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 1998: the year past - 1999: the...
 Faculty, staff, and students
 Chili in the news
 General announcements
 Friday's coffee break
 Did you know that...
 Visiting scientists and post-d...
 PLP monthly computer review
 Recent publications






Group Title: PLP news
Title: PLP news. Volume 3, Issue 1. January, 1999.
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067320/00001
 Material Information
Title: PLP news. Volume 3, Issue 1. January, 1999.
Series Title: PLP news
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: Plant Pathology Department, IFAS, University of Florida
Affiliation: University of Florida -- College of Agricultural and Life Sciences -- Plant Pathology Department -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Publisher: Plant Pathology Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date: January, 1999
 Notes
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067320
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    1998: the year past - 1999: the year ahead
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Faculty, staff, and students
        Page 4
    Chili in the news
        Page 5
    General announcements
        Page 5
    Friday's coffee break
        Page 6
    Did you know that...
        Page 7
    Visiting scientists and post-docs
        Page 8
    PLP monthly computer review
        Page 9
    Recent publications
        Page 10
        Page 11
Full Text



Highlights


* From the field: Decline in turkey oak
* Who is who in Plant Pathology


iws


1998: The ye;




It is that time of
the year again! Time to stop
for a few moments and
reflect on what happened and what was
accomplished by the Department in the
past year. It is also time to look ahead,
and perhaps speculate a little, as to what
may happen in the Department in the
year ahead.
1998 was, by most accounts, a
tumultuous and yet eventful year at all
levels. At the national level, disruptive
politics ruled the day, and yet otherwise it
was a good and prosperous year with all
sorts of new scientific and technological
developments. At the state and the uni-
versity level, more politics and more up-
heaval at the very top level, but the uni-
versity has continued to make progress in
virtually all directions. IFAS went
through the year in a succession of three
vice presidents, and yet continuity and
optimism have ruled and "all systems are
go" for improvements in teaching, re-
search, and extension. The Plant Pathol-
ogy Department went through its own
version of turmoil, but still we made
progress in all of our programmatic areas
and we have entered a new era of per-
sonnel and program rejuvenation.
Undoubtedly the biggest news
for the Department in 1998 was our be-
ing authorized first to hire a new faculty
member with expertise in molecular ge-
netics of disease resistance, and later to


The Newsletter of
the Plant '
Department
Volume 3 Issue 1
January 1999


ar past 1999: The year ahead


by Dr. Geoge Agrios
Chairman


hire a second faculty member with pri-
marily teaching responsibility but also
partial responsibility to do research in
turfgrass pathology. Dr. Prem Chourey
chaired the Search and Screening Com-
mittee for the first position and, after a
national search, they gave us three excel-
lent candidates to be interviewed. The
Department quickly and overwhelmingly
chose the best of the three candidates in
the person of Dr. Wen-Yuan Song. Dr.
Song did his graduate work at the Insti-
tute of Genetics, Academia Sinica, Bei-
jing, China, and at the University of Cali-
fornia at Davis (1993-1995) and received
his PhD in 1995. He continued to work
as a postdoctorate at UC-Davis where he
isolated the rice bacterial blight disease
resistance gene Xa21. This gene encodes
a receptor-like kinase with ser-
ine/threonine specificity, the first such
kinase with a defined function, and an
ideal system to study the signaling path-
way and molecular mechanisms in dis-
ease resistance. Dr. Song is expected to
join the Department February 8, 1999.
The search for candidates for
the 7, ".. teaching/ '7. ".. turfgrass pa-
-i. .1.- position has just begun. Job an-
nouncements have been sent to appro-
priate journals and applications for the
position will be accepted until April 15,
1999. Dr Bill Zettler chairs the Search
and Screening Committee for this posi-
tion.


Another very important change
to our campus departmental faculty came
about by the sudden retirement of Dr.
Robert Stall, which was brought about by
his desire to stay home and assist his
ailing wife. Immediately following the
retirement of Dr. Stall, Dr. Jeffrey B.
Jones, a close collaborator of Dr. Stall,
transferred his program from Bradenton
to Gainesville. The transfer was made
possible by the coincidence of Dr. Stall's
retirement and the fact that Dr. Jones had
been offered a position as Leader of a
USDA Laboratory in another state and
so, unless transferred, he would be leav-
ing Bradenton and IFAS. Dr. Jones will
continue his, and for a while Dr. Stall's,
program in plant bacteriology.
We also had changes in faculty
personnel at the North Florida Research
Center at Quincy. Dr. Timor Momol, a
1986 Ph.D. graduate of our Department,
was hired last October as 6(0" extension:
41, ".. research pathologist for horticul-
tural crops. At the same time, Dr. Fred
Shokes, who studied foliar diseases of
peanut and soybean, resigned his position
in December and moved to Virginia
Tech where he became Director of one
of their Research Centers.
In 1998, both our undergradu-
ate and graduate programs made great
strides. We had more undergraduate
majors (25) than ever before. Several of
them again took advantage of the de-


* New members of our department
* New section on Computer Review


Highlights








2 PLP NEWS
1999
partmental work-study program for our
majors and worked in the laboratories
and on projects of our faculty, thus
gaining valuable research experience.
Of the 7 'i idl. iltin, 3 went on to gradu-
ate school, all of them in our Depart-
ment. Enrollments continue to rise in
"Fundamentals of Plant Pathology", and
even more in PLP 2000 "Plants, Plagues,
and People" and PLP 2060 "Molds, Mil-
dews, Mushrooms, and Man". Both of
these courses are taught twice a year and
each has enrollment of over 100 each
time they are taught. The new faculty
position in teaching given to our De-
partment last year was primarily the result
of increased enrollments in these courses.
Also, as a result of PLP 2000, Drs. Zet-
tier and Carlye Baker finished putting the
lectures into a book form and had it
published by the publishers Simon and
Schuster under the title "Biohistory:
Plants, Plagues and People". General
Plant Pathology courses were also taught
at the Indian River Research Center (Ft.
Pierce) by Dr. Ron Sonoda and at the
Research Center at Jay (Milton) by Dr.
Fred Shokes.
The number of graduate stu-
dents in our Department varied from 33
to 37, and we graduated five of them,
one Ph.D. and four Masters. Last year
the department, at the urging of our col-
lege administrators and in line with other
Departments, abandoned the Master of
Agriculture degree in favor of the Master
of Science Non-thesis degree. Our De-
partment was also one of the first to re-
ceive approval and to participate in the
3/2 Program. In this program, out-
standing juniors (3.5 or better GPA,
121 i or better GRE) can take graduate
courses in the 4th and 5h year, and at the
end of the fifth year can receive both a
Bachelor's and a Master's degree. Our
undergraduate student Jessica Roberts
more than met the criteria, joined the 3/2
Program, and was also offered an IFAS
fellowship. Now she is an undergradu-
ate/graduate student.


