• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 U.S. scientists detect soybean...
 NCBA chooses provider for animal...
 Anthrax confirmed in Sutton County,...
 Bronson urges residents to keep...
 Bacteria propel gains in ammonia...
 South Korea to support research...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. August 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00008
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. August 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: August 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00008
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    U.S. scientists detect soybean rust, farmers brace for outbreaks
        Page 2
        Page 3
    NCBA chooses provider for animal ID program
        Page 4
    Anthrax confirmed in Sutton County, Texas
        Page 5
    Bronson urges residents to keep safety and pets in mind with hurricane season under way
        Page 6
    Bacteria propel gains in ammonia removal
        Page 7
    South Korea to support research in BSE-resistant cattle
        Page 8
Full Text
















Dates to Remember


August


Beet management Clalendar .... .. 2 1-4 Bccl aittic Replodction \lan.imcnit School -
UF Scientists Detect Soybean Rust. Farmers Brace 1-6 Southern Regional 4-H Horse Championships -
for Outbreaks Montgomery, AL
for Outbreaks4 E\tcn n Fanm Fn l Da' .Li. FL
NCBA Chooses Provider for Animal ID Program .... 4 4 Selection and Management Tools to Improve your
Calf Crop LaBelle, FL
Anthrax Confirmed in Sutton County. Texas ... .... Crop LaBel, FL
6 C (.iL t I i,. i TIi +ii -'_ (.lUll"C I P.L1 0I '5 I (QIIIIlC FL
Bronson Urges Residents to Keep Safety and Pets in 9-13 NCBA Mid Year Conference Denver, CO
Mind With Hunicane Season Ulnder \Wav 13 NMirth Fh'nd. Beet& rI' .i"C t r1- up Ex rI .,n I .-i n-c
\iiini.il H.i., Ficid D.0, ( i.iiiin C il FL
Bacteria Propel Gains in Ammonia Remo\ al 7 18 NFREC Beef Cattle/Forage Field Day Marianna, FL
South Korea to Support Research into BSE-resistant 27 \I.r t i Ti.iiiiii (.'uinc iP.,n 5 "5I QunIc,. FL
Cattle 8
September
15-17 (.- \ Fr.ll (u.-irtc.rl' \Ir -in.- ( r ,,,.l R \L cr. FL
25 Florida Santa Gertrudis Sale Bartow, FL
Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

o J.D. Arthington 2005 North Florida Beef Cattle/
BeefCattle Management, Ona Forage Field Day
J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna Mark your calendars and plan to attend the 3rd Annual Beef
o. GR. Hansen Cattle/Forage Field Day at the University of Florida/Institute
BeefCattle Production, Marianna of Food andAgricultural Sciences', (UF/IFAS) North Florida
EG Hembry, Professor Research and Education Center Beef Unit in Marianna, Fla.,
Department Chairman, Gainesville on Thursday, August 18, 2005. The program will begin at
: M.J. Hersom 8:00 a.m. CDT and will end at 3:00 p.m. Lunch and
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville refreshments will be provided.
*: T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville The field day will include demonstrations along with field
o: E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor tours of ongoing research. Topics covered will include an
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville update and demonstration of the new Feed Efficiency Facility,
o: T.T. Marshall, Professor the integration of cattle grazing into a crop rotation scheme,
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
BeefCattleanagement, Gainesville fertilization of pastures, weed control in pastures, an update
*: R.O. Myer, Professor
AnimalNutritionist, Marianna on cool season forages, and mineral supplementation of the
: W. Taylor, Coordinator cow herd.
Youth Education /1......... Gainesville
Youth Educationk / .As. Gainesville The NFREC-Beef Unit is located one mile west of Greenwood,
o. S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville Fla. on state highway 162. For additional information call
*: T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor (X51 I 4x2-991 14 o i5 (i1) 4s2-1243. Aregistrationfee of $5 will
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville be charged.


In This Issue...


