• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 Johanns announces expansion of...
 Company or a snack? Letting pregnant...
 Bronson deploys state vets to check...
 Egypt lifts ban on U.S. beef...
 Same-page.com and the Partnershio...
 French woman may have died of vCJD...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. April 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00004
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. April 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: April 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Johanns announces expansion of BSE Research Program and research initiative to improve food safety
        Page 5
    Company or a snack? Letting pregnant sows choose
        Page 6
    Bronson deploys state vets to check farm animals for E. coli
        Page 6
    Egypt lifts ban on U.S. beef products
        Page 7
    Same-page.com and the Partnershio for Food Safety Education work together
        Page 7
    French woman may have died of vCJD in 1971
        Page 8
Full Text




:-.UNIVERSITY OF 1 '
"FLORIDA

IFAS EXTENSION / ..
i April 200

April 2005


In This Issue...


Beef Managenient Calendar
Fift -fourth Annual Beef Cattle Short Course
Johanns .iinounces E\pansion of BSE Research
Program and Research Initiati\ c to Improx e
Food Safetr
C'oipian or a Snack" Letting Pregnant So\ s
Choose
Bronson Deplo\ s State \'ts to Check Farm Animals
for E coll
Eg~pt Lifts Ban on Li S Beef Products
Same-Page corn and the Partnership for Food Safet\
Education Work Tocether
French W oman Ma\ Ha\ c Died of (C'JD in 11171


h
7

7
S


Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

+ J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
Beef Cattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
G.R. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
*: F.G. Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
M.J. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
Beef Cattle Management, Gainesville
SR.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
*: W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/Training, Gainesville
SS.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


Dates to Remember


April
2 Sital 4-11 & FF\ Ln\csloc, .IiidmLi C(onItsl -
Giines ilk FI
6 4-H Day in the Legislature Tallahassee. FL
9 Sat 4 -H & F'F HosisL .l lidnnU (I.'IIIL'-,L -
Gi,11icilll FL
9 County 4-H & Open Horse Show Ncwberiy. FL
16i Siae; 4-H & FF A L.ii Jlidn' ii- Conieuc -
i,iiine~s i]lic FL
20 Cattle Wokshop BSE & National ID DcFuniak
Springs Cihic Center
22-23 .A.a A HI orN SIlo\\ Nlanalna;i. FL

May
-I-h 54'j' A t 111111.11 Bt vl C'illIc S1hi n ('oin.iIL (U;Ini L-\ IC.


21
26(
29-
June 1


FL
Heart of Florida Club Calf Sale Alachua. FL
Coin S.ll:,ie Field D:Iv C( In FI.
Area F Horse Show Miami. FL


Fifty-fourth Annual Beef
._ Cattle Short Course
,^ .-.F_-- ^r -K, ..-,--




Don't forget to register!


If you haven't already registered for the 54th
Annual Beef Cattle Short course, time is running out
to receive the $85.00 reduced early registration fee.
After April 22, 2005, the regular registration fee will
be $110.00. Please visit http://www.animal.ufl.edu/
extension/beef/2005bcscRegistration.shtml to register
or go to page 2 for more information.


The Institute ofFood andAgricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity -Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and
other services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.


r


^\








40


Beef Management
Calendar


April
0 Plant warm season annual pastures.
0 Plant corn for silage.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Check dust bags or apply treated ear tags.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if necessary.
0 Observe cows for repeat breeders.
0 Deworm cows as needed if not done in March.
0 Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3
months of age and before 12 months of age.
0 Market cull cows and bulls.
0 Update market information and refine market strategy
for calves.

May
0 Remove bulls.
0 Harvest hay from cool season crops.
0 Plant warm season perennial pastures.
0 Fertilize warm season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.
0 Check for spittlebugs and treat if necessary.
0 Apply spot-on agents for grub and louse control.
0 Check dustbags.
0 Vaccinate and implant with growth stimulant any later
calves.
0 Reimplant calves with growth stimulant at 90-120
days, when you have herd penned.
0 Dispose of dead animals properly.
0 Update market information and refine marketing
plans.
0 Remove bulls May 21 to end calving season March
1.

