• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 A bull is worth?
 USDA awards $2.5 million for rural...
 Compounds may help produce jucier...
 2006 American Farm Bureau annual...
 NIAA launches Johne's disease education...
 The Florida Beef Quality Producer...
 America's Heartlands highlights...
 U.S. cattlemen support senate action...
 Meat export board joins Wal-Mart...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. November 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00011
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. November 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: November 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    A bull is worth?
        Page 2
    USDA awards $2.5 million for rural youth development
        Page 3
    Compounds may help produce jucier meat
        Page 4
    2006 American Farm Bureau annual meeting
        Page 4
    NIAA launches Johne's disease education program
        Page 5
    The Florida Beef Quality Producer Program
        Page 5
    America's Heartlands highlights cattle industry's role in U.S. agriculture
        Page 6
    U.S. cattlemen support senate action on Japan
        Page 7
    Meat export board joins Wal-Mart in China pork promotion
        Page 8
Full Text
















In This Issue...
Beef NManaiement Calendar 2
A Bull is Worth' 2
USDAA\\ards $2 5 Million for Rural Youth
Development ..... ...... ..........
Compounds IMa\ Help Produce Juicier Meat ... ... .. 4
2(0)h American Farnn Bureau Annual Mleetin, 4
NIAA Launches Johne's Disease Education Program 5
The Flonrda Beef Qualit. Producer Program .... ... ..
Americas Heartland Highlights Cattle IndustrL s Role
in LI S Agnculture 0
U S Cattlemen Support Senate Action on Japan 7
Meat Export Board Joins Wal-Nart in China Pork
Prom option .... ... ........ .. ... ..... .




Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

O J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: GR. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
o EG Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
o VM.J. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
*: T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
: R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/ .......... Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


Dates to Remember


November


1-3 Inriei A.'enc\ BA.,ic Pie-,cibedi hie I iTiiinLt CA'uria-e.
C',- le ien i'_ \elsl,:,i .A ckldii. FL
3 Southern Cattle Company Bull Sale Marianna, FL
4 FI St An.r l'i'tll C l,\\ l:.' "CIiLre" iiur OkeecIh:..',ee. FL
4-5 Florida Cracker Cattle Association Gathering & Sale -
Brooksville
4-6 E.i-tern N.vii.nal 4-H H..:.i e RounLIIIlI|'l Lotsin \ ille. KY
7 Three Trees/Twin Valley Bull Sale Woodbury, GA
9 A- I icilturtIal Enteir i ise \\, :rksl.:.ps f,.:.I N :ortnh Florid.l: -
Su'.:lrnnee V\lle\ FL
15 National 4-H Livestock Judging Contest Louisville,
KY
15 \\ inter Beef Herd M:NinAiemenr Sr:i ke. FL
16 Florida Beef Quality Producer Program Arcadia, FL
18-19 C.'1 p C,.,.::,le\ Ranch Bull S.ile Fi.inklin TX
30 Florida Beef Quality Producer Program Okeechobee,
FL
311 FCA .( ti .erl l Meetir'n Cle\. ist..:.n. FL
Drr 2


December

3 4-H Youth Li\est..:ck E\ ,llu tn:n SchI,.:':l (C.1inesl \ lle
6 Horse Council Meeting Duval County
III 4-H1 FF. Hlorse .i4tliHni ScI..:.:l GC. ries,\ lle FL
17 Tri-County 4-H Horse Show Series Columbia
County
25 C( liri -t i .i-


I


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.









0


Beef Management
Calendar


November
0 Have soils tested.
0 Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.
0 Use mineral with high level of magnesium if grass
tetany has been a problem in the past.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
0 Maintain adequate nutrient level for cow herd.
0 Calve in well-drained pastures.
0 Survey pastures for poisonous plants.
0 Start summarizing your annual records, both
production and financial-then you will have time to
make adjustments for tax purposes.
0 Re-evaluate winter feeding program and feed
supplies.
0 Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so
you have time to find replacements if some fail.
0 Implement bull conditioning program.
0 Review plans and arrangements for the upcoming
breeding season.
0 Check progress of developing replacement heifers
are they going to meet your target weight by the
start of the breeding season?

