• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue
 Beef management calendar
 Beef management calendar
 2006 AMIF Animal Care and Handling...
 USDA releases estimates of farm...
 Applications accepted for 2006...
 Senate stalls Japan imports
 National ID process appears in...
 The Florida Beef Quality Producer...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. October 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00010
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. October 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: October 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00010
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    2006 AMIF Animal Care and Handling Conference slated for Feb. 23-24, 2006, in Kansas City
        Page 3
    USDA releases estimates of farm production losses
        Page 4
    Applications accepted for 2006 Beef Industry Vision award
        Page 5
    Senate stalls Japan imports
        Page 6
    National ID process appears in disarray
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The Florida Beef Quality Producer Program
        Page 8
Full Text




















Beef Management Calendar 2
International Stockmen's Edlucational Foundation
Tra\ el Fello\ ship Guidelines .... ... .... .... 2
2tn06 ANMIF Animal Care and Handling Conference
Slated for Feb _'-'4. 2li0t. in Kansas C'ity
USDA Releases Estimates of Farm Production Losses 4
Applications Accepted for 211116 Beef InldustN V7ision
A \x a rd .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 5
Senate Stalls Japan Imports 6
National ID Process Appears In Disarraly
The Florida Beef Qualit\ Producer Program 8
Ag For Life ................... ...............




Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

+ J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: GR. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
EG Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
M.J. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
*: T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
: E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/ .......... Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


Dates to Remember


October


4 N.:.nil Fi.-:.ri-l Beef & F :I.t-ue (GI.:.uLi Bull Selectitri &
N ii:n.-,teneiirt Neetinr \\el!loiiiL. FL
7 Livestock Evaluation Coaches Workshop -
Gainesville, FL
7 M Bi.-tu*_i, (-).k Kni.:.1 Bull S-le AIC.-,1t FL
13 National 4-H Meats Judging Contest Manhattan, KS
13 F :.ridtA A.\ Ilu Ass\.:.c-iati.n Bull S.-le \\' it l'tulit FL
13-14 1st Annual Quail Management Shortcourse Arcadia,
FL
15 St .i.:.lh'S C-.:.Liti\ C.ittlet ren' Ci' ckei D.-\ Elk ,tn.
FL


19
21
22
22
25
27
28
29
29
29
29


Bartow Angus Bull Sale Bartow, FL
GrAihirm .ArnLi Bull Sale Okeech,.:.bee FL
Debter Hereford Bull Sale Horton, AL
4-H Hi:or-se Sh:i'v. Ne\\ hein FL
Bradford County Swine Clinic Starke, FL
Keipfer '.ill.i. :\\ Sale Ki-ss.i ee FL
Lemmon Cattle Enterprise Bull Sale Okeechobee, FL
SE Bi .1II';LI Breeders Sh.:.\\ cAie S.ile .rlid lus1 ... AL
Walden Farms Bull Sale Brantley, AL
G- le! O'G(iti-uh Disperail Sile \\ illist:.n. FL
Georgia Limousin Association Graded Bull Sale
Irwinville, GA


November

1-3 inter A.-enc\ B.1~ic Plescribedl File Ti.iiini.i C':o I e.
C.ittleien'\ \Vers.'.:.n Arc.ibli.i. FL
3 Southern Cattle Company Bull Sale Marianna, FL
4 Fir-t A-'nnul.i C( \'. I:\ "Chute" Out Okeeclh.l:ee. FL
4-5 Florida Cracker Cattle Association Gathering & Sale -
Brooksville
4-6 E.i-astern N.tion n:'il 4-H H-..:.ie R 'ioundu'l| LoutI\ ille. KY
7 Three Trees/Twin Valley Bull Sale Woodbury, GA
9 A..i icuhlurAl Entelri i e \\ :rkslh.:l.;p f.: N It:nlh Fil:rnl:i -
Su'.:innee \-:ie\ FL
15 National 4-H Livestock Judging Contest Louisville,
KY
311 FCA (utiNerl Meetin. Cle. st..:.n. FL
Dec 2


In This Issue...


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.








40


Beef Management
Calendar


October
0 Plant cool season legumes.
0 Plant small grain pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites, especially lice, and treat
if needed.
0 Check for spittlebugs and grassloopers and treat, if
needed.
0 Watch condition of cow herd; maintain adequate
nutrition.
0 Isolate any additions to the herd for 30 to 60 days
and observe for signs of disease; retest for brucellosis
and leptospirosis.
0 Be sure you have adequate handling facilities, and
they are in good working order.
0 If you are raising bulls for the commercial market,
October thru December is the main bull-buying
season for cattlemen in south Florida and now is the
time to have your promotion program fully activated.

November
0 Have soils tested.
0 Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.
0 Use mineral with high level of magnesium if grass
tetany has been a problem in the past.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
0 Maintain adequate nutrient level for cow herd.
0 Calve in well-drained pastures.
0 Survey pastures for poisonous plants.
0 Start summarizing your annual records, both
production and financial-then you will have time to
make adjustments for tax purposes.
0 Re-evaluate winter feeding program and feed
supplies.
0 Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so
you have time to find replacements if some fail.
0 Implement bull conditioning program.
0 Review plans and arrangements for the upcoming
breeding season.
0 Check progress of developing replacement heifers
are they going to meet your target weight by the
start of the breeding season?


December
R Begin grazing small grain pastures (if ready).
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
R Deworm cows and heifers prior to winter feeding
season.
0 Observe regularly for calving difficulties.
0 Rotate calving pastures to prevent diseases.
0 Watch for scours in calves.
0 Investigate health of bulls before you buy.
0 Have dead animals posted by a veterinarian or
diagnostic laboratory.
0 Complete review of management plan and update
for next year. Check replacement heifers to be sure
they will be ready to breed 3 4 weeks prior to the
main cow herd.



SInternational
Stockmen's
Educational
Foundation Travel
Fellowship Guidelines

In an effort to enhance the educational experiences
of college students and strengthen the leaders of
tomorrow's livestock industry, the International
Stockmen's Educational Foundation awards travel
fellowships each year for the International Livestock
Congress held in Houston, Texas, to senior level and
graduate students of accredited colleges or universities.
The International Livestock Congress, managed by
the International Stockmen's Educational Foundation in
cooperation with the Houston Livestock Show and
Rodeo is a unique global event, that brings leaders from
the livestock industry together in a think-tank
environment with government officials, scientists, and
educators to discuss issues of international importance
that affect the future of animal agriculture. The event will
be held February 27-March 2,2006, in Houston, Texas.
Fellowships include airfare, ground transportation,
hotel and scheduled meals. Scholastic achievement,
leadership experiences and letters of recommendation
are all part of the stringent qualifying requirements.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








40


Beef Management
Calendar


October
0 Plant cool season legumes.
0 Plant small grain pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites, especially lice, and treat
if needed.
0 Check for spittlebugs and grassloopers and treat, if
needed.
0 Watch condition of cow herd; maintain adequate
nutrition.
0 Isolate any additions to the herd for 30 to 60 days
and observe for signs of disease; retest for brucellosis
and leptospirosis.
0 Be sure you have adequate handling facilities, and
they are in good working order.
0 If you are raising bulls for the commercial market,
October thru December is the main bull-buying
season for cattlemen in south Florida and now is the
time to have your promotion program fully activated.

November
0 Have soils tested.
0 Observe cows daily to detect calving difficulty.
0 Use mineral with high level of magnesium if grass
tetany has been a problem in the past.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
0 Maintain adequate nutrient level for cow herd.
0 Calve in well-drained pastures.
0 Survey pastures for poisonous plants.
0 Start summarizing your annual records, both
production and financial-then you will have time to
make adjustments for tax purposes.
0 Re-evaluate winter feeding program and feed
supplies.
0 Get breeding soundness exams on bull battery so
you have time to find replacements if some fail.
0 Implement bull conditioning program.
0 Review plans and arrangements for the upcoming
breeding season.
0 Check progress of developing replacement heifers
are they going to meet your target weight by the
start of the breeding season?


December
R Begin grazing small grain pastures (if ready).
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if needed.
R Deworm cows and heifers prior to winter feeding
season.
0 Observe regularly for calving difficulties.
0 Rotate calving pastures to prevent diseases.
0 Watch for scours in calves.
0 Investigate health of bulls before you buy.
0 Have dead animals posted by a veterinarian or
diagnostic laboratory.
0 Complete review of management plan and update
for next year. Check replacement heifers to be sure
they will be ready to breed 3 4 weeks prior to the
main cow herd.



SInternational
Stockmen's
Educational
Foundation Travel
Fellowship Guidelines

In an effort to enhance the educational experiences
of college students and strengthen the leaders of
tomorrow's livestock industry, the International
Stockmen's Educational Foundation awards travel
fellowships each year for the International Livestock
Congress held in Houston, Texas, to senior level and
graduate students of accredited colleges or universities.
The International Livestock Congress, managed by
the International Stockmen's Educational Foundation in
cooperation with the Houston Livestock Show and
Rodeo is a unique global event, that brings leaders from
the livestock industry together in a think-tank
environment with government officials, scientists, and
educators to discuss issues of international importance
that affect the future of animal agriculture. The event will
be held February 27-March 2,2006, in Houston, Texas.
Fellowships include airfare, ground transportation,
hotel and scheduled meals. Scholastic achievement,
leadership experiences and letters of recommendation
are all part of the stringent qualifying requirements.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Travel fellowship recipients must participate
in all activities of the Congress and develop a
professional paper that summarizes the outcomes
of the event.
These papers must be submitted in English to
the student's department head and a copy forwarded
to the ISEF office within 90 days following the
Congress. Papers will be evaluated by a selection
committee for possible publication in a proceedings
of the event, with the author of the paper selected
as outstanding invited to return to the ILC Houston
or other related event.
Recipients will also be required to make a
presentation to a breed association or a similar
group in their area about their experiences at the
International Livestock Congress.
An application may be downloaded from
http://www.livestockcongress.com. For further
information please contact:
Julie J. Bryant
Executive Director
International Stockmen's Educational Foundation
P.O. Box 26918
Fort Worth, TX 76126
Phone: (817) 443-0686
Fax: (817) 887-5288
Email: julie@livestockcongress.com


Please note that students have been
disqualified for failing to send all required
information. You will not be notified if all
information is not received.


Julie J. Bryant
Executive Director
International Stockmen's Educational
Foundation
Fort Worth, TX
Phone: (817) 443-0686
Fax: (817) 887-5288
Email: julie@livestockcongress.com


2006 AMIF Animal Care
and Handling
Conference Slated for
Feb. 23-24, 2006, in Kansas City

Wal-Mart, McDonald's Representatives to
Keynote Conference


Representatives ofWal-Mart, McDonald's and the
Federal Bureau of Investigation Counterterrorism
Division will headline the AMI Foundation Animal Care
and Handling Conference for the Food Industry,
February 23-24, 2006, at the Sheraton Overland Park
in Overland Park, KS, just outside Kansas City.
The conference will again offer an opening general
session followed by three tracks: Management and
Policy, Applied Pig Handling and Applied Cattle
Handling.
This year's conference boasts 11 cosponsoring
organizations: The American Association of Bovine
Practitioners; American Association of Swine
Veterinarians; Animal Agriculture Alliance; Food
Marketing Institute; National Cattlemen's Beef
Association; National Grocers Association; National
Milk Producers Federation; National Pork Board;
National Pork Producers Council; National Council of
Chain Restaurants; and the National Restaurant
Association.
Joan Menke-Schaenzer, vice president of food
safety and security at Wal-Mart, and Bob Langert,
director of social responsibility atMcDonald's, will deliver
a "keynote panel discussion" of consumer expectations
for animal welfare. The discussion will be moderated by
Charlie Amot, president of CMA Consulting.
Also during the conference's opening general
session, John Lewis, director of the FBI's
counterterrorism division, will deliver a provocative talk
on animal extremism and the challenges faced in the
United States.
Many of the conference's highly rated faculty will
return again to instruct in the various tracks. They include
Temple Grandin, Ph.D. of Colorado State University;
Joe Regenstein, Ph.D., of Comell University; Gerald


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


SOURCE:





4


Kinard ofLEARN, Inc.; John McGlone, Ph.D., of Texas
Tech University (invited); Robert "Bo" Manly, president
and COO, Premium Standard Farms, Inc.; and Mike
Siemens, Ph.D. of Smithfield Foods.
Attendees in the Management and Policy Track
will benefit from sessions on auditing, leading culture
change, security, managing controversy and USDA
humane slaughter initiatives.
Attendees in the Applied Pig Handling Track will
enjoy a special, in-depth session on C02 stunning, a look
at practical ways to improve handling, a discussion of
pig transport issues and a look at AMIF's Animal
Handling Guidelines andAudit Guide.
The Applied Cattle Handling Track features a look
at religious slaughter and how to troubleshoot problems
in Kosher and Halal operations; cattle transport, handling
and stunning and the relationship between cattle handling
and beef quality.
New this year are special "Welfare Tech" sessions,
where equipment suppliers can present data and
information about their products and how they have been
documented to enhance animal handling stunning. To
request a Welfare Tech application, contact AMIF's
Ginger Bray at gbray@meatami.com or (202) 587-
4200.
In addition, exhibitors may showcase their products
and services during a special Welcome Reception on
February 23. To reserve an exhibit space, contact Katie
Brannan at kbrannan@meatami.com or (202) 587-
4200.
The conference will be immediately preceded by
the International Meat Animal Welfare Research
Conference (IMAWRC), a research-focused
conference that looks at emerging research and issues in
the field of animal welfare.
Registration fees for those registering before
December 31, 2005, are $325 for AMImembers, $450
for non-members and $295 when three or more members
register together. After December 31, registrations rates
increase to $425 for members and $395 for when three
or more members register together.
For a complete agenda or to register, go to
www.animalhandling.org.


For more information contact:
David Ray
Vice President, Public Affairs
Phone: (202) 587-4243
Email: dray@meatami.com

Janet Riley
Sr. Vice President, Public Affairs
Phone: (202) 587-4245
Email: jriley@meatami.com


SOURCE:


AMI American Meat Institute
Washington, DC
Phone: (202) 587-4200
Fax: (202) 587-4300
Release September 21, 2005


USDA USDA Releases Estimates
-M of Farm Production
Losses

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has released
a preliminary assessment ofU.S. agricultural production
losses due to hurricane Katrina in the mid-south and
drought in the eastern Corn Belt. The report estimates
hurricane-related losses to be nearly $900 million.
"Given the severity of the hurricane, the agricultural
losses could have been much greater," Johanns said.
"With that said, there is a long road ahead for many of
our producers who face infrastructure and long-term
losses not accounted for in this assessment. USDA is
committed to supporting producers throughout long and
short term recovery."
Hurricane-force winds missed major crop
production areas in the mid-south. Substantial portions
of rice, soybeans and corn production in hurricane-
affected states were harvested prior to landfall of
Hurricane Katrina, which also limited production losses.
Much of the crop losses are attributable to lost
horticultural production in Florida and along the Gulf
Coast.
USDA's Sept. crop production survey indicated
cotton production losses in the range of 4 percent for


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







Alabama and Mississippi, key cotton production states.
Louisiana is estimated to have lost 9 percent of the state's
sugarcane production, which would account for about
1.5 percent of the U. S. sugar production expected for
fiscal year 2006. Although corn, rice and soybean losses
appear to be modest, the assessment report
acknowledges that producers will face higher costs
harvesting the blown over crops, which will require more
time and high-cost fuel to harvest.
Short-term livestock production losses due to the
hurricane are estimated in the range of $30 million.
Millions of chickens were killed. Producers also lost eggs,
poults and chicken grow-out facilities, which will lead to
longer term economic losses for some producers. Dairy
producers discarded an estimated $3 million worth of
milk due to lost electricity on farms and at dairy
processing plants and might face a period of reduced
cow productivity. An estimated 10,000 cattle were lost.
This preliminary assessment provides estimates of
2005 production losses and does not include
infrastructure or long-term losses. Crop and livestock
producers face added losses in the form of damaged or
destroyed barns, equipment buildings, fences, machinery,
as well as losses associated with degraded farm fields,
carcass disposal, electrical power losses and fuel
shortages.
The nearly $900 million in lost production due to
the hurricane compares to a combined total of $20 billion
in farm cash receipts in 2004 for producers in Alabama,
Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee.
The USDA assessment also reviews production
losses due to the drought in the eastern Corn Belt,
estimating $1.3 billion in corn and soybeans losses in
Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin.
In addition to hurricane and drought production losses,
the report notes that grain and oilseed producers
throughout the Midwest have faced reduced prices due
to the shipping interruption in New Orleans ports.
Crop insurance will cover a portion of farm
production losses attributable to Hurricane Katrina, the
drought and other adverse weather conditions this year.
While coverage varies by crop and state, in general, 70
to 95 percent of planted acreage is covered by insurance
in the hurricane-affected area and 60 to 75 percent of
corn and soybean acreage is covered in the drought-


affected area.
USDAs preliminary assessment is subject to change
as more information becomes available. The report is
available on the USDAWeb site at http://www.usda.gov/
katrina.


SOURCE:


Terri Teuber
Phone: (202)720-4623
AngelaHarless
Phone: (202)720-4623
United States Department of
Agriculture
Washington, D.C
Release September 20, 2005


Applications
NCF Accepted for 2006
-- 0 Beef Industry Vision
Award

The National Cattlemen's Foundation is now
accepting applications for the 2006 Beef Industry Vision
Award.
The VisionAward recognizes individuals in the cattle
industry for innovations that have enhanced not only their
business, but the industry as a whole. Applications are
evaluated on the basis of effective use of technology,
impact on production cost, ingenuity of implementation,
innovative marketing, impact on the industry and optimum
resource management.
Applications should focus on a specific concept
and its effect on the beef industry. This competition is
not limited to original ideas, practices or technologies. It
also encompasses alternative uses for existing
procedures, practices and technologies that have
benefited the cattle industry. Applicants must be a U. S.
citizen or U.S.-based business engaged in some aspect
of the beef industry. Regional winners will be eligible
every other year to re-submit an application for the
national award.
Up to seven regional finalists will be selected, and
one recipient will be named national VisionAward winner.
Each regional winner will receive a $500 award and is


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


asked to designate an NCBA affiliate to also receive a
$500 grant. The national winner will receive roundtrip
airfare, hotel accommodations and two complimentary
registrations for the 2006 Cattle Industry Convention
and Trade Show in Denver, Colorado. Regional winners
also receive two complimentary registrations for this
event.
Applications and all supporting material must be
received by November 30,2005. Detailed information
about the Vision Award can be found on the National
Cattlemen's Foundation website at http://
www.nationalcattlemensfoundation.org or by calling
(303) 850-3347.
The 2005 VisionAward winner was Jim Schwertner
from Texas. He was recognized for his involvement in
developing industry-leading programs such as the Vac
45 program, Schwertner Select, BeefAdvantage and
ConsolidatedBeefProducers. "For years, I've believed
that the industry needs vertically integrated information,"
Schwertner said. "The current technology, combined with
individual ID, could evolve this industry into a
marketplace focused on quality and consistency. From
the rancher to the retailer, we can evaluate the quality of
the product, striving to represent a better and more
wholesome center of the plate for the consumer."
The Beef Industry Vision Award program is a
collaborative effort of the National Cattlemen's
Foundation and Micro Beef Technologies.

SOURCE: PaulaWaggoner
Phone: (303) 850-3347
Email: pwagggoner@beef.org
National Cattlemen's Beef
Association
http://www.beefusa.org/
Release September 21, 2005


Senate Stalls Japan Imports
AMI questions USDA 'consistency'

Bipartisan Senate coalition voted overwhelmingly
to prohibit Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns from
spending any money for the purpose of making its
proposed rule reopening the border to Japanese beef


permanent. The vote was 72-26, and the ban would last
until "the president certifies to Congress that Japan has
granted open access to Japanese markets for beef and
beef products produced in the United States."
Ben Nelson, D-Neb., introduced the amendment.
In his floor speech, Nelson cited objections to the rule
made by Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund in their
comments submitted last week concerning the proposed
rule.
USDA supporters aren't too happy with the
proposed rule, either. In its comments concerning
USDA's proposed rule to allow limited imports of
Japanese beef, the American Meat Institute approved
of the initiative but asked why Japan is allowed to export
to the United States when it has only had a feed ban in
place for four years compared to eight in Canada -
yet is being allowed the same rights as Canadian exporters
while Japan continues to ban shipments from both the
United States and Canada.
"It is both ironic and exceptionally disappointing to
the beef industry that APHIS is expeditiously moving
forward to reopen the American market to these
products from Japan while the Japanese government
refuses to apply the OIE (Office of International
Epizootics) guidelines with respect to American beef
products," said J. Patrick Boyle, AMI president. He
added that due to the length of the feed ban in place in
Canada, the continued ban on live cattle and beef
products from cattle 30 months and over makes little
sense. "Although AMI supports the proposal to allow
the importation of Japanese beef, consistent treatment
should also be afforded to Canada and other minimal
risk regions," Boyle said.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release September 21, 2005


National ID Process Appears In
Disarray
It's tough to slow down a stationary object, but
USDA and the industry have apparently managed it
where the National Animal Identification System (NAIS)


