• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 54th Annual Beef Cattle Short...
 ABGA Judge Certification Progr...
 Reverse trade mission being planned...
 Beefmobile ventures into cyber...
 NIAA Symposium to focus on zoonotic...
 American Meat Institute launches...
 Meat case study to be unveiled...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. March 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00003
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. March 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: March 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    54th Annual Beef Cattle Short Course
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    ABGA Judge Certification Program
        Page 5
    Reverse trade mission being planned to spur exports of Florida cattle to Puerto Rico
        Page 5
    Beefmobile ventures into cyberspace
        Page 6
    NIAA Symposium to focus on zoonotic diseases
        Page 7
    American Meat Institute launches new website
        Page 7
    Meat case study to be unveiled at AMI conference
        Page 8
Full Text






































Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

*o J.D. Arthington
BeefCattle Management, Ona
J.N. Carter
BeefCattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: GR. Hansen
BeefCattle Production, Marianna
*: EG. Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
*o MJ. Hersom
Extension BeefCattle Specialist, Gainesville
o: T.A. Houser
Extension MeatSpecialist, Gainesville
*o E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
I. T.T. Marshall, Professor
BeefCattle Management, Gainesville
R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/Training, Gainesville
S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
BeefCattle Nutrition, Gainesville


4/V, Dates to Remember


March

I R noi\ in Foici_'s Pio~[ uin \\ ticluikia. FL
3 Renovating Forages Program Arcadia, FL
3-6 A.Jul Hor,.i:dnlhinp School \VW ick(. FL
5 Small Farms Livestock Production Conference -
Okeechobee, FL
8 Rc no\ riIII' Fou'ics Pioiuain Okl;chobc. FL
10 Renovating Forages Program LaBelle, FL
19 Sinill Firlls L i\ ciock Pioduclion Coni'I.lnce -
Alcudia. FL
19 SLik 4-H Hippolo,_ Coniiks Oilndo FL
19 County 4-H &: Open Hoisi. Sho\\ Ni \\b.m FL
22 Livestock Record Book Workshop Brooksville, FL


April


2 Sluic 4-H & FFA Li\ esockl Jiudimniu Cooincsi -
Gaimes\ lk FL
6 4-H Day in the Legislature Tallahassee, FL
4) Stite 4-H & FFA Hois. Jludciin' ConIKst GdII.s\ ill.
FL
9 County 4-H & Open Horse Show Newbeny, FL
I1 S i:ne 4-H & FF -\ Nl cn .1ii' d lin l (C niIel G.iine. \ dle
FL
20 Cattle Wokshop BSE & National ID DeFuniak
Springs Civic Center
22-23 AijI A Horse Sho\\ Nl:ri:iinil. FL


UNIVERSITY OF

SFLORIDA S Cenc e

IFAS EXTENSION I I .e rs ,.


March 2005


In This Issue...


Beef Nccf Nlananmcncnt (alcndiar

Fift0 -fourth A.nnlal Beef (attle Short Couisc

ABGA Judge Ccrnfication Prorl.m 5a

Rcl ci'rs Trade Mission Bcinm, Planncd to Spur E\ports
of Florida Cattic to Puerto Rico

Bcc'fmobilc Vnturcs Into C' bcrspacc 1

NIAA S\ Imposlunl to Focus on Zoonotic Discases 7

Amcnrcan Meat Institutc Lainches NC\\ \\-cb Site 7

Meat (asc Stud\ to bc lUmn\ilced at ANII (onlfcrcncc '


-4..-',-.


It's time to register for the Fifty-fourth Annual
Beef Cattle Short Course, May 4-6, 2005.
Please see page 2 for information.


The Institute of Food and Agrcultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research educational information, and
other services only to indivduals that function with regard to race, color sex, age, handicap, or national ongin. For information on obtaining other extension pubhcations, contact your
county Cooperative Extension Service office.


^-"'^K ZA
- -ra,
-1A





2


Beef Meef Management
Calendar


March
0 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
0 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and
rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
0 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1 st for external
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear
tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.