2005 North Florida Beef Cattle Forage Field Day .... 1


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.








0


Beef Management
Calendar


Auaust
0 Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as
possible, if they are in your area.
0 Cut hay.
0 Apply lime for fall and winter crops.
0 Harvest Bahiagrass seed.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Update market information and marketing plans.
0 Check for army worms, spittlebugs, and mole
crickets, and treat if necessary.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Wean calves and cull cow from herd.
0 Watch for evidence of abortions.
0 Observe animals regularly for signs of disease.
0 If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or
heel flies were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle
grubs this month.
0 Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement
herd.

September
0 Cut hay.
0 Heavily graze pastures to be interplanted to cool
season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for mole crickets, spittlebugs, and
grassloopers, and treat if necessary.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Wean calves and cull cow herd if not already done.
Remove open, unsound, or poor producing cows.
0 Train cowboys to observe normal and abnormal
behavior and signs of disease.
0 Be sure any replacement purchases are healthy and
have been calfhood vaccinated for brucellosis.
0 September or October is a good time to deworm
the cow herd if internal parasites are a problem.
0 When replacement heifers are weaned, give them
required vaccinations and teach them to eat from a
bunk then put them on a good nutrition program.
0 Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
criteria, and start checking availability of quality
animals.


0 Review winter feed supply and feeding plans so that
needed adjustments can be made before supplies
tighten and prices rise.

October
0 Plant cool season legumes.
0 Plant small grain pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites, especially lice, and treat
if needed.
0 Check for spittlebugs and grassloopers and treat, if
needed.
0 Watch condition of cow herd; maintain adequate
nutrition.
0 Isolate any additions to the herd for 30 to 60 days
and observe for signs of disease; retest for brucellosis
and leptospirosis.
0 Be sure you have adequate handling facilities, and
they are in good working order.
0 If you are raising bulls for the commercial market,
October thru December is the main bull-buying
season for cattlemen in south Florida and now is the
time to have your promotion program fully activated.


UF Scientists
Detect Soybean
Rust, Farmers
Brace for Outbreaks


Asian soybean rust, a crop-killing disease first
detected in the United States last fall, has been found
near Citra on soybeans at a University of Florida "sentinel
plot" planted early to detect the fungus. It was one of
two findings this week that mark the first appearances
of soybean rust on U.S. soybeans during the typical
growing season, and UF researchers fear the discovery
signals the beginning of outbreaks that may devastate
the nation's $16 billion soybean industry.
The disease was found Wednesday by Jim Walker,
a biological scientist with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant
Industry, which has been monitoring the plots in
cooperation with UF's Institute ofFood and Agricultural
Sciences, or UF/IFAS. On Thursday, a Division of Plant


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


H u fL, IV1;[, I) 1
FLORHIDA
I F 5 [ .X]I 'N 0








0


Beef Management
Calendar


Auaust
0 Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as
possible, if they are in your area.
0 Cut hay.
0 Apply lime for fall and winter crops.
0 Harvest Bahiagrass seed.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Update market information and marketing plans.
0 Check for army worms, spittlebugs, and mole
crickets, and treat if necessary.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Wean calves and cull cow from herd.
0 Watch for evidence of abortions.
0 Observe animals regularly for signs of disease.
0 If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or
heel flies were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle
grubs this month.
0 Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement
herd.

September
0 Cut hay.
0 Heavily graze pastures to be interplanted to cool
season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for mole crickets, spittlebugs, and
grassloopers, and treat if necessary.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Wean calves and cull cow herd if not already done.
Remove open, unsound, or poor producing cows.
0 Train cowboys to observe normal and abnormal
behavior and signs of disease.
0 Be sure any replacement purchases are healthy and
have been calfhood vaccinated for brucellosis.
0 September or October is a good time to deworm
the cow herd if internal parasites are a problem.
0 When replacement heifers are weaned, give them
required vaccinations and teach them to eat from a
bunk then put them on a good nutrition program.
0 Determine bull replacement needs, develop selection
criteria, and start checking availability of quality
animals.


