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 In this issue...
 Beef management calendar
 USDA releases rule to establish...
 Buy good bulls close to home
 NCBA statement regarding announcement...






Group Title: Animal science newsletter
Title: Animal Science newsletter. January 2005.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067334/00001
 Material Information
Title: Animal Science newsletter. January 2005.
Series Title: Animal Science newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Department of Animal Sciences, IFAS
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Florida Cooperative Extension Service -- Department of Animal Sciences -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: January 2005
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067334
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    In this issue...
        Page 1
    Beef management calendar
        Page 2
    USDA releases rule to establish minimal-risk regions for bovine spongiform encephalopathy
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Buy good bulls close to home
        Page 5
    NCBA statement regarding announcement of Canadian case of BSE
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text





































Prepared by Extension Specialists in
Animal Sciences

+ J.D. Arthington
Beef Cattle Management, Ona
: J.N. Carter
Beef Cattle Extension Specialist, Marianna
*: GR. Hansen
Beef Cattle Production, Marianna
EG. Hembry, Professor
Department Chairman, Gainesville
M.1J. Hersom
Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, Gainesville
*: T.A. Houser
Extension Meat Specialist, Gainesville
*o E.L. Johnson, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.T. Marshall, Professor
Beef Cattle Management, Gainesville
: R.O. Myer, Professor
Animal Nutritionist, Marianna
S W. Taylor, Coordinator
Youth Education/Training, Gainesville
+ S.H. TenBroeck, Associate Professor
Extension Equine Specialist, Gainesville
+ T.A. Thrift, Assistant Professor
Beef Cattle Nutrition, Gainesville


S /, Dates to Remember



January

II Ocalia Bull S:ik Ocala. FL
12-15 Master Hoof Care Technician Training Program -
Gainesville, FL
13 Sen Salfc Food Salci\ Trnni:iiin i Lina,2icrs -
Gii"insu\ ille. FL
17 Hog & Ham Workshop Gainesville, FL
2n Florida Cmllemncn IInsillumc & Trade Sho\\ -
KiSSlilni'cc. FL
20 Spring Pasture Workshop Gainesville, FL
22 Flondi Bull Tiisl Sak. Nlananni. FL




February


1-2 Florida RIInumIaII Nilnllrion S\ iposiiini -
G iii:Kn\s ille. FL
12 Florida State Fair Horse & Livestock Judging -
Tampa, FL
IX-211 .llAmicin onlllh Hoise C'oucill Yollih Horse
Leaderslip S\~ ilposiinln College S:iuioi. PA
18-22 Alachua County Youth Fair & Livestock Show -
Gainesville, FL
1 2111 15 Por\ Club Edikllionl D:a\ CIU:nci'\ Illc FL


UNIVERSITY OF 0' W ,

SFLORIDA ji cnce

IFAS EXTENSION r.4S


January 2005


In This Issue...
Beef Nlanaenment Calendar 2
Livestock Snummary 2
USDA Releases Rule to Establish Mlinimal-Risk
Regions tor Bo\ ine Sponitfonrm
Enceplhalopath 3
Recognizes Canada as Nliinmal-Risk Region.
Nlaking it Eligible to Expolt to the United
States 3
Buy Good Bulls Close to Home 5
NCBA Statement Regardlinu Announcement of
Canadian Case of BSE 6
Final Rule on BSE and Nlinimal-Risk Regions 0


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmave Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information, and other
services only to individuals that function with regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publcations, contact your county
Cooperative Extension Service office.









0


Beef Management
Calendar


January
0 Apply lime for summer crops.
0 Check for lice and treat if necessary.
0 Control weeds in cool season pastures.
0 Begin grazing winter clover pastures when
approximately 6 inches high. Rye should be 12-
18 inches high.
0 Watch for grass tetany on winter pastures.
0 Increase magnesium levels in mineral mixes if
grass tetany has been previous problem (if you
are not already using a high magnesium mineral).
0 Check mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out for October calving season.
0 Make up breeding herd lists if using single sire
herds.
0 Watch for calf scours.
0 Make sure cow herd has access to adequate fresh
water.
0 Buy only performance tested bulls with superior
records.
0 Give bulls extra feed and care so they will be in
condition for breeding season.
0 Examine bulls for breeding soundness and semen
quality prior to the breeding season.
0 Get taxes filed.
0 Discuss herd health with you veterinarian and
outline a program for the year.
0 Vaccinate cows and heifers against vibriosis and
leptospirosis prior to the breeding season.
0 Carry a pocket notebook to record heat, breeding
abnormalities, discharges, abortions, retained
placentas, difficult calvings and other data.
0 Observe cow herd for calving difficulties.

