• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 Food check-out day is February...
 USDA announces the nation's first...
 Reduced stress cattle handling...
 Dietary guidelines confirm beef's...
 News study says that BSE transmission...
 Pork producers agree to two-year...
 Johanns turns up the heat...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal science newsletter. February 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00002
 Material Information
Title: Animal science newsletter. February 2005.
Series Title: Animal science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: February 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    Food check-out day is February 7
        Page 3
    USDA announces the nation's first conservation easement in the Grassland Reserve Program
        Page 4
    Reduced stress cattle handling saves money
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Dietary guidelines confirm beef's nutritional benefits
        Page 7
    News study says that BSE transmission risk to humans is very low
        Page 7
    Pork producers agree to two-year EPA study on emissions
        Page 8
    Johanns turns up the heat on Japan
        Page 8
Full Text




,.LUNVE1RSIT Y OF. :-

FLORIDA Scienc

TFAS EXTENSION rl/ ,
Fbur 00. 1 8

February 2005


In This Issue...
Beef Nlanauement Calendar
Livestock Summarx
Food Check-Out Da\ is Februarn
LSDA Announces The Nation's First Conser\ation
Easement In The Grassland Reser\e Prouram
Reduced Stress Cattle Handlinu Sa\es Nlone\
Dietary Guidelines Confirm Beefs Nutritional
Benefits
Ne\\ Study Says That BSE Transmission Risk to
Humans is \'Ve Lo\\
Pork Producers Agree to T\\o-Year EPA Study on
Emissions
Johanns Turns Up the Heat on Japan


J


Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

+ J.D.Arthington
Beef Cattle Management, Ona
+ J.N. Carter
Beef Cattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
G.R. Hansen
Beef Cattle Production, Marianna
F.G. Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
*: M.J. Hersom
Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, Gainesville
*: T.A. Houser
Extension Meat Specialist, Gainesville
E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
Beef Cattle Management, Gainesville
o R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/Training, Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
ST.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
Beef Cattle Nutrition, Gainesville


7


8
S


I


-p,

't
'k


Dr. Robert Sand retired on
December 31, 2004, after 33
years and 1 month at the
University of Florida. Dr. Sand
will be doing consulting and
environmental assessments for
EMS. He is planning to reside
in Colorado July thru
September.


The Institute ofFoodandAgricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an EqualEmployment Opportunity -Affirmanive Acton Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and other
services only to individuals thatfunction with regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contactyour county
Cooperative Extension Service office.


i ; , Dates to Remember


February
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FL

March
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4
5





2


Beef Management
Calendar


February
E Top dress winter forages, if needed.
E Check and fill mineral feeders.
E Put bulls out with breeding herd.
E Work calves (identify, implant with growth
stimulant, vaccinate, etc.).
E Make sure lactating cows are receiving an
adequate level of energy.
R Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases.
E Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
seasonally up.
E Check for lice and treat if needed.

March
E Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and
get fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while
there is still good soil moisture.
E Prepare land for summer crops.
E Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
E Check and fill mineral feeder.
E Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate
and rest if needed.
E Deworm cows as needed.
E Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
E Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1st for
external parasite control or use insecticide
impregnated ear tags.
E Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
E Put bulls out March 1st for calving season to start
December 9.
E Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.

April
E Plant warm season annual pastures.
E Plant corn for silage.
E Check and fill mineral feeder.
E Check dust bags or apply treated ear tags.
E Check for external parasites and treat if necessary.
R1 Observe cows for repeat breeders.


a


http://www.animal. ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


E Vaccinate against blackleg and brucellosis after
3 months of age and before 12 months of age.
E Market cull cows and bulls.
E Update market information and refine market
strategy for calves.