June
0 Last date for planting sorghum.
0 Check mineral feeder, use at least 8% phosphorus
in mineral an not over 2 12 to 1 calcium to
phosphorus ratio.
0 Check pastures and hay field for spittlebugs, mole
crickets, and army worms.


0 Treat if necessary; best month for mole cricket
control.
0 Check dustbags.
0 Watch for evidence of pinkeye and treat.
0 Utilize available veterinary services and diagnostic
laboratories.
R Get heifers vaccinated for brucellosis if not already
done.
0 Pregnancy check cows.
0 Update market information and plans.
0 Make first cutting of hay.
0 Put bulls out June 1 for calves starting March 11.
0 Reimplant calves at 90 to 120 days with growth
stimulant.


Fifty-fourth Annual Beef
Cattle Short Course




The rapidly changing cattle industry requires the beef
producer to use everything at hi s or her disposal to remain
competitive in a world market place. We know the effects
that closed international markets can have on our industry.
And, we understand that our competitive advantage in
the world market depends on the production of a high
quality product. We are also challenged by U.S.
consumers that have never expected a higher quality beef
product than they do today. Knowing market dynamics
and understanding the consumer is critical to your success.
The first half day of this year's Beef Cattle Short Course
examines consumer trends, expectations and demands,
international trade of beef and beef products, and the
2005 market outlook. An outside perspective of Total
Quality Management sets the stage for discussions the
second day related to factors effecting the quality of your
beef herd. A panel of beef industry representatives will
conclude the morning discussion with remarks and
answers to your questions. Plan on being informed and
entertained with Thursday afternoon's session. New this
year will be live demonstrations of low stress handling of
cattle with ranch horses and cattle working dogs. The
demonstrations will conclude with a session on cow horse
care and maintenance. Friday morning's program will
focus on grazing issues including pasture management,


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








defining fertilization, and pH management for optimum
forage production. The last half of the morning will be
devoted to breakout discussion sessions for producers
from various regions of the state. There will be an Allied
Industries Trade Show on Wednesday evening and a
reception sponsored by the trade show participants.
Farm Credit ofNorth Florida will again host a cook-out
lunch on Thursday. The traditional "Steak-Out" on
Thursday evening will provide good prime rib and
fellowship. Production of quality beef is the key to market
share and this year's Beef Cattle Short Course will
provide you with the keys to producing that quality beef,
so plan now to attend.
For more information or to register, please visit the
web site at http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/
2005BCSC.shtml or phone (352) 392-1916.



Agenda

"Maintaining Quality Production in a Dynamic
Market Place"


2:15 International Trade of Beef and Beef
Products
Paul Clayton, U.S. Meat Export
Federation, Denver, CO
3:00 Refreshment Break

Presiding: TerryHouser, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

3:20 Total Quality Management a Perspective
From Outside the Beef Industry
-Mike Frihart, Bama Company, Tulsa, OK
4:15 Beef and the Consumer: Trends,
Expectations, and Demands
Molly McAdams, Fresh Product
Development & Fresh Own Brand, HEB
Grocery Company, San Antonio, TX
5:00 Allied Industry Trade Show and
Reception
Several companies will have exhibits and
representatives to answer your questions.
Hors d'oeuvres provided compliments of the
exhibitors. A cash bar is available for your
enjoyment.


Thursday, May 5, 2005


Wednesday, May 4, 2005


AM


AM

11:00 Registration (Hilton UF Conference Center)

PM

"National and Global Implications of Florida
Beef Production"

Presiding: F GlenHembry, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:00 Welcome
Dr. Jimmy Cheek, Senior V.P. Agriculture
and Natural Resources, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL
1:15 Remarks
Mike Milicevic, President, Florida
Cattlemen's Association, Okeechobee, FL
1:30 Market Outlook for 2005
John Lawerence, Iowa Beef Center, Iowa
State University, Ames, IA


7:00 Improved Herd Health Through Nutrition
Breakfast Sponsored by Lakeland
Animal Nutrition and Alltech,Inc.