April
0 Plant warm season annual pastures.
0 Plant corn for silage.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Check dust bags or apply treated ear tags.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if necessary.
O Observe cows for repeat breeders.
0 Deworm cows as needed if not done in March.
0 Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3
months of age and before 12 months of age.
0 Market cull cows and bulls.
0 Update market information and refine market
strategy for calves.


May
0 Remove bulls.
0 Harvest hay from cool season crops.
0 Plant warm season perennial pastures.
0 Fertilize warm season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.


0 Check for spittlebugs and treat if necessary.
R Apply spot-on agents for grub and louse control.
0 Check dust bags.
R Vaccinate and implant with growth stimulant any later
calves.
0 Reimplant calves with growth stimulant at 90-120
days, when you have herd penned.
0 Dispose of dead animals properly.
0 Update market information and refine marketing
plans.
0 Remove bulls May 21 to end calving season March
1.



Fifty-fourth Annual Beef
Cattle Short Course
S, .".. % ..
S- -- -. -



The rapidly changing cattle industry requires the beef
producer to use everything at his or her disposal to remain
competitive in a world market place. We know the effects
that closed international markets can have on our industry.
And, we understand that our competitive advantage in
the world market depends on the production of a high
quality product. We are also challenged by U.S.
consumers that have never expected a higher quality beef
product than they do today. Knowing market dynamics
and understanding the consumer is critical to your success.
The first half day of this year's Beef Cattle Short Course
examines consumer trends, expectations and demands,
international trade of beef and beef products, and the
2005 market outlook. An outside perspective of Total
Quality Management sets the stage for discussions the
second day related to factors effecting the quality of your
beef herd. A panel of beef industry representatives will
conclude the morning discussion with remarks and
answers to your questions. Plan on being informed and
entertained with Thursday afternoon's session. New this
year will be live demonstrations of low stress handling of
cattle with ranch horses and cattle working dogs. The
demonstrations will conclude with a session on cow horse
care and maintenance. Friday morning's program will
focus on grazing issues including pasture management,
defining fertilization, and pH management for optimum
forage production. The last half of the morning will be


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





2


Beef Meef Management
Calendar


March
0 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and get
fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while there is
still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
0 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate and
rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
0 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1 st for external
parasite control or use insecticide impregnated ear
tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.

April
0 Plant warm season annual pastures.
0 Plant corn for silage.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Check dust bags or apply treated ear tags.
0 Check for external parasites and treat if necessary.
O Observe cows for repeat breeders.
0 Deworm cows as needed if not done in March.
0 Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after 3
months of age and before 12 months of age.
0 Market cull cows and bulls.
0 Update market information and refine market
strategy for calves.


May
0 Remove bulls.
0 Harvest hay from cool season crops.
0 Plant warm season perennial pastures.
0 Fertilize warm season pastures.
0 Check mineral feeder.


0 Check for spittlebugs and treat if necessary.
R Apply spot-on agents for grub and louse control.
0 Check dust bags.
R Vaccinate and implant with growth stimulant any later
calves.
0 Reimplant calves with growth stimulant at 90-120
days, when you have herd penned.
0 Dispose of dead animals properly.
0 Update market information and refine marketing
plans.
0 Remove bulls May 21 to end calving season March
1.



Fifty-fourth Annual Beef
Cattle Short Course
S, .".. % ..
S- -- -. -



The rapidly changing cattle industry requires the beef
producer to use everything at his or her disposal to remain
competitive in a world market place. We know the effects
that closed international markets can have on our industry.
And, we understand that our competitive advantage in
the world market depends on the production of a high
quality product. We are also challenged by U.S.
consumers that have never expected a higher quality beef
product than they do today. Knowing market dynamics
and understanding the consumer is critical to your success.
The first half day of this year's Beef Cattle Short Course
examines consumer trends, expectations and demands,
international trade of beef and beef products, and the
2005 market outlook. An outside perspective of Total
Quality Management sets the stage for discussions the
second day related to factors effecting the quality of your
beef herd. A panel of beef industry representatives will
conclude the morning discussion with remarks and
answers to your questions. Plan on being informed and
entertained with Thursday afternoon's session. New this
year will be live demonstrations of low stress handling of
cattle with ranch horses and cattle working dogs. The
demonstrations will conclude with a session on cow horse
care and maintenance. Friday morning's program will
focus on grazing issues including pasture management,
defining fertilization, and pH management for optimum
forage production. The last half of the morning will be