Livestock Summary

The U.S. Department of
Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service announced
recently that further tests for Bovine
Spongiform Encephalopathy, or mad-
cow disease, turned out negative,
alleviating the fears of the U.S. cattle industry. After
the initial screening came back inconclusive, the
Agriculture Department ran a "gold standard" test
twice. "Negative results from both tests make us
confident that the animal in question is indeed
negative," said John Clifford, deputy administrator
of the department's Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service.
The confirmatory tests were done at the National
Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa.
Officials did not release where the cow came from
or why it was suspected of being diseased. The
possibility of a second case of BSE rattled cattle
producers, meatpackers, and other industry
stakeholders.
"This is not an unexpected situation and proves
why it is important to await the final test results from
USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratory,"
said National Cattlemen's Beef Association president
Jan Lyons in a statement after the results were
released. "What Americans need to know is that the
U.S. government and cattle industry will continue to
protect public and animal health from BSE," she said.
"For example, this animal never entered the human
food supply, nor did it enter the animal feed chain,
proving the systems in place are working to protect
public and animal health."
After the announcement was made, the
American Meat Institute issued a statement that said
"it was gratified by news that an 'inconclusive' test








result for BSE...ultimately tested negative." Some
scientists and industry officials say it is possible that
the enhanced surveillance may detect additional
cases, but say this poses no food safety issue, the
AMI said in its statement.

What Americans need to know is that the U.S.
government and cattle industry will continue to
protect public and animal health from BSE. This
animal never entered the human food supply, nor did
it enter the animal feed chain, proving the systems
in place are working to protect public and animal
health.

Livestock Trends
Florida Bool Cow Inventory


A Food Check-Out Day is
February 7

By February 7 the average American will have
earned enough income to pay for the entire year's
food supply, and state agriculture leaders are
encouraging Floridians to remember the efforts of
the farmers who make this feat possible.

"Americans enjoy the safest, most abundant and
most affordable food supply on earth," Florida
Agriculture Commissioner Charles H. Bronson said.
"Based on U.S. Department of Agriculture statistics,
it takes just 37 days for the average American to earn
enough disposable income to pay for his or her
family's food supply for the entire year."


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Florida Commercial Hog Slaughter




, a
Flori Mil P u nu
a iooa\ 'I l



Florida Milk Production Values


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SOURCE: The Florida Agri-Journal
Researched by Kurt Shiver
Marketing Specialist I
Division of Marketing
Release January 3, 2005


Thanks to modern farming techniques,
S America's farmers and ranchers are producing more
S food on fewer acres, leaving more open space for
S wildlife habitat. Precision farming practices boost
S crop yields and overall efficiency by using satellite
S maps and computers to match seed, fertilizer and crop
_N4 protection applications to local soil conditions.

"Food Check-Out Day is a celebration of the
bounty from America's farms and ranches and how
that bounty is shared with American consumers
through affordable food prices," said Carl Loop,
president of the Florida Farm Bureau Federation.
"Compared to other expenses facing America's
families, food is a bargain. While Americans must
only work until early February to pay for their yearly
S0D food supply, last year they had to work until April 11
to pay for their taxes."

The idea for Food Check-Out Day was
developed by the American Farm Bureau Women's
Committee and was first observed in 1998 with an
event in Chicago. Since then, observances have been
held, respectively, in Phoenix, Nashville,
Philadelphia, Las Vegas, New Orleans, and
= Jacksonville. This year's event will be held in Orange
County, California.

More than 24 million American workers -
representing 17 percent of the total U.S. workforce
produce, process, sell and trade the nation's food
and fiber. However, only 4.6 million of those people


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


T.





4


live on farms, which is slightly less than 2 percent of
the total U.S. population. There are 2.13 million
farms dotting America's rural landscape.
Florida's 44,000 commercial farmers grow
more than 280 different crops. Florida is the nation's
"winter salad bowl," providing 80 percent of the fresh
vegetables grown in the United States during January,
February and March of each year. Year-round, Florida
ranks No. 2 nationally in the U.S. production of fresh
vegetables. Agriculture is Florida's second-leading
industry next to tourism, and has an estimated overall
economic impact of more than $62 billion annually.
The Florida Farm Bureau Federation is the
state's largest general-interest agricultural association
with more than 151,000 member-families statewide
and Farm Bureaus in 62 counties. Headquartered in
Gainesville, the federation is an independent, non-
profit agricultural organization.