0 Review winter feed supply and feeding plans so that
needed adjustments can be made before supplies
tighten and prices rise.

October
0 Plant cool season legumes.
0 Plant small grain pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for external parasites, especially lice, and treat
if needed.
0 Check for spittlebugs and grassloopers and treat, if
needed.
0 Watch condition of cow herd; maintain adequate
nutrition.
0 Isolate any additions to the herd for 30 to 60 days
and observe for signs of disease; retest for brucellosis
and leptospirosis.
0 Be sure you have adequate handling facilities, and
they are in good working order.
0 If you are raising bulls for the commercial market,
October thru December is the main bull-buying
season for cattlemen in south Florida and now is the
time to have your promotion program fully activated.


UF Scientists
Detect Soybean
Rust, Farmers
Brace for Outbreaks


Asian soybean rust, a crop-killing disease first
detected in the United States last fall, has been found
near Citra on soybeans at a University of Florida "sentinel
plot" planted early to detect the fungus. It was one of
two findings this week that mark the first appearances
of soybean rust on U.S. soybeans during the typical
growing season, and UF researchers fear the discovery
signals the beginning of outbreaks that may devastate
the nation's $16 billion soybean industry.
The disease was found Wednesday by Jim Walker,
a biological scientist with the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant
Industry, which has been monitoring the plots in
cooperation with UF's Institute ofFood and Agricultural
Sciences, or UF/IFAS. On Thursday, a Division of Plant


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


H u fL, IV1;[, I) 1
FLORHIDA
I F 5 [ .X]I 'N 0






















Jim Marois, left, and David Wright, professors at the
University of Florida s North Florida Research and
Education Center in Quincy, check soybean plants for Asian
soybean rust -Friday, July 1, 2005. First discovered in the
United States in fall 2004, the crop-killing disease was
found growing on cultivated soybeansfor the first time this
week, striking early-planted "sentinel plots" in Florida and
Alabama. To help protect the nation 's $16 billion soybean
crop, the researchers are monitoring plants around the state
for signs of the disease. (AP photo/University of Florida/
IFAS/Thomas,,r In


Industry laboratory confirmed that the pathogen was
Asian soybean rust, said David Wright, a UF/IFAS
professor of agronomy in Quincy.

The other discovery was made Tuesday on a sentinel
plot in Baldwin County, Ala., Wright said. Previously,
soybean rust was found in Florida and other Southern
states after the 2004 growing season ended. The crop is
typically planted in the spring and produces soybeans in
the summer and early fall.

"There's a lot at stake now, and nobody really
knows what will happen," Wright said. "But if there are
maj or problems, it will affect a lot of people."

Losses from the disease which kills up to 95
percent of infected plants could drive up prices on
products ranging from margarine and peanut butter to
livestock feed and biodiesel fuel, he said.

UF and state agricultural experts have joined a
nationwide effort to help farmers protect this year's crop,
estimated at 74 million acres, Wright said. Soybeans are
grown in 31 states, with heaviest production in the
Midwest.


By monitoring sentinel plots at 26 Florida sites,
Wright and other scientists at UF's North Florida
Research and Education Center in Quincy hope to
provide data on the disease's development, distribution
and other factors that could assist farmers in northern
areas of the nation, Wright said. The project is funded
by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and the North
Central Soybean Research Program, a consortium
representing higher education institutions in the 31
soybean- producing U.S. states.

Many growers are concerned about being caught
off guard by soybean rust, because the fungus, known
as Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is spread by tiny spores that
can travel hundreds of miles on air currents, he said.
"The fungus also matures very quickly," Wright said.
"Once a spore lands on a host plant it can produce new
spores in nine days."

Despite its name, soybean rust attacks more than
30 species of legumes, a plant family that includes beans,
peas and clover, he said. On soybeans, it causes infected
leaves to develop small brownish spots, then turn yellow
and fall off

Crop protection sprays called fungicides control
the disease in South America, where soybean rust arrived
in 2001, Wright said. But U.S. farmers fear the sprays
could cut profits.