JANUARY


1998 may have also been the
year that got the Doctor of Plant Medi-
cine (DPM) Professional Degree Pro-
gram on its way. The University of Flor-
ida administration and the Florida Board
of Regents approved the pre-proposal for
the DPM in July. A full proposal was
submitted in September and it is making
its way through some more University
committees back to the Board of Re-
gents. So far all is going well. The DPM
degree program is interdisciplinary, pro-
fessional (like physicians, veterinarians,
dentists, etc.) rather than graduate (no
thesis), has a two-semester internship,
and if approved, it will accept its first
students in August 2000.
Among the other teaching-
related activities we can mention the par-
ticipation of our graduate and under-
graduate students in the IFAS exhibits,
such as the "Gator Encounter" held in
and around Fifield Hall for High School
students, the "TailGator" held on the
main campus for early undergraduates
and alumni, etc. Our students put to-
gether excellent exhibits and made us all
proud. Many thanks again to all who
helped. The students also organized and
participated in a field trip to the Dover
strawberry Research Center where Dr.
Dan Legard had prepared an excellent
program for them.
Our students, and some of the
postdocs and USPS, also put together
spring and fall picnics and an excellent
Christmas party for enjoyment by all in
the Department and their families. I am
grateful to them for their initiative and
their hard work.
Research activities in the De-
partment continued at their usual hectic
pace. Characterization of viruses, gene
isolation and sequencing, genetic engi-
neering of plants for disease resistance,
plant infection and cell death, bacteriocin
characterization, infection and photo-
synthesis, genetics of plant-pathogen
interaction, biological control of plant
diseases and weeds, postharvest pathol-
ogy of tomatoes and strawberries, soil


solarization, population genetics of
pathogens, silicon effects on disease de-
velopment, and several other topics, were
studied by our faculty, postdocs, graduate
students, and USPS, both in the main
campus and at the Research Centers,
often in collaboration among several of
them.
The interaction of researchers in
Gainesville and in Research Centers has
been steadily increasing. This is shown by
the increasing number of our graduate
students doing part of their research at
Centers. (It is also partially indicated by
the fact that two of our three station
wagons wore out and had to be aban-
doned during the year because of the
increased travel between Gainesville and
the Centers).
Our faculty, postdocs, graduate
students, and even some USPS, contin-
ued to publish the results of their re-
search in prestigious scientific journals
and to present abstracts at national and
international meetings. Several of our
scientists attended and presented talks at
the International Plant Pathology Con-
gress at Edinburgh, Scotland. Several
also serve as editors of scientific journals,
editors of books, members of grant re-
view panels, etc.
Funding for research continues
to come overwhelmingly from grants and
contracts received by our faculty and to
some extent from SHARE funds given
our faculty by industry or commodity
groups. State funding continues at ap-
proximately the same level as before and
is used to pay for the main functions of
the Department (graduate assistantships,
undergraduate work-study program, tele-
phones, computers, copying, transporta-
tion, greenhouses, repairs, etc.), which are
used in proportion to the size and activity
of each research, t, ,_i,;i_. or extension
program. This year we also had to use a
good portion of the state-provided
budget towards start-up funds for the
new faculty member we hired.
The important plant disease
problems in the state continue to be basi-








3 PLP NEWS
1999
cally the same as in 1997, with a few im-
portant developments. Tomato yellow
leafroll virus seems to have spread state-
wide and some tomato fields were totally
destroyed by the virus. This raises serious
concerns about the future of the tomato
industry in Florida in the presence of this
virus and increases the pressure on us
plant pathologists to find or develop
means to deal with tomato yellow leafroll
virus as soon as possible. Another dis-
ease, citrus canker, was found in more
and more widely distributed areas in
south Florida. So far, the disease has
been found in urban areas, which makes
it very difficult to nearly impossible to
eradicate. The fear is that continued pres-
ence and spread in urban areas will
eventually lead to spread to commercial
groves, especially during severe storms
and hurricanes. Phytophthora infestans on
potato and tomato, and Phytophthora capsici
on cucurbits and pepper continued to be
of great concern last year. Citrus tristeza
virus threatens to become of even greater
importance to the citrus industry now
that the brown citrus aphid has become
widespread, but the visible situation has
not changed so far.
The appearance of many new,
introduced, damaging pathogens, insects,
weeds, etc., in Florida in the last few
years has become of concern to federal,
state, and IFAS officials and has gener-
ated much interest and some activity to-
wards creating a Center for the Study of
Invasive Pests in Florida. Stay tuned...
Extension activities continued
last year along the lines followed in the
recent past. Extension programming and
its implementation were carried out by all
our pathologists with a majority exten-
sion FTE. Additional extension activities
were carried out by our plant pathologists
with smaller extension assignment and by
other colleagues located primarily at
IFAS Research Centers. The personnel at
the Plant Disease Clinics in Gainesville,
Immokalee, Homestead, and Quincy
carried out their responsibilities of diag-
nosing the diseases in submitted plant


JANUARY


samples and in providing recommenda-
tions for their management and control.
Dr. Pam Roberts completed her first year
as Extension Plant Pathologist at Immo-
kalee, while Dr. Tim Momol began his
employment as Extension Plant Patholo-
gist at Quincy in October. The directors
of the Plant Disease Clinics voted last
October to increase the per sample diag-
nostic fee from $15 to '., beginning
January 1, 1999.
1999 is about two weeks old as
this is being written. A lot of work lies
ahead of us. Improvement of under-
standing and mutual respect within the
Department is greatly needed for the
benefit of all individually, and of the De-
partment as a whole. Also, in spite of the
great cooperation existing among faculty
in Gainesville and at the Centers, more
and better cooperation is desirable and,
with the new technology, it is almost
within reach. We now can become better
connected through computers so that we
can do more and better research faster.
We can have more people statewide en-
joy the satisfaction of teaching and to
contribute towards more courses offered
and to more effective teaching. Addition-
ally, we can use computer connections
between county faculty and our four
Plant Disease Clinics for immediate and
on-the-spot diagnosis of plant diseases by
our expert diagnostician colleagues. The
Department intends to promote such
statewide faculty cooperation to the
greatest extent possible with the re-
sources available.
Our teaching program has made
great progress in several directions but it
is time we take a closer look at the areas
that are likely to advance even more as
well as at those that need help to meet
their goals. Our lower level courses PLP
2000 "Plants, Plagues and People" and
PLP 2060 "Molds, Mildews, Mushrooms
and Man" are likely to reach enrollments
of 200 or more every time each of them
is taught. For example, PLP 2000, taught
by Dr. Zettler, already has 177 students
in the 1999 spring semester. Dr. Carlye