For more information:

USDA Economic Research Service
The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural
Resources, and Rural America:
http://www.ers.usda.gov/briefing/
CPIFoodAndExpenditures/Data/table7.htm

Food Check-Out Day newspaper public service
ad (PDF):
http://www.florida-agriculture. com/pubs/pubform/
pdf/Food_Checkout Day 2005.pdf

Food Check-Out Day radio public service
announcements:
http://www.florida-agriculture.com/
food_checkoutday.htm

Overview of Florida's agriculture industry:
http://www.florida-agriculture.com/agfacts.htm

Economic impact of Florida agriculture:
http://www.florida-agriculture.com/
economic_impact.htm

Florida Farm Bureau Federation:
http://www.FloridaFarmBureau.org


Food For Thought ... From Florida's Farmers:
http://www.florida-farmers.com


SOURCE:


MaryAnn Kwader,
Phone: (352) 374-1533
Email: mkwader@sfbcic.com


Scott Christmas
Phone: 352.378-8100, ext 1070
Email: schristmas@sfbcic.com
Florida Farm Bureau
http://floridafarmbureau.org/
Release January 14, 2005




USDA USDA Announces The
SNation's First
Conservation Easement
In The Grassland Reserve
Program

Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman has
announced the first conservation easement completed
in the Grassland Reserve Program (GRP). The
easement is located on 83 acres of grassland in
Sumter County, S.C.
"Our nation's grasslands provide significant
economic and ecological benefits and play a key role
in environmental quality," said Veneman. "This
program helps conserve grasslands and helps
maintain viable ranching and farming operations.
This easement provides permanent protection for the
property's ranching operation from conversion to
non-grassland uses."
The Natural Resources Conservation Service
(NRCS) worked with Rowland Alston, the South
Carolina landowner, to develop a grassland resources
conservation plan that will maintain the viability of
a perennial stand of mixed grasses through common
grazing practices such as rotational grazing and cross
fencing. Also, habitat for bobwhite quail will be
protected from haying and mowing during the
primary nesting season.
GRP, a voluntary program offering landowners


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







the opportunity to protect, restore and enhance
grasslands on their property, is administered by
NRCS, the Farm Service Agency and the Forest
Service. The program emphasizes protection for
grasslands that are under threat of conversion to
cropland or other uses.
The Farm Security and Rural Investment Act
of 2002 authorized USDA to enroll up to 2 million
acres of restored and improved grasslands,
rangelands, pasturelands, shrublands and other
similar lands into GRP easements.
GRP participants may enroll eligible lands
through rental agreements consisting of 10, 15, 20
or 30-years, or through 30-year or permanent
easements. In fiscal year 2004, NRCS and FSA
jointly processed 10,122 GRP applications on 6.5
million acres.
Since the beginning of the program in fiscal year
2003, 302 easement projects have been approved in
37 states covering 184,842 acres valued at
approximately $61 million. GRP easements have not
been completed for these projects. NRCS and GRP
participants have jointly developed grassland
resources conservation plans, completed appraisals
and are finalizing the easement acquisition process.
Additional information on GRP is available at
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/programs/grp.


Alisa Harrison
Phone: (202) 720-4623

Mary Cressel
Phone: (202) 690-0547

USDA
http://www.usda.gov
Release January 13, 2005


Reduced Stress Cattle Handling
Saves Money

Managers need to change bonus programs to
incite better cattle handling practices