"Management Factors Affecting Quality in the
Herd"

Presiding: MattHersom, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

8:30 Genomics Building Blocks of the
Product / Effect on the Beef Product
Ronnie Green, Food Animal Production,
USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD

9:15 Nutrition What You Feed Really Does
Matter
Robbi Pritchard, Department of Animal and
Range Sciences, South Dakota State
University, Brookings, SD


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


10:00 Refreshment Break

10:20 Health and Stress Preparation Prevents
Poor Performance
Max Irsik, College of Veterinary Medicine,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

Presiding: Todd Thrift, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

11:15 Panel Discussion/Response to Questions
Concerning Factors Affecting Beef
Quality
Ronnie Green National Program Leader,
Food Animal Production, USDA-ARS,
Beltsville, MD
Robbi Pritchard Professor, Ruminant
Nutrition, Department of Animal and Range
Sciences, South Dakota State University,
Brookings, SD
Max Irsik Extension Veterinarian, College
of Veterinary Medicine, UF/IFAS, Gainesville,
FL

PM

12:00 Leave for Lunch at UF/IFAS Horse Teaching
Unit (Sponsored by Farm Credit ofNorth
Florida Directions to be provided)

"Practical Ranch Issues Facing Cattlemen
Today"

Presiding: Joel McQuagge, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:30 Demonstration and Discussion: Working
with Horses and Cattle in Today's Ranch
Environment
Topics will include: Low stress cattle handling,
Starting horses on cattle, Ranch horse safety,
and Increasing ranch horse value
Buster McLaury
3:30 Break
4:00 Cattle Handling with Dogs -Arnie Sarlo
and DavidMillburn, Babcock Cattle Co.,
Punta Gorda, FL
5:00 Cow Horse Care and Maintenance -
Lori Warren and EdJohnson; Department of
Animal Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL


and Dana Zimmel, Large Animal Clinical
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL
6:30 Cattlemen's Steak-Out (Horse Teaching
Unit)

Friday, May 6, 2005

AM

"Grass, Fertilizer, and Management: Grazing
Issues Affecting the Florida Cow Herd"

Presiding: JohnArthington, Range Cattle REC,
UF/IFAS, Ona, FL

8:30 Florida Pasture Management for Beef
Cattle Production -Martin Adjei, Range
Cattle REC, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL
9:15 Pasture pH and Liming Issues Affecting
Forage Yield -Martin Adjei, Range Cattle
REC, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL
9:30 Refreshment Break
9:45 Breakout Sessions
Each session will have a program designed to
meet the needs of cattlemen in the designated
area. Specific fertilizer, grass, and
management systems recommendations will be
presented and discussed by extension
professionals in these areas.
1. Northwest Florida
2. Central Florida
3. South Florida
4. Ranchette Small Farm-Introductory
Producer
11:45 Adjourn


SOURCE:


Matt Hersom
Phone: (352) 392-2390
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu

Todd Thrift
Phone: (352) 392-8597

University ofFlorida
Department of Animal Sciences
Gainesville, FL
http://www.animal.ufl.edu


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








Johanns Announces Expansion
of BSE Research Program and
Research Initiative to Improve
Food Safety

Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns today
announced that almost $2 million in funding has been
redirected to enhance research on bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE) and that $5 million has been
awarded to 17 colleges and universities to establish a
Food Safety Research and Response Network.
"In a rapidly changing world marketplace, science
is the universal language that must guide our rules and
policies, rather than subjectivity or politics," said Johanns.
"Expanding our research efforts to improve the
understanding ofBSE and other food-related illness
pathogens will strengthen the security of our nation's food
supply. These projects will help improve food safety by
enhancing our research partnerships with the academic
community and establish anothertool to aid our response
to food-related disease outbreaks."
Johanns made the announcement during keynote
remarks at the National Restaurant Association's Food
Safety Summit. The BSE research funds, redirected by
USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS), will be
used for new B SE proj ects and facilities and build upon
President Bush's fiscal year 2006 budget proposal, which
would increase BSE research by $7.3 million or 155


This U.S. cow and others like her are safe from mad cow disease
thanks in large part to ARS research.