Baker, one of our Courtesy Assistant
Professors, will also be offering PLP
2000 this Fall Semester as a Distance
Learning Class through the Intemet.
On the other hand, some of our
advanced courses (PLP 5053 "Tropical
Plant Pathology", PLP 6262 "Plant
Pathogenic Fungi", and PLP 6502 "Ge-
netics of Host/Parasite Interactions"), all
of them excellent and very useful
courses, are not being taught due to lack
of student enrollment. Our graduate stu-
dents would benefit considerably if they
could take at least some of these courses.
Of course, we will have some additional
flexibility in offering these and other
courses through the new faculty coming
in, that is, Dr. Song who has 2" ..
teaching, and through the other new fac-
ulty member yet to be hired, who will
have 7 ".. teaching responsibility.
If and when the Doctor of Plant
Medicine professional degree program is
given final approval this Spring, we will
be busy on at least two fronts: 1) Pre-
paring and distributing advertising in-
formation about the DPM program for
recruiting and admitting students in this
unique program; and 2) Looking for fel-
lowship and tuition-waver funds for
these students.
One problem that has surfaced
in the last year or so and may have reper-
cussions in this and subsequent years is
the fact that some of the faculty, who say
they may be retiring in the next two or
three years, are no longer accepting new
graduate students. This somehow re-
duces their efforts to obtain grants and
significantly limits the choice of on-
campus programs and faculty with
whom new graduate students can work.
We hope our Center faculty can help us
fill some of the need.
Our research programs are con-
tinuing to be carried out and to be re-
evaluated around the state. Most pro-
grams, because of their importance and
productivity, or, a few of them, because
the faculty are near retirement, are being
continued with minor adjustment. Sev-








4 PLP NEWS
1999
eral others are being modified to keep up
with developments, and some new ones
are expected to be started, for example,
on molecular genetics of disease resis-
tance and on turfgrass pathology. Re-
search on diseases of various crops con-
tinues in Gainesville and also in Research
Centers near which these crops are
grown. Newly introduced pathogens and
alternative control methods are and will
continue consuming much time and ef-
fort of our researchers.
The study of the molecular bi-
ology of geminiviruses, potyviruses and
closteroviruses will continue at a high
level due to the importance of these vi-
ruses to Florida vegetables and to citrus.
The molecular genetics of Xanthomonas
and other bacteria, and their epidemio-
logy, are also being studied to learn how
better to control the diseases they cause
on vegetables, ornamentals, tropical fruits
and citrus. Molecular genetics, ecology,
epidemiology, biological control and
other aspects of fungal pathogens of
many crops are being studied in almost
every one of our Research Centers and at
Gainesville. Fungal, bacterial, and even
viral pathogens are also being studied for
their efficacy as biocontrol agents of im-
portant weeds.
Our extension programs con-
tinue to transfer the science and to pro-
vide recommendations about disease
diagnosis, management and control to
the growers who will be using them.
With the hiring of Dr. Tim Momol at
Quincy last October, in 1999 all our
Plant Disease Clinics will again have a
faculty member in charge, and horticul-
tural crop diseases will receive the atten-
tion they deserve. Probably the biggest
news in Florida plant pathology since the
establishment of the Plant Disease Clin-
ics at three Research Centers is the recent
authorization to hire a plant pathologist
for research on fungal, mostly foliar, dis-
eases of citrus while the present faculty,
Dr. Pete Timmer, who is doing such
research now, will take on a majority
extension citrus -' irl. .1. .-- responsibility.


JANUARY


This arrangement will fill a long and seri-
ous gap in our extension service to the
most important crop of the state, which
for many years until now has been man-
aged with makeshift measures.
Some of our Extension Plant
Pathologists are interested in promoting
Distance Learning and have been pre-
paring teaching materials on disease de-
velopment, diagnosis and control that
will be used to teach classes of profes-
sionals through distance education. Also,
some discussions are taking place among
administrators about the feasibility of
equipping the rest of our county faculty
specialists with computers, cameras, mi-
croscopes, and related equipment, as well
as appropriate training, for distance diag-
nosis. This will make possible disease
diagnosis in the county faculty's office, or
even in the field, through computer and
camera connections of the county per-
sons with diagnosticians at our Plant
Disease Clinics or other diagnostic serv-
ices.
So, everything considered, 1998
has been quite a good year for our state-
wide Department, and we have plenty of
new and important things to work on
and to make progress in during 1999.
Many thanks for your cooperation and
help in 1998 and I am looking forward to
a great year for everyone in 1999.


Faculty, staff, and students

Awards:
* Congratulations to Jessica Roberts!
Jessica was selected as the recipient of
the George Webber Award. The award is
granted to an undergraduate who has
excelled in the Plant Pathology program.
* Also congratulations
to Bob Kemerait and
Gustavo Astua-
Monge! Gustavo and
Bob were selected as
recipients of the Francis A. Wood
Award. This award goes to masters or
doctorate students who have shown out-
standing research effort in Plant Pathol-


ogy. A travel grant, to present related
research, is part of the award.
* Drs. Kucharek and Charudattan re-
ceived the Professorial Excellence Award
from IFAS. This award includes also a
".. I'r r" raise.

Meetings:
* Dr. Tom Kucharek recently traveled
to the Florida Panhandle Watermelon
and Cucurbit Meeting. Dr. Kucharek
presented a course on disease manage-
ment, with emphasis on gummy stem
blight. The meeting was held to inform
growers of the latest production prac-
tices, disease management techniques,
and irrigation techniques, among other
issues.
* Dr. Zettler returned last week from
Taiwan. He participated in the Interna-
tional Symposium on Development of
Bulb Fower Industry, and gave a talk
entitled: "Perspectives for controlling
Dasheen mosaic virus in cultivated
aroids by micropropagation." Besides
enjoying the meeting, Dr. Zettler could
spend some time with some of his for-
mer graduate students, Drs. Tso-Chi
Yang ("George") and Ting-Chin Deng,
and with Dr. Purcifull's former student,
Dr. Chin-An Chang
Consulting abroad:
* Dr. Dean Gabriel recently traveled to
Brazil to review grant proposals submit-
ted for a functional genomics project. Dr.
Gabriel was part of a team brought in by
FAPESP to SAo Paulo as experts in ge-
netics and plant pathology. The grants
are for functional studies of the world's
first sequenced plant pathogen, Xylella
fastidiosa, the causal agent of Citrus varie-
gated chlorosis (CVC). Dr. Gabriel plans
to return for a second round of reviews
as well as to make recommendations on
future projects.

New members of our department:
* The new faculty member of our de-
partment, Dr. Song, will be joining us on
February 8th. Dr. Song will be working in








5 PLP NEWS
1999
the field of molecular genetics of disease
resistance.
* Mr. Eduardo Carlos, from Brazil, is a
recent addition to the graduate student
program of Plant Pathology. More in-
formation about Eduardo can be found
in this issue of the PLPNews.
We/kome on ,/r,.:.'.'

Who is leaving us:
SDr. Laurence Marais is going back to
his country, South Africa, after a one-year
sabbatical. Dr. Marais stayed in Lake
Alfred, but he had the opportunity to
interact with members of Dr. Niblett's
lab and also to present a seminar for our
department in Gainesville.
We wish him the best back home!