Other than genetics the easiest, most
economical, way to increase profitability of you
cowherd (as well as to reduce loss in the bad years)
is through stress free cattle handling. It is not only a
way to increase gains as much as a half pound a day
with no added expenses; it has also been shown to
reduce medicine costs by as much as 50% and to
significantly reduce packers discounting your cattle
for bruises and dark cutters. There is also the side
benefit of being able to market your cattle as being
handled in a stress free manner as a hedge against
animal activists. Articles have been written by Dr.
Temple Grandin of the University of Colorado and
livestock handling expert Bud Williams showing that
by reducing stress on cattle during handling that gains
in feedlots can increase by a half pound a day, medical
costs can be cut in half, and packer discounts for
bruises and dark cutters can also be significantly
reduced. This is added money producers could be
making without any cash outlay. It can also add
money to the pockets of cow/calf and yearling outfits.
With all of the positive benefits, why aren't more
operations implementing these methods?
There are several reasons. People have a hard
time understanding the basic principles behind
handling cattle in a stress free manner as the only
way they have ever been taught is to try and force
the cattle into going out the gate. Managers need to
realize the following things and adjust accordingly:
Following the old adage, "time is money" getting
things done quickly rather than efficiently costs
money in the long run through stress related shrink
and sickness.
Today, as many people in management have
never had the hands on experience of handling cattle,
they don't realize bad cattle handling when they see
it. When they see people charging around a pen to
pull cow they assume that the cow is hard to handle
not realizing that the person pulling the cow is
causing most of the reaction of the cow or cattle.


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


SOURCE:


ernr





6


Traditionally cattle handling from horseback has
been headed down the path of being more stressful
on cattle for a long time. As such, only a small
minority of people working cattle understand how
to handle cattle in a reduced stress manner.

Not many realize that every time they ride into
a pen of cattle, they are training the cattle to respond
they way they do, and are also training their horse to
either get better, get worse, or reinforcing the horse
that they are being "perfect" despite any bad habits
they may have.
Perhaps one of the biggest problems is that
people look at competitive events such as working
cow horse, team penning, cutting and roping as being
"the way" to work cattle. In reality the horses trained
for these events are nearly impossible to use in
working cattle in a reduced stress manner.

Perhaps the biggest reason is no reason to do so
on part of the people doing the work. Current bonus
programs are given to the whole herd health crew
when the death loss stays under a certain point.
Managers need to start keeping close track of death
loss on an individual basis and distributing the bonus
money accordingly to individual performance.

A bonus system needs to be implemented on a
pen by pen basis based upon what the projected daily
gain was, and what it wound up actually being as the
higher gains are in direct proportion to how the cattle
were handled on a daily basis.
As for the big question, how do you work cattle
in a reduced stress manner, the answer is both
simplistic and complicated. Let it happen by using
the cow's natural instinct to your advantage. Sounds
simple until you realize that this instinct actually
works nearly the opposite of what we have been
taught, which means we also need to train our horses
to work in a different way (which in essence is
making them much more versatile than any show
horse). So the first thing you need to do is learn how
the natural instinct works.
As there are really very few wild cattle anymore,
the "fight or flight" is not (for the most part) an
accurate description moving cattle. This is especially
true in a feedlot situation where pen checkers are
riding through the cattle on a daily basis. If the riders


are doing their job properly, cattle should be calm to
ride through and calm to handle. You should not be
moving the cattle by using fright. The first step is
actually in forgetting about the flight zones described
in the "flight or flight" methods of handling cattle.
Cattle, whether they are actually wild or if they are
accustomed to being handled, have a natural handle
that has nothing to do with flight.
The best way to describe it is as a "discomfort
zone" which is similar to people in a crowded
situation, whether it is in a mall or sporting event.
Rather than move in a straight line, your course is
determined by the amount of traffic around you and
how you are feeling pressured by that traffic. Cattle
react in the same way to how much pressure you are
putting on them, and from what direction you are
approaching. Although they may not react as quickly,
cattle will react to another cow moving through the
pen much as they do a rider. The only real difference
is that you, unlike another cow, are trying to get them
to go to a particular place, namely, out the gate.
So what is the basic instinct of a cow when it is
trying to get away from you? Most of the time it is
trying to circle around you. This is what they do (or
try to do) with predators. When you try to head it
off, its reaction is to speed up in order to get around
you. If, rather than speeding up, you simply trot
several steps away from the cow at an angle, it will
stop and look back at you or turn back towards the
gate, rather than keep trying to run around you.
In order to accomplish this, it will take a lot of
time and effort. It is not something that you can send
a couple of people to a short clinic and expect them
to understand it, let alone have the rest of the crew
learn it from them. The best, perhaps only, two ways
of having a crew that practices Reduced Stress
Methods of cattle handling, is to hire a crew that
already understands and uses these methods, or: hire
someone to come in and work with your crew for a
month and come in several more times for a few days
to help them brush up on their methods.