December
0 Begin grazing small grain pastures (if ready).
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
0 Deworm cows and heifers prior to winter feeding
season.
0 Observe regularly for calving difficulties.
0 Rotate calving pastures to prevent diseases.
0 Watch for scours in calves.
0 Investigate health of bulls before you buy.
0 Have dead animals posted by a veterinarian or
diagnostic laboratory.
0 Complete review of management plan and update
for next year. Check replacement heifers to be sure
they will be ready to breed 3 4 weeks prior to the
main cow herd.

January
0 Apply lime for summer crops.


0 Check for lice and treat if necessary.
0 Control weeds in cool season pastures.
0 Begin grazing winter clover pastures when
approximately 6 inches high. Rye should be 12-18
inches high.
0 Check mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out for October calving season.
0 Make up breeding herd lists if using single sire herds.
0 Watch for calf scours.
0 Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in
condition for breeding season.
0 Make sure cow herd has access to adequate fresh
water.
0 Buy only performance tested bulls with superior
records.
0 Get taxes filed.
0 Discuss herd health with you veterinarian and outline
a program for the year.
0 Review herd health program with your veterinarian
regularly.
0 Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained
placentas, difficult calvings and other data.
0 Observe cow herd for calving difficulties.
0 Watch for grass tetany on winter pastures.
0 Increase magnesium levels in mineral mixes if grass
tetany has been previous problem (if you are not
already using a high magnesium mineral).
0 Examine bulls for breeding soundness and semen
quality prior to the breeding season.
0 Vaccinate cows and heifers against vibriosis and
leptospirosis prior to the breeding season.


A Bull is
Worth?

During bull buying
season this is a question in
many producers' minds.
What is abull worth? An analysis of bull prices compared
to 550 lb steer values over the past ten years suggests
that it typically takes between 4 and 5 calves (between
20 to 25% of the bull value) to purchase a bull at the
average price. (The bull price data is the annual average
bull price from 10 respective breed associations averaged
together over the previous 10 years, compared to the


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml









0


Beef Management
Calendar


November
0 Have soils tested.
0 Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.
0 Use mineral with high level of magnesium if grass
tetany has been a problem in the past.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
0 Maintain adequate nutrient level for cow herd.
0 Calve in well-drained pastures.
0 Survey pastures for poisonous plants.
0 Start summarizing your annual records, both
production and financial-then you will have time to
make adjustments for tax purposes.
0 Re-evaluate winter feeding program and feed
supplies.
0 Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so
you have time to find replacements if some fail.
0 Implement bull conditioning program.
0 Review plans and arrangements for the upcoming
breeding season.
0 Check progress of developing replacement heifers
are they going to meet your target weight by the
start of the breeding season?

December
0 Begin grazing small grain pastures (if ready).
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
0 Deworm cows and heifers prior to winter feeding
season.
0 Observe regularly for calving difficulties.
0 Rotate calving pastures to prevent diseases.
0 Watch for scours in calves.
0 Investigate health of bulls before you buy.
0 Have dead animals posted by a veterinarian or
diagnostic laboratory.
0 Complete review of management plan and update
for next year. Check replacement heifers to be sure
they will be ready to breed 3 4 weeks prior to the
main cow herd.

January
0 Apply lime for summer crops.


0 Check for lice and treat if necessary.
0 Control weeds in cool season pastures.
0 Begin grazing winter clover pastures when
approximately 6 inches high. Rye should be 12-18
inches high.
0 Check mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out for October calving season.
0 Make up breeding herd lists if using single sire herds.
0 Watch for calf scours.
0 Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in
condition for breeding season.
0 Make sure cow herd has access to adequate fresh
water.
0 Buy only performance tested bulls with superior
records.
0 Get taxes filed.
0 Discuss herd health with you veterinarian and outline
a program for the year.
0 Review herd health program with your veterinarian
regularly.
0 Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained
placentas, difficult calvings and other data.
0 Observe cow herd for calving difficulties.
0 Watch for grass tetany on winter pastures.
0 Increase magnesium levels in mineral mixes if grass
tetany has been previous problem (if you are not
already using a high magnesium mineral).
0 Examine bulls for breeding soundness and semen
quality prior to the breeding season.
0 Vaccinate cows and heifers against vibriosis and
leptospirosis prior to the breeding season.