February
0 Top dress winter forages, if needed.
0 Check and fill mineral feeders.
0 Put bulls out with breeding herd.
0 Work calves (identify, implant with growth
stimulant, vaccinate, etc.).
0 Make sure lactating cows are receiving an
adequate level of energy.


0 Watch calves for signs of respiratory diseases.
0 Cull cows that failed to calve while prices are
seasonally up.
0 Check for lice and treat if needed.

March
0 Fertilize pasture to stimulate early growth and
get fertilizer incorporated in grass roots while
there is still good soil moisture.
0 Prepare land for summer crops.
0 Begin grazing warm season permanent pastures.
0 Check and fill mineral feeder.
0 Observe bulls for condition and success. Rotate
and rest if needed.
0 Deworm cows as needed.
0 Make sure calves are healthy and making good
weight gains.
0 Hang forced-use dust bags by April 1st for
external parasite control or use insecticide
impregnated ear tags.
0 Identify, vaccinate, implant, and work late calves.
0 Put bulls out March 1 st for calving season to start
December 9.
0 Remove bulls March 22nd to end calving season
January 1.





Livestock Summary

Japan and the United States
have agreed to partially resume beef
shipments to Japan, but there are still
many details to work out. BSE-
related ban, which has been in place
for ten months, has prevented the U. S. from shipping
beef to a market that is valued at $1.4 billion a year.
Exports could begin in a matter of weeks, but
probably will not be fully restored until next year.
Japan purchased 920 million pounds of beef in 2003,
making it the largest export market for U.S. beef.
The country's beef purchases represented 36 percent
of all U.S. beef exports.
The agreement with Japan should cause other


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml









Asian countries to lift their bans on U.S. beef as well.
Taiwan and South Korea will likely resume beef trade
with the U.S. soon. Officials in Taiwan have indicated
that the required assessments and evaluations for
trade to resume are almost complete. The final step
is on-site inspection of U.S. B SE-testing procedures.
In 2003, Taiwan's purchases of beef and products
were valued at around $325 million.

South Korea's involvement will most likely
hinge on the terms of the agreement with Japan. South
Korea was the third largest buyer of U.S. beef in 2003,
representing 23 percent of beef exports.

Turning to imports, beef imports for the first 8
months of 2004 were 8 percent higher than imports
for the first 7 months of 2002. The year 2003 is not a
suitable comparison because the ban on imports of
Canadian beef distorted the market. Imports for 2004
are forecast to be 3.59 billion pounds-12 percent
higher than the record 3.2 billion pounds imported
in 2002. Beef imports should increase an additional
2 percent in 2005-to 3.66 billion pounds.

Exports of both beef and live cattle remain small
by historical standards. Canada and Mexico are the
only two major markets that have reopened their
markets to allow imports of U.S. beef, and both
markets have been limited so far. Forecast beef
exports remain at 446 million pounds in 2004 and
600 million pounds in 2005. Live cattle exports are
expected to total 40,000 in 2004 and 30,000 in 2005.
These include veal calves to be raised and slaughtered
in Canada.



Livestock Trends


Florida Milk Cow Inventory


I

c


170 -
160 -
150
1-10 -
130
120
110
too1
1999


2000 2001


2002


Florida 2003 Milk Production Per Cow


_-c
r
0
a
I


so




S01


I 400 .
1.300
1.200
1,100
1,000
900
August


September Oclober November December


Florida 2003 Table Egg Prices


too
90
so
80

so
50
4O
30
20
July August S


URCE:


The Florida Agri-Journal
Researched by Kurt Shiver
Marketing Specialist I
Division of Marketing
Release November 17, 2004


USDA USDA Releases Rule
Sto Establish Minimal-

Risk Regions for

Bovine Spongiform

Encephalopathy

Recognizes Canada as Minimal-Risk
Region, Making it Eligible to Export to the
United States


The U.S. Department of Agriculture today
announced that after conducting an extensive risk
review it is establishing conditions under which it
will allow imports of live cattle under 30 months of
age and certain other commodities from regions with
effective bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)
2003 prevention and detection measures.