SOURCE:


PR Web Press Release by:
Robert Kinford, Too Lazy For You
Livestock & Literary Co.
Release January 12, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


SDietary
Guidelines
Confirm Beef's
Nutritional
Benefits

Nutrient-rich foods should play a prominent role
in a healthy diet, according to the 2005 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans released Wednesday by the
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A key message
conveyed by the new Dietary Guidelines is that
Americans should select nutrient-rich foods from all
food groups and lead more active lives, rather than
rely on special diets as a path to good health.
Calorie-for-calorie, lean beef packs more
nutrients into fewer calories than many other animal
proteins, and today's beef is leaner than ever before.
A total of 19 cuts of beef qualify as "lean" under
government labeling guidelines, according to the
USDA Nutrient Database. Many of these cuts are 20
per cent leaner than USDA data indicated just 14
years ago.
Research funded by America's beef producers
through the national Beef Checkoff Program has
helped showcase the nutritional quality of beef, and
educate the public about beefs nutritional benefits.
These efforts were coordinated on behalf of the
Cattlemen's Beef Board and state beef councils by
the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA).
The NCBA serves as one of the Beef Board's
contractors for checkoff-funded programs.
"The Dietary Guidelines confirm that people
can not only enjoy the flavor and quality of lean beef
but they can also feel good about it being part of a
healthy diet," said Cattlemen's Beef Board member
Wade Zimmerman, a Sugar City, Colo. cattle
producer and chairman of the beef industry's Joint
Nutrition and Health Committee. "Eating beef is a
pleasure but not a guilty pleasure when
incorporated into a balanced diet of nutrient-rich
foods.
"Beef producers should be very pleased with
the place beef holds in these very sensible and


realistic Dietary Guidelines. It is gratifying to see
these guidelines promote a diet that Americans can
actually stick with, and enjoy their favorite foods
while still leading a healthy lifestyle."


SOURCE:


Mary K. Young
Phone: (303) 850-3364
Email: mkyoung@beef.org


Joe Schuele
Phone: (303) 850-3360
Email: jschuele@beef.org

National Cattlemen's Beef Assoc.
http://www.beef org
Release January 13, 2005



New Study Says That BSE
Transmission Risk to Humans is
Very Low

A study published in the online version of the
British medical journal Lancet finds that while bovine
spongiform encephalopathy can be transferred to
humans in the form of variant Cruetzfeldt-Jakob
disease, it takes massive consumption of specified
risk materials like brains and other parts associated
with the central nervous system to produce an
infection. The study, Risk of oral infection with
bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent in primates,
found that human infectivity from consuming
diseased cattle products is seven to 20 times lower
than the infectivity rate for cattle consuming the same
products. Additionally, it estimated that a human
would have to eat some 3.3 pounds of infected neural
tissue to be at risk of developing the disease. The
study concluded that "existing public health measures
can prevent transmission of BSE to man."
"Early in the BSE epidemic in the United
Kingdom, before scientists fully understood BSE or
its transmission, Britons routinely and unknowingly
consumed infected parts from cattle, like brains," said
James H. Hodges, president of the American Meat
Institute Federation. "Yet less than 150 human cases