A Bull is
Worth?

During bull buying
season this is a question in
many producers' minds.
What is abull worth? An analysis of bull prices compared
to 550 lb steer values over the past ten years suggests
that it typically takes between 4 and 5 calves (between
20 to 25% of the bull value) to purchase a bull at the
average price. (The bull price data is the annual average
bull price from 10 respective breed associations averaged
together over the previous 10 years, compared to the


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Cattle-Fax annual average steer price.)

From 1995-2004 the calf price as a percentage of
bull price averaged 23%, with a low occurring in 1996
of 18.1% and a high in 2004 of 27.2%. That percentage
has increased in recent years due to a strong calf market
that the bull market hasn't kept pace with.

Given the average 550 lb steer price for 2005 of
$128, this would historically suggest bull values would
be in a range of $2,700 to $2,900 per head. If history
repeats itself, that would have the average bull price at
its highest levels in history. Given the fact that bull prices
have not recently kept pace with calf prices, a more
likely scenario would be for that spread to continue to
widen and bull averages to be around $2,500/head, still
a historically high price.


9 Bull-to-550 Ib Steer Ratio
28
2 -
26
E 24

E
NT20,
T _-s.,


SOURCE:


Troy Applehans
Cattle-Fax
Englewood, CO
Phone: (800) 825-7525
Web: http://www.cattle-fax.com
Release September 21, 2005


SOURCE:


USDA USDAAwards $2.5 Million
Sfor Rural Youth
Development

Agriculture Deputy Secretary Chuck Conner has
announced that USDA is awarding $2.5 million through
the Rural Youth Development Grant Program, which


provides opportunities for rural youth to gain leadership
skills.

"More than 4 million young Americans live in our
rural communities," Conner said. "USDA is committed
to helping them learn and grow in agriculture so they can
make a difference in their lives and communities."

The grants were awarded to the National 4-H
Council, Girl Scouts of the USA and the National FFA
Organization to expand youth development programs,
reach the needs of rural youth and involve youth in
designing these activities.

These organizations currently reach more than one
in three young people in rural America. Activities
conducted through the Rural Youth Development Grant
Program affect youth in 50 states.

USDA's Cooperative State Research, Education
and Extension Service (CSREES) administers the awards
to the organizations, who in turn distribute the funds to
local programs on a competitive basis. In 2005, each
organization received $840,000.

These three organizations have 275 years of
collective experience in serving rural youth needs, and
they are equipped to help rural youth face issues in the
21st century. The Rural Youth Development Grant
Program provides greater access to educational,
leadership and service opportunities and resources so
youth in 4-H, FFA and Girl Scouts are empowered to
build strong communities.

CSREES helps advance knowledge of agriculture,
the environment, human health and well-being, by
supporting research, education, and extension programs
in the Land-Grant University System and other partner
organizations. For more information, visit http://
www.csrees.usda.gov.


EdLoyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
JenniferMartin
Phone: (202)-720-8188
USDA
Washington, DC
Web: http://www.usda.gov
Release October 27, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


Compounds May Help Produce
Juicier Meat

Getting ajuicy cut of meat isn't always the easiest
of tasks. Juiciness is governed by how much fat-called
marbling fat-is woven within the muscles. But the
likelihood of getting ajuicy steak or chop may increase
in the future, thanks to Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) scientists who are studying a class of compounds
that increase marbling fat in livestock.
ARS physiologist Gary Hausman and his colleagues
at the Animal Physiology Research Unit in Athens, GA,
in collaboration with University of Georgia researchers,
developed a method that can increase marbling fatby as
much as 3.5 percent by adding the compound as a feed
supplement for swine.
Increased marbling fat improves meat quality
factors such as flavor intensity, juiciness and texture.
Decreasing fat in meats has been a goal of breeders in
the past, but it results in meat that is not considered
desirable by consumers.
Some of the compounds, called thiazolidinediones,
are currently approved by the Food and Drug
Administration for use in diabetic people to control
glucose levels. However, none are currently approved
by FDA for use in livestock with the intent of changing
food composition.
In research studies, the compounds were mixed
into livestock feed with relative ease during animal
production. Most of the research focused on swine, but
the compounds may also improve marbling fat in beef
cattle as well.
Enhanced marbling fat would increase carcass
value, benefitting the livestock industry and possibly