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








devoted to breakout discussion sessions for producers
from various regions of the state. There will be an Allied
Industries Trade Show on Wednesday evening and a
reception sponsored by the trade show participants.
Farm Credit of North Florida will again host a cook-out
lunch on Thursday. The traditional "Steak-Out" on
Thursday evening will provide good prime rib and
fellowship. Production of quality beef is the key to market
share and this year's Beef Cattle Short Course will
provide you with the keys to producing that quality beef,
so plan now to attend.

For more information or to register, please visit the
website at http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/
2005BCSC.shtml or phone (352) 392-1916.

Agenda

"Maintaining Quality Production in a Dynamic
Market Place"


Wednesday, May 4, 2005


AM

11:00 Registration (Hilton UF Conference Center)

PM

"National and Global Implications of Florida
Beef Production"

Presiding: F. Glen Hembry, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:00 Welcome
Dr. Jimmy Cheek, Senior V.P. Agriculture
and Natural Resources, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL
1:15 Remarks
Mike Milicevic, President, Florida
Cattlemen's Association, Okeechobee, FL
1:30 Market Outlook for 2005
John Lawerence, Iowa Beef Center, Iowa
State University, Ames, IA
2:15 International Trade of Beef and Beef
Products
Paul Clayton, U.S. Meat Export
Federation, Denver, CO
3:00 Refreshment Break


Presiding: Terry Houser, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

3:20 Total Quality Management a Perspective
From Outside the Beef Industry
Mike Frihart, Bama Company, Tulsa, OK
4:15 Beef and the Consumer: Trends,
Expectations, and Demands
Molly McAdams, Fresh Product
Development & Fresh Own Brand, HEB
Grocery Company, San Antonio, TX
5:00 Allied Industry Trade Show and
Reception
Several companies will have exhibits and
representatives to answer your questions.
Hors d'oeuvres provided compliments of the
exhibitors. A cash bar is available for your
enjoyment.

Thursday, May 5, 2005


AM


7:00 Improved Herd Health Through Nutrition
Breakfast Sponsored by Lakeland
Animal Nutrition andAlltech,Inc.

"Management Factors Affecting Quality in the
Herd"

Presiding: Matt Hersom, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

8:30 Genomics Building Blocks of the
Product / Effect on the Beef Product
Ronnie Green, Food Animal Production,
USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD

9:15 Nutrition What You Feed Really Does
Matter
Robbi Pritchard, Department of Animal and
Range Sciences, South Dakota State
University, Brookings, SD

10:00 Refreshment Break

10:20 Health and Stress Preparation Prevents
Poor Performance
Max Irsik, College of Veterinary Medicine,
UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





4


Presiding: Todd Thrift, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

11:15 Panel Discussion/Response to Questions
Concerning Factors Affecting Beef
Quality
Ronnie Green National Program Leader,
Food Animal Production, USDA-ARS,
Beltsville, MD
Robbi Pritchard Professor, Ruminant
Nutrition, Department of Animal and Range
Sciences, South Dakota State University,
Brookings, SD
Max Irsik Extension Veterinarian, College
of Veterinary Medicine, UF/IFAS, Gainesville,
FL

PM

12:00 Leave for Lunch at UF/IFAS Horse Teaching
Unit (Sponsored by Farm Credit of North
Florida Directions to be provided)

"Practical Ranch Issues Facing Cattlemen
Today"

Presiding: Joel McQuagge, Department of Animal
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL

1:30 Demonstration and Discussion: Working
with Horses and Cattle in Today's Ranch
Environment
Topics will include: Low stress cattle handling
Starting horses on cattle, Ranch horse safety,
and Increasing ranch horse value
Buster McLaury
3:30 Break
4:00 Cattle Handling with Dogs Arnie Sarlo
and DavidMillburn, Babcock Cattle Co.,
Punta Gorda, FL
5:00 Cow Horse Care and Maintenance -
Lori Warren and Ed Johnson; Department of
Animal Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL
and Dana Zimmel, Large Animal Clinical
Sciences, UF/IFAS, Gainesville, FL
6:30 Cattlemen's Steak-Out (Horse Teaching
Unit)


Friday, May 6, 2005

AM

"Grass, Fertilizer, and Management: Grazing
Issues Affecting the Florida Cow Herd"

Presiding: John Arthington, Range Cattle REC,
UF/IFAS, Ona, FL

8:30 Florida Pasture Management for Beef
Cattle Production Jack Rechcigl, Gulf
Coast REC, UF/IFAS, Bradenton, FL
9:15 Pasture pH and Liming Issues Affecting
Forage Yield Martin Adjei, Range Cattle
REC, UF/IFAS, Ona, FL
9:30 Refreshment Break
9:45 Breakout Sessions
Each session will have a program designed to
meet the needs of cattlemen in the designated
area. Specific fertilizer, grass, and
management systems recommendations will be
presented and discussed by extension
professionals in these areas.
1. Northwest Florida
2. Central Florida
3. South Florida
4. Ranchette Small Farm-Introductory
Producer
11:45 Adjourn


SOURCE:


Matt Hersom
Phone: (352) 392-2390
Email: hersom@animal.ufl.edu


Todd Thrift
Phone: (352) 392-8597

University of Florida
Department of Animal Sciences
Gainesville, FL
http://www.animal.ufl.edu


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








ABGA Judge
Certification Program


The rapid growth of the American goat industry
has created great opportunities as well as challenges.
Within the American Boer Goat Association (ABGA),
our sanctioned show program has developed from 20
shows in 1997 to 121 in 2004. ABGA is in need of
certifying judges to meet the demand of current and new
breeding Boer goat shows. ABGA and the goat industry
are in need of qualifying judges in all regions of the United
States.
The ABGAjudge certification program is designed
for individuals with a livestock judging background (all
species) and/or strong production animal agriculture
experience. Each program is limited to 25-30 candidates
and will be held in San Angelo, Texas. Dr. Frank
Craddock, professor and extension sheep and goat
specialist in San Angelo, Texas will conduct the program.
The cost of the program is $200.00. The dates of the
programs are listed below.

Judae Certification Proaram Dates


+ April 21-23, 2005

+ May 26-28, 2005

+ October 27-29, 2005

For an application for the ABGAjudge certification
program or if you have any questions regarding the
ABGA certification program, please feel free to contact
Robert Swize, Executive Director ABGA, at (325) 486-
2242.
Judging of breeding animals is an important task as
the judge's insight and knowledge aids producers with
their breeding and marketing programs. Judges also play
a vial role of educating the exhibitors as well as the
viewing public.


SOURCE:


American Boer Goat Association
http://www.abga.org/
Phone: (325) 486-2242
Release February 2005


.\ ,
,k I /


Reverse Trade Mission
Being Planned to Spur
Exports of Florida Cattle
to Puerto Rico


Florida cattle producers will show their livestock
to prospective buyers from Puerto Rico this spring during
a reverse trade mission organized by the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Planned for April, the reverse trade mission is the latest
in a series of marketing initiatives that began over five
years ago involving the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
and Florida.
"We look forward to working with Puerto Rico's
newly elected government and Secretary of Agriculture,
Sr. Jose Orlando Fabres Laboy, in furthering our trade
relationship," Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson said. "Florida's breeding stock is well suited
for Puerto Rico's environment, and our state's cattlemen
welcome the opportunity to explore new opportunities."
Representatives ofBronson's Division of Marketing
and Development will meet with Puerto Rico government
leaders and members of the Puerto Rico Beef Industry
Board in coming weeks to plan the details of the reverse
trade mission.
The trade relationship began in March 1999 when
representatives of the Puerto Rico government and the
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services entered into discussions about the feasibility of
shipping Florida breeding stock to the island. While the
cost of transportation by air was a barrier to trade,
shipping by sea proved to be commercially viable and
paved the way for the first purchase of Florida cattle.
The Puerto Rico Beef Industry Board sent a delegation
to Florida ranches to select the stock, which resulted in
sales of over $150,000 for that year.
Since that first sale, Department marketing
representatives have continued to develop contacts with
Puerto Rico's beef industry leaders and government
officials to further position Florida as a supplier of
superior quality, tropically adapted cattle. Shipments
continued generating sales of
$308,650 in 2000
$135,000 in 2001