Various:
* Kenny Seebold's dissertation and
Sherri Angels's thesis were submitted
for IFAS awards of best dissertation and
best thesis.
* Have you recognized the pictures of
two students of our in the new issue of
"Impact magazine"? The pictures of un-
dergraduate students
Melanie Cash and Lisa
Nozdon are, respec-
tively, on pages 30 and
31 of that magazine...
* There are some "new members" in our
department. Dr. Song and his wife had a
baby girl, named Joanna, last December
28t. Also, former grad student and for-
mer post-doc Dr. Ping Duan and his
wife had a baby boy named Kevin, last
December 15th.
We want to congratulate the four ofyou and
wish the bestforyour babies!!!



Chili in the News


The 11 Annual Fifield
Hall Chili Contest was held from
12-1 Jan. 25, 1999. This yearly '


JANUARY


event organized by the USPS Organiza-
tion is a much-anticipated friendly com-
petition and every chili chef is encour-
aged to enter. Proceeds directly support
acquisitions for the Plant Pathology
Reading Room.
This year's results are proof that
members of our department are really
good cooks! Members of the Plant Pa-
thology department dominated the com-
petition (for the first time in awhile!).
Jerry Minsavage and Richard
Blacharski (coincidentally the presidents
of the USPS and Graduate Student
Organizations, respectively) shared
1st place in the 'Chili with Meat'
category. Mark Gooch, who
submitted two entries in the 'Vegetarian
Chili' category, captured first place de-
spite splitting his votes! Post-doc Chan-
drika Ramadugu won in the 'Exotic'
category. Chandrika also won as 'Overall
Best Chili'.
We would like to thank
Maureen Petersen for sewing the
aprons used as prizes in the Chili Con-
test. Beth Mitchell kindly donated an
appealing looking bottle of red and green
chilis in vinegar, and red chili shaped salt
and pepper shakers. We all really appre-
ciate the help of the many people who
contributed to the success of the event.
By the way, did everyone see the
end of channel 20's six o'clock news the
day of the chili contest? We have had
our 15 seconds of fame! Betcha Presi-
dent Lombardi wants to come next year.



General Announcements

* A job announcement for a 7" .. teach-
ing, '.".. research position in Turfgrass
Pathology have been sent to Phytopa-
thology News and Science.

* The ICBR Genomic Seminar Series of
January and February are:
January 29th "Large-scale
gene trap mutagenesis in
mice", by Dr. Arthur Snyder


(Yale University).
February 5th "Plant Genomics and the
future of food and nutrition", by Dr.
Ganesh Kishore I. .!i' uinr. ,
February 19t "Genomics and Epige-
nomics in maize", by Dr. Joachim
Messing (Waksman Institute of Microbi-
ology).
Seminars location: C1-7, HSC.
Time: 3pm.

* The message below was sent to all grad
students via e-mail by Ms. Joann Fischer,
of the Graduate Programs. Because of its
importance and relevance, we decided to
publish it in the PLPNews:

Just before graduating you will need to:
1. Fill out a degree application for the
correct degree and submit it to the Reg-
istrar's Office.
2. All courses on the Program of Study
(Form 2) must have been (or are cur-
rently) being taken. If not, we will need a
short memo stating the entire committee
agrees to the deletions and/or additions.
3. All "I" grades must be cleared by the
Graduate School deadline (always the
Monday of graduation week).
4. All graduate students are required to
have an exit interview with Dr. Shireman
(call our office to schedule). M.S. and
Ph.D. students should schedule their
appointments when they have their FI-
NAL, corrected thesis/dissertation ready
to be signed and they need to bring the
entire thesis/dissertation, not just the
signature page. Dr. Shireman will not
sign the first submission and her signa-
ture is not required for the first submis-
sion to the Graduate School. Non-thesis
students can schedule their exit interview
as soon as they have set up the date of
their oral exam.
5. All graduate students must turn in to
our office the COA exit questionnaire.
We have sent them to all of our depart-
ments and ask that you give them out to
your graduating students.
6. After the final exam form is signed we
will keep a copy here and send one copy








5 PLP NEWS
1999
the field of molecular genetics of disease
resistance.
* Mr. Eduardo Carlos, from Brazil, is a
recent addition to the graduate student
program of Plant Pathology. More in-
formation about Eduardo can be found
in this issue of the PLPNews.
We/kome on ,/r,.:.'.'

Who is leaving us:
SDr. Laurence Marais is going back to
his country, South Africa, after a one-year
sabbatical. Dr. Marais stayed in Lake
Alfred, but he had the opportunity to
interact with members of Dr. Niblett's
lab and also to present a seminar for our
department in Gainesville.
We wish him the best back home!



Various:
* Kenny Seebold's dissertation and
Sherri Angels's thesis were submitted
for IFAS awards of best dissertation and
best thesis.
* Have you recognized the pictures of
two students of our in the new issue of
"Impact magazine"? The pictures of un-
dergraduate students
Melanie Cash and Lisa
Nozdon are, respec-
tively, on pages 30 and
31 of that magazine...
* There are some "new members" in our
department. Dr. Song and his wife had a
baby girl, named Joanna, last December
28t. Also, former grad student and for-
mer post-doc Dr. Ping Duan and his
wife had a baby boy named Kevin, last
December 15th.
We want to congratulate the four ofyou and
wish the bestforyour babies!!!



Chili in the News


The 11 Annual Fifield
Hall Chili Contest was held from
12-1 Jan. 25, 1999. This yearly '


JANUARY


event organized by the USPS Organiza-
tion is a much-anticipated friendly com-
petition and every chili chef is encour-
aged to enter. Proceeds directly support
acquisitions for the Plant Pathology
Reading Room.
This year's results are proof that
members of our department are really
good cooks! Members of the Plant Pa-
thology department dominated the com-
petition (for the first time in awhile!).
Jerry Minsavage and Richard
Blacharski (coincidentally the presidents
of the USPS and Graduate Student
Organizations, respectively) shared
1st place in the 'Chili with Meat'
category. Mark Gooch, who
submitted two entries in the 'Vegetarian
Chili' category, captured first place de-
spite splitting his votes! Post-doc Chan-
drika Ramadugu won in the 'Exotic'
category. Chandrika also won as 'Overall
Best Chili'.
We would like to thank
Maureen Petersen for sewing the
aprons used as prizes in the Chili Con-
test. Beth Mitchell kindly donated an
appealing looking bottle of red and green
chilis in vinegar, and red chili shaped salt
and pepper shakers. We all really appre-
ciate the help of the many people who
contributed to the success of the event.
By the way, did everyone see the
end of channel 20's six o'clock news the
day of the chili contest? We have had
our 15 seconds of fame! Betcha Presi-
dent Lombardi wants to come next year.



General Announcements

* A job announcement for a 7" .. teach-
ing, '.".. research position in Turfgrass
Pathology have been sent to Phytopa-
thology News and Science.

* The ICBR Genomic Seminar Series of
January and February are:
January 29th "Large-scale
gene trap mutagenesis in
mice", by Dr. Arthur Snyder


(Yale University).
February 5th "Plant Genomics and the
future of food and nutrition", by Dr.
Ganesh Kishore I. .!i' uinr. ,
February 19t "Genomics and Epige-
nomics in maize", by Dr. Joachim
Messing (Waksman Institute of Microbi-
ology).
Seminars location: C1-7, HSC.
Time: 3pm.