Juiciness is governed
by how much fat is
woven within the
muscles, which is
called marbling fat.
This steak exhibits a
desirable amount of
marbling fat.


providing increased profitability for producers.
Other technologies exist for boosting marbling fat,
but they are costly and the effectiveness varies. Apatent
for the new technology has been filed and foreign
licensing rights are available.
ARS is the chief scientific research agency of the
U.S. Department ofAgriculture.


SOURCE:


Sharon Durham
USDA/ARS
Beltsville, MD
Phone: (301) 504-1611
Email: sdurham@ars.usda.gov
Release October 27, 2005


2006 American Farm
Bureau Annual Meeting
Sunday, January 08, 2006 -
Wednesday, January 11, 2006

A city known equally well for its deep musical roots
and as a cultural and learning destination will welcome
Farm Bureau members this coming January. Nashville,
Tenn., also know as "Music City, USA," is the site for
the American Farm Bureau Federation's 87th annual
convention, Jan. 8-11,2006.
More than 5,000 Farm Bureau members from
across the nation will gather in "Music City, USA" to
learn more about the forces shaping today's agriculture
and participate in a grassroots policy setting process that
will guide Farm Bureau through 2006.
"Nashville's rich musical heritage is well-known,
but Farm Bureau members also have the opportunity to
experience this city's unique dedication to fine arts and
higher education, which has earned it the nickname
'Athens ofthe South,'" said Jennifer Holdgreve, AFBF's
annual convention coordinator. "While visiting Nashville,
farm and ranch families from across the nation have the
opportunity to visit with old friends, make new friends
and find out more about the current issues influencing
the policies that directly influence their operations."
Farm Bureau members attending the 2006 AFBF
annual convention will be offered a broad range of


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


Compounds May Help Produce
Juicier Meat

Getting ajuicy cut of meat isn't always the easiest
of tasks. Juiciness is governed by how much fat-called
marbling fat-is woven within the muscles. But the
likelihood of getting ajuicy steak or chop may increase
in the future, thanks to Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) scientists who are studying a class of compounds
that increase marbling fat in livestock.
ARS physiologist Gary Hausman and his colleagues
at the Animal Physiology Research Unit in Athens, GA,
in collaboration with University of Georgia researchers,
developed a method that can increase marbling fatby as
much as 3.5 percent by adding the compound as a feed
supplement for swine.
Increased marbling fat improves meat quality
factors such as flavor intensity, juiciness and texture.
Decreasing fat in meats has been a goal of breeders in
the past, but it results in meat that is not considered
desirable by consumers.
Some of the compounds, called thiazolidinediones,
are currently approved by the Food and Drug
Administration for use in diabetic people to control
glucose levels. However, none are currently approved
by FDA for use in livestock with the intent of changing
food composition.
In research studies, the compounds were mixed
into livestock feed with relative ease during animal
production. Most of the research focused on swine, but
the compounds may also improve marbling fat in beef
cattle as well.
Enhanced marbling fat would increase carcass
value, benefitting the livestock industry and possibly



Juiciness is governed
by how much fat is
woven within the
muscles, which is
called marbling fat.
This steak exhibits a
desirable amount of
marbling fat.


providing increased profitability for producers.
Other technologies exist for boosting marbling fat,
but they are costly and the effectiveness varies. Apatent
for the new technology has been filed and foreign
licensing rights are available.
ARS is the chief scientific research agency of the
U.S. Department ofAgriculture.