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


m# m#








ABGA Judge
Certification Program


The rapid growth of the American goat industry
has created great opportunities as well as challenges.
Within the American Boer Goat Association (ABGA),
our sanctioned show program has developed from 20
shows in 1997 to 121 in 2004. ABGA is in need of
certifying judges to meet the demand of current and new
breeding Boer goat shows. ABGA and the goat industry
are in need of qualifying judges in all regions of the United
States.
The ABGAjudge certification program is designed
for individuals with a livestock judging background (all
species) and/or strong production animal agriculture
experience. Each program is limited to 25-30 candidates
and will be held in San Angelo, Texas. Dr. Frank
Craddock, professor and extension sheep and goat
specialist in San Angelo, Texas will conduct the program.
The cost of the program is $200.00. The dates of the
programs are listed below.

Judae Certification Proaram Dates


+ April 21-23, 2005

+ May 26-28, 2005

+ October 27-29, 2005

For an application for the ABGAjudge certification
program or if you have any questions regarding the
ABGA certification program, please feel free to contact
Robert Swize, Executive Director ABGA, at (325) 486-
2242.
Judging of breeding animals is an important task as
the judge's insight and knowledge aids producers with
their breeding and marketing programs. Judges also play
a vial role of educating the exhibitors as well as the
viewing public.


SOURCE:


American Boer Goat Association
http://www.abga.org/
Phone: (325) 486-2242
Release February 2005


.\ ,
,k I /


Reverse Trade Mission
Being Planned to Spur
Exports of Florida Cattle
to Puerto Rico


Florida cattle producers will show their livestock
to prospective buyers from Puerto Rico this spring during
a reverse trade mission organized by the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Planned for April, the reverse trade mission is the latest
in a series of marketing initiatives that began over five
years ago involving the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
and Florida.
"We look forward to working with Puerto Rico's
newly elected government and Secretary of Agriculture,
Sr. Jose Orlando Fabres Laboy, in furthering our trade
relationship," Florida Agriculture Commissioner Charles
H. Bronson said. "Florida's breeding stock is well suited
for Puerto Rico's environment, and our state's cattlemen
welcome the opportunity to explore new opportunities."
Representatives ofBronson's Division of Marketing
and Development will meet with Puerto Rico government
leaders and members of the Puerto Rico Beef Industry
Board in coming weeks to plan the details of the reverse
trade mission.
The trade relationship began in March 1999 when
representatives of the Puerto Rico government and the
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services entered into discussions about the feasibility of
shipping Florida breeding stock to the island. While the
cost of transportation by air was a barrier to trade,
shipping by sea proved to be commercially viable and
paved the way for the first purchase of Florida cattle.
The Puerto Rico Beef Industry Board sent a delegation
to Florida ranches to select the stock, which resulted in
sales of over $150,000 for that year.
Since that first sale, Department marketing
representatives have continued to develop contacts with
Puerto Rico's beef industry leaders and government
officials to further position Florida as a supplier of
superior quality, tropically adapted cattle. Shipments
continued generating sales of
$308,650 in 2000
$135,000 in 2001


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


m# m#





6


$245,200 in 2002
$200,000 in 2003, and
$412,500 in 2004.

Bronson traveled to Puerto Rico in 2002 to further
enhance the growing trade relationship. He met with the
Puerto Rico Beef Industry Board, the Presidents of the
Senate and the House and other Puerto Rico government
officials. That same year, the Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Services purchased a loading
chute to facilitate the shipping of cattle from the Port of
Jacksonville. The Department also assisted the Puerto
Rican livestock industry in the research and exportation
of "Florakirk" bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon), a
perennial grass used as a high-yielding, high-quality, fine-
stemmed forage for hay production in Florida. The
shipment of Florakirk from the University of Florida's
Cattle Research and Education Center was the result of
a request by Puerto Rican ranchers visiting Florida to
buy cattle.