Fungicide treatments for an acre of soybeans would
cost $10 to $30 per year, he said. Protecting the entire
U.S. crop could total more than $1 billion.

"Soybeans have a low profit margin, probably $25
to $50 per acre," Wright said. "So there's not much
room for new expenses."

To determine which fungicides work best under
Florida's growing conditions, UF researchers are
conducting field trials of about 20 products, said Jim
Marois, a UF plant pathologist. The trials, held at the
Quincy center, will also investigate application methods.

"Growers prefer the lowest-priced products that
work," Marois said. "We want to help them make
informed choices."

UF researchers will also investigate tilling methods
that bury old plant residue, a practice that could prevent
dormant spores from starting new outbreaks, he said.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







"This method will only work against spores that
survive the winter here, and we're not sure that will
happen," Marois said. "We hope not, because then we'll
only have outbreaks if spores arrive from other
countries."
Native to Asia, soybean rust is believed to have
reached the United States in September when winds
from Hurricane Ivan transported spores from South
America, he said. There, the disease affects Brazil, Bolivia
and Paraguay.
Concerns about international terrorism spurred U.S.
preparations for soybean rust, Marois said. In the
aftermath of the Sept. 11 disaster, it was identified as a
possible bioterrorism agent, which led to the development
of federal programs to identify and respond to the
disease.
"We've had a very coordinated effort," Marois
said. "Although nobody's happy soybean rust is here,
the silver lining is that we're learning more about how
we can take a nationwide approach to crop diseases."
Florida will be a critical state in the fight against
soybean rust, said X.B. Yang, a professor of plant
pathology at Iowa State University in Ames.
"What happens in Florida may well determine the
risk level for Midwest states," said Yang, who is part of
an Iowa group collaborating with UF researchers.
"Information generated by UF scientists is essential for
colleagues in the north."


DavidWright
Phone: (850) 875-7119
Email: dlw@ifas.ufl.edu

Jim Marois
Phone: (850) 875-7120
Email: marois@ifas.ufl.edu

X.B. Yang
Phone: (515) 294-8826
Email: xbyang@iastate.edu
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL


US


NCBA Chooses
Provider for Animal
ID Program


The National Cattlemen's BeefAssociation has
chosen BearingPoint Inc. as the lead technology provider
for its proposed national animal identification program,
which it is developing because of the long gestation of
USDA's planned mandatory National Animal
Identification Service (NAIS). Other technology
providers selected include Microsoft, ViaTrace and S&H
Marketing.
BearingPoint was selected, NCBA said, both for
its experience in large-scale technology solutions and its
ability to focus on the identification system. NCBA
expects a program to be beta tested by October and
fully operational by January 2006. USDA's plan, by
comparison, isn't set to become fully operational until
January 2009.
"The Commission feels that having an identification
program in place by fall 2005 is essential," saidAllen
Bright, a Nebraska cattleman and head of NCBA's
Animal Identification Commission. "Many of our
domestic and international customers are requesting
identification already, and we believe a market-driven
solution is quicker and better protected than a
bureaucratic, government solution."
NCBA's program will be totally voluntary, but it
will meet USDA's goal of 48-hour traceability from any
point in the production process. Eventually, NCBAplans
to turn over its program to a producer-run, multi-species
consortium of food producers that will fund and operate
the program and, most importantly, safeguard data that
many ranchers and producers consider to be proprietary,
competitive information.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release July 8, 2005


By: Tom Nordlie
Phone: (352) 392-1773 x 278
Release July 1, 2005

http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


4


SOURCE:








Anthrax Confirmed in Sutton
County, Texas

Two ranches in Sutton County, Texas have
laboratory-confirmed cases of anthrax in horses, deer
and cattle, and laboratory results are pending for
several other sites in the county, where livestock and
deer losses have been reported. Although this bacterial
disease occurs almost yearly in this region of the state,
cases have not been confirmed within Sutton County for
more than 20 years. Typically, outbreaks are in Val
Verde, Edwards, Kinney and Uvalde counties, but on
rare occasions, cases have been confirmed as far south
as Starr County, reports Dr. Thurman Fancher, director
of Area 6 (West Texas) for the Texas Animal Health
Commission (TAHC).
"Anthrax is under-reported, because many ranchers
in this area automatically dispose of carcasses and
vaccinate livestock when they find dead animals that are
bloated or bloody-common signs of the disease," said
Dr. Fancher. "Anthrax is a reportable disease, however,
and it's important to know when an outbreak occurs, so
other ranchers can be notified to vaccinate.
Dr. Fancher explained that it is common to see
death losses in one pasture, but not across the fence.
However, all livestock in an infected area should be
vaccinated, to prevent potential losses. There is no
effective, approved manner to deliver anthrax vaccine
to grazing wildlife that cannotbe captured and confined.
Dr. Fancher said that, during the anthrax outbreak,
deer owners enrolled in the chronic wasting disease
(CWD) surveillance program are to report death losses,
but they should check with their private veterinary
practitioner before collecting brain tissue from the animal
for CWD testing. "If a dead deer has clinical signs of
anthrax, we may need to avoid opening the carcass," he
said. CWD has not been detected in Texas.
"Anthrax is an ancient disease that occurs
worldwide. The first reports in livestock date back to
1500 BC," noted Dr. Fancher. "When an infected animal
dies, the ground becomes contaminated with the spores
ofBacillus anthracis bacteria, unless the carcass and soil
are purified with a very hot fire. Even though spores do
not multiply or spread underground, they can lie dormant


in soil for decades, awaiting the perfect combination of
weather and soil conditions to become vegetative.
Animals then are exposed to the disease when they eat
grass contaminated with the bacteria."
TAHC regulations require that the affected animal's
bedding, its carcass, and nearby manure be burned with
wood, diesel or gasoline (tires and oil create too much
pollution), to cleanse the ground. Do not open carcasses.
If there is a bum ban in the area, contact the TAHC
Area office in Lampasas at 1-800-658-6642 for
disposal information.
Livestock on the premises must then be vaccinated
and held under quarantine for a short time, to ensure any
anthrax-exposed animals are not moved from the
premises. Laboratory tests, conducted by the Texas
Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory in College
Station, are needed to confirm infection, and suspected
cases should be reported to private veterinary
practitioners or the TAHC's headquarters in Austin at
1-800-550-8242."
Anyone handling or burning carcasses, or
vaccinating livestock against anthrax should wear long
sleeves and gloves. Exposure can cause a nasty, black
sore that requires medical attention and antibiotics.
General sanitation procedures should be followed after
handling livestock, and equipment used on the animals
should be disinfected. Pets should be kept from dead
carcasses or bones of dead animals, which may pose a
disease risk. Healthy animals should be moved from
anthrax-contaminated areas.
"Visitors to the area should not be alarmed by
anthrax," said Dr. Fancher. "Just leave dead animals
alone, and don't pick up shed antlers or old animal bones.
By the time the area's hunting season begins, the cooler
weather brings an outbreak to a close. If, after an outing,
you develop an unusual sore, see your physician for
treatment."
Actions that should be taken during an anthrax
outbreak:
1. Properly dispose of animal carcasses by burning to
prevent exposure to other animals, such as predators or
dogs. Remove healthy livestock from the area.
2. Vaccinate livestock if cases occur in the surrounding


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


areas. Because the anthrax vaccine is a "live" vaccine, it
should not be administered concurrently with
antibiotics. Vaccinated animals are to be withheld from
slaughter for two months.
3. Restrict movement of livestock from an affected
premise until animals can develop immunity through
vaccination.