SOURCE:


Sharon Durham
USDA/ARS
Beltsville, MD
Phone: (301) 504-1611
Email: sdurham@ars.usda.gov
Release October 27, 2005


2006 American Farm
Bureau Annual Meeting
Sunday, January 08, 2006 -
Wednesday, January 11, 2006

A city known equally well for its deep musical roots
and as a cultural and learning destination will welcome
Farm Bureau members this coming January. Nashville,
Tenn., also know as "Music City, USA," is the site for
the American Farm Bureau Federation's 87th annual
convention, Jan. 8-11,2006.
More than 5,000 Farm Bureau members from
across the nation will gather in "Music City, USA" to
learn more about the forces shaping today's agriculture
and participate in a grassroots policy setting process that
will guide Farm Bureau through 2006.
"Nashville's rich musical heritage is well-known,
but Farm Bureau members also have the opportunity to
experience this city's unique dedication to fine arts and
higher education, which has earned it the nickname
'Athens ofthe South,'" said Jennifer Holdgreve, AFBF's
annual convention coordinator. "While visiting Nashville,
farm and ranch families from across the nation have the
opportunity to visit with old friends, make new friends
and find out more about the current issues influencing
the policies that directly influence their operations."
Farm Bureau members attending the 2006 AFBF
annual convention will be offered a broad range of


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







sessions, special events and entertainment. "It's a full
schedule, with something to suit the interests of every
member," said Holdgreve.
The annual Young Farmer and Rancher
competitions, scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 8, and Monday,
Jan. 9, are just one of many highlights on this year's
tentative agenda. Some of the nation's top young farmers
and ranchers will participate in the YF&R Discussion
Meet, the YF&RAchievementAwards and the YF&am.
For further information or to make your
reservations, please visit http://floridafarmbureau.org/
afbf2006.aspx.


SOURCE:


Florida Farm Bureau
Web: http://floridafarmbureau.org/


noNALH NIAA Launches
r Johne's Disease
Education Program

The National Institute for Animal Agriculture
(NIAA) is launching a collaborative effort between
industry and government to educate producers,
veterinarians and others involved in dairy and beef
production about Johne's disease. The program is
designed to help minimize risks and control Johne's
disease, a bacterial disease of the intestinal tract that
cause ruminants to waste away. The disease is prevalent
in cattle, but is also found in other ruminants. It is
estimated to cost the dairy industry in excess of $200
million annually.
"The National Johne's Educational Initiative will
enhance educational efforts about Johne's by utilizing
previously available information on the disease and
coordinating the development of new materials that are
needed," says Dr. Ken Olson, Johne's education
coordinator forNIAA. "The goal is to control and reduce
incidence of Johne's in the U.S."
NIAA is working with USDA on the initiative to
implement a strategic plan developed by the National
Johne's Working Group, which is part of the U.S. Animal
Health Association. The collaborative effort provides a
focal point for collection and distribution of Johne's


information, according to Olson.
"Through this initiative, we will be reviewing existing
publications and information as well as identifying
additional educational needs for producers and those
who work with them," says Olson.
The initiative will help producers in three key areas:
Minimize the risk of Johne's entering their herd
through implementation of proven management practices;
Reduce the economic impact in herds with the
disease through enhanced management; and
Eliminate Johne's as a factor in dairy and beef
production.
More information on the Initiative will be available
on the Internet at www.j ohnesdisease.org. For further
information, contact Ken Olson at
kolson@animalagriculture.org.


SOURCE: BenRichey
NIAA
Bowling Green, KY
Phone: (270) 782-9798
Email: brichey@animalagriculture.org
Web: http://animalagriculture.org
Release October 6, 2005


LM II- I- O The Florida Beef
FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION Quality Producer
Program

Why is it Important to My Beef Cattle
Operation? and How Can I Get Involved?

A series of upcoming meetings will be held to
address these questions and many others. The Florida
Beef Quality Producer Program is a cooperative
program that has been developed by the University of
Florida Beef Cattle Extension Group, the Florida
Department ofAgriculture and the Florida Cattlemen's
Association. The educational program is designed to
update producers on Beef Quality Assurance (BQA).
Florida has had an informal BQA program for 15 years
and most producers are aware of the beef quality issues
facing our industry like injection site blemishes and


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







sessions, special events and entertainment. "It's a full
schedule, with something to suit the interests of every
member," said Holdgreve.
The annual Young Farmer and Rancher
competitions, scheduled for Sunday, Jan. 8, and Monday,
Jan. 9, are just one of many highlights on this year's
tentative agenda. Some of the nation's top young farmers
and ranchers will participate in the YF&R Discussion
Meet, the YF&RAchievementAwards and the YF&am.
For further information or to make your
reservations, please visit http://floridafarmbureau.org/
afbf2006.aspx.