Some of the new funding will go to finding sensitive new
techniques for characterizing BSEprions. Here, Chemist I,,,
Silva (left) and research leader J. Mark Carter in Albany,
Calif., load samples for analysis via nanospray liquid
chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy.


percent over 2005 funding levels. The newly funded
projects include international collaborations with the
Veterinary Laboratory Agency in Great Britain to study
the biology of the BSE agent, the Italian BSE Reference
Laboratory to evaluate present diagnostic tools for
detecting atypical BSE cases and the University of
Santiago de Compostela in Spain to compare North
American and European BSE strains.
About $750,000 will go toward abiocontainment
facility now under construction at the ARS National
Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa. These facilities
will eventually allow the long-term study ofBSE infection
in cattle and other large animals, which can take a decade
or more.
USDA' s Agricultural Research Service has been a
leader in research on transmissible spongiform
encephalopathies (TSEs) such as scrapie, which affects
sheep, and chronic wasting disease in deer. ARS
developed the immunohistochemistry testthat is currently
used as the gold standard in the United States to confirm
a diagnosis ofB SE. ARS has an annual budget of nearly
$10 million for TSE research and 15 scientists involved
in the research, primarily in Ames; Pullman, Wash., and
Albany, Calif.
The Food Safety Research and Response
Network, spearheaded by North Carolina State
University, will include a team of more than 50 food safety
experts from 18 colleges and universities who will
investigate several of the most prevalent food-related


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


illness pathogens. Pathogens like E. coli, Salmonella and
Campylobacter will be studied to determine where they
are found in the environment, how they are sustained
and how they infect herds. This team of researchers
brings a broad range of expertise to tackle these persistent
research challenges.
The group also will serve as a response team that
can be mobilized to conduct focused research to control
maj or episodes of food-related illnesses. Episodes could
include investigation of health problems associated with
agricultural bioterrorism and the deliberate contamination
of agricultural commodities. USDA's Cooperative State
Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES)
provided funding for the award.
The 17 other institutions in the project are:
University of Florida, Cornell University, Iowa State
University, McMasters University, Mississippi State
University, North Dakota State University, The Ohio
State University, Tuskegee University, University of
Arizona, University of California at Davis, University of
California at Berkeley, University of Illinois, University
of Kentucky, University of Minnesota, University of
Montreal, Washington State University, and West Texas
A&M University.


SOURCE: Kim Kaplan
Email: Kaplan@ars.usda.gov
Phone: (301) 504-1637
USDA/ARS
http://www.ars.usda.gov
Release March 18, 2005




Company or a Snack? Letting
Pregnant Sows Choose

Pressing the bar enough times brings a little snack
one day, socializing with neighbors the next day. So far,
pregnant sows are choosing the snacks.
Scientists have often compared pregnant sows in
different housing situations. But now scientists from the
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Purdue
University are asking the moms-to-be for their
preferences. Purdue University animal behavioralistEd


Paj or, at West Lafayette, Ind., decided to do just that in
a search for what little extras might enrich life for sows.
Pajor is part of a team of Purdue and ARS animal welfare
researchers at West Lafayette that includes ARS animal
behavioralists Donald Lay, Jeremy Marchant-Forde and
Ruth Marchant-Forde. The ARS part of the team also
includes immunologist Susan Eicher and neuroscientist
Heng-wei Cheng.
Pajor set up a study with 16 pregnant sows,
studying four at a time. He put each animal in a
conventional gestation stall designed to confine pregnant
sows-but then added a control bar. On one day the
bar allows a snack. The next day it opens a door to
allow a visit with other sows. This goes on for several
days. with the number ofrequi red bar presses increasing
each day.
The sows' limits on how many times they would
press the bar with their snouts for a reward were about
the same whether the treat was food or socializing,
indicating that socializing wasn't anything special to them.
But the next round of experiments will show if sows
refine their choices in a more "homey" environment-
one where there's more to do, a soft floor and plenty of
straw to satisfy instincts for nesting or rooting.
The conventional stalls used in the first study are
barren environments with slatted, cement floors. Pregnant
sows are isolated, one to a stall, to make sure that each
gets her proper diet.


