• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 Youth 'seize the moment' at NJSA...
 8th annual Hay Field Day
 Supreme court rules beef checkoff...
 Beef cattle reproduction management...
 Agricultural research published...
 4-H leader welcomes new challenges...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. June 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00006
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. June 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: June 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    Youth 'seize the moment' at NJSA National Youth Leadership Conference
        Page 3
    8th annual Hay Field Day
        Page 4
    Supreme court rules beef checkoff constitutional
        Page 4
    Beef cattle reproduction management school
        Page 5
    Agricultural research published by UF/IFAS ranks among top 20 institutions worldwide
        Page 6
    4-H leader welcomes new challenges at Cattlewomen's Association president
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text






































Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

+ J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: G.R. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
*: F.G. Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
M.J. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
+ R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/Training, Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


In This Issue...
Bccf Nlanagencnt Calendar
Success for the Fift -fourth Annual Beef Cattic
Short Course 2
Youth "Seize the lMonent" at NJSA National
Youth Leadership Conference ?
S"' Annual Ha\ Field Da\ 4
Supreme Court Rules Beef Checkoff
Constitutional 4
Beef Cattle Reproduction Management School 5
Arncultural Research Published b\ UF IFAS
Ranks Among Top 211 Institutions
\\brld\\ ide
4-H Leader \\elcomcs Ne\\ Challenges as
C'attle\\omens Association President 7


2005 Beef Cattle Short Course Allied Industry Trade "li. *
and Reception, Hilton UF Conference Center, Gainesville, FL -
May 4, 2005


.UNIVERSITY OF i

FTLORISrDA inr

IFAS EXTENSION

SeJune 2005.
June 2005


-N


^ /1Itj Dates to Remember


June
1 Ajea F Hoise Sho\\ lhanum. FL
2-3 Livestock/Forages Extension In-Service Training -
Gainesville. FL
S-10 2''i(5 L:uee iAunul Entetienc; Rescue Ga:mie- die.
FL
14-17 FCA & FCW Animal Convention & Allied Trade
Show Marco Island, FL
17 State 4-H Hoise E ents- Guinesm ile FL
18 3" Annual Tri-State Farm Field Day Sloconib. AL
23-25 4-H Ho: & Ham Ga:uness die. FL

July
7-9 State 4-H Hoijc Sihoi Tanip:. FL
8 8' Annual Hma Field Day Alaclua, FL
9 Nlea Goal Tianulnie Couise iPitll 1 o' 5i Quincll \. FL
12-15 National County Agent Convention Orlando, FL
21 Santa Rosa Counnt Fauin Tou Milton. FL
23 2005 Referring Veterinarian Appreciation Day -
Gainesville, FL
25-2') Siale I-H CouiJress Ganes\ ille FL
30 Meat Goat Training Course (Part 2 of 5) Quincv. FL


The Institute ofFood andAgricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity -Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension pubhcations, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.








0


Beef Management
Calendar


June
0 Last date for planting sorghum.
0 Check mineral feeder, use at least 8% phosphorus
in mineral and not over 2 12 to 1 calcium to
phosphorus ratio.
0 Check pastures and hay field for spittlebugs, mole
crickets, and army worms.
0 Treat pastures if necessary; best month for mole
cricket control.
0 Check dustbags.
0 Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat.
0 Utilize available veterinary services and diagnostic
laboratories.
0 Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already
done.
0 Pregnancy check cows.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Make first cutting of hay.
0 Put bulls out June 1 for calves starting March 11.
0 Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
stimulant.

July
0 Cut corn silage.
0 Control weeds in summer pastures.
0 Apply nitrogen to warm season pastures, if needed.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check pastures for army worms and mole crickets,
and treat if necessary.
0 Wean calves and cull cow from herd.
0 Watch for evidence offootrot and treat.
0 Consider preconditioning calves before sale including
vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3
weeks before sale.
0 Check dustbags.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Revaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.

August
0 Treat for liver flukes as close to August 15th as
possible, if they are in your area.


0 Cuthay.
0 Apply lime for fall and winter crops.
0 HarvestBahiagrass seed.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Update market information and marketing plans.
0 Check for army worms, spittlebugs, and mole
crickets, and treat if necessary.
0 Check dustbags.
0 Wean calves and cull cow from herd.
0 Watch for evidence of abortions.
0 Observe animals regularly for signs of disease.
0 If cattle grubs were found on cattle last winter or
heel flies were observed in the pasture, treat for cattle
grubs this month.
0 Pregnancy test and cull open heifers from replacement
herd.





.:, .- "



Success for the Fifty-fourth
Annual Beef Cattle Short Course

The 54th Annual Beef Cattle Short Course at the
University of Florida continued the long tradition of an
excellent educational program. This year's theme
Maintaining Quality Production in a Dynamic Market
Place attracted over 400 participants to the BCSC this
year. Overviews of the beef market and beeftrade issues
started the Wednesday program. Total Quality
Management and meeting consumer demands were also
addressed on Wednesday afternoon. A surprise visit by
Jim McAdams, NCBA president was a special treat.
On Thursday, the quality production theme was
continued, addressing the effects of genetics, nutrition,
and health on Florida cattle production. Despite record
rainfall, the outdoor activities on Thursday afternoon and
evening educated and entertained the large crowd with
demonstrations of cattle handling with horses and dogs.
Pasture management was the topic for Friday morning,
the large audience heard about fertilization and pH issues
affecting Florida pastures. Break-out sessions for Florida
geographic regions continued the informative discussions.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







The BCSC target audience consists of beef cattle
producers and managers who are interested in increasing
net profits and a producing quality beef product and
willing to make management changes to do so. Profitable
production, processing, and utilization of cattle without
endangering the resources at their disposal is paramount
to the BCSC participant.


Matt Hersom
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 392-2390
UF/IFAS, Department of Animal
Sciences
Gainesville, FL
Release May 23, 2005


Youth "Seize the
Moment" at NJSA
National Youth
Leadership
Conference


The nation's top youth swine leaders gathered to
discuss ideas and challenge themselves to "Seize the
Moment" at the 2005 NJSANational Youth Leadership
Conference, held April 29-May 1 in Champaign, IL.
More than 90 young leaders from 19 states were inspired
by keynote speaker Andrew McCrea ofMarysville, Mo.
- a farmer, rancher and award-winning syndicated radio
broadcaster. He encouraged participants to push
themselves beyond their comfort zones, develop their
roots and grow as leaders.
"To get a sense of direction, we have to dig deep
in our own lives," McCrea challenged participants.
A variety of swine industry leaders provided insight
and motivation for NJSA members. Dick Jurgens,
president of United Producers Inc. in Towanda, IL,
educated youth on the National Animal Identification
System. A panel consisting of Dr. Tom Carr, University
of Illinois animal sciences professor of Champaign, IL;
James Altemus, Meadowbrook Farms vice president of
marketing and communications ofBelleville, IL; and Curt
Zehr of Zehr Farms of Washington, IL; discussed


SOURCE:


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


answering consumers' demands on pork quality. And
nationally renowned livestockjudges Grant Grebner of
Washburn, IL, Brian Hines of Quincy, Mich., and Andy
Rash ofKewanee, IL, put youth in the judges' shoes
during an interactive judging ethics discussion.
In addition, three former NJSA board members -
Jesse Heimer, U.S. Wellness Meats sales associate and
office manager of Taylor, Mo.; Daniel Hendrickson,
owner ofHoosier State Semen Supply of Farmland, Ind.;
and Molly McCormick, St. Elizabeth's School ofNursing
student of Lafayette, Ind. discussed where they are
now, and how the lessons learned in NJSA still play a
part in their daily lives.
Youth also chose from a variety of breakout
workshops during the event. Doug Hankes, owner of
www.showtowin.com of Galesburg, IL, gave pointers
on how to begin a successful business from an idea in
"Scratchpad to Success." NJSA Secretary Sara Houret
of LaGrange, CA, educated participants on the new
NJSA mentoring program, MVP, or Mentoring Values
People. NJSA Vice President Hope Ballman of
Leitchfield, KY, and NJSA Director Zach Brockhaus of
Tuttle, OK, helped prepare participants for the demands
of higher education in "Getting Ready for College." And
youth learned to discover their talents in "Utilizing Your
TILT Talents in Life Training," presented by NJSA
Director Wravenna Phipps ofKearney, NE.
For many participants, a highlight of the event was
touring Hi Point Swine Genetics Inc. of Chrisman, IL,
the University of Illinois Meats Lab in Champaign, IL,
and Prairie State Semen Inc. of Champaign, IL.
The 2005 NJSA National Youth Leadership
Conference was sponsored by the National Swine
Registry, the National Pork Board, Kent Feeds, Intervet,
Truline Genetics, Case IH, Tabco Business Forms Inc.,
Ag Star Financial Services, ADM Alliance Nutrition Inc.,
Indiana Yorkshire Breeders, Hi Point Genetics Inc.,
Prairie State Semen Inc., AKEY Feeds and the
University of Illinois Animal Sciences Department.
Plans are underway for the 2006 NJSA National
Youth Leadership Conference. For more information,
contact Jennifer Shike, NSRDirector of Junior Activities,
at (765) 463-3594, or log onto www.nationalswine.com.








SOURCE: Jennifer Shike
National Swine Registry
West Lafayette, IN
Email: Jennifer@nationalswine.com
Phone: (765) 463-3594
Release May 2, 2005




8th Annual Hay Field Day

July 8, 2005

Boston Farm Santa Fe River Ranch Beef Unit
Alachua, FL


Pasture Establishment
Pasture Renovation
Pests and Weeds Control
+ Tropical Soda Apple
AnhydrousAmmonia
Hay Field Equipment


Directions: Exit I-75 at Exit 404, turn east on 236
for 3 miles to 241, turn north on 241 for 3 miles. The
Boston-Santa Fe River Ranch Beef Unit is on the right,
before the river.


Cindy Sanders
Email: cbsanders@ifas.ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 955-2402
Alachua County Extension
Gainesville, FL
Release May 17, 2005


F,'* aN. E-XlEN1I 'Y 01-
- FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION


Supreme Court Rules
Beef Checkoff
Constitutional

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Beef
Checkoff Program is constitutional, thus allowing the
program's demand-building efforts to continue. The
decision overturns a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Eighth Circuit that found the federal Beef
Promotion and Research Act in violation of the First
Amendment. The checkoff has helped grow consumer
demand for beef more than 25 percent since 1998 and
has increased the prices that producers receive for their
cattle.
"We are elated," said Jim McAdams, an Adkins,
Texas, cattleman and president of the National
Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA). "Throughout the
lengthy litigation process, we believed in the merits of
our case and the merits of the beef checkoff." He said,
"We anticipated a positive decision. This is a victory for
all producers who want demand-building efforts in beef
safety, nutrition and promotion continued."
Cattlemen have supported a checkoff assessment
since 1922. January 2005 independent research indicates
that a significant 73 percent ofbeef producers support
the current $1-per-head beef checkoff program. Upon
the Supreme Court's acceptance of the beef checkoff
case in May 2004, an overwhelming 113 state and
national beef industry and general agriculture
organizations signed a friend-of-the-court amicus brief
in support of the beef checkoff. The brief was also signed
by attorneys general from 35 states and Puerto Rico
and the chairmen of both the U. S. House and Senate
Agriculture Committees.
Myron Williams, a Wall, S.D., cattleman and
chairman of the Federation of State Beef Councils
Division of NCBA said, "It's clear that a majority of
cattlemen and agricultural groups recognize that checkoff
programs are good for local beef industries and
economies." He said, "Cattle-Fax estimates that the beef
demand gain injust the past seven years has added about
$250 per head to the value of fed cattle and $200 per
head to the value of calves. Consumers are willing to
pay more for the high-quality beef we are producing."
The beef checkoff has stimulated the development


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


4


U
U
U

U
U


SOURCE:








SOURCE: Jennifer Shike
National Swine Registry
West Lafayette, IN
Email: Jennifer@nationalswine.com
Phone: (765) 463-3594
Release May 2, 2005




8th Annual Hay Field Day

July 8, 2005

Boston Farm Santa Fe River Ranch Beef Unit
Alachua, FL


Pasture Establishment
Pasture Renovation
Pests and Weeds Control
+ Tropical Soda Apple
AnhydrousAmmonia
Hay Field Equipment


Directions: Exit I-75 at Exit 404, turn east on 236
for 3 miles to 241, turn north on 241 for 3 miles. The
Boston-Santa Fe River Ranch Beef Unit is on the right,
before the river.


Cindy Sanders
Email: cbsanders@ifas.ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 955-2402
Alachua County Extension
Gainesville, FL
Release May 17, 2005


F,'* aN. E-XlEN1I 'Y 01-
- FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION


Supreme Court Rules
Beef Checkoff
Constitutional

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that the Beef
Checkoff Program is constitutional, thus allowing the
program's demand-building efforts to continue. The
decision overturns a ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Eighth Circuit that found the federal Beef
Promotion and Research Act in violation of the First
Amendment. The checkoff has helped grow consumer
demand for beef more than 25 percent since 1998 and
has increased the prices that producers receive for their
cattle.
"We are elated," said Jim McAdams, an Adkins,
Texas, cattleman and president of the National
Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA). "Throughout the
lengthy litigation process, we believed in the merits of
our case and the merits of the beef checkoff." He said,
"We anticipated a positive decision. This is a victory for
all producers who want demand-building efforts in beef
safety, nutrition and promotion continued."
Cattlemen have supported a checkoff assessment
since 1922. January 2005 independent research indicates
that a significant 73 percent ofbeef producers support
the current $1-per-head beef checkoff program. Upon
the Supreme Court's acceptance of the beef checkoff
case in May 2004, an overwhelming 113 state and
national beef industry and general agriculture
organizations signed a friend-of-the-court amicus brief
in support of the beef checkoff. The brief was also signed
by attorneys general from 35 states and Puerto Rico
and the chairmen of both the U. S. House and Senate
Agriculture Committees.
Myron Williams, a Wall, S.D., cattleman and
chairman of the Federation of State Beef Councils
Division of NCBA said, "It's clear that a majority of
cattlemen and agricultural groups recognize that checkoff
programs are good for local beef industries and
economies." He said, "Cattle-Fax estimates that the beef
demand gain injust the past seven years has added about
$250 per head to the value of fed cattle and $200 per
head to the value of calves. Consumers are willing to
pay more for the high-quality beef we are producing."
The beef checkoff has stimulated the development


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


4


U
U
U

U
U


SOURCE:








of more than 2,100 new beef products since 1998.
Advertising tracking research indicates that the checkoff
is improving consumer attitudes about beef s nutritional
value. And, the checkoff s organized and proactive public
response to a single case of BSE diagnosed in the U. S.
has been credited with maintaining the high level of
consumer confidence in the safety ofU.S. beef.
Williams continued, "State beef councils and their
Federation a division ofNCBA are committed to
protecting the brand equity built in the "Beef It's What's
For Dinner."' campaign."

"It is time now for industry groups to put aside
their differences and move forward together," concluded
McAdams.

SOURCE: Joe Schuele
Email: j schuele@beef.org
Phone: (303) 850-3360
Sharyl Sauer
Email: ssauer@beef.org
Phone: (303) 850-3359
NCBA, Centennial, CO
Release May 23, 2005


Beef Cattle Reproduction
Management School

August 1-4, 2005

Deseret Ranch
Deer Park, Florida


Tuesday, August 2


AM
8:00

PM
12:00
1:00
1:30
2:30
2:45
3:30
4:15
5:00


Lab Session at Cow Pens


Lunch
Genetic Mgmt. for Efficient Reproduction
Heifer Development
Break
Coping with Calving Problems
Bull Breeding Soundness Exam
Live Animal Demo of Breeding Soundness Exam
Adjourn


Wednesday, August 3
AM
8:00 Lab Session at Cow Pens


PM
12:00
1:00
1:45
3:00
3:15
3:45
5:00


Lunch
Repro Implications ofBody Condition
Nutrition for Reproduction
Break
Breeding Season Management
Body Condition Problem
Adjourn


Thursday, August 4


AM
8:00
10:00
10:30
11:30
12:00


Lab Session at Cow Pens
Bull Selection & Use of Performance Records
Estrus Synchronization & Heat Detection
Review & Exam
Lunch & Adjourn


Tentative Schedule SPONSORED BY:


Registration
Welcome
Reproduction Basics
Break
Health Mgt.- Vaccinations Program
Pregnancy Testing Video
Reproductive Tract Lab
Adjourn


Central Florida Livestock Agents Group (CFLAG) -
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service
TO REGISTER FOR THIS EVENT CONTACT
YOUR LOCAL AGENT
SIGN-UP IS ON A FIRST-COME BASIS -
COST: $175

* Sumter (352) 793-2728
* Marion (352) 620-3440
* Brevard (321) 633-1702
* Lake (352) 343-4101


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


Monday, August 1


PM
1:00
1:30
1:35
3:00
3:15
4:00
4:30
5:00








* Seminole/Orange (407) 836-7570
* Volusia (386) 822-5778
* Polk (863) 519-8677
* Osceola (321) 697-3000


SOURCE:


Mark Shuffitt
Email: JMSH@ifas.ufl.edu
Phone: (352) 620-3440
Marion County Extension
Ocala, FL
Release May 18, 2005


,, 1. IN[' E KL: ITY OF
*'FLOR IDA
IFAS EXTENSION




Agricultural Research Published
by UF/IFAS Ranks Among Top
20 Institutions Worldwide

In a decade-long tally on agricultural research
published by universities and government agencies, the
University of Florida is among the top 20 institutions
worldwide.
The listing appears in the bimonthly update from
Essential Science Indicators, which measured the number
of agricultural scientific papers published in recognized
journals from June 1994 to June 2004. The universities
and government agencies in the top 20 are out of a pool
of 298 institutions worldwide that published the top one
percent of all agricultural scientific papers during the 10-
year period.
The statistical listings in Essential Science
Indicators, compiled by Thomson Scientific in
Philadelphia, Pa., measure the performance of
researchers in the agricultural sciences and 21 other
scientific fields.
"Covering a multidisciplinary selection of 8,700
scientific journals from around the world, this in-depth
analytical tool offers data for ranking scientists,
institutions, countries andj oumals," saidNancy Bayers,
manager of the research services group at Thomson
Scientific. "Our goal is to increase the impact of research


by empowering researchers to accelerate discovery."
Richard Jones, dean for research at UF's Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, or UF/IFAS, said
universities arejudged according to the amount of their
agricultural research that is published in recognized, peer-
reviewed scientific oumals or cited by authors of other
scientific papers. UF/IFAS is one of two universities in
the South to make the top 10 ranking.
"This is an important measure of our success, and
we are pleased that our statewide research programs
rank among the best in the nation and the world, which
points to the quality of our faculty and their outstanding
work," Jones said.
Jones said UF/IFAS faculty published 1,195 scientific
papers that were cited 5,601 times by authors of other
scientific articles during the 10-year period. The
agricultural sciences category includes general
agriculture, agricultural chemistry and agronomy. The
published research findings cover topics ranging from
agricultural engineering and horticulture to microbiology
and food science.
Not surprisingly, researchers at the U.S.
Department of Agriculture were first in the rankings,
publishing 6,498 papers in scientific oumals that were
cited 38,877 times during the 10-year period.
France's Institut National de la Recherche
Agronomique filled the No. 2 slot, with 3,041 published
papers that were cited in 21,070 times. Scientists at
Wageningen University in the Netherlands came in third,
publishing 2,214 papers that were cited 13,996 times.
University of California atDavis came in fourth, publishing
1,668 papers that were cited 12,889 times. Spain's
Consej o Superior de Investigaciones rounded out the
top five with 2,213 papers that were cited a total of
12,224 times.
In national rankings with other U.S. public
universities, UF/IFAS scientists ranked first in the
horticultural sciences and forest resource and wildlife
sciences categories. In animal science category, UF/IFAS
ranked third in the nation, after the University of
Wisconsin and the University of Illinois.
"Considering the fact that we are competing with
agricultural researchers in many nations, UF/IFAS
scientists can be proud of our strong standing, which


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


6





7


indicates that our faculty and research programs are truly
world-class," said Jimmy Cheek, UF senior vice
president for agriculture and natural resources. "Of
course, there is always room for improvement, and we
look forward to even greater research achievements from
our outstanding faculty working in more than two dozen
different disciplines."

With than 38,000 worldwide employees, The
Thomson Corp. is a recognized leader in providing access
to high-value, essential information for researchers and
scholars worldwide for more than 45 years. The firm
provides value-added information to more than 20 million
users in scientific research, higher education and other
fields.

SOURCE: Jimmy Cheek
Phone: (352) 392-1971
Richard Jones
Phone: (352) 392-1784
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL
Nancy Bayers
Phone: (800) 336-4474
Thomson Scientific
By: Chuck Woods
Phone: (352) 392-1773 x 281
Release May 4, 2005



4-H Leader Welcomes New
Challenges as Cattlewomen's
Association President

As a 4-H leader, Marlene Strickland helped build
a program so popular there's a waiting list to join -
now she hopes to bring similar results to the nation's
largest beef industry organization for women.
In February, Strickland took office as president of
American National CattleWomen Inc. (ANCW), a
national, nonprofit group of about 2,000 women involved
in ranching and related agribusiness. She will guide the
organization for one year, and plans to boost membership
using what she's learned during three decades leading a
Sarasota 4-H club with her husband, Don. The two are
business owners and part-time ranchers.
"My 4-H experiences have given me ideas, hopes,


goals and training, which assisted me in reaching this
level in the beef industry," she said.

The Stricklands lead the Ridin' Rednecks, a
Sarasota 4-H club that boasts about 55 members, so
many that newcomers are admitted only when previous
members depart, she said. Like all clubs in the Florida
4-H Youth Development Program, it's administered by
the University of Florida's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences. The Stricklands became 4-H
leaders in 1975, because their daughters were involved
in the club.

Though their children have long since grown up -
4-H membership is open to youth ages 8 to 18 the
Stricklands enjoy the work so much that they've stayed
on. For Marlene, running the club was invaluable
preparation for her new role.
"Planning meetings, agendas, trips, assigning
committees, raising funds, recognizing achievement, these


Marlene Strickland, president ofAmerican National
Cattle Women Inc., poses with two ofher family's angus beef
cattle at her home in Sarasota May 4, 2005. The nation's
largest beef industry 111,,1, -,l,. ,,for women, ANCW
encourages women in agribusiness. Strickland said she
gained experience for the position from her 30 years as a
volunteer with the Florida 4-H Youth Development
Program, which is administered statewide by the University
ofFlorida's Institute ofFood andAgricultural Sciences.
(Photo by Josh Wickham/University ofFlorida/IFAS)


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


are all goals which should be common to any
organization," she said. "And through 4-H I was able to
meet many people in livestock, agriculture and the
legislative arena."

One of the most important lessons Strickland took
from 4-H was that organizations stay strong by reaching
out to members, she said. This spring, she's putting the
concept into practice by crisscrossing the nation to visit
ANCW members in Washington state, Washington,
D.C., Oklahoma, Arizona, Alabama, Colorado and
North Dakota.
"I have been revitalized by visiting all these states
and seeing where our members live, getting a glimpse of
their lifestyles and problems, and getting their feedback,"
she said.
Part of the reason for Strickland's hectic travel
schedule is that her presidency coincides with an effort
by ANCW to determine how the organization can best
help its members keep pace with the industry, she said.
Founded in 1952, ANCW has witnessed, and
encouraged, expansion of the opportunities available to
women in agribusiness. Consumer education and beef
promotion are the backbone of ANCW' s public outreach
efforts, Strickland said. The group's best-known projects
are the National Beef Cook-Off recipe contest and the
National Beef Ambassador Program, a public speaking
competition for teenagers.
ANCW boasts 26 affiliate organizations, including
Florida CattleWomen, a statewide group Strickland
joined in 1987. Though she grew up on large commercial
cattle ranches in Florida and Arizona, as an adult
Strickland has raised cattle largely as a hobby. Marlene
and Don Strickland operate an electrical contracting
business, Land Electric, but began keeping a few head
of angus beef cattle at their family farm in 1970 because
they wanted their children to enjoy the educational
opportunities ranching brings.
"My family background and membership in Florida
CattleWomen taught me about the cattle business in
Florida," Marlene Strickland said. "We have continued
raising cattle because it helps us stay abreast of
everything happening in the industry, like inoculation and
marketing, and we can teach our 4-H kids what we
learn."


Strickland's involvement in the beef industry at a
national level began via Florida CattleWomen and the
ANCW National Beef Ambassador Program, she said.
In 1991, Florida CattleWomen asked her to help a
Florida youth compete in the ambassador program's
national finals and Strickland found the program to be
an ideal way to help teens develop self- confidence and
leadership skills. In the mid-1990s she was twice elected
president of Florida CattleWomen, which enabled her
to attend national ANCW meetings, where she learned
more about the program and began promoting it more in
Florida.
In 1999, Strickland began serving on a national
committee for the ambassador program, and also became
a regional director for ANCW. In 2003, she was elected
ANCW vice president and the following year was
selected president-elect at the ANCW national
convention in Phoenix.
Despite her responsibilities with ANCW, Strickland
spends as much time as ever with the Ridin' Rednecks,
said Marcia Morris, a UF extension agent working for
the Sarasota County 4-H program. The two have been
acquainted for five years.

"Marlene hasn't slowed down one bit," Morris
said. "She's also very involved with her family, her
business and her church. She does so much, it's almost
like she has a twin."
Strickland says her leadership philosophy can be
summed up in a phrase she uses as the theme for her
ANCW presidency, "spread a little sunshine, each one
reach one." She believes communication and cooperation
are crucial to any organization's success, and sees 4-H
promoting those values within families.
"4-H provides entertainment, education and
something where a family can work together and see
progress," she said. "In 4-H, winning is nice but it isn't
everything. Participation is more important."


SOURCE:


Marlene Strickland
Phone: (941) 371-1771
Marcia Morris
Phone: (941) 861-9814
By: Tom Nordlie
Phone: (352) 392-1773
Release May 4, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml




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