SOURCE:


Florida Farm Bureau
Web: http://floridafarmbureau.org/


noNALH NIAA Launches
r Johne's Disease
Education Program

The National Institute for Animal Agriculture
(NIAA) is launching a collaborative effort between
industry and government to educate producers,
veterinarians and others involved in dairy and beef
production about Johne's disease. The program is
designed to help minimize risks and control Johne's
disease, a bacterial disease of the intestinal tract that
cause ruminants to waste away. The disease is prevalent
in cattle, but is also found in other ruminants. It is
estimated to cost the dairy industry in excess of $200
million annually.
"The National Johne's Educational Initiative will
enhance educational efforts about Johne's by utilizing
previously available information on the disease and
coordinating the development of new materials that are
needed," says Dr. Ken Olson, Johne's education
coordinator forNIAA. "The goal is to control and reduce
incidence of Johne's in the U.S."
NIAA is working with USDA on the initiative to
implement a strategic plan developed by the National
Johne's Working Group, which is part of the U.S. Animal
Health Association. The collaborative effort provides a
focal point for collection and distribution of Johne's


information, according to Olson.
"Through this initiative, we will be reviewing existing
publications and information as well as identifying
additional educational needs for producers and those
who work with them," says Olson.
The initiative will help producers in three key areas:
Minimize the risk of Johne's entering their herd
through implementation of proven management practices;
Reduce the economic impact in herds with the
disease through enhanced management; and
Eliminate Johne's as a factor in dairy and beef
production.
More information on the Initiative will be available
on the Internet at www.j ohnesdisease.org. For further
information, contact Ken Olson at
kolson@animalagriculture.org.


SOURCE: BenRichey
NIAA
Bowling Green, KY
Phone: (270) 782-9798
Email: brichey@animalagriculture.org
Web: http://animalagriculture.org
Release October 6, 2005


LM II- I- O The Florida Beef
FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION Quality Producer
Program

Why is it Important to My Beef Cattle
Operation? and How Can I Get Involved?

A series of upcoming meetings will be held to
address these questions and many others. The Florida
Beef Quality Producer Program is a cooperative
program that has been developed by the University of
Florida Beef Cattle Extension Group, the Florida
Department ofAgriculture and the Florida Cattlemen's
Association. The educational program is designed to
update producers on Beef Quality Assurance (BQA).
Florida has had an informal BQA program for 15 years
and most producers are aware of the beef quality issues
facing our industry like injection site blemishes and


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


bruises. With the current market situation, it is becoming
increasingly important to not only be aware of what can
be done to improve beef quality but it is also critical to
DOCUMENT your beef quality practices and
procedures. The demand for source verified, age
verified, and process verified cattle is increasing and
market access is certainly greater for cattle with a known
and documented history. The Florida Beef Quality
Producer Program will focus on these topics and many
others including:
* Injection site management
* Avoiding residues from antibiotics, medicated feeds,
chemicals, feed contaminants, feed toxins, ruminant by-
products
* Foreign object avoidance
* Breeding and genetic selection
* Utilization of animal heath products
* Cattle handling/processing
* Cull cow management
Most importantly, the training will focus on the
Record Keeping that will help you DOCUMENT the
beef quality practices on your operation. Producers who
attend the meeting will receive the 140 page Florida Beef
Quality Producer manual that outlines how a producer
can implement a Beef Quality Assurance Plan on his/her
operation. I would encourage all beef cattle producers
to attend this meeting and I also recommend that all
producers bring their cow crew. Beef Quality Assurance
is everyone'sj ob and it takes everyone to implement it
properly
Meeting Dates for Florida Beef Quality Producer
program:
Arcadia
November 16' 10am-3:00 pm
Desoto Co. Extension Office
Contact: Jim Selph (863) 993-4846
Okeechobee
November 30t 10am-3:00 pm
Okeechobee Co. Extension Office
Contact: Pat Hogue (863) 763-6469