* The message below was sent to all grad
students via e-mail by Ms. Joann Fischer,
of the Graduate Programs. Because of its
importance and relevance, we decided to
publish it in the PLPNews:

Just before graduating you will need to:
1. Fill out a degree application for the
correct degree and submit it to the Reg-
istrar's Office.
2. All courses on the Program of Study
(Form 2) must have been (or are cur-
rently) being taken. If not, we will need a
short memo stating the entire committee
agrees to the deletions and/or additions.
3. All "I" grades must be cleared by the
Graduate School deadline (always the
Monday of graduation week).
4. All graduate students are required to
have an exit interview with Dr. Shireman
(call our office to schedule). M.S. and
Ph.D. students should schedule their
appointments when they have their FI-
NAL, corrected thesis/dissertation ready
to be signed and they need to bring the
entire thesis/dissertation, not just the
signature page. Dr. Shireman will not
sign the first submission and her signa-
ture is not required for the first submis-
sion to the Graduate School. Non-thesis
students can schedule their exit interview
as soon as they have set up the date of
their oral exam.
5. All graduate students must turn in to
our office the COA exit questionnaire.
We have sent them to all of our depart-
ments and ask that you give them out to
your graduating students.
6. After the final exam form is signed we
will keep a copy here and send one copy








6 PLP NEWS
1999


back to the department. Please be sure
all three copies are sent here because we
must send the original over to the
Graduate School after Dr. Shireman
signs it.
7. The college copy of the the-
sis/dissertation needs to be in our office
by the Monday of graduation week. It
must be in a letter size expanding binder
(not legal size) on 1(0" 1, rag bond like
the original.

* The series of professional develop-
ment seminars during the Spring se
mester have already started last January
21st. The seminars are open to all
graduate students. The second seminar
will cover issues in Intellectual property
rights and the Intemet. It will be held on
February 24, from 4-6:00 p.m., at Rm.
NEB 100. If you want more informa-
tion about the forthcoming seminars,
you can check the site:
http://web.ortge.ufl.edu/ education

* The Workshops for teaching assistants
are happening every Tuesday from 5-
7:00 p.m., at Rm. TUR 2354 and will
continue until the end of February. The
next training sessions will be:
Feb. 2nd Testing and grading
Feb. 9t Basic principles of learning
Feb. 16th Diversity in the classroom
Feb. 23rd Troubled and disruptive stu-
dents
The workshops are free, but if you want
to attend them, you should call OIR
Teaching Center at 392-2010 or pre-
register on line at http:/ /rove.
ufl.edu/-teachctr/main.html



Friday's coffee break

The labs in charge of .
the coffee break for
the month of Febru- 4 lj
ary are:

February 5th Drs. Kimbrough's and
Kucharek's labs


February 12h Drs. Pring's and


Chourey's labs
February 19h -
February 26th -
full's labs


Dr. Niblett's lab
Drs. Simone's and Purci


Remember that on February 26h we will
be celebrating the "birthdays of the
month".


Important Dates

Januray 29t
- Last day to withdraw with 25% refund.
- Last day to apply to Office of the Uni-
versity Registrar for degree to be con-
ferred at the end of the spring semester.
February 15th
- President's day.
February 20th
- CLAST test.


Birthdays of the month


Henry Ross
Dauri Tessmann
JeffJones
Chuck Niblett
Clint Warren
Maureen Peterson
Gary Marlow
Mayra Vega
Juliana Freitas-Astua
Asha Brunings
Brian Siegmann
Manjunath Keremane


2/03
2/05
2/05
2/15
2/16
2/17
2/17
2/18
2/22
2/24
2/24
2/27


-


Happy birthday to you all!!
Who is Who in our Department


Who IS "h...



Dr. Tom Kucharek, exten-
sion/research plant pathologist of our
department, is originally from Ohio. Dr.
Kucharek did his B.Sc. in Biology at
Kent State University in Ohio, and he
completed both his M.Sc. and Ph.D. at
the University of Minnesota. His master's
thesis was in the Department of Plant
Pathology examining Fusanium monikforme
in corn stalks under the supervision of
Dr. Kommedahl. His Ph.D. dissertation
focused on teliospore germination of leaf
rust on wheat under Dr. Harry Young Jr.
and Dr. M.F. Kemkamp. Dr. Kucharek's
interest in plant pathology dates back to
the summer between his junior and sen-
ior years at Kent State. It was a summer
work/study position at an experimental
station at Ohio State University under
Dr. J.D. Wilson where he got his first
taste of plant p arhi. .--. Since that time,
Dr. Kucharek has worked in many dif-
ferent areas of applied and extension
plant -' rh. ..-. with emphasis on agro-
nomic and vegetable crops. Crops of
particular interest are peanuts, tobacco,
grains and cucurbits. A few of his current
research endeavors include: Cyindrocla-
dium black rot in peanut, Gummy stem
blight of watermelon, SAR (systemic
acquired resistance) for blue mold of
tobacco, Rhizoctonia-induced diseases of
tobacco, and some work with transgenic
squashes against viral pathogens (in
conjunction with Dr. Purcifull). His main
focus is to find economically feasible
control measures for plant diseases. Dr.
Kucharek would like to dispel the myth
that extension plant pathology is primar-
ily concerned with chemical pesticides,
and that he strives to recommend the
most practical control measures, regard-
less of what they may be.

Robert Kemerait Jr. is native
to Gainesville, with ties to the University
of Florida that date back as far as 3 gen-


JANUARY


r'








7 PLP NEWS
1999
erations. Bob has a B.Sc. in Biology from
Davidson College in North Carolina and
a B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University
of Florida. He also did some post bacca-
laureate work in the botany department
at the UF. Bob has converted his Mas-
ter's thesis into a Ph.D. under the direc-
tion of Dr. Tom Kucharek. His main
interest is in the soil borne fungal patho-
gens that are affecting peanut crops in
Florida, and he plans to work in applied
extension plant Irih. .1. .-- after complet-
ing his Ph.D. Bob finds that dealing with
growers enriches his experience as a re-
search plant pathologist because it forces
him to think of the practical application
of plant pathology, and also has found
that dealing with growers is challenging
and rewarding. Bob says that you must
first earn the respect and trust of the
growers, and then talk science regarding
the appropriate control measures.