This final rule ensures the continued protection


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


;eplember October November





4


of public and animal health from BSE, while
removing prohibitions on the importation of certain
animals and commodities from minimal-risk regions.
Prior to being able to import to the United States,
each country must undergo a thorough risk
assessment.
"We are committed to ensuring that our
regulatory approach keeps pace with the body of
scientific knowledge about BSE," said Agriculture
Secretary Ann M. Veneman. "After conducting an
extensive review, we are confident that imports of
certain commodities from regions of minimal risk
can occur with virtually no risk to human or animal
health. Our approach is consistent with guidelines
established by the World Organization for Animal
Health, or OIE, and relies on appropriate, science-
based risk mitigation measures."
OIE recommendations, which are based on the
latest science, provide guidelines for trade in cattle
of any age, as well as beef and many other cattle
products, even from countries that are considered to
be at high risk for BSE as long as appropriate
mitigation measures are applied to protect both
human and animal health.
Canada will be the first country recognized as a
minimal-risk region and, as such, will be eligible to
export to the United States live cattle under the age
of 30 months, as well as certain other animals and
products. Live cattle imported from Canada under
this rule, which is over 500 pages, will be subject to
restrictions designed to ensure that they are
slaughtered by the time they reach 30 months of age.
These include permanent marking of the animals as
to their origin, requiring them to move in sealed
containers to a feedlot or to slaughter, and not
allowing them to move to more than one feedlot while
in the United States.
USDA is confident that the animal and public
health measures that Canada has in place to prevent
BSE, combined with existing U.S. domestic
safeguards and additional safeguards provided in the
final rule provide the utmost protections to U.S.
consumers and livestock. When Canadian ruminants
and ruminant products are presented for importation
into the United States, they become subject to


domestic safeguards as well. Beef imports that have
already undergone Canadian inspection are also
subject to re- inspection at ports of entry by the
USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)
to ensure only eligible products are imported.
USDA conducted a thorough risk analysis for
certain types of Canadian ruminants and ruminant
products introducing BSE into the United States. This
risk analysis included careful consideration of the
risk mitigation measures Canada has in place to detect
and prevent BSE in Canadian cattle and also the risk
mitigation measures imposed in this final rule.
USDA has concluded that Canada meets the
requirements for a minimal-risk region. The minimal-
risk standards that Canada has met include among
others:
* Prohibition of specified risk materials in
human food.
* Import restrictions sufficient to minimize
exposure to BSE: Since 1990, Canada has maintained
stringent import restrictions, preventing the entry of
live ruminants and ruminant products, including
rendered protein products, from countries that have
found BSE in native cattle or that are considered to
be at significant risk for BSE.
* Surveillance for BSE at levels that meet or
exceed international guidelines: Canada has
conducted active surveillance for BSE since 1992
and exceeded the level recommended in international
guidelines for at least the past seven years.
* Ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in place and
effectively enforced: Canada has had a ban on the
feeding of ruminant proteins to ruminants since
August 1997, with compliance monitored through
routine inspections.
* Appropriate epidemiological investigations,
risk assessment, and risk mitigation measures
imposed as necessary: Canada has conducted
extensive investigations in response to any BSE
finding and has taken additional risk mitigation
measures in response.
The rule also outlines conditions under which
sheep, goats, cervids and camelids can be imported,


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml








as well as meat and certain other products and
byproducts from these animals.
USDA first proposed changes to its regulations
regarding establishing minimal-risk regions and
conditions for safely importing live ruminants and
ruminant products from such regions on Nov. 4, 2003,
and the comment period was still under way when
the United States announced its first case ofBSE on
December 23, 2003, in a cow imported from Canada.
To allow additional time for commenters to evaluate
the proposal in the context of the first U.S. finding
of the disease, USDA reopened the comment period
and accepted comments until April 7, 2004. The final
rule will be published in the Jan. 4, 2005 Federal
Register and will be effective March 7, 2005.
Other countries or regions that meet the
minimal-risk conditions will be considered in the
future. The designation of any future countries as
minimal-risk regions will be accomplished through
rulemaking procedures following completion of an
appropriate risk assessment.


SOURCE: United State Department of
Agriculture
http://www.usda.gov
Release December 29, 2004


Buy Good Bulls Close to Home

It is common knowledge that beef cattle either
inherit or develop an adaptability to climates in which
they were produced over many generations. This is
why Brahman cattle perform well in tropical and
subtropical climates around the world, and perform
less well in temperate climates. The reverse is true
for cattle produced in temperate regions (Angus,
Hereford, Charolais, and others).
Adaptability of cattle to a specific environment
is even more refined than that expressed above. Years
ago many cattle operations existed on the muck or
organic soils around lake Okeechobee. Cattlemen
often stated that one could move breeding cattle from
sand-land pastures to the muck, but not visa-versa.


For some reason breeding cattle produced on muck-
land for several generations lost their adaptability to
sand-land pastures, even in Florida. The reason for
this change could be related to the better year-round
availability of higher quality forage grown on muck-
soil pastures, or the absence of liver flukes on muck
soil pastures.
In a classical experiment to study
environmental/genetic interactions in beef cattle Dr.
Marvin Koger and co-workers transferred Florida
Hereford cows to Montana with similar cattle kept
in Florida. Like wise, Montana Hereford cows were
transferred to Florida with similar cows kept in
Montana.
The results of this study showed that when cows
of the same breed are removed from their native
environment they perform less well than counterparts
that remained in their native environment. The
negative response caused by this change in
environment was much more drastic for Montana
Herefords moved to Florida than Florida Herefords
moved to Montana.
Although the above study compared climatic
extremes that demonstrated environment/genetic
interactions in beef cattle, similar responses can occur
with cattle a lot closer to home. This is especially
true for bulls used in sub-tropical south Florida. There
are several problems encountered. The first being that
non-adapted bulls do not hold up under our hot
weather. Often those bulls last only a couple of years
of breeding. Secondly, if non-adapted bulls are used
over several generations it will affect the adaptability
of the cow herd if replacement heifers are retained.
An excellent example of European cattle that
were adapted to Florida's climate is the Charolais
herd developed by Henry Douglas in Zephyrhills over
a 50 year period. This herd produces slick haired
Charolais cattle proven to be very productive as
straightbreds and especially as crossbreds (Brahman
x Charolais) when used in a breeding project
conducted by Mac Peacock at the Range Cattle
Research and Education Center.

Adaptability is one trait needed in Florida cattle,
but it has to be compromised to some degree to make
improvements in other important traits like feedlot


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml







performance and carcass quality. So in closing let's
say Florida cattlemen should buy bulls as close to
home as possible and still obtain the genetics essential
to improving economically important production
traits.


SOURCE:


Findlay Pate
UF/IFAS, Range Cattle REC
fmpate@animal.ufl.edu
Published in "The Peace River
Farmer and Rancher"
Release December 2004


(NCBA Statement
BEEF Regarding
Announcement of
Canadian Case of
BSE

Jan Lyons, Kansas Cattle Producer, and
President, National Cattlemen's Beef
Association

"The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA)
confirmed on Jan. 2 that an Alberta dairy cow born
in 1996 (prior to the feed ban) has tested positive for
Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). No part
of the animal entered the human food or animal feed
systems.
"This animal was identified as part of Canada's
BSE surveillance program. Both Canada and the
United States began an enhanced BSE surveillance
program to better assess the level of risk of BSE. In
doing so, finding additional cases of BSE, especially
in older animals, was not unexpected.
"To date, the United States has tested 158,754
animals for BSE beginning June 1, 2004, and has
not found another U.S. case.
"On Dec. 29, 2004, USDA announced the final
rule to establish Canada as a "minimal risk region"
for BSE which will resume imports of certain cattle
and beef products from Canada to the United States.
The subsequent finding of BSE in this animal should
not have any bearing on the implementation of the


rule scheduled for March 7, 2005. This is an
important step toward normalizing global trade,
which increases profitability for America's cattle
producers.
"NCBA supports a multiple firewall approach
to ensuring this diminishing disease has NO effect
on public or animal or on our ability to trade safe
beef and beef products. This firewall approach
includes:
* Removal of specified risk materials (SRMs)
from all animals entering the human food supply.
SRMs are tissues that, in infected cattle, could
potentially carry the BSE agent. This measure is
internationally recognized as the most effective
means to protect public health from BSE.
* A ban on ruminant-derived proteins in cattle
feed since 1997. International experts agree that a
feed ban breaks the cycle of BSE and assures the
disease will be eliminated. The U.S. Food and Drug
Administration reports a 99 percent compliance rate
for the feed ban.
Canada has all these systems in place, as does
the United States.
"For cattle producers, providing the safest beef
in the world has always been our number one priority.
We're committed to protecting the health of the
consumers who purchase our product, protecting the
health of our cattle herd, and ensuring sustainability
for U.S. cattlemen. For generations, our livelihood
has depended on providing safe, wholesome and
nutritious beef to your family and our own."

SOURCE: National Cattlemen's Beef
Association
http://www.beef.org
Release January 2, 2005


Final Rule on BSE and Minimal-
Risk Regions

Veterinary Services

On Jan. 4, 2005, after a careful and thorough
science-based risk assessment and a comprehensive


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml


6





7


rulemaking process, the U.S. Department of
Agriculture (USDA) published a final rule amending
its regulations to provide for the importation of
certain ruminants, ruminant products and byproducts
from regions that pose a minimal risk of introducing
bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) into the
United States. The rule establishes criteria for regions
to be recognized as presenting minimal risk of
introducing BSE into the United States. This rule
ensures the continued protection of the U.S. food and
feed supply from BSE, while removing unnecessary
prohibitions on the importation of certain
commodities from minimal-risk regions.
A minimal-risk region could include:
* A region in which BSE-infected animals have been
diagnosed, but sufficient regulatory measures have
been put in place that would make the introduction
of BSE into the United State unlikely; or
* A region that has taken effective regulatory measures
to prevent BSE, has never detected the disease, but
cannot be considered BSE free.
By establishing criteria for minimal-risk
regions, the United States has taken a leadership role
in fostering trade of low-risk products with countries
that have a low incidence of BSE and historically
strong risk mitigation measures. Such a move is
consistent with the World Organization for Animal
Health (OIE) recommendations for the trade in
animals and animal products from BSE-affected
countries.

Classification of Canada as Minimal-Risk Region
In addition to defining the standards for
minimal-risk regions, this rule places Canada in the
minimal-risk category and defines the requirements
that must be met to allow the import of certain
ruminants and ruminant products from Canada.
USDA conducted a thorough risk analysis to
evaluate the risk of resuming the importation of
Canadian ruminants and ruminant products in view
of the two BSE cases of Canadian origin. This risk
analysis included careful consideration of the risk
mitigation measures Canada has in place to detect
and prevent B SE within Canadian cattle and also the
risk mitigation measures imposed in this final rule.


USDA determined that allowing the importation of
certain Canadian ruminants and ruminant products
under the conditions imposed by the rule will
continue to protect against introducing additional
cases of BSE into the United States.
USDA has determined that Canada meets the
requirements for a minimal-risk region. The minimal-
risk standards that Canada has met include, among
other things:
* Import restrictions sufficient to minimize exposure
to BSE. Since 1990, Canada has maintained stringent
import restrictions preventing the entry of live
ruminants and ruminant products, including rendered
protein products, from countries that have found BSE
in native cattle or that are considered to be at
significant risk for BSE.
* Surveillance for BSE at levels that meet or exceed
international guidelines. Canada has conducted active
surveillance for BSE since 1992 and exceeded the
level recommended in international guidelines for at
least the past seven years.
* Ruminant-to-ruminant feed ban in place and
effectively enforced. Canada has had a ban on the
feeding of ruminant proteins to ruminants since
August 1997, with compliance monitored through
routine inspections.
* Appropriate epidemiological investigations, risk
assessment, and risk mitigation measures imposed
as necessary. Canada has conducted extensive
investigations of B SE cases and has taken additional
risk mitigation measures in response to these cases.
These risk mitigation measures include among others,
prohibiting specified risk materials in human food.

Commodities Eligible for mport from Canada

The final rule is effective March 7, 2005. Certain
live ruminants and ruminant products and byproducts
are eligible for importation from Canada as of that
date under specified conditions. The following
commodities are allowed to be imported as long as
they meet applicable criteria specified in the
regulations:
* Bovines, for feeding or immediate slaughter, as long
as they are slaughtered at less than 30 months;
* Sheep and goats (ovines and caprines), for feeding
or immediate slaughter, as long as they are


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8


slaughtered at less than 12 months of age;
* Meat from bovines, ovines, caprines and cervids
(deer, elk, caribou, moose, and reindeer); and
* Certain other products and byproducts, including
bovine livers and tongues, gelatin, and tallow.
USDA is also specifying that there are no import
restrictions because of BSE for live cervids or
camelids (i.e., llamas, alpacas, guanacos and vicunas)
from a BSE-minimal risk region.

Additional Requirements for Canadian Imports

USDA is confident that the animal and public
health measures that Canada has in place to prevent
BSE, combined with existing U.S. domestic
safeguards and additional safeguards provided in the
final rule provide the utmost protections to U.S.
consumers and livestock. The final rule provides the
following additional requirements for live Canadian
feeder cattle designed to ensure they are slaughtered
before they reach 30 months of age:
* Feeder cattle must be permanently marked with a
brand to identify the BSE minimal-risk region of
origin before entering the United States. Feeder cattle
exported from Canada will be branded with "CAN;"
* Cattle must be individually identified with an ear
tag before entering the United States. This ear tag
allows the animal to be traced back to the premises
of origin (birth herd);
* Information must be included on the cattle's animal
health certification, relating to animal identification,
origin, destination, and responsible parties;
* Cattle must be moved to feedlots in sealed
containers and cannot go to more than one feedlot;
and
* SRM's will be removed from Canadian cattle
slaughtered in the United States in accordance with
FSIS regulations.
The final rule provides the following additional
requirements for live Canadian sheep and goats
designed to ensure they are slaughtered before they
reach 12 months of age:
* Sheep and goats must be permanently marked with
a brand to identify the BSE minimal-risk region of
origin before entering the United States. Sheep and
goats exported from Canada will be branded with a
"C; "


* Sheep and goats must be individually identified with
an ear tag before entering the United States. This ear
tag allows the animal to be traced back to the premises
of origin;
* Information must be included on the sheep's and
goat's animal health certification, relating to animal
identification, origin, destination, and responsible
parties;
* Sheep and goats must be moved to feedlots in sealed
containers and cannot go to more than one feedlot.
USDA first proposed changes to its regulations
regarding establishing minimal-risk regions and
conditions for safely importing live ruminants and
ruminant products from such regions on November
4, 2003, and the comment period was still under way
when the United States announced its first case of
BSE on December 23, 2003. To allow additional time
for commenters to evaluate the proposal in the
context of the first U.S. finding of the disease, USDA
reopened the comment period and accepted
comments until April 7, 2004.
Other countries or regions that meet the
minimal-risk conditions will be considered in the
future. The designation of any future countries as
minimal-risk regions will be accomplished through
rulemaking procedures following completion of an
appropriate risk assessment.

Economic Impact

Prior to detection of BSE in Canada in May
2003, the United States and Canada engaged in
significant trade in feeder cattle and slaughter cattle.
This rule will reestablish mutually beneficial trade
in live animals between the two countries. Because
the United States has permitted imports from Canada
of boneless beef from animals less than 30 months
of age since mid-2003, this rule is expected to have
little impact on U.S. beef imports.


SOURCE:


Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service (APHIS)
http://www.aphis.usda.gov
Release December 2004


http://www.animal.ufl.edu/extension/beef/newsletter.shtml




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