Marianna
February 2nd 10am-3:00 pm
Jackson Co. Extension Office
Contact Doug Mayo (850) 482-9620
Kissimmee
March 9th 10am-3:00 pm
Osceola Co. Extension Office
Contact Randy Bateman (321) 697-3000


SOURCE:


Todd Thrift
Phone: (352) 392-8597
Email: thrift@animal.ufl.edu
UF/IFAS, Department of Animal
Sciences
Gainesville, FL 32611-0910


America's Heartland Highlights
Cattle Industry's Role in U.S.
Agriculture
PBS series features several episodes
on beef production

Cattle and beef production -the largest segment
of American agriculture will play a prominent role in
upcoming episodes ofAmerica 'Heartland. This new
weekly public television series profiles the people, places
and processes of our nation's agriculture.
Over the next year, 20 episodes of America '
Heartlandwill tap into and strengthen the ties that
bind all Americans together: the love of our land and the
respect for the people who live on it and make their
living from it. Hosted by Paul Ryan, each episode will
feature about five separate news segments.
The U.S. cattle industry is featured in several
segments ofthe program, including:
Ryan hosts a feature on the 800,000-acre King
Ranch of Texas. The legend of this historic south Texas
ranch is told through the experiences of cowboys who
have ridden its vast stretches for decades. Viewers are
also offered insights into the King family history and the
Texas Longhorn cattle that this ranch helped introduce
to America.


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7


Reporter Pat McConahay visits one of
America's more unusual ranches, which has become a
Florida tourist attraction. At the Babcock Ranch, an
ancient livestock breed known as "cracker cattle" is
raised along with alligators.
Correspondent Craig Miller takes the audience
to California to witness the use of global positioning
system (GPS) technology to track cattle.
Reporter Jason Shoultz introduces a Montana
cattle breeder who mixes the rough-and-ready ranching
lifestyle with high-tech science to build better stock.
McConahay visits the scenic Wisconsin ranch
of country music star Michael Martin Murphey, where
running the ranch operation involves the entire family.
Jim McAdams, a Texas rancher and president of
the National Cattlemen's BeefAssociation (NCBA), said
cattlemen will be pleased to see a television series
celebrating the heritage of the cattle industry, as well as
the prominent role it still plays in the nation's economy.
"As a rancher, I will watch this series with great
interest and anticipation," McAdams said. "But I am also
grateful that the program offers urban folks the
opportunity to learn more about farming and ranching
and the role that agriculture played in building this nation."
John Braly, NCBAvice-president for industry and
member services and an advisory board member of
America's Heartland, also predicts the program will
appeal to a wide audience.
"PBS stations in California carried a similar
program called California Heartland," Braly said.
"Other than NOVA, it was the most-watched PBS
program in California. And, it was heavily viewed in
some of the largest urban centers."
America's Heartland will be carried on at least
141 PBS affiliates, covering 40 percent of the nation's
households. Viewers should check local listings for
programs times, and can learn more about the program
at http://www.americasheartland.org.


SOURCE:


Joe Schuele
NCBA
Centennial, CO
Phone: 303-850-3360
Email: j schuele@beef.org


U.S. Cattlemen
Support Senate
Action on Japan


Senators Kent Conrad
(D-N.D.) and Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) are introducing
bipartisan legislation regarding the 22-month ban on U.S.
beef going into Japan in effort to regain this valuable
market for America's cattle ranchers. The bill calls for
tariffs on Japanese products if Japan does not reopen its
important domestic market to U.S. beef.
"U.S. beef is among the safest in the world," says
Sen. Conrad. "There is no scientific basis for Japan to
continue blocking our exports. If Japan does not accept
our beef, we will impose tariffs to compensate for the
damage they have caused our ranchers, who are suffering
from Japan's trade embargo. The time has come for
Japan to live up to its commitments and reopen its borders
to American-grown beef."
"Despite the efforts of even the highest office in
our nation's government, Japan continues to keep
American beef out of their country," says Sen. Roberts.
"This week, the Japanese Food Safety Commission again
failed to reach an agreement to remove the blockade to
U.S. beef imports. And to add insult to injury, four of the
Commission's twelve members did not even show up. I
am troubled that our negotiations with Japan have
deteriorated to this point."
The Senate legislation will require the U.S.
Department of Treasury to implement additional tariffs
on goods grown, produced or manufactured in Japan
unless the U. S. Trade Representative certifies that Japan
has reopened its market to American beef by December
15, 2005.
"Cleary, Senate leaders are detecting the intense
level of frustration from cattle producers across the
countryside, and like us they are frustrated with the
inactivity of the Japanese Food Safety Commission
(FSC)," says National Cattlemen's Beef Association
(NCBA) President and Texas cattle producer Jim
McAdams. "We know the possibility of renewed trade
with Japan is on the horizon, and we support any efforts
from the Senate impelling Japan's FSC to expedite the
process."