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





7


SDietary
Guidelines
Confirm Beef's
Nutritional
Benefits

Nutrient-rich foods should play a prominent role
in a healthy diet, according to the 2005 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans released Wednesday by the
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and
the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A key message
conveyed by the new Dietary Guidelines is that
Americans should select nutrient-rich foods from all
food groups and lead more active lives, rather than
rely on special diets as a path to good health.
Calorie-for-calorie, lean beef packs more
nutrients into fewer calories than many other animal
proteins, and today's beef is leaner than ever before.
A total of 19 cuts of beef qualify as "lean" under
government labeling guidelines, according to the
USDA Nutrient Database. Many of these cuts are 20
per cent leaner than USDA data indicated just 14
years ago.
Research funded by America's beef producers
through the national Beef Checkoff Program has
helped showcase the nutritional quality of beef, and
educate the public about beefs nutritional benefits.
These efforts were coordinated on behalf of the
Cattlemen's Beef Board and state beef councils by
the National Cattlemen's Beef Association (NCBA).
The NCBA serves as one of the Beef Board's
contractors for checkoff-funded programs.
"The Dietary Guidelines confirm that people
can not only enjoy the flavor and quality of lean beef
but they can also feel good about it being part of a
healthy diet," said Cattlemen's Beef Board member
Wade Zimmerman, a Sugar City, Colo. cattle
producer and chairman of the beef industry's Joint
Nutrition and Health Committee. "Eating beef is a
pleasure but not a guilty pleasure when
incorporated into a balanced diet of nutrient-rich
foods.
"Beef producers should be very pleased with
the place beef holds in these very sensible and


realistic Dietary Guidelines. It is gratifying to see
these guidelines promote a diet that Americans can
actually stick with, and enjoy their favorite foods
while still leading a healthy lifestyle."


SOURCE:


Mary K. Young
Phone: (303) 850-3364
Email: mkyoung@beef.org


Joe Schuele
Phone: (303) 850-3360
Email: jschuele@beef.org

National Cattlemen's Beef Assoc.
http://www.beef org
Release January 13, 2005



New Study Says That BSE
Transmission Risk to Humans is
Very Low

A study published in the online version of the
British medical journal Lancet finds that while bovine
spongiform encephalopathy can be transferred to
humans in the form of variant Cruetzfeldt-Jakob
disease, it takes massive consumption of specified
risk materials like brains and other parts associated
with the central nervous system to produce an
infection. The study, Risk of oral infection with
bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent in primates,
found that human infectivity from consuming
diseased cattle products is seven to 20 times lower
than the infectivity rate for cattle consuming the same
products. Additionally, it estimated that a human
would have to eat some 3.3 pounds of infected neural
tissue to be at risk of developing the disease. The
study concluded that "existing public health measures
can prevent transmission of BSE to man."
"Early in the BSE epidemic in the United
Kingdom, before scientists fully understood BSE or
its transmission, Britons routinely and unknowingly
consumed infected parts from cattle, like brains," said
James H. Hodges, president of the American Meat
Institute Federation. "Yet less than 150 human cases


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


of vCJD have occurred in the UK." Since these NPPC plans to host six sign-up meetings for
riskiest parts of cattle are forbidden in the human producers across the country in the coming weeks.
food supply, he said, infection is highly unlikely.
"BSE firewalls in place in the United States will SOURCE: Anna Blessing
continue to protect the public health," Hodges said. Email: ablessing@(meatingplace.con


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
Meating Place
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release January 28, 2005


Pork Producers Agree to Two-
Year EPA Study on Emissions

In a step toward air emission policy changes
for livestock and poultry operations nationwide, the
National Pork Producers Council finalized a consent
agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency.
A major component of the agreement is a two-
year study of air emissions from livestock and poultry
operations across the country. Based on the study's
findings, EPA will set national air policies.
Before policy changes can be put in place, says
Dave Roper, chairman of NPPC's Environment
Committee and a member of the Agriculture
Department's federal advisory committee on
agricultural air emissions, farmer and regulators need
to understand how air laws apply to different farms.
Producers who sign the consent agreement and
pay a small penalty will be released from liability
for past violations, under the agreement.
"All producers, whether they signed the
agreement or not, will be subject to applicable
permitting, emissions reporting and other compliance
requirements once the data are analyzed and EPA
publishes new national livestock air emissions
standards," Roper said.
University scientists will conduct the study;
Purdue University will manage the study and provide
status reports to the EPA, industry and other public.