Mr. Chuck R. Semer IV is
originally from Treeport, Louisiana but
was raised in the San Francisco area of
California. Chuck completed his B.Sc. in
Biology at the University of Akron, in
Ohio; and later pursued a M.Sc. in Plant
Pathology at Ohio State University,
where he worked on using Baillus subtil-
lus as a biological control agent for Dutch
elm disease. He has worked in a variety
of places within Florida, in both industry
and academia. For 8 years, Chuck
worked for Yoder brothers in south
Florida. He has been with the Depart-
ment of Plant P Irl. .1. _-- for quite some
time. During that time here, he has
worked for Dr. Frank Martin on biologi-
cal control of tomato pathogens, Dr.
Charudattan on biological control of
weeds, and currently works with Dr.
Kucharek. Chuck's major research inter-
est is in plant disease diagnosis. Chuck
has been working on a comprehensive
compilation of plant disease diagnosis
with the APS Diagnostic Committee
since 1986. The Plant Disease Diagnosis


web site
h//:ptth hammock ifas ufl edu/ x


is


JANUARY


html. Chuck also has been working with
Dr Kucharek on mantataining and up-
dating a web site for the Soil and Crop
Science Society of America, which ad-
dress is
http://gnv.ifas.ufl.edu/scssfweb/scssf.html

Misty Nielsen is a native of Min-
neapolis, Minnesota. She came to the
University of Florida after high school to
pursue a B.Sc. in Microbiology, but in he
Spring of 1998 she decided to switch into
the Plant Pathology Department. She
likes our smaller department, more per-
sonal contact with instructors, and the
opportunity to get involved in the de-
partmental work study program. Misty
currently does undergraduate research
with Dr. Tom Kucharek on peanut rust.
Her project involves studying spore sur-
vival of Puccnia arachidis to show peanut
debris in the field can serve as a source
of inoculum for the next season. Misty
enjoys her project and after she gradu-
ates, she would like to continue to work
on her masters in our department with
Dr. Kucharek. In her spare time Misty
enjoys rock climbing, roller blading,
watching movies, and supporting envi-
ronmental causes.


Did you know that...


Dr. Kucharek enjoys garden-
ing, fishing, hiking, and reading about
history. Dr. Kucharek told me a fish
story in which he claims to have caught
some bass. I asked him where he fishes
and he said that he couldn't tell me. After
all, two things you don't tell people are:
1) where your fishing holes are and 2)
where to find morels.

Bob Kemerait Jr. enjoys hunt-
ing fossils and arrowheads. Bob also told
me that both his mother and father have
degrees from the University of Florida,
and that his grandmother worked for the
Graduate School of the University of
Florida for 30 years.


Chuck R. Semer IV enjoys
traveling with his wife and restoring an-
tique automobiles. His current restora-
tion project involves an automobile that
he purchased from a faculty member in
the department. He has been working on
the car for the last 10 years.

Misty Nielsen has a Mexican
red knee tarantula that she keeps as a pet.


Misty also spent the
last two summers
working in the zoo at
Busch Gardens
(Tampa, Florida).


A new graduate student

Eduardo Carlos Fermino is
the new addition to the UF's Plant Pa-
thology team! Mr. Fermino (or "Edu-
ardo" as he likes to be called) was born in
Votuporanga, Sao Paulo, in the Southeast
of Brazil. He comes from a family with
old ties to the citrus industry in Brazil. In
1996, he completed his Master's degree
working with disease-related proteins of
a particular disease, with a controversial
etiology (i.e. heated discussion where
nobody really knows what's going on!) at
the Parand State University, in Londrina,
Brazil. The disease, normally called "Cit-
rus decline", causes blight symptoms in
citrus trees resulting in important losses
for farmers. He also attended a short
course in plant breeding at the Wagenin-
gen Agricultural University (Netherlands)
in 1998.
Before coming to UF, Eduardo
spent three years researching CVC (Cit-
rus variegated chlorosis) and 'Citrus
blight' with a prestigious foundation in
Brazil (Fundecitrus). He also worked at
the Citrus Research Center at Limeira
(Sao Paulo State) using molecular mark-
ers for breeding programs. Eduardo will
be working on his Ph.D. under Dr.
Kenneth S. Derrick's guidance, re-
searching CVC.


. /./hal~ok ifas ul edu/m /index


.
J \'








8 PLP NEWS
1999
In his leisure time Eduardo likes
to play sports, go out, have fun and
mainly share some high quality time with
his 2 daughters Luisa and Ligia, and his
wife Darlene.


Visiting scientists
and post-docs

Dr. Rupali Datta was bom in
Calcutta, India where she lived until the
age of five; at which time her family
moved to Hyderabad, India (about 1,000
km from Calcutta).
Rupali received a B.Sc. in Life
Sciences from the University of Hydera-
bad after which she completed a M.Sc.
on the photoregulation of amylases at the
same university. Her M.Sc. thesis was
entitled: "Interaction between cellular
differentiation and light-mediated amy-
lase induction in greening maize leaves."
She later earned a Ph.D. in the same de-
partment as a continuation of her Mas-
ter's thesis. The title of her dissertation
was "The interrelationship between leaf
development and light- ..:
regulated amylase ex-
pression in maize."
After completing her Ph.D.,
Rupali went on to do a post-doc in Nii-
gatu, Japan at the University of Niigatu.
She spent one year exploring the regula-
tion of amylases by histone acetylation.
We are now fortunate to have Rupali
here in our department working as a
post-doctorate in Dr. Prem Chourey's lab
investigating the complexities of sugar
regulation, tubulin, and invertase in
maize.
On the rare occasion that Rupali
has some free time to herself, she enjoys
listening to Indian classical music, em-
broidering and other types of needle-
v.i .!l:i, reading, and traveling.

We wish Rupal and Eduardo a warm welcome
and hope that their time here with us is both
enriching and enjoyable


JANUARY


From the field

Xylella fastidiosa and decline in tur-
key oak (Quercus laevis)
by Bob Kemerait

Anyone who has traveled to
Crescent Beach or St. Augustine from
Gainesville has passed through western
Putnam County on Highway 20, known
locally as Hawthorne Road. The scenery
is pleasant and deceptively unremarkable.
Rolling terrain covered with towering
pines and smaller turkey oaks (Quercus
laevis) is broken by sandy roads and
pierced by shimmering lakes. Growing
up in Florida, I spent many weekends
and holidays in this area near the small
town of Interlachen. As a boy, I had free
roam of the woods around my grand-
mother's house and was dismayed by
what I considered then to be the severe
shortcomings of the scrawny, yet abun-
dant, turkey oak. Unlike its cousin the
live oak (Quercus vginiana), turkey oaks
were poor for climbing, inadequate for
tree forts, and provided little relief from
the heat of the summer's sun. As I grew,
I began to appreciate them more for their
ability to survive on dry, sandy, sterile
soils that might have been too poor to
support other species (7). I also ob-
served that the trees provided habitat for
a number of different birds and their
acoms were eaten by small mammals;
perhaps they were important after all.
Within the past ten years, I
began to notice that more and more of
the larger trees were beginning to show
symptoms of stress, dieback, and even
death. As more trees began to die, peo-
ple in the area believed that the trees
were "just getting old" and that "old age"
was responsible for the decline. In the
spring when the trees should have been
producing new flushes of leaves, many
remained dormant, some still covered
with the dried leaves from the previous
year. During the spring and summer,
these diseased trees are very apparent as