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8


Cosponsors of the legislation include Senators
Wayne Allard, (R-Colo.); Max Baucus, (D-Mont.); Kit
Bond, (R-Mo.); Sam Brownback, (R-Kan.); Conrad
Burns (R-Mont.); Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.); Norm
Coleman, (R-Minn.); John Cornyn (R-Texas); Larry
Craig, (R-Idaho); Mike Crapo, (R-Idaho); Byron
Dorgan, (D-N.D.); Mike Enzi, (R-Wyo.); Tim Johnson,
(D-S.D.); Blanche Lincoln, (D-Ark.); Harry Reid, (D-
Nev.); Ken Salazar, (D-Colo.); Jim Talent, (R-Mo.);
Craig Thomas, (R-Wyo.); and John Thune, (R-S.D.).
"America produces some of the highest quality beef
in the world," says Sen. Thune. "Our standard for
excellence is respected by nations worldwide, and Japan
should be no exception. Our cattle and ranching industries
are a source of pride forAmerica and a key component
of U.S. economic growth and global competitiveness.
Japanese leaders must follow through with the good-
faith commitment they made last year to resume imports."
"Japan has chosen to ignore internationally
recognized science and has instead based its food safety
on emotional, politically-driven arguments," says
Roberts. "Free trade is a two-way street. More
importantly, in the context of the pending negotiations in
the Doha Round of the World Trade Organization, I urge
my colleagues to support this bill because it sends the
message to American producers that we will stand up
forAmerican agriculture in our trade negotiations."
NCBA is urging members of the Senate to support
this legislation and asking members of the House of
Representatives to take up Rep. Jerry Moran's (R-Kan.)
House Resolution 137, which calls for the U. S. Trade
Representative to immediately impose retaliatory trade
sanctions against Japan if it continues to delay meeting
its obligations as part of the understanding reached
October 2004.
"I think I speak for all cattlemen when I say it's
time," says McAdams. "Through NCBA, cattlemen have
continued to loudly express their frustrations with this
non-science based trade ban. These Senators' leadership
is appreciated."
For more information from NCBA regarding the
Japanese embargo, including a timeline of events, go to:
http://hill.beef org/japan.


SOURCE:


TanyaAugustson
Phone: (202) 347-0228
Email: taugustson@beef.org
Karen Batra
Phone: (202) 347-0228
Email: kbatra@beef.org
NCBA
Centennial, CO
Release October 26, 2005


Meat Export Board Joins Wal-
Mart in China Pork Promotion

The United States Meat Export Federation joined
forces with Wal-Mart's Chinese store division to launch
Wal-Mart's first-ever U.S. pork promotion. The
promotion, held in Wal-Mart's new Shanghai store,
featured sliced boneless butt and brisket, with in-store
sampling, recipes and nutritional information about U.S.
pork products.
According to USMEF, pork exports to China and
Hong Kong have risen 12 percent through the first eight
months of the year to 48,101 tons while the value
has risen 18 percent to $67.5 million.
USMEF also teamed up with the Nebraska Corn
Board to promote Nebraska value-added pork in Japan.
The promotion, Nebraska Pork Sausage Tasting Session,
introduced Japanese meat buyers to high-quality
Nebraska sausages, provided by Wimmer's Meats, West
Point, NE.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
MeatingPlace.com
Release October 27, 2005


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