SOURCE: Dan Sleep
Phone: (850) 487-8908
Email: sleepd@doacs.state.fl.us
FDACS
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us/
Release February 16, 2005




Beefmobile Ventures
Into Cyberspace

A newly launched Web site at
http://www.beefmnobile.com highlights the Beef Checkoff
Program and the travels of its "Beefmobile" to assist state
beef councils and auction markets as they plan
appearances by the roving information center.
The Beefmobile is funded by the Cattlemen's Beef
Board on behalf of America's beef producers. "The Beef
Act and Order of 1985 mandates that those contributing
to the Beef Checkoff Program know how their dollars
are invested, and the Beefmobile and this accompanying
Web site are a couple of ways we achieve that objective,"
said Beef Board Chairman Al Svajgr, a Nebraska
cattleman.


"The Beefmobile provides producers with direct
access to the results of beef checkoff research and
promotional efforts. It also gives producers in the area a
chance to ask questions about the checkoff and to
provide input regarding how checkoff dollars should be
invested."

The Beefmobile project is conducted on behalf of
the Cattlemen's Beef Board by the National Livestock
Producers Association (NLPA). NLPA serves as one
of the Beef Board's contractors for checkoff-funded
programs.
NLPA Chairman Jack Hanson, a beef producer
from Susanville, Calif, said the Beefmobile's online
presence helps extend its outreach to producers in every
comer of the country.
"Even though the Beefmobile is making many visits
to livestock auctions nationwide, as well as making
appearances at major consumer venues, it is still difficult
to reach as many grassroots producers as we would
like," he said. "The Beefmobile Web site adds another
layer to this project's coverage and gives online visitors
easy access to information about this exciting program
and the beef checkoff."
In the "Wrangler" section of the Web site, visitors
can learn more about Tracey Orsburn, the 2005
Beefmobile Wrangler, and get information about
becoming a future Beefmobile Wrangler. In other areas
within the site, producers can learn about an array of
various checkoff-funded projects, view the Beefmobile's
upcoming schedule, and provide feedback about the
program.


SOURCE:


Scharee Atchison
Phone: (719) 538-8843
Email: SLAtchison@nlpa.org

Diane Henderson
Phone: (303) 850-3465
Email: dhenderson@beef.org
National Cattlemen's Beef
Association
http://www.beef.org
Release February 18, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


NATIONAL NIAA Symposium
INSTI TU TE
AcRICSTu to Focus on
4 Zoonotic Diseases

The National Institute for Animal Agriculture
(NIAA) is hosting a focused symposium in conjunction
with its 2005 Annual Meeting in St. Paul, Minn.
Protecting the Global Food Supply: Growing Concerns
for Emerging Zoonotic Diseases will be held on April 7
at the Radisson Riverfront Hotel.
The symposium will be a collaborative discussion
including producers, veterinarians, government officials,
food company representatives and academicians. The
agenda involves a broad range of stakeholders, from
animal and human health disciplines, which will gather to
address the new epidemiological challenges of animal-
human interactions.
"We're entering a new era for addressing zoonotic
diseases," said NIAA Chairman of the Board Rick
Sibbel, D.V.M. "NIAA has identified a need for all
industry sectors to come together to discuss the many
human-animal interactions and other factors that must
be understood to avoid emerging zoonotic diseases and
threats to our food supply in the future."
Avian Influenza is an example ofa zoonotic disease
that may be emerging as a pandemic threat. It is clear
from this example that these challenges have worldwide
implications on animal production, the food supply and
human health. Veterinarians, animal health and public
health officials can have a significant impact through
epidemiological investigations. "Engaging with groups
such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Department of Homeland Security, USDA, APHIS'
Wildlife Services and others can enhance our ability to
mitigate the impact of zoonotic diseases," said Sibbel.
The program will feature several keynote speakers
from the U.S. and abroad to discuss growing concerns
ofzoonotic diseases on a global platform. Other highlights
include lessons from past experience, strategies for
enhancing global food system protection and a panel of
individuals involved with Minnesota's collaborative
efforts between industry, government and university to
protect the global food supply.
The symposium is co-sponsored by the National


Center for Food Protection and Defense and the Center
for Animal Health and Food Safety at the University of
Minnesota. The agenda is scheduled from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., followed by a reception. For more information
on the symposium, including speakers and registration,
go to http://www.animalagriculture.org or call (270) 782-
9798.


