel Buskirk
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Beef Cattle Research Update
Release December 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


Steers sired by terminal bulls were significantly
heavier at most stages of production, from birth to
harvest, and grew faster from birth to weaning than steers
sired by maternal bulls. Terminal-sired steers consumed
significantly more feed, but there were no differences
between sire types in feed conversion or cost of gain.
Carcasses sired by terminal bulls were significantly
heavier than those sired by maternal bulls, but other
carcass traits did not differ.
Profitability was compared using two different
marketing scenarios-selling calves at weaning or retained
ownership through harvest. If sold at weaning, terminal-
sired calves would generate $39.52 more net return than
maternal-sired calves. If retained through harvest,
terminal-sired calves would generate $83.62 more net
return than matemal-sired calves. These results suggest
that for commercial cow-calf producers who routinely
retain ownership of their calves through harvest and who
have access to a reliable source of affordable females,
the use of a terminal crossbreeding system may be a
viable strategy for enhancing profitability (Schneider et
al. 2005. Colorado State Univ. Beef Report).



Effects of Limit Feeding of Grain
and Added Fat on Reproductive
Performance

University of Georgia researchers conducted two
experiments to evaluate the effects of limit-feeding a high
concentrate diet and the addition of fat on reproductive
performance and hormone profiles of mature cows. In
Exp. 1, Angus cows (27 days post-partum) were allotted
to one of two treatments for 56 days immediately
preceding the breeding season: 1) bermudagrass hay fed
ad libitum (H); or 2) limit-fed a corn-based diet (C).
After 56 days, cows grazed bermudagrass pasture and
were exposed to bulls for 75 days. Initial body condition
scores for both groups were 5.5. Likewise, after
breeding season, condition scores for both treatments
were similar (5.4). However, body wt. loss was
significantly greater for C than for H cows (116 vs. 18
lb). Nevertheless, days to first estrus was not different
between treatments (52.9 and 52.4 for H and C,
respectively). Insulin concentrations were greater at 56
days for C than for H cows.


In Exp. 2, Angus cows (12 days post-partum) were
allotted to one of four treatments for 56 days prior to
breeding season: 1) bermudagrass hay + 4.6 lb
cottonseed meal as a source of fat (HF); 2) bermudagrass
hay + 5.5 lb corn-soybean meal mix (no fat; HNF); 3)
limit-fed corn + 4.6 lb cottonseed meal (CF); or 4) limit-
fed corn (no fat; CNF). Final body condition scores
and days to first estrus were similar among treatments.
Like Exp. 1, insulin concentration was higher at 56 days
for cows fed corn than for those fed hay. These results
show that a corn-based diet increases insulin
concentrations compared with feeding a hay-based diet.
However, overall reproductive performance was not
affected by pre-breeding energy concentration or added
dietary fat (Rossi et al. 2005. J. Anim. Sci. [Suppl. 1]
Abstract W163).



Feedlot Cattle Getting Fatter in
the Wrong Places

Cattle-FaxTM analysts recently reported that the
percent of Yield Grade 4 cattle has been increasing at a
rate of about 1 percentage point per year since 2001. In
2005, it averaged about 7%, compared to only 2% in
2001. If this rate continues, the percent of Yield Grade
4 cattle could reach 12% by 2010. Equally alarming is
the fact that the percent of Choice grade cattle has
remained relatively flat during the same 2001-2005 time
period. In other words, carcasses are getting fatter on
the outside, but marbling is not keeping pace with external
fat. Heavier carcass weights are also contributing to the
increase in Yield Grade 4's.

************ S* SI SI S SO S SO S


SOURCE:


Harlan Ritchie, Steven Rust, and
Daniel Buskirk
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Beef Cattle Research Update
Release December 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml




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