SOURCE:


Don Comis
Email: Comis@ars.usda.gov
Phone: (301) 504-1625
USDA/ARS
http://www.ars.usda.gov
Release March 15, 2005


01// Bronson Deploys State
Vets to Check Farm
Animals for E. coli

Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson announced that he


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





6


illness pathogens. Pathogens like E. coli, Salmonella and
Campylobacter will be studied to determine where they
are found in the environment, how they are sustained
and how they infect herds. This team of researchers
brings a broad range of expertise to tackle these persistent
research challenges.
The group also will serve as a response team that
can be mobilized to conduct focused research to control
maj or episodes of food-related illnesses. Episodes could
include investigation of health problems associated with
agricultural bioterrorism and the deliberate contamination
of agricultural commodities. USDA's Cooperative State
Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES)
provided funding for the award.
The 17 other institutions in the project are:
University of Florida, Cornell University, Iowa State
University, McMasters University, Mississippi State
University, North Dakota State University, The Ohio
State University, Tuskegee University, University of
Arizona, University of California at Davis, University of
California at Berkeley, University of Illinois, University
of Kentucky, University of Minnesota, University of
Montreal, Washington State University, and West Texas
A&M University.


SOURCE: Kim Kaplan
Email: Kaplan@ars.usda.gov
Phone: (301) 504-1637
USDA/ARS
http://www.ars.usda.gov
Release March 18, 2005




Company or a Snack? Letting
Pregnant Sows Choose

Pressing the bar enough times brings a little snack
one day, socializing with neighbors the next day. So far,
pregnant sows are choosing the snacks.
Scientists have often compared pregnant sows in
different housing situations. But now scientists from the
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Purdue
University are asking the moms-to-be for their
preferences. Purdue University animal behavioralistEd


Paj or, at West Lafayette, Ind., decided to do just that in
a search for what little extras might enrich life for sows.
Pajor is part of a team of Purdue and ARS animal welfare
researchers at West Lafayette that includes ARS animal
behavioralists Donald Lay, Jeremy Marchant-Forde and
Ruth Marchant-Forde. The ARS part of the team also
includes immunologist Susan Eicher and neuroscientist
Heng-wei Cheng.
Pajor set up a study with 16 pregnant sows,
studying four at a time. He put each animal in a
conventional gestation stall designed to confine pregnant
sows-but then added a control bar. On one day the
bar allows a snack. The next day it opens a door to
allow a visit with other sows. This goes on for several
days. with the number ofrequi red bar presses increasing
each day.
The sows' limits on how many times they would
press the bar with their snouts for a reward were about
the same whether the treat was food or socializing,
indicating that socializing wasn't anything special to them.
But the next round of experiments will show if sows
refine their choices in a more "homey" environment-
one where there's more to do, a soft floor and plenty of
straw to satisfy instincts for nesting or rooting.
The conventional stalls used in the first study are
barren environments with slatted, cement floors. Pregnant
sows are isolated, one to a stall, to make sure that each
gets her proper diet.


SOURCE:


Don Comis
Email: Comis@ars.usda.gov
Phone: (301) 504-1625
USDA/ARS
http://www.ars.usda.gov
Release March 15, 2005


01// Bronson Deploys State
Vets to Check Farm
Animals for E. coli

Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services
Commissioner Charles H. Bronson announced that he