1


Meating Place
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release January 26, 2005


Johanns Turns Up the Heat on
Japan

Newly confirmed Agriculture Secretary Mike
Johanns called on Japan's ambassador to the United
States Ryozo Kato on January 27, 2005, lobbying
hard for a "date certain" on which Japan will end its
ban on American beef products. "I told him that there
was an issue we just needed to immediately address
and get behind us," Johanns said after the meeting
with Kato. "And that was the beef issue." Johanns
said that the issue is so important to USDA that it
will put a team to work on addressing Japanese
concerns around the clock if need be, and that there
is strong, bipartisan concern in congress over the
issue. Asked if Kato would take action quickly,
Johanns said he expected that the ambassador would
be in touch with his superiors by the end of the day.
Asked if he thought the time line could be measured
in days, weeks or months, he responded, "Needless
to say, he (Kato) did not come prepared to say the
date will be Feb. 1 or Feb. 15th. But I certainly felt
the willingness to work with us and get this behind
us. We both expressed that."


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
Meating Place
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release January 28, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml





8


of vCJD have occurred in the UK." Since these NPPC plans to host six sign-up meetings for
riskiest parts of cattle are forbidden in the human producers across the country in the coming weeks.
food supply, he said, infection is highly unlikely.
"BSE firewalls in place in the United States will SOURCE: Anna Blessing
continue to protect the public health," Hodges said. Email: ablessing@(meatingplace.con


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
Meating Place
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release January 28, 2005


Pork Producers Agree to Two-
Year EPA Study on Emissions

In a step toward air emission policy changes
for livestock and poultry operations nationwide, the
National Pork Producers Council finalized a consent
agreement with the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency.
A major component of the agreement is a two-
year study of air emissions from livestock and poultry
operations across the country. Based on the study's
findings, EPA will set national air policies.
Before policy changes can be put in place, says
Dave Roper, chairman of NPPC's Environment
Committee and a member of the Agriculture
Department's federal advisory committee on
agricultural air emissions, farmer and regulators need
to understand how air laws apply to different farms.
Producers who sign the consent agreement and
pay a small penalty will be released from liability
for past violations, under the agreement.
"All producers, whether they signed the
agreement or not, will be subject to applicable
permitting, emissions reporting and other compliance
requirements once the data are analyzed and EPA
publishes new national livestock air emissions
standards," Roper said.
University scientists will conduct the study;
Purdue University will manage the study and provide
status reports to the EPA, industry and other public.


1


Meating Place
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release January 26, 2005


Johanns Turns Up the Heat on
Japan

Newly confirmed Agriculture Secretary Mike
Johanns called on Japan's ambassador to the United
States Ryozo Kato on January 27, 2005, lobbying
hard for a "date certain" on which Japan will end its
ban on American beef products. "I told him that there
was an issue we just needed to immediately address
and get behind us," Johanns said after the meeting
with Kato. "And that was the beef issue." Johanns
said that the issue is so important to USDA that it
will put a team to work on addressing Japanese
concerns around the clock if need be, and that there
is strong, bipartisan concern in congress over the
issue. Asked if Kato would take action quickly,
Johanns said he expected that the ambassador would
be in touch with his superiors by the end of the day.
Asked if he thought the time line could be measured
in days, weeks or months, he responded, "Needless
to say, he (Kato) did not come prepared to say the
date will be Feb. 1 or Feb. 15th. But I certainly felt
the willingness to work with us and get this behind
us. We both expressed that."


SOURCE:


Pete Hisey
Email: phisey@meatingplace.com
Meating Place
http://www.meatingplace.com
Release January 28, 2005


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml




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