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Overview of Colonial Development: France, Spain, and Britain

FHC UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067300/00001

Material Information

Title: Overview of Colonial Development: France, Spain, and Britain
Series Title: Spanish Colonial St. Augustine. Maps.
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Zent, Keith E. Sr.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Saint Augustine (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Florida   ( lcsh )
Colonies -- Spain -- America
Genre: lesson plan
Temporal Coverage: Spanish Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns County -- Saint Augustine -- Historic city
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Funding: Funded by a grant from the Florida Humanities Council

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Board of Trustees of the University of Florida on behalf of authors and contributors. All rights reserved.
System ID: UF00067300:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067300/00001

Material Information

Title: Overview of Colonial Development: France, Spain, and Britain
Series Title: Spanish Colonial St. Augustine. Maps.
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Zent, Keith E. Sr.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Saint Augustine (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Florida   ( lcsh )
Colonies -- Spain -- America
Genre: lesson plan
Temporal Coverage: Spanish Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns County -- Saint Augustine -- Historic city
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Funding: Funded by a grant from the Florida Humanities Council

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Board of Trustees of the University of Florida on behalf of authors and contributors. All rights reserved.
System ID: UF00067300:00001


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-e-eple_ Lesson Plans



Overview of Colonial Development:
France, Spain, and Britain
Prepared by Keith E. Zent, Sr.,
Raines Senior High School, Jacksonville, Florida.

Intended Grade: High School

Subject Areas: Social Studies and American History

Correlation to National or Florida Sunshine State Standards:
S.S.A.4.4.2.

Approximate Time Required: 3 sessions

Materials Required:
For teacher, suitable lecture material
Attachments and worksheets for this assignment
Outline Map of United States
Short descriptive overviews of
1. Pedro Menendez de Aviles
2. Jean Ribault (1562-1565)
3. Rene de Laudonniere (1564-1565)
4. Drake's burning of St. Augustine 1586
5. Moore's burning of St. Augustine 1702
6. English colonization (1587-1763)
7. James Oglethorpe (1696-1785)

Objectives:
Students will understand how religious, social, political and economic
development shaped the settlement patterns of North America

Instructions:
Activity #1
Lecture on the Spanish colonization efforts on the east coast prior to contact with
French settlers, their ouster, and subsequent contact with English sea forces and
border conflicts between "La Florida" and Georgia (Carolinas southward)
(See Readings, Image Gallery, Timeline, and Primary Sources for relevant
materials. Also see Web Links for online source material.)









Activity #2
Students will use the Outline Map of United States to mark the locations of
Spanish, French, and English settlements, timelines of occupation, and summarize
the main personalities, military, political, social and economic events and practices
of the colonies (Spanish, French, and English).

Activity #3
Class discussion of the development of Spanish "La Florida," explaining the
primary differences between the colonies of Spain, France, and England in the
lower south.

Homework
Research and answer from your short descriptions
1. Which of the countries were more religiously driven in their in their
efforts to colonize?
2. Why did the French fail in their efforts to colonize?
3. In your opinion, how significant is St. Augustine to American history from
what you read about the colonizing of North America?

Evaluation:
Observation
Student participation
Written work










Some Spanish Accounts of Drake's Raid on St. Augustine
[Pedro Men6ndez Marques to the president of the House of Trade, San Agustin, June 17,
1586] 1



Very Illustrious Sir

I am reduced to such a situation that I do not know where to begin to relate the hardship
and misery which have befallen this land. Therefore this communication will not be long,
as will be observed.

On the 6th instant Francis Drake arrived at this port with 42 sail, 23 being large vessels
and nineteen pinnaces, frigates and shallops. At dawn on the 7th he landed 500 men and
with seven large pinnaces sought me forthwith in the fort. With 80 men I had in the fort I
resisted him until nearly midday. In view of my resistance he sent to the ships which lay
outside the bar for reinforcements, and in nine vessels landed some 2000 men and planted
four pieces of artillery among certain sand dunes near the fort, with which he began to
batter it. I retired as best I could, to protect my women and children (more than 200
persons).

Having occupied the fort, the enemy took and sacked the town and burned the church
with its images and crosses, and cut down the fruit trees, which were numerous and good.
He burned the fort and carried off the artillery and munitions and food supplies. We are
all left with the clothes we stood in, and in the open country with a little munition which
was hidden. We are without food of any sort except six hogsheads of flour which will last
twenty days at half a pound per head. I am reporting to His Majesty in full in the
accompanying dispatch and entreat your lordship to forward it immediately, and to
favour me as far and as speedily as possible, since help for Florida must come from your
lordship's hands.

Our Lord, etc.

San Agustin, June 17, 1586.


Pedro Men6ndez Marqu6s











An English Account of the Siege of St. Augustine 1586
Although I have replaced the archaic typeface and modernized the spelling in this
selection I have left the antiquated words, punctuation and run-on sentences to retain the
flavor of the original document.
-ed.

Selections from Sir Frances West Indian Voyage by Walter Bigges London 1589

p.42-46

After three days spent in watering our ships, we departed now the second time from this
Cape of St. Anthony the thirteenth of May, and proceeding about the Cape of Florida, we
never touched anywhere, but coasting alongst Florida, and keeping the shore still in sight,
the eight and twentieth of May early in the morning, we described on the shore a place
built like a Beacon, which was in deed a scaffold upon four long masts, raised on end for
men to discover to the seaward, being in the latitude of thirty degrees, or very near there
unto. Our Pinnaces manned, and coming to the shore, we marched up alongst the
riverside, to see what place the enemy held there; for none amongst us had any
knowledge thereof at all.

Here the general took occasion to march with the companies himself in person, the
Lieutenant general having the