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


is sending department veterinarians and inspectors to
inspect and conduct testing on farm animals linked to a
series of illnesses of children who recently attended
agricultural fairs.
Although the Florida Department of Health (DOH)
is investigating several possible sources that may be
responsible for the outbreak, including food and water
the children may have consumed, Bronson said he is
taking the proactive step of dispatching veterinarians to
check on animals in an effort to enhance and expedite
the DOH inquiry.
"We want to do all that we can to support health
officials to get to the bottom of this case," Bronson said.
"We will provide all of our data to our colleagues at the
Department of Health and stand ready to assist them in
any way we can."
State veterinarians are tracking the animals that
were present at the recent Central Florida Fair in
Orlando and at the Strawberry Festival in Plant City -
as a number of the illnesses were reportedly among
children who attended one or the other of the festivals.
They will then conduct various tests on the animals traced
to those fairs to determine what, if any infections, could
have been transferred from the animals.
In the meantime, officials stress that it is critically
important that anyone who comes in contact with animals
takes sanitary precautions, including thoroughly washing
one's hands after contact with the animals. Some bacteria,
such as E. coli, can reside in animals without causing
them any disease but can make humans sick ifthe bacteria
lingers on the hands and is ingested along with food.


SOURCE: Dr. Thomas Holt
Phone: (850) 410-0900
DOACS
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us
Release March 24, 2005



USDA Egypt Lifts Ban on U.S.
Beef Products

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has


announced that Egypt is immediately resuming imports
of U.S. beef and beef products from animals less than
30 months of age.
"We are extremely pleased at the reopening of
another important market for U.S. beef exports and
anticipate that exports will quickly return to pre-BSE
trade levels," said Johanns. "USDAwill continue to focus
on our efforts on opening additional markets by
promoting the use of science-based regulations in the
global trade in beef."
The agreement requires age and origin requirements
under a USDA Agricultural Marketing Service Beef
Export Verification (BEV) program. In 2003, Egyptian
purchases ofU. S. beef and beef products amounted to
$30 million, with liver accounting for nearly 65 percent
or $19 million of total sales.


SOURCE:


EdLoyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Dana Cruikshank
Phone: (202) 720-3329
USDA
http://www.usda.gov
Release March 21, 2005



Same-Page.com and
the Partnership for
S Food Safety
Education Work
Together


Same-Page.com has announced the successful
addition of the Partnership for Food Safety to the Same-
Page.com family. The Partnership for Food Safety, a
non-profit, unites industry associations, consumer and
public health groups and the United States Department
of Agriculture, along with the Environmental Protection
Agency, the Department of Health and Human Services,
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the
Food and Drug Administration, to educate the public
about safe food handling and preparation. Coordinating
efforts between these vast and disparate agencies can


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


is sending department veterinarians and inspectors to
inspect and conduct testing on farm animals linked to a
series of illnesses of children who recently attended
agricultural fairs.
Although the Florida Department of Health (DOH)
is investigating several possible sources that may be
responsible for the outbreak, including food and water
the children may have consumed, Bronson said he is
taking the proactive step of dispatching veterinarians to
check on animals in an effort to enhance and expedite
the DOH inquiry.
"We want to do all that we can to support health
officials to get to the bottom of this case," Bronson said.
"We will provide all of our data to our colleagues at the
Department of Health and stand ready to assist them in
any way we can."
State veterinarians are tracking the animals that
were present at the recent Central Florida Fair in
Orlando and at the Strawberry Festival in Plant City -
as a number of the illnesses were reportedly among
children who attended one or the other of the festivals.
They will then conduct various tests on the animals traced
to those fairs to determine what, if any infections, could
have been transferred from the animals.
In the meantime, officials stress that it is critically
important that anyone who comes in contact with animals
takes sanitary precautions, including thoroughly washing
one's hands after contact with the animals. Some bacteria,
such as E. coli, can reside in animals without causing
them any disease but can make humans sick ifthe bacteria
lingers on the hands and is ingested along with food.


SOURCE: Dr. Thomas Holt
Phone: (850) 410-0900
DOACS
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us
Release March 24, 2005



USDA Egypt Lifts Ban on U.S.
Beef Products

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns has


announced that Egypt is immediately resuming imports
of U.S. beef and beef products from animals less than
30 months of age.
"We are extremely pleased at the reopening of
another important market for U.S. beef exports and
anticipate that exports will quickly return to pre-BSE
trade levels," said Johanns. "USDAwill continue to focus
on our efforts on opening additional markets by
promoting the use of science-based regulations in the
global trade in beef."
The agreement requires age and origin requirements
under a USDA Agricultural Marketing Service Beef
Export Verification (BEV) program. In 2003, Egyptian
purchases ofU. S. beef and beef products amounted to
$30 million, with liver accounting for nearly 65 percent
or $19 million of total sales.