SOURCE: CarlaEverett
Texas Animal Health Commission
Austin, TX
Phone: (800) 550-8242, ext. 710
FAX: (512) 719-0719
Email: ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us
Release July 7, 2005



Bronson Urges
S -" Residents to Keep
SSafety and Pets in
Mind With
Hurricane Season
UnderWay


Florida Commissioner ofAgriculture and Consumer
Services Charles H. Bronson is reminding residents to
take steps to protect their homes, pets and livestock
now that the 2005 hurricane season is under way.
"After last year's horrific hurricane season, people
are taking storm preparations very seriously," Bronson
said. "But while people are stocking up on batteries,
food and water, we want to be sure other critical issues
are also addressed, including their animals."
The Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services includes the Division of Animal
Industry, which assists citizens in evacuating livestock,
provides assistance to farmers after a storm, and helps
people find pet-friendly shelters and hotels. The
Department also oversees food safety as well as the safe
sale, use, storage, handling and transportation of propane
gas.
Bronson is providing some tips for residents to use


to prepare for the hurricane season:

Propane Gas

* If forced to evacuate, turn off the propane tank
service valve and the shut-off valve on all propane
appliances.
* Appliance and equipment controls that have
been under water should be inspected by the gas
company and the controls replaced prior to being put
back into service.

Food Safety

* Stock up with foods that require no refrigeration,
preparation or cooking.
* All food contaminated by flood water (except
undamaged metal cans) should be discarded.
* Undamaged cans as well as refrigerators,
counters, cookware dishes and glassware contaminated
by flood water should be washed, rinsed and sanitized
in a solution of 2 teaspoons of unscented household
bleach per gallon of room-temperature potable water.
* Keep several gallons of bottled water available.
If under a boil-water notice, do not use tap water or
make ice without bringing the water to a rolling boil for
at least one minute.

Environmental

* Store lawn chemicals and fertilizers off the
ground in a location that is not subject to flooding.

Pets and SmallAnimal Safety

* Keep ID tags and vaccinations up to date.
* Prepare a pet survival kit, including food for two
weeks, a manual can opener, medications, a pet carrier,
bedding, and vaccination records.
* If you plan to board a pet, make written
arrangements in advance, well before a storm threatens.
* Contact hotels and motels along your evacuation
route to check policies on accepting pets and keep the


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


list handy.
* The Humane Society of the United States
(HSUS) has prepared a helpful brochure "Disaster
Preparedness for Pets," which can be accessed on the
web at http://www.hsus.org/ace/18732.

Horses and Livestock

* Keep vaccinations and other health requirements
up to date.
* If possible, make arrangements in advance for
evacuation of horses. Know where you can take your
horses for shelter along your evacuation route. Make
sure your horse trailer is "ready to go" or other transport
arrangements are prepared well in advance. Carry your
vaccination record and health papers with you.
* If not evacuating, make sure animals have access
to high ground in case of flooding.
* Check all gates, fences and enclosures for loose
parts and overall sturdiness.
* Secure equipment, small sheds and other items
that may become flying debris and injure animals.


Services by calling 1-800-HELPFLA. Never give cash
and always write checks payable to the organization,
not an individual.
Bronson says consumers who are educated about
the potential dangers a natural disaster presents to health,
home and pocketbook are more likely to avoid being
harmed or victimized by scam artists. Consumers can
find out more about food safety tips and animal welfare
information by logging on to the Department's web site
at http://www.doacs.state.fl.us and checking out the
Division of Food Safety, and the Division of Animal
Industry which lists pet-friendly shelters.


SOURCE:


Liz Compton
Email: comptol@doacs.state.fl.us
Phone: (850)251-5693

Terence McElroy
Email: mcelrot@doacs.state.fl.us
Phone: (850) 488-3022
Florida Department ofAgriculture
and Consumer Services, Tallahassee,
FL
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us
Release June 3, 2005


Price-gouging


* It is illegal in Florida to charge excessive prices
for essential items such as gas, food, ice, lumber and
lodging following a declaration of emergency by the
governor. Residents should report any price-gouging
by calling 1-800-HELPFLA.