SOURCE:


Ben Richey
Phone: (270) 782-9798
Email: brichey@animalagriculture.org
National Institute for Animal
Agriculture
http://animalagriculture.org
Release February 17, 2005


American Meat
Institute Launches
New Web Site

The American Meat Institute
(AMI) today unveiled a new web site
www.animalhandling.org that aims to
be a resource for the meat industry, the public and the
media about animal handling in meat plants.
Included on the new site is the AMI Foundation
(AMIF) Recommended Animal Handling Guidelines and
Audit Guide, 2005 edition, written by one of the world's
leading animal welfare experts, Dr. Temple Grandin of
Colorado State University. The guide can be downloaded
for free and includes AMI Foundation audit forms for
cattle and calves, pigs and sheep.
AMIF's Recommended Animal Handling
Guidelines and Audit Guide is the gold standard for animal
handling and auditing worldwide. AMIF was the first
animal agriculture organization to develop animal handling
guidelines, originally released in 1991, and also the first
to develop a self-audit program, originally released in
1997. The guidelines are used in the Certified Humane
Raised and Handled Certification ProgramTM. In
addition, they are recommended by the American
Humane Association. Today, these documents have been
merged into a single, easy-to-use guide, complete with
official audit forms.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


NATIONAL NIAA Symposium
INSTI TU TE
AcRICSTu to Focus on
4 Zoonotic Diseases

The National Institute for Animal Agriculture
(NIAA) is hosting a focused symposium in conjunction
with its 2005 Annual Meeting in St. Paul, Minn.
Protecting the Global Food Supply: Growing Concerns
for Emerging Zoonotic Diseases will be held on April 7
at the Radisson Riverfront Hotel.
The symposium will be a collaborative discussion
including producers, veterinarians, government officials,
food company representatives and academicians. The
agenda involves a broad range of stakeholders, from
animal and human health disciplines, which will gather to
address the new epidemiological challenges of animal-
human interactions.
"We're entering a new era for addressing zoonotic
diseases," said NIAA Chairman of the Board Rick
Sibbel, D.V.M. "NIAA has identified a need for all
industry sectors to come together to discuss the many
human-animal interactions and other factors that must
be understood to avoid emerging zoonotic diseases and
threats to our food supply in the future."
Avian Influenza is an example ofa zoonotic disease
that may be emerging as a pandemic threat. It is clear
from this example that these challenges have worldwide
implications on animal production, the food supply and
human health. Veterinarians, animal health and public
health officials can have a significant impact through
epidemiological investigations. "Engaging with groups
such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
Department of Homeland Security, USDA, APHIS'
Wildlife Services and others can enhance our ability to
mitigate the impact of zoonotic diseases," said Sibbel.
The program will feature several keynote speakers
from the U.S. and abroad to discuss growing concerns
ofzoonotic diseases on a global platform. Other highlights
include lessons from past experience, strategies for
enhancing global food system protection and a panel of
individuals involved with Minnesota's collaborative
efforts between industry, government and university to
protect the global food supply.
The symposium is co-sponsored by the National


Center for Food Protection and Defense and the Center
for Animal Health and Food Safety at the University of
Minnesota. The agenda is scheduled from 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., followed by a reception. For more information
on the symposium, including speakers and registration,
go to http://www.animalagriculture.org or call (270) 782-
9798.


SOURCE:


Ben Richey
Phone: (270) 782-9798
Email: brichey@animalagriculture.org
National Institute for Animal
Agriculture
http://animalagriculture.org
Release February 17, 2005


American Meat
Institute Launches
New Web Site

The American Meat Institute
(AMI) today unveiled a new web site
www.animalhandling.org that aims to
be a resource for the meat industry, the public and the
media about animal handling in meat plants.
Included on the new site is the AMI Foundation
(AMIF) Recommended Animal Handling Guidelines and
Audit Guide, 2005 edition, written by one of the world's
leading animal welfare experts, Dr. Temple Grandin of
Colorado State University. The guide can be downloaded
for free and includes AMI Foundation audit forms for
cattle and calves, pigs and sheep.
AMIF's Recommended Animal Handling
Guidelines and Audit Guide is the gold standard for animal
handling and auditing worldwide. AMIF was the first
animal agriculture organization to develop animal handling
guidelines, originally released in 1991, and also the first
to develop a self-audit program, originally released in
1997. The guidelines are used in the Certified Humane
Raised and Handled Certification ProgramTM. In
addition, they are recommended by the American
Humane Association. Today, these documents have been
merged into a single, easy-to-use guide, complete with
official audit forms.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


In addition to the guidelines and audit forms, the
new web site www.animalhandling.org also includes
sections on animal welfare auditing, animal handling
training materials, a section on animal welfare versus
animal rights, an explanation of federal requirements for
animal welfare in meat plants and a series of photos that
illustrate animal handling in meat plants.
Also on the site are new "helmet stickers" that can
be used by plants to recognize animal handlers who are
trained and qualified. The stickers cost $25 per 100
stickers, including shipping and handling.
"The American Meat Institute Foundation has been
a leader in developing animal handling standards and in
offering top-notch training opportunities, like our Animal
Care and Handling Conference, held last week in Kansas
City," said AMI President J. Patrick Boyle. "Animal
welfare is a non-competitive issue in the meat industry
and we are pleased to offer all of our resources on a
single, easy-to-navigate web site. We also hope that this
web site will be an important resource for reporters and
the public."

SOURCE: Janet Riley
Phone: (202) 587-4245
Email: jriley@meatami.com

David Ray
Phone: (202) 587-4243
Email: dray@meatami.com
American Meat Institute
http://www.meatami.com
Release February 16, 2005


0 Meat Case Study
aa to be Unveiled at
AMI Conference

New qualitative and quantitative research into
consumer attitudes and meat purchasing behavior will
be unveiled at the opening general session on March 6
of the American Meat Institute/Food Marketing Institute
conference in Orlando, Fla.


by Cryovac, AMI, the Cattlemen's Beef Board and the
National Pork Board, probes consumer attitudes toward
meat in regard to taste, shopping and cooking. Focus
groups discussed retail formats and how retailers might
encourage consumers to purchase more meat and
nontraditional cuts of meat.
Study findings will be compared and contrasted
with the results of the 2002 National Meat Case Study,
which examined actual meat case products as well as
consumer purchasing behavior. Over 100 retail locations
were studied for the survey, which quantifies the real
estate commanded by different species, case-ready
meats, cooked or prepared products, non-meat products
and the like.
"The consumers who participated in the focus
groups spoke loudly and clearly about their shopping,
cooking and eating experiences and had some practical
recommendations for retailers and meat and poultry
processors," said Jerry Kelly, national coordinator, retail
task force for Cryovac. "Clear themes emerged from
these discussions, and Annual Meat Conference
attendees will benefit from seeing a comparison of the
focus group findings to their actual behavior and what's
actually in the meat case."
Meat Marketing & Technology magazine will
feature an in-depth look at the research in its April 2005
issue.
The Annual Meat Conference will be held March
6-8, 2005, at the Caribe Royale Resort and Convention
center in Orlando. Further information is available at the
AMI (http://www.meatami.com) and FMI websites
(http://www.fini.org).


SOURCE:


Janet Riley
Phone: (202) 587-4245
Email: jriley@meatami.com

David Ray
Phone: (202) 587-4243
Email: dray@meatami.com
American Meat Institute
http://www.meatami.com
Release February 17, 2005


The National Meat Case Study, jointly sponsored


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml




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