SOURCE:


EdLoyd
Phone: (202) 720-4623
Dana Cruikshank
Phone: (202) 720-3329
USDA
http://www.usda.gov
Release March 21, 2005



Same-Page.com and
the Partnership for
S Food Safety
Education Work
Together


Same-Page.com has announced the successful
addition of the Partnership for Food Safety to the Same-
Page.com family. The Partnership for Food Safety, a
non-profit, unites industry associations, consumer and
public health groups and the United States Department
of Agriculture, along with the Environmental Protection
Agency, the Department of Health and Human Services,
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the
Food and Drug Administration, to educate the public
about safe food handling and preparation. Coordinating
efforts between these vast and disparate agencies can


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







be a monumental task and requires constant
communication. Facing the challenges of trying to
communicate nationwide with members, The Partnership
for Food Safety executives began looking for an online
solution. What they discovered was a solution in the form
of Same-Page.com's eStudio 6. A virtual online
environment, eStudio 6 allows members located around
the country to meet and share everything from important
planning and strategy documents, to their daily calendars,
have live chats and share photos and videos.
Same-Page CEO Bruce Collen said "eStudio 6 is
based on the solid principles and psychology of
collaboration and teamwork. Many man-hours of time
and research went into how geographically diverse teams
work together. The result ofthat analysis is realized in e-
studio 6. We continue to see amazing results when clients
utilize the product and we know that The Partnership
for Food Safety will be no exception."
"We became very excited when The Partnership
for Food Safety approached us about e-Studio 6 as a
solution. Unlike the myriad of generic corporations that
utilize us, this group is doing critical, life-saving work in
our nation and we were anxious to get behind that." "We
knew that as soon as they began using the e-Studio
product, they would quickly see their productivity take
a big leap." "We remain prepared to provide them with
any training or customizations they require to make their
job easier. I have seen firsthand the results of food
poisoning and other food related issues and therefore
have a great interest in their cause. I know that any efforts
we make on their behalf will be well worth the results
they achieve in educating the public" says Bruce Collen.
"Helping clients like The Partnership forFood Safety is
important for business owners like me that want their
companies to be socially involved and responsible versus
just being about the profit."
Same-Page.com eStudio is available for review or
evaluation at http://www.same-page.com. The
Partnership for Food Safety's information is available
for review at http://www.fightbac.org.


SOURCE:


French Woman May Have Died
of vCJD in 1971

UnitedPressInternationalreported that a former
researcher at the National Institutes of Health, Bruce
Johnson, examined the brain of a French woman who
died in 1971 and concluded that she died of variant
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the human form of bovine
spongiform encephalopathy.
If this is confirmed, it pushes back the date of the
first discovery ofvCJD a quarter of a century.
The woman, who was not identified due to privacy
restrictions, was diagnosed after death as suffering from
sporadic CJD, a relatively rare brain-wasting disease
that appears to arise spontaneously. However, Johnson
said that after subjecting brain samples to the Western
blot test, considered by most authorities to be the most
accurate test available, he detected malformed proteins
that resembled those ofvCJD rather than those of CJD.
A sample of the woman's brain had been inj ected
into a chimpanzee in the late 1970s, and when Johnson
tested the primate's brain, it too resembled vCJD rather
than CJD.
Johnson retired from the NIH' s Laboratory for
Central Nervous System Studies in 2003, and that
laboratory was closed down in 2004. Johnson hopes to
run more tests on the brain when he starts a new position
with the Food and Drug Administration.
However, NIH told UPI that it planned to destroy
its collection of diseased brain tissue in the near future
unless some other lab or researcher claimed it. That
would end any chance of confirming or refuting Johnson's
initial research.


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release March 25, 2005


Bruce Collen
Phone: (239) 395-7655
http://www.same-page.com/
Release March 21, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


8


*rc~




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs