• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 UF/IFAS and FAMU create website...
 New UF/IFAS study shows double-digit...
 Protecting livestock during...
 Where to invest profits
 Johanns announces model food security...
 The Black Stallion Literacy...
 USDA plans to ease restrictions...
 Two more positive BSE tests in...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. May 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00005
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. May 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: May 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00005
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    UF/IFAS and FAMU create website to help small farmers
        Page 2
    New UF/IFAS study shows double-digit increases for most Florida farmland values
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Protecting livestock during a hurricane
        Page 5
    Where to invest profits
        Page 6
    Johanns announces model food security plans for federal establishment
        Page 6
    The Black Stallion Literacy Project
        Page 7
    USDA plans to ease restrictions on slaughter of downer cattle
        Page 8
    Two more positive BSE tests in Japan
        Page 8
Full Text





^.UNIVERSITY OF l(
'rFLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION I I sll ,-
i.a iarsl

May2005


In This Issue...
Beef Nlananeement Calendar ........................................
liF IFAS and F.ANII_ Create \\'esite to Help Small
Farm eir ...................................... ................
Ne\x IF IFA-S Studl\ Slio\\ Double-Diult Increases
foir ost Florida Farmlanld V'lues .........................
Protecting L i stock During a Hurnicane..................... 5
\\here to In\ est P ofit .................................... ........ 6
Johlnns Announces Model Food SecuntI, Plans for
Federal E stablisl ents ........................................... 6
The Black Stallion Liteac', Project................................


LUSDA Plans to Ease Restrictions on Slauulliter of
D o\\ ner C battle ................................... ..............


T\\o More Positi\e BSE Test i Japan ......................... 8


Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

*o J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
Beef Cattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
+ G.R. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
+ F.G. Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
+ M.J. Hersom
Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Houser
Extension Meat Specialist, Gainesville
+ E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
+ R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
+ W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/1. .. Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
Beef Cattle Nutrition, Gainesville


N


Dates to Remember


May


4-5
10
17
21
26
29


54'1' -iiii; il LLI. ';I IL Slim C(oII'c ;ainesi I ll FL
Horse Management Workshop Gaincsville, FL
FoiLiuc Beef H\\oikshol lnuinoi;lee. FL
Heart of Florida Club Calf Sale Alaclma, FL
Coni Silue Field Dau C'li:. FL
Area F Horse Show Miami. FL


June

1 Areai I Horse slio%. Rli;ini. -L
2-3 1 ivcsloclk/FoTagcus Fxlcnsioni In-Scunicc Triiiniig -
Gaimcsvilc, FL
8-10 )P_-,' Lnrce Aiiiini;iI Ei.ieiueiei\ Res.ue W( liiies\ ille.
FI
14-17 FCA & FCW Annual Comncntion & Allied Trade Show
Marco Island. FL
17 Simn, 4-H Hoi.m. Fi clirs (ii inc' ilkl Fl
18 3'1 Annual Tri-Statc Farm Field Day Sloconib, AL
23-2. 1-H Hoe & Hnni (jan1es\ ille. I- L


The Institute of Food andAgricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.


r


^\





2


0


Beef Management
Calendar


May
0 Remove bulls.
0 Harvest hay from cool season crops.
0 Plant warm season perennial pastures.
0 Fertilize warm season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for spittlebugs and treat if necessary.
0 Apply spot-on agents for grub and louse control.
[ Check dust bags.
0 Vaccinate and implant with growth stimulant any later
calves.
0 Reimplant calves with growth stimulant at 90-120
days, when you have herd penned.
0 Dispose of dead animals properly.
0 Update market information and refine marketing
plans.
0 Remove bulls May 21 to end calving season March
1.

June
0 Last date forplanting sorghum.
0 Check mineral feeder, use at least 8% phosphorus
in mineral an not over 2 12 to 1 calcium to
phosphorus ratio.
0 Check pastures and hay field for spittlebugs, mole
crickets, and army worms.
0 Treat if necessary; best month for mole cricket
control.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat.
0 Utilize available veterinary services and diagnostic
laboratories.
0 Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already
done.
0 Pregnancy check cows.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Make first cutting ofhay.
0 Put bulls out June 1 for calves starting March 11.
0 Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
stimulant.


July
R Cut corn silage.
0 Control weeds in summer pastures.
0 Apply nitrogen to warm season pastures, if needed.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for army worms and mole crickets, and treat
ifnecessary.
0 Wean calves and cull cow herd.
0 Watch for evidence offootrot and treat.
0 Consider preconditioning calves before sale including
vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3
weeks before sale.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Revaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.



L Lr.MVERSY OF UF/IFAS and FAMU
SFLORIDA Create Website to
IFAS Help Small Farmers

Small farmers in Florida face a variety of issues
and challenges and with less resources available to them
than larger farms, they can be at a competitive
disadvantage. With small farms representing over 90%
of farms in Florida, ensuring their success is vital to the
agriculture industry in the state. That's why UF/IFAS
and FAMU have created a website (http://
smallfarms.ifas.ufl.edu) that specifically addresses the
needs of small farmers.
"The website was developed to make small farm
information accessible in one location," said Bob
Hochmuth, the Multi-County Agent at the UF/IFAS
North Florida Research and Education Center in
Suwannee Valley. "Small farmers may be seeking
information on getting started in farming or considering
one of many alternative enterprises and it is all pulled
together in one site to make the search easy."
The website provides links and other resources for
small farmers including, how to get started, enterprise
budgeting, business planning, financing grants, and much
more. Farmers using the site can select topics on
enterprises of special interest to them, including
aquaculture, cut flowers, livestock, and organic farming.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr





2


0


Beef Management
Calendar


May
0 Remove bulls.
0 Harvest hay from cool season crops.
0 Plant warm season perennial pastures.
0 Fertilize warm season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for spittlebugs and treat if necessary.
0 Apply spot-on agents for grub and louse control.
[ Check dust bags.
0 Vaccinate and implant with growth stimulant any later
calves.
0 Reimplant calves with growth stimulant at 90-120
days, when you have herd penned.
0 Dispose of dead animals properly.
0 Update market information and refine marketing
plans.
0 Remove bulls May 21 to end calving season March
1.

June
0 Last date forplanting sorghum.
0 Check mineral feeder, use at least 8% phosphorus
in mineral an not over 2 12 to 1 calcium to
phosphorus ratio.
0 Check pastures and hay field for spittlebugs, mole
crickets, and army worms.
0 Treat if necessary; best month for mole cricket
control.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat.
0 Utilize available veterinary services and diagnostic
laboratories.
0 Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already
done.
0 Pregnancy check cows.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Make first cutting ofhay.
0 Put bulls out June 1 for calves starting March 11.
0 Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
stimulant.


July
R Cut corn silage.
0 Control weeds in summer pastures.
0 Apply nitrogen to warm season pastures, if needed.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for army worms and mole crickets, and treat
ifnecessary.
0 Wean calves and cull cow herd.
0 Watch for evidence offootrot and treat.
0 Consider preconditioning calves before sale including
vaccination for shipping fever and IBR at least 3
weeks before sale.
0 Check dust bags.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Revaccinate calves at weaning for blackleg.



L Lr.MVERSY OF UF/IFAS and FAMU
SFLORIDA Create Website to
IFAS Help Small Farmers

Small farmers in Florida face a variety of issues
and challenges and with less resources available to them
than larger farms, they can be at a competitive
disadvantage. With small farms representing over 90%
of farms in Florida, ensuring their success is vital to the
agriculture industry in the state. That's why UF/IFAS
and FAMU have created a website (http://
smallfarms.ifas.ufl.edu) that specifically addresses the
needs of small farmers.
"The website was developed to make small farm
information accessible in one location," said Bob
Hochmuth, the Multi-County Agent at the UF/IFAS
North Florida Research and Education Center in
Suwannee Valley. "Small farmers may be seeking
information on getting started in farming or considering
one of many alternative enterprises and it is all pulled
together in one site to make the search easy."
The website provides links and other resources for
small farmers including, how to get started, enterprise
budgeting, business planning, financing grants, and much
more. Farmers using the site can select topics on
enterprises of special interest to them, including
aquaculture, cut flowers, livestock, and organic farming.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr





3


Each topic includes information on production, marketing,
and economics as well as other appropriate links.

"What a fabulous resource," said Betty O'Toole,
owner of O'Toole's Herb Farm in Madison, Fla. "Jim
and I have found that the IFAS small farmwebpagehas
become an invaluable tool for our business. The site is
jammed packed with useful information, quick and user
friendly, even for the computer novices as we are."

Input from small farmers and allied organizations,
identifying issues critical to small farmers, such as access
to profitable markets, business skills development,
accessible technical information, and alternative crops
and enterprises, was used to help design the site.

Input from counties throughout Florida identified
the need for small farm educational programs to be
developed. The small farm website provides information
that farmers can employ to address these issues and
become more efficient in their business.

SOURCE: Yasmin Wallas, Information Specialist
Email: YWallas@ifas.ufl.edu
Phone: (850) 875-7112
UF/IFAS, North Florida REC-Quincy
Quincy, FL
Release April 15, 2005



New UF/IFAS Study Shows
Double-Digit Increases for Most
Florida Farmland Values

The value of agricultural land continued to increase
in all areas of the state last year, buoyed by a population
boom and strong nonagricultural demand for land,
according to a new University of Florida survey.

"Following recent trends, the market for agricultural
land was very active this past year, and the rate of increase
in land values was particularly high in the southern regions
of the state," said John Reynolds, a professor emeritus
with UF's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
"In most land-value categories, we recorded double-
digit increases."

He said the most prominent changes occurred in


John Reynolds, a
professor emeritus with
the University of
Florida's Institute of
Food and Agricultural
Sciences, initiated his
annual agricultural
land values survey in
1985. He says a
population boom and
strong nonagricultural
demand for land
continues to push land
values higher everyyear.
(UF/IFAS photo by Josh
Wickham)


South Florida where the value of cropland increased by
58 percent and pastureland values jumped by 76 percent.
The largest increases were in the Indian River area,
Okeechobee County and the Gulf Coast counties.


Cropland and pastureland in other regions also
experienced substantial increases: 19 to 25 percent in
the central region of the state, 10 to 19 percent in the
northwest region and 9 to 15 percent in the northeast
region.

Although citrus groves did not increase in value as
much as cropland and pasture, the value of orange groves
in the south region increased by 10 percent and 12
percent in the central region. The value of grapefruit
groves increased 34 percent in the south region and 15
percent in the central region. The value of land with 5-
to 7-year-old citrus plantings increased about 9 percent
in the south and central regions.

The average value of orange groves in the south
region was $6,540 per acre, about $130 per acre higher
than in the central region. The estimated value of
grapefruit groves increased to $5,264 per acre in the
south region, about $746 per acre higher than in the
central region. The average value of land with 5- to 7-
year-old citrus groves was $5,920 per acre in the south
region, about $580 per acre higher than in the central
region.

Reynolds' 2004 land value survey, which measures
changes over the past year, divides the state into five
regions: south, southeast, central, northeast and
northwest. Because of the impact urbanization has on


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


agricultural land values, Reynolds collects data for the
southeast region, including Miami-Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
He also measures the value of transition land -
acreage being converted or likely to be converted to
nonagricultural sites for homes, subdivisions and
commercial uses. Counties were divided into metropolitan
and non- metropolitan counties, and transition land values
were estimated for each region.
The value of transition land within five miles of a
major town in metropolitan counties increased by 7 to
13 percent in northern regions of the state and by 6 to
52 percent in southern regions. In dollar amounts, the
value of transition land in metro counties ranged from
$14,082 to $24,983 per acre, except in the southeast
region of the state where transition land values were
$62,500 per acre.
The value of transition land more than five miles
from a major town in metro counties ranged from $7,950
to $14,352 per acre, except in the southeast where the
value was $36,250 per acre.
In non-metro counties, the value of transition land
within five miles ofa major town ranged from $4,793 to
$6,778 per acre. Transition land more than five miles
from a major town ranged from $3,921 to $5,446 per
acre.
For the 2004 study, six counties were reclassified.
Reynolds said the changes in the northwest include
moving Jefferson and Wakulla counties into the
Tallahassee metropolitan statistical area (MSA), which
is a federal designation for urban or urbanizing areas. In
the northeast region, Gilchrist County was moved into
the Gainesville MSA, and Flagler County was removed
from adjacent MSA counties. In the southern region,
Indian River County was designated as the Vero Beach
MSA.
"It is important to emphasize that the value of a
specific tract of land may vary substantially from the
survey estimates because of the physical characteristics
of the tract, its location and the economic or institutional
factors that restrict its use," Reynolds said. "The survey
measured land values up to May 2004, and it does not
include any changes in land values that may have
occurred after last year's hurricane season."


The 2004 Florida Agricultural Land Value Survey
also shows:
* Last year, the value of cropland and pastureland
in the south region increased from $1,100 to $1,400
per acre. The value of improved pasture was higher in
the central region than in other regions. The lowest
agricultural land values were reported in the northwest
region, ranging from $1,450 per acre for unimproved
pasture to $2,193 per acre for irrigated cropland.
* The value of irrigated cropland was $3,901 per
acre in the south region, $3,709 in the central region,
and $3,428 in the northeast region. The value of non-
irrigated cropland was $3,237 in the central region,
$2,657 in the northeast region and $1,983 in the
northwest region.
* The value of improved pasture ranged from
$3,608 per acre in the central region to $1,783 per acre
in the northwest region. The value of unimproved
pasture ranged from $2,605 per acre in the south region
to $1,451 in the northwest region.
* The value of farm woods increased by 18
percent in the northwest region of the state and by 16
percent in the northeast region.
Survey respondents were asked if they expect
agricultural land values to be higher, lower or remain
unchanged during the next 12 months. Eighty-five percent
of the respondents in northern areas and 67 percent of
the respondents in south region expect land values to
increase during the next year. Only 2 percent expect
lower land values during the next 12 months.
Respondents in the southeast region said that they expect
land values to increase by 30 percent, primarily because
of strong urban demands.
The annual food and resource economics
department survey, which Reynolds started in 1985, was
compiled from information provided by 190 respondents
from around the state. Respondents included property
appraisers, farm lenders, real estate brokers, farm
managers, land investors, federal farm- assistance and
conservation staff, UF/IFAS extension agents, and
others who develop and maintain information about rural
land values.
More details on the survey, "Nonagricultural
Demand Causes Agricultural Land Values to Increase"


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr







(FE 545), are available on the UF/IFAS
Electronic Data Information Source (EDIS)
Web site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/.


SOURCE: John Reynolds, Professor Emeritus
Phone: (352) 378-8966
Email: JohnR@nrpsforesters.com

By: Chuck Woods
Phone: (352) 392-1773, Ext. 281
UF/IFAS News
Gainesville, FL
Release April 4, 2005


Protecting
Livestock During a
Hurricane

As we all nervously take
part in the countdown to June 1
which is the official start date of the 2005 Hurricane
Season, now is the time to begin our hurricane
preparation. This seems unfair as many of us are still
attempting to clean and rebuild from the 2004 season,
but nature doesn't seem to stop for anyone and proper
preparation is crucial as last season proved to many.
The damage to agriculture caused by the four
powerful, hurricanes that hit Florida was great, with
significant damage to livestock operations. Trees fell
across fences, allowing livestock to get out, often along
roads and highways, causing even greater complications.
Recovery required removal of downed trees and repair
of fences, as well as rounding up stray livestock and
returning them to pastures.
The lessons learned from last hurricane season may
help cattlemen prepare for the 2005 season.


An excerpt from the National Extension Disaster
Handbook, developed by UF/IFAS

* When the forces of a hurricane cause flooded
conditions, livestock that are not in a confined area can
usually take care of themselves. Do not, however, let
them become trapped in low-lying pens.


* Provide feed and water for the livestock. Water
is essential. Thirsty animals will try to break out to get to
flood waters. If water is in short supply, limit the
livestock's feed intake.


* Block off narrow passageways where animals
would be unable to turn around. A few heavy animals in
a narrow dead end can be dangerous not only to
themselves but also to the buildings in which they are
housed.

* Make provisions to block livestock from even
remote access to herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers and
treated seeds. Store agricultural chemicals and seeds
where hurricane flood waters will not contaminate
livestock feed or water.

* Turn off electricity at the main switch. Livestock
could damage electric fixtures, causing fires or
electrocutions.

* If there is a possibility that dairy barns may
become flooded, drive cattle out of the barn. During the
rapid rise of water, cattle often refuse to leave a barn
and may drown if the water rises high enough in the barn.

N InTVEFRSMTY OF
- FLORIDA) The Disaster Handbook
IFAS

The Disaster Handbook can be accessed by visiting
http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu/default.htm.
SThis is an ongoing program of
the Prevention and Preparedness
K- Design Team, State Major Program
(SMP) 124 of Florida Cooperative
Extension. SMP 124 is concerned
with delivering information and training to the people of
the State of Florida in the areas of agricultural safety and
disaster preparedness and recovery. For more
information about the agriclutural safety program, please
visit the Florida AgSafe Web site at http://
www.flagsafe.ufl.edu/.
S Florida, through University of
Florida Cooperative Extension, is a
EXTENSION DISASTER member of the Extension Disaster
EDUCATION NETWORK Education Network (EDEN).
EDEN is a consortium of Extension professionals from


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







45 states and Puerto Rico whose responsibilities involve
disaster issues. EDEN acts as a nationwide network
which can provide rapid response to member needs with
information, contacts, and publications. In addition,
EDEN provides continuing support to member states
through an annual meeting, committee work,
coordination with federal agencies and the EDEN Web
site (http://www.eden.lsu.edu/default.aspx).


SOURCE:


The Disaster Handbook
http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu/default.htm
UF/IFAS
Gainesville, FL


Where to Invest Profits

Reprinted with permission from Drovers,
March 2005 issue

Noble Foundation agricultural economist Fred
Schmedt says that through the combination of high prices
and ample grass, the nation's cow herds have truly
become "cash cows." In the business world, cash cows
are products that generate a steady, dependable flow of
cash. With that added cash, producers need to carefully
consider where they put that money.
"The temptation will be great to purchase a new
pickup or upgrade to a better line of farm equipment,"
he says. "These types of purchases will no doubt make
life easier, but will they ensure profits next year and the
year after?"
Better choices might be to identify key areas of the
operation where investments will lead to lower future
production costs or increased quality and quantity of
production. Here are some of Mr. Schmedt's
suggestions.
* Cattle genetics: Now is the time for producers
to assess the type and quality of calves they are
producing. Do they fit the market? Do you need more
muscle or more growth?
* Working facilities: With more emphasis on
backgrounding programs, working facilities are needed
to enable producers to easily perform routine health-


management procedures. Investments in facilities should
focus on items that will make cattle working faster, easier
and safer for both humans and animals.
* Grazing facilities: Fencing and water systems
can make grazing more efficient, leading to increased
production. Grazing cows can cost half as much as
producing and feeding hay. Every county has different
priorities, but some counties have EQUIP funds for
fencing and water systems available through the NRCS.
* Feed storage: Bulk storage is a long-term
investment that immediately saves $20 to $30 per ton
over sacked supplements. In many areas, hay storage
sheds offer long-term feed savings. As the availability of
alternative feeds such as brewers grains (a byproduct of
expanding ethanol production) increases, a good
investment might be building a commodity shed to receive
and store truckload lots of the cheaper byproduct feeds.
* Pasture acquisition: In the long term, all
businesses need to grow to survive. Now would be a
good time to consider adding additional grazing capacity.
Leased land is usually more economical than purchasing,
but now is a good time to evaluate all possible
alternatives.


SOURCE:


Drovers
http://www.drovers.com
Phone: (913) 438-8700
Email: ghenderson@drovers.com
Release March 2005


Johanns Announces
SD Model Food Security
Plans for Federal
Establishments

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns announced the
availability of model food security plans and training that
meat, poultry and egg processing plants can utilize to
strengthen security measures and prevent potential acts
of intentional contamination.
"Food security is a shared responsibility of USDA
and our many partners to prevent or respond to the


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr


6







45 states and Puerto Rico whose responsibilities involve
disaster issues. EDEN acts as a nationwide network
which can provide rapid response to member needs with
information, contacts, and publications. In addition,
EDEN provides continuing support to member states
through an annual meeting, committee work,
coordination with federal agencies and the EDEN Web
site (http://www.eden.lsu.edu/default.aspx).


SOURCE:


The Disaster Handbook
http://disaster.ifas.ufl.edu/default.htm
UF/IFAS
Gainesville, FL


Where to Invest Profits

Reprinted with permission from Drovers,
March 2005 issue

Noble Foundation agricultural economist Fred
Schmedt says that through the combination of high prices
and ample grass, the nation's cow herds have truly
become "cash cows." In the business world, cash cows
are products that generate a steady, dependable flow of
cash. With that added cash, producers need to carefully
consider where they put that money.
"The temptation will be great to purchase a new
pickup or upgrade to a better line of farm equipment,"
he says. "These types of purchases will no doubt make
life easier, but will they ensure profits next year and the
year after?"
Better choices might be to identify key areas of the
operation where investments will lead to lower future
production costs or increased quality and quantity of
production. Here are some of Mr. Schmedt's
suggestions.
* Cattle genetics: Now is the time for producers
to assess the type and quality of calves they are
producing. Do they fit the market? Do you need more
muscle or more growth?
* Working facilities: With more emphasis on
backgrounding programs, working facilities are needed
to enable producers to easily perform routine health-


management procedures. Investments in facilities should
focus on items that will make cattle working faster, easier
and safer for both humans and animals.
* Grazing facilities: Fencing and water systems
can make grazing more efficient, leading to increased
production. Grazing cows can cost half as much as
producing and feeding hay. Every county has different
priorities, but some counties have EQUIP funds for
fencing and water systems available through the NRCS.
* Feed storage: Bulk storage is a long-term
investment that immediately saves $20 to $30 per ton
over sacked supplements. In many areas, hay storage
sheds offer long-term feed savings. As the availability of
alternative feeds such as brewers grains (a byproduct of
expanding ethanol production) increases, a good
investment might be building a commodity shed to receive
and store truckload lots of the cheaper byproduct feeds.
* Pasture acquisition: In the long term, all
businesses need to grow to survive. Now would be a
good time to consider adding additional grazing capacity.
Leased land is usually more economical than purchasing,
but now is a good time to evaluate all possible
alternatives.


SOURCE:


Drovers
http://www.drovers.com
Phone: (913) 438-8700
Email: ghenderson@drovers.com
Release March 2005


Johanns Announces
SD Model Food Security
Plans for Federal
Establishments

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns announced the
availability of model food security plans and training that
meat, poultry and egg processing plants can utilize to
strengthen security measures and prevent potential acts
of intentional contamination.
"Food security is a shared responsibility of USDA
and our many partners to prevent or respond to the


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr


6





7


contamination of foodproducts and we continue to make
these efforts a priority," said Johanns. "By applying the
principles contained in these plans, federal and state
inspected plants can increase their own preparedness
planning while doing theirpart to protect America's food
supply."
The security of meat, poultry and egg processing
facilities can be enhanced through the implementation of
risk-management techniques tailored to each
establishment's needs. Food security plans are valuable
technical and operational resources that can help plant
operators identify various types of preventive steps to
minimize the risk of food product tampering or other
criminal actions.
The model food security plans are being issued in
the form of guidance documents and are voluntary.
However, USDA strongly encourages all establishments
operating under federal and state inspection programs
to develop plans to fit their particular needs, as each
plant may be vulnerable.
The model plans are designed for meat and poultry
slaughter facilities, meat and poultry processing plants,
egg processing plants and import facilities, which are
available on the Food Safety and Inspection Service
(FSIS) web site at: http://www.fsis.usda.gov. The model
plans are also intended to be used with other FSIS food
security resources, such as food security guidelines and
food security checklists that were developed over the
past three years.
To assist the industry, especially small and very small
establishments in developing food security plans, FSIS
will conduct a series of training workshops throughout
the nation in May, June and July 2005. FSIS also expects
to broadcast some of the workshops via the intemet in
order to include more plant operators.
The purpose of the workshops is to provide
additional guidance about the development and
implementation of food security plans for meat, poultry
and egg processing facilities, import establishments and
identification warehouses. Tools such as the Model Food
Security Plans, FSIS Industry Self-Assessment Checklist
for Food Security and FSIS Directive 5420.1, Revision
1 (Food Security Verification Procedures) will be
addressed during the half-day meetings.


For planning purposes, a tentative schedule has
been created. Information on specific meeting
locations and agendas will be posted on FSIS' web
site, http://www.fsis.usda.gov, for each workshop.
FSIS highly recommends that attendees pre-
register for the workshops by logging on to the web site
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News/Meetings_&_Events/ or
by calling the toll-free registration number (800) 485-
4424.


SOURCE:


Ed Loyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Steven Cohen
Phone: (202) 720-9113
USDA, Washington, DC
http://www.usda.gov
Release- April 14, 2005


The Black
Stallion
Literacy
Project


,, The program is
S based on the classic
Lkcf y books of Walter Farley
and the natural connection between children and horses.
The project was conceived in 1999 by Farley's son,
Tim and Mark Miller, owner of Arabian Nights Dinner
Attraction in Kissimmee, Florida.
Friends for more than thirty years, Tim and Mark
share a common interest in encouraging children to read.
Tim knows the influence his father's books have had on
millions of children, and Mark grew up and remains in
the company of horses -- a winning combination for a
program designed to motivate children to read.
The program introduces children in first grades to
reading their very own book and touching the pony in
the book. Later, the children attend a horse day event
where they learn more about horses and have an
opportunity to read to their favorite horse.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


The fourth grade program continues the legacy of
reading by providing each child with their own copy of
The Black Stallion, a universally recognized children's
classic as well as an introduction to the critically
acclaimed 1979 movie of the same name.
To sponsor the program, enrollment, or volunteer
information, please contact The Black Stallion Literacy
Project at (407) 239-9223.


SOURCE: The Black Stallion Literacy Project
http://www.bslp.org



USDA Plans to Ease Restrictions
on Slaughter of Downer Cattle

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has suggested
he is considering easing the ban on the slaughter of so-
called downer cattle, non-ambulatory animals that cannot
walk or stand on their own. At present, all such animals
are prohibited from being used for human food.
Johanns said that if an animal has a broken leg and
is under 30 months of age, there is no danger of bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, so such animals should be
allowed into the food chain.
Consumer groups, activists for humane animal
treatment and medical authorities oppose any such easing
of restrictions on grounds of food safety and compassion.
Johanns stated that cattle at 1,110 pounds can be
expected to bring about $1,000 at slaughter, but only
$200 if rendered for pet food, a sizeable loss for the
industry, since about 200,000 such animals are
condemned each year.
But a bovine veterinarian, Jim Reynolds of the
University of California's School of Veterinary Medicine,
disputed those figures. Non-ambulatory animals bring
less money even if slaughtered for food, due to the
difficulty of transporting them, processing them and
trimming them for food, he maintains. "A survey of down
dairy cattle at a slaughter house in California found 60
percent of the downers were condemned and the value
of the passed cattle to be about one-fourth that of
ambulatory cows," Reynolds said. "Sending down cattle


to slaughter cannot be supported by economics."
More important, he said, may be the food safety
issue; a broken leg does not mean that an animal may
not be suffering from something else as well. "It is very,
very difficult for a veterinarian to differentiate the many
reasons a cow may be non-ambulatory," he said. "There
are metabolic and infectious causes as well as trauma
and fractures, and accurate diagnosis is usually not
possible at the farm."
Farm Sanctuary, an animal welfare group, sided
with Reynolds. "The Bush administration's regressive
proposal to allow the slaughter of some downed cattle
presents a risk both for animals and for the American
consumer," said Gene Bauston, president of the group.
"Not only does it mean increased suffering for untold
numbers ofinjured cattle, but it also increases the chance
that diseased meat may enter the human food supply."
Bauston pointed out that broken limbs may in fact
be a symptom of greater problems, such as BSE.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.Meatingplace.com
Release April 21,2005


Two More Positive BSE Tests in
Japan

Two more cattle have tested positive for bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, Kyodo News reports.
The two, one black cow born in 1987 and a
Holstein born in 1995, were found in the Miyagi
Prefecture.
If the initial test results are confirmed, they would
be Japan's 18th and 19th known cases of BSE.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.Meatingplace.com
Release April 20,2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr





8


The fourth grade program continues the legacy of
reading by providing each child with their own copy of
The Black Stallion, a universally recognized children's
classic as well as an introduction to the critically
acclaimed 1979 movie of the same name.
To sponsor the program, enrollment, or volunteer
information, please contact The Black Stallion Literacy
Project at (407) 239-9223.


SOURCE: The Black Stallion Literacy Project
http://www.bslp.org



USDA Plans to Ease Restrictions
on Slaughter of Downer Cattle

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has suggested
he is considering easing the ban on the slaughter of so-
called downer cattle, non-ambulatory animals that cannot
walk or stand on their own. At present, all such animals
are prohibited from being used for human food.
Johanns said that if an animal has a broken leg and
is under 30 months of age, there is no danger of bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, so such animals should be
allowed into the food chain.
Consumer groups, activists for humane animal
treatment and medical authorities oppose any such easing
of restrictions on grounds of food safety and compassion.
Johanns stated that cattle at 1,110 pounds can be
expected to bring about $1,000 at slaughter, but only
$200 if rendered for pet food, a sizeable loss for the
industry, since about 200,000 such animals are
condemned each year.
But a bovine veterinarian, Jim Reynolds of the
University of California's School of Veterinary Medicine,
disputed those figures. Non-ambulatory animals bring
less money even if slaughtered for food, due to the
difficulty of transporting them, processing them and
trimming them for food, he maintains. "A survey of down
dairy cattle at a slaughter house in California found 60
percent of the downers were condemned and the value
of the passed cattle to be about one-fourth that of
ambulatory cows," Reynolds said. "Sending down cattle


to slaughter cannot be supported by economics."
More important, he said, may be the food safety
issue; a broken leg does not mean that an animal may
not be suffering from something else as well. "It is very,
very difficult for a veterinarian to differentiate the many
reasons a cow may be non-ambulatory," he said. "There
are metabolic and infectious causes as well as trauma
and fractures, and accurate diagnosis is usually not
possible at the farm."
Farm Sanctuary, an animal welfare group, sided
with Reynolds. "The Bush administration's regressive
proposal to allow the slaughter of some downed cattle
presents a risk both for animals and for the American
consumer," said Gene Bauston, president of the group.
"Not only does it mean increased suffering for untold
numbers ofinjured cattle, but it also increases the chance
that diseased meat may enter the human food supply."
Bauston pointed out that broken limbs may in fact
be a symptom of greater problems, such as BSE.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.Meatingplace.com
Release April 21,2005


Two More Positive BSE Tests in
Japan

Two more cattle have tested positive for bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, Kyodo News reports.
The two, one black cow born in 1987 and a
Holstein born in 1995, were found in the Miyagi
Prefecture.
If the initial test results are confirmed, they would
be Japan's 18th and 19th known cases of BSE.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.Meatingplace.com
Release April 20,2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtrr




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