Post-disaster Scams

* Con artists may prey on residents who suffer
home damage by offering to repair the damage with
materials leftover from a previous job. Citizens can
protect themselves by checking with the local building
department or with the Florida Department of Business
and Professional Regulation to make sure the contractor
is licensed. They should also ask for and verify local
references.
* Charity scams often surface following a disaster.
Before you give, ensure that the charity is registered with
the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer


Bacteria Propel Gains in
Ammonia Removal

Using an innovative bacterial process, Agricultural
Research Service (ARS) scientists are paving the way
for new, cost-efficient and large-scale methods of
removing ammonia from livestock wastewater.
In tests with anammox--a technology that uses rare
anaerobic bacteria to convert nitrite and ammonium to
harmless dinitrogen gas--soil scientists Matias Vanotti
and Ariel Szogi at ARS' Coastal Plains Soil, Water and
Plant Research Center in Florence, S.C., have scored
noteworthy results.
They're the first researchers to isolate from animal
wastewater the planctomycetes bacteria used in the
anammox process. They've also highlighted anammox's
commercial potential by removing nitrogen from
wastewater at rates similar to those obtained using


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


He discussed the anammox results earlier this week
at the annual international meeting of the American
Society ofAgricultural Engineers, in Tampa, Fla.
ARS is the U.S. Department ofAgriculture's chief
scientific research agency.


SOURCE:


- -
Soil scientists Ariel Szogi (left) and Matias Vanotti examine
a packed-bed bench reactor containing the anammox
bacteria immobilized in polymer gel beads.
Image courtesy Matias Vanotti.


conventional methods.
Short for "anaerobic ammonium oxidation,"
anammox was discovered in the Netherlands during the
1990s. The process is more energy-efficient than
traditional biological nitrogen-removal systems because
only part of the ammonium in wastewater needs to be
nitrified, and it removes ammonium without needing
costly aeration or additives.
In tests in Florence and at a swine farm near
Kenansville, N.C., Vanotti and Szogi achieved the high
nitrogen-removal rates by improving the bacteria's
environment for reproduction. The bacteria's slow
multiplication makes their cultivation difficult. The
scientists' isolation of the bacteria from wastewater during
these tests may make possible economical treatments
for high-ammonia effluents, because it shows that it may
not be necessary to cultivate the bacteria off-site. Vanotti
added that although the researchers have used anammox
to remove up to 500 grams of nitrogen per cubic meter
daily from wastewater, their goal is to triple this rate within
the next year.
The scientists have also launched a cooperative
three-year project with EMBRAPA, Brazil's agricultural
research agency, to develop a new-generation, cost-
effective anammox-based treatment of livestock
wastewater. Vanotti said this treatment may reduce
nitrogen-treatment costs four-fold.


Luis Pons
ARS/USDA
Beltsville, MD
Phone: (301) 504-1628
Email: lpons@ars.usda.gov
Release July 22, 2005


South Korea to Support
Research into BSE-resistant
Cattle

The South Korean government plans to fully
support research efforts to develop a new breed of cattle
resistant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy, said
Minister ofAgriculture and Forestry Park Hong-Soo.
The Minister made the remarks after recently
observing the artificial insemination of a specially fertilized
egg into a cow by South Korean stem cell researcher
Hwang Woo-Suk. The fertilized egg transplant is part of
ongoing research by Hwang to develop specific genetic
strands immune to B SE infection.
No case ofB SE has been detected in South Korea,
but the growing volume of global trade has raised
concern that an outbreak could occur there.
Hwang made international headlines last year by
cloning the world's first human embryos. He said that it
could take four to five years to develop B SE-resistant
cattle.
Hwang's research is being performed in conjunction
with the National Livestock Research Institute.


SOURCE:


John Gregerson
Email: gregerson@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release July 25, 2005


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