individuals or in small groups as one
drives east from Gainesville. I had ac-
cepted the "old age" diagnosis without
question until early in 1998 when Dr.
Dave Mitchell mentioned to me that
some of the largest turkey oaks on his
property near the Alachua-Putnam
County line were suffering from what he
described as "Ed Bamard's disease".
Knowing that Dr. Bamard was a forest
pathologist with the Florida Department
of Agriculture's Division of Forestry, my
curiosity was aroused. I was to learn that
decline of these oaks was not necessarily
the result of "old age", but perhaps due
at least in part to the xylem limited bacte-
rium, Xylellafastidiosa. This was a patho-
gen to which I had paid scarce attention
since studying Pierce's disease of grape in
the introductory plant pathology course.
In a paper from May, 1998, Drs.
Ed Barnard, Don Hopkins, Bob
McGovem, and Mr. Ernest Ash showed
that X. fastidiosa is commonly associated
with declining turkey oaks and was de-
tectable in other species of oaks in Flor-
ida exhibiting leaf scorch symptoms (1).
The researchers consistently found the
pathogen associated with diseased trees,
but normally absent from symptomless
ones. It was also determined that cur-
rent-year shoots on turkey oaks with leaf
scorch symptoms were 29% shorter than
those from asymptomatic trees (1).
Shoots on trees that tested positive for
the presence of Xylelafastidiosa were ap-
proximately 38".. shorter than on trees in
which the pathogen was not detected (1).
Although Koch's postulates have not yet
been satisfied for this pathosystem,
Chang and Walker from the University
of Georgia were able to demonstrate that
a xylem-limited bacterium, likely a strain
of X.fastidiosa, is responsible for the leaf
scorch disease in the related northern red
oak (Q. rubra) (3).
For those who, like me, have
forgotten some of what they learned
about xylem-limited bacteria and X. fas-
tidiosa, here is a quick refresher on an
intriguing pathogen. Xylla fastidiosa is








9 PLP NEWS
1999
best known as the causal agent of
Pierce's disease of grapevine which se-
verely limits grape production in our
state. Because the disease was found to
be graft-transmissible and the pathogen
was vectored by insects leafhopperss,
sharpshooters, and spittlebugs) but could
not be isolated on artificial media, it was
believed to be caused by a virus (6,11).
After it was found that the symptoms of
Pierce's disease could be suppressed us-
ing tetracycline antibiotics, Hopkins and
Mollenhauer and Goheen et al. were able
to observe rickettsia-like bacteria consis-
tently associated with the xylem tissue of
diseased grapevines (5,9). However, it
was not until 1978 that Davis et al were
finally able to isolate the Gram-negative,
rod-shaped bacterium and successfully
complete Koch's postulates (4). The
pathogen became officially known as
Xylellafastdiosa in 1987 (12). In Florida,
X. fastidiosa affects not only grapevines
and turkey oaks, but also American elder,
Virginia creeper, eastern baccharis, su-
mac, golden rod, peach, blackberry, black
cherry, southern red oak, laurel oak, wa-
ter oak, sycamore, mulberry, live oak,
post oak, and bluejack oak (1,8,10).
Questions have been raised as to the role
of X.fastidiosa in the region-wide decline
of oak trees and in the decline of shade
trees in South Carolina (1,2).
Control of diseases caused by
X.fastidiosa is difficult. In some instances
the pathogen can be controlled if antibi-
otics such as tetracycline hydrochloride
are injected into the trunk of the tree,
though this may not be effective if the
xylem is severely plugged (11). The
planting of tolerant cultivars is likely to
be the most successful solution (11).
At this time, Dr. Bamard says
that he is not ready to believe that xylem-
limited bacteria are responsible for all of
the declining turkey oaks in Florida. On
a recent visit to his office, he explained to
me that the root pathogen Armilaria is
also frequently found in association with
these trees. Further research is needed to
determine if the bacterial and fungal


JANUARY


pathogens may both be involved. Dr.
Bamard also added that future research
may explain the phenomenon where
trees symptomatic for leaf scorch are
found in close proximity to apparently
healthy ones. Possible reasons include
preferential feeding by the insect vectors
and some degree of resistance in the
"healthier" oaks.

Literature Cited
1. Bamard, E. L., Ash, E. C., Hopkins, D. L.,
and McGovem, R.J. 1998. Distribu-
tion of Xylella fastidosa in oaks in
Florida and its association with de-
cline in Quercus laevis. Plant Dis.
82:569-572.
2. Blake, J. H. 1993. Distribution of Xy/ella
fasidiosa in oak, maple, and sycamore
in South Carolina. Plant Dis.
77:1262.
3. Chang, C. J., and Walker, J. T. 1988. Bac-
terial leaf scorch of northern red oak:
Isolation, cultivation, and pathoge-
nicity of a xylem-limited bacterium.
Plant Dis. 72:730-733.
4. Davis, M. J., Purcell, A. H., and Thom-
son, S. V. 1978. Pierce's disease of
grapevines: isolation of the causal
bacterium. Science 199:75:77.
5. Goheen, A. C., Nyland, G., and Lowe, S.
K. 1973. Association of rickettsia-
like organism with Pierce's disease of
grapevinesand alfalfa dwarf and heat
therapy of the disease of grapevines.
P r. 1- ....1 63:341-345.
6. Freitag, J. H. 1951. Host range determi-
nation of the Pierce's disease virus of
grapes as determined by insect
transmission. Pli r.. iT'.'....
41:920-934.
7. Harrar, E. S. and Harrar, J. G. 1962.
Guide to Southern Trees. Dover
Publications, Inc., New York. pp.
211-212.
8. Hopkins, D. L., and Adlerz, W. C. 1988.
Natural hosts of XylelIa fastidosa in
Florida. Plant Dis. 72:429-431.
9. Hopkins, D. L, and Mollenhauer, H. H.
1973. Rickettsia-like bacterium asso-
ciated with Pierce's disease of grapes.
Science 179:298-300.
10. McGovem, R. J., and Hopkins, D. L.
1994. Association of Xylellafastidosa
with leaf scorch and decline of live
oak in Florida. Plant Dis. 78:924.


11. Raju, B. C., and Wells, J. M. 1986. Dis-
eases caused by fastidious xylem-
limited bacteria and strategies for
management. Plant Dis. 70:182-186.
12. Wells, J. M., Raju, B. C., Hung, H. Y.,
Wiesburg, W. G., Mandelco-Paul, L.,
and Brenner, D. J. 1987. Xylellafas-
tidiosa gen. nov., sp. nov.: Gram-
negative, xylem -limited, fastidious
plant bacteria related to Xanthomo-
nas spp. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol.
37:136-143.