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


asked to designate an NCBA affiliate to also receive a
$500 grant. The national winner will receive roundtrip
airfare, hotel accommodations and two complimentary
registrations for the 2006 Cattle Industry Convention
and Trade Show in Denver, Colorado. Regional winners
also receive two complimentary registrations for this
event.
Applications and all supporting material must be
received by November 30,2005. Detailed information
about the Vision Award can be found on the National
Cattlemen's Foundation website at http://
www.nationalcattlemensfoundation.org or by calling
(303) 850-3347.
The 2005 VisionAward winner was Jim Schwertner
from Texas. He was recognized for his involvement in
developing industry-leading programs such as the Vac
45 program, Schwertner Select, BeefAdvantage and
ConsolidatedBeefProducers. "For years, I've believed
that the industry needs vertically integrated information,"
Schwertner said. "The current technology, combined with
individual ID, could evolve this industry into a
marketplace focused on quality and consistency. From
the rancher to the retailer, we can evaluate the quality of
the product, striving to represent a better and more
wholesome center of the plate for the consumer."
The Beef Industry Vision Award program is a
collaborative effort of the National Cattlemen's
Foundation and Micro Beef Technologies.

SOURCE: PaulaWaggoner
Phone: (303) 850-3347
Email: pwagggoner@beef.org
National Cattlemen's Beef
Association
http://www.beefusa.org/
Release September 21, 2005


Senate Stalls Japan Imports
AMI questions USDA 'consistency'

Bipartisan Senate coalition voted overwhelmingly
to prohibit Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns from
spending any money for the purpose of making its
proposed rule reopening the border to Japanese beef


permanent. The vote was 72-26, and the ban would last
until "the president certifies to Congress that Japan has
granted open access to Japanese markets for beef and
beef products produced in the United States."
Ben Nelson, D-Neb., introduced the amendment.
In his floor speech, Nelson cited objections to the rule
made by Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund in their
comments submitted last week concerning the proposed
rule.
USDA supporters aren't too happy with the
proposed rule, either. In its comments concerning
USDA's proposed rule to allow limited imports of
Japanese beef, the American Meat Institute approved
of the initiative but asked why Japan is allowed to export
to the United States when it has only had a feed ban in
place for four years compared to eight in Canada -
yet is being allowed the same rights as Canadian exporters
while Japan continues to ban shipments from both the
United States and Canada.
"It is both ironic and exceptionally disappointing to
the beef industry that APHIS is expeditiously moving
forward to reopen the American market to these
products from Japan while the Japanese government
refuses to apply the OIE (Office of International
Epizootics) guidelines with respect to American beef
products," said J. Patrick Boyle, AMI president. He
added that due to the length of the feed ban in place in
Canada, the continued ban on live cattle and beef
products from cattle 30 months and over makes little
sense. "Although AMI supports the proposal to allow
the importation of Japanese beef, consistent treatment
should also be afforded to Canada and other minimal
risk regions," Boyle said.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release September 21, 2005


National ID Process Appears In
Disarray
It's tough to slow down a stationary object, but
USDA and the industry have apparently managed it
where the National Animal Identification System (NAIS)


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


is concerned.

At the ID-Info Expo in Chicago last week, USDA
clarified its expectations for the private-industry, NAIS
database the agency announced it would allow on Aug.
30. You may remember that ever since USDA established
NAIS in April 2004, its stated intent had been for a
federal database. Besides ensuring access to the requisite
information in the event of an animal health emergency,
USDA said federal control would allow the leverage and
interface with other government databases, such as those
used for emergency response.
On the other side of the fence, some in the industry
- most notably the National Cattlemen's Beef
Association (NCBA) had remained adamant that a
private database would offer more privacy protection
for the data. Incidentally, there's still no definitive answer
as to whether that will ultimately prove true.
But, for whatever reason, USDA bowed to
producers who wanted a private database. What some
proponents of the privatized system may not have
anticipated, however, is that in assuming responsibility
for building and maintaining this database- over which
USDA will still have oversight- industry also assumes
the total cost for an NAIS component that USDA
appeared ready to pay for. It's akin to someone forcing
you to spend your money to buy them a pickup to drive.
Furthermore, USDA officials emphasized last week
that the private system must be developed and maintained
by "a legal entity" representing all livestock species.
According to John Clifford, Deputy Administrator for
the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's
Veterinary Services program, this entity must be able to
enter into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with
USDA. He said USDA doesn't care if the organization
is preexisting or newly minted, just so it fits the criteria
and the industry decides it's the organization it wants to
use.
The crux of this, besides letting USDA off the hook
for financing, or at least sharing cost in this portion of the
system, is the livestock industry must now figure out how
to develop a new organization everyone agrees to, or
identify and agree upon an existing organization that meets
USDA's criteria.
Beginning last January, NCBA said it was


spearheading the effort to organize a private livestock
industry consortium to develop an NAIS database. At
the meeting last week, Mike John, NCBA president-
elect, intimated such a group was coming together. When
asked for names of organizations joining NCBA in the
process, though, he demurred.
Likewise, visiting with reps of other key livestock
industry organizations, we've yet to find any who admit
they've signed on to this or any other consortium. So,
either folks are keeping their cards close, orthey've none
to play.
For the record, based on about 600 responses to
USDA's request for public commentto its "Draft Program
Standards" and "Draft Strategic Plan" issued in May,
54% of all responding producers supported a private
database; 39% a federal one. Of cattle producers
responding, 64% wanted a private system. If you
consider producers and everyone else who responded,
the majority supported a federal database (48%), while
36% wanted a private one.
In the meantime, there's still no definitive answer
whether NAIS will be mandatory or voluntary. USDA
has yet to issue program rules and standards. It's also
yet to begin issuing NAIS numbers, as it had planned to
do beginning in August. And, and...
One long-time, dogged advocate of national animal
ID in the name of protecting the national herd was so
downhearted by the turn of events at the Chicago meeting
last week that he speculated NAIS progress had been
set back at least a year.
In an effort to help unite the industry to figure out
how to organize in order to build the database NAIS
requires, USDA will host a public meeting Oct. 12 at
the Radisson Hotel & Suites in Kansas City, MO., from
8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Learn more at:
a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/0 1an20051800/
edocket. access. gpo. ov/2005/05-18 760. htm.


SOURCE:


Beef Stocker Trends
Email: beef@pbmmenewsletters.com
Release October 3, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


The Florida Beef Quality
Producer Program

Why is it Important to My Beef Cattle
Operation? and How Can I Get Involved?

A series of upcoming meetings will be held to
address these questions and many others. The Florida
Beef Quality Producer Program is a cooperative
program that has been developed by the University of
Florida Beef Cattle Extension Group, the Florida
Department ofAgriculture and the Florida Cattlemen's
Association. The educational program is designed to
update producers on Beef Quality Assurance (BQA).
Florida has had an informal BQA program for 15 years
and most producers are aware of the beef quality issues
facing our industry like injection site blemishes and
bruises. With the current market situation, it is becoming
increasingly important to not only be aware of what can
be done to improve beef quality but it is also critical to
DOCUMENT your beef quality practices and
procedures. The demand for source verified, age
verified, and process verified cattle is increasing and
market access is certainly greater for cattle with a known
and documented history. The Florida Beef Quality
Producer Program will focus on these topics and many
others including:
* Injection site management

* Avoiding residues from antibiotics, medicated feeds,
chemicals, feed contaminants, feed toxins, ruminant by-
products
* Foreign object avoidance

* Breeding and genetic selection

* Utilization of animal heath products

* Cattle handling/processing
* Cull cow management

Most importantly, the training will focus on the
Record Keeping that will help you DOCUMENT the
beef quality practices on your operation. Producers who
attend the meeting will receive the 140 page Florida Beef
Quality Producer manual that outlines how a producer
can implement a Beef Quality Assurance Plan on his/her
operation. I would encourage all beef cattle producers


to attend this meeting and I also recommend that all
producers bring their cow crew. Beef Quality Assurance
is everyone'sj ob and it takes everyone to implement it
properly
Meeting Dates for Florida Beef Quality Producer
program:
Arcadia
November 16' 10am-3:00 pm
Desoto Co. Extension Office
Contact: Jim Selph (863) 993-4846
Okeechobee
November 30t 10am-3:00 pm
Okeechobee Co. Extension Office
Contact: Pat Hogue (863) 763-6469
Marianna
February 2nd 10am-3:00 pm
Jackson Co. Extension Office
Contact Doug Mayo (850) 482-9620
Kissimmee
March 9th 10am-3:00 pm
Osceola Co. Extension Office
Contact Randy Bateman (321) 697-3000


SOURCE:


Todd Thrift
Phone: (352) 392-8597
Email: thrift@animal.ufl.edu
UF/IFAS, Department of Animal
Sciences
Gainesville, FL 32611-0910
Release October 4, 2005


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