PLP monthly computer review

by Mike Mahovic


s' While every one of
us either finds computers
to be a helpful tool in our research/work,
or a necessary evil thereof, we all have to
face these technological wonders sooner
or later. Whether we do it with grace or
with constant system error messages, and
perhaps intense aggravation leading to
unnecessary kinetic system maintenance,
can be highly dependent on some few
little things we may or may not do.
Fortunately, we have recently brought on
board a computer administrator who not
only has vast knowledge of various com-
puter intricacies, but has been (so far)
blessed with the patience to sit down
with us and walk us through some of the
more exasperating moments. In an effort
to maintain Mark Ross's sanity and pa-
tience with us, as well as to hopefully
ease some of our computing pains, he
and I will work together on putting forth
an article once a month with various
computer tidbits that should be helpful
to the entire department. Here we will
answer questions you may have had that
would be helpful for all to see on paper;
we will keep you as up to date as possible
on implemented policies; and we will try
to keep you generally informed as to
what is going on with the computers of
the department.
As things stand now, we are ex-
pecting a second new machine for the








10 PLP NEWS
1999
library, and Mark is looking into possible
sources of funding for some more new
computers. Mark is also attempting to
procure use of a back-up server such that
during server down time (for network
maintenance, etc.) the basic use will still
be available (e-mail, forms folders, et. al.).
In order to streamline functionality
of the library computers, the computer
committee is trying to implement some
policies (both new and old) in the reading
room. For example, all of the machines
should soon have all of the same pro-
grams on them (Office 97, Corel Suite 8,
either Corel Draw or Photo Shop for
picture editing, and so forth) so that we
no longer will we have to fight over the
one machine with a working copy of
SAS. This will of course be limited to
each machine's capabilities. Also, we
would like to mention that the rules for
whom may use the computers (PLP de-
partmental members only!) and the disal-
lowing of unauthorized software installa-
tion on them will be more strictly en-
forced.
With some standardization and new
equipment, the computers in the library
should be a lot easier for us to muddle
through using. With Mark around, we
should also be a little more able to have
our own computers up and running
more often than in the past. In an effort
to begin the tradition, here are the pat-
ented, much anticipated, PLP Newslet-
ter's "Mark's Bytes o' Computer Wis-
dom" for the month:
"This issues' tip involves file man-
agement. Computers have made it very
convenient to produce large numbers of
documents quickly. Unfortunately, it is
difficult for us 'mere' humans to keep up
without a system. First and foremost,
remember to keep AT LEAST TWO
copies of important files in TWO differ-
ent places. Floppies and hard disks will
eventually fail.
"Second, devise a file naming con-
vention and stick to it. Consistent file
names go a long way in the memory pro-
cess. Use meaningful names.


JANUARY


"Third, use sub-directories (folders)
to organize different types of files (data
files, correspondence, spreadsheets, etc.).
Store all sub-folders under one main
document folder. This really helps in the
backup process.
"Fourth, clean out old files ruth-
lessly. Multiple revisions of a document
are good while writing, but when the
project's finished, it's time for 'house-
cleaning'."
If you have any other questions,
ideas, comments, etc. that you would like
to see here in future articles, feel free to
e-mail me at mmahovic@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
or Mark at maross@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu and
we'll try to get it in a future edition.
-Good computing to you all!
Recent Publications

Papers:

Ciesiolka, L.D.; Hwin, T.; Gearlds, J.D.;
Minsavage, G.V.; Saenz, R.;
Bravo, M.; Handley, V.; Conover,
S.M.; Zhang, H.; Caporgno, J.;
Phengrasamy, N.B.; Toms, A.O.;
Stall, R.E.; Whalen, M.C. Regula-
tion of expression of avirulence
gene avrRxv and identification of a
family of host interaction factors by
sequence analysis of avrBsT. Mo-
lecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
12: 35-44. 1999.
Haynes, K.G.; Lambert, D.H.; Christ,
B.J.; Weingartner, D.P.; Douches,
D.S.; Backlund, J.E.; Secor, G.; Fry,
W.; Stevenson, W. Phenotypic sta-
bility of resistance to late blight in
potato clones. Evaluated at 8 sites
in the United States. American
Journal of Potato Research 75: 211-
217. 1998.
Hervas, A.; Landa, B.; Datnoff, L.E.;
Jimenez-Diaz, R.M. Effects of
commercial and indigenous micro-
organisms on fusarium-wilt devel-
opment in chickpea. Biological
control 13: 166-176. 1998.
Hill, J.E.; Strandberg, J.O.; Hiebert, E.;
Lazarowitz, S.G. Asymmetric infec


tivity of pseudorecombinants of
cabbage leaf curl virus and squash
leaf curl virus implications for bi-
partite geminivirus evolution and
movement. Virology 250: 283-292.
1998.
Kenyon, L.; Harrison, N.A.; Ashburner,
G.R.; Boa, E.R.; Richardson, P.A.
Detection of a pigeon pea witches-
broom-related phytoplasma in trees
of gliricidia-sepium affected by lit-
fle- leaf disease in Central-America.
Plant Pathology 47: 671-680. 1998.
Lewandowski, D.J.; Dawson, W.O.
Deletion of internal sequences re-
sults in tobacco mosaic-virus defec-
tive RNAs that accumulate to high-
levels without interfering with repli-
cation of the helper virus. Virology
251: 427-437. 1998.
Purcifull, D.E.; Hiebert, E.; Petersen,
M.A.; Simone, G.W.; Kucharek,
T.A.; Gooch, M.D.; Crawford,
W.E.; Beckham, KA.; De Sa,
P.B. Partial characterization of a
distinct potyvirus isolated from
watermelon in Florida. Plant disease
82: 1386-1390. 1998.
Ruan, Y.L.; Chourey, P.S. A fiberless
seed mutation in cotton is associ-
ated with lack of fiber cellinitiation
in ovule epidermis and alterations in
sucrose synthase expression and
carbon partitioning in developing
seeds. Plant Physiology 118: 399-
41,.. 1998.
Smither-Kopperl, M.L.; Charudattan,
R.; Berger, R.D. Plectospoinum
tabadnum, a pathogen of the inva-
sive aquatic weed Hydrilla vertillata
in Florida. Plant Disease 83: 24-28.
1999.
Yu, Z.H.; Stall, RE.; Vallejos, C.E. De-
tection of genes for resistance to
common bacterial-blight of beans.
Crop Science 38: 12 '-1296. 1998.


Chapters of books:
Pring, D. R.; Chen, W.; Tang, H. V.;
Howad, W.; Kempken, F. 1998.








11 PLP NEWS
1999
Transcript nucleolytic processing,
RNA editing, and the restoration of
male fertility in sorghum. pp. 43-
47. In: Plant Mitochondria: From
Gene to Function. Moller, I. M.,
Gardestrom, P, and Glaser, E., eds.
Backhuys Publishers, The Nether-
lands.

Books:


Zettler, F.W.; Baker, C.A., eds. 1999.
Biohistory: Plants, Plagues and
People. Simon & Schuster Custom
Publishing, Needham Heights,
M.A. 333pp.

Editor
Juliana Freitas-Astua
:..F _!i.. ...ufl.edu
News Team
Adriana Castanieda


Alvaro Ureia
Angela Vincent
Liane Rosewich
Mariadaniela Lopez
Maureen Petersen
Michael Mahovic
Misty Nielsen
Robert Harveson
Robert Kemerait
Wayne Jurick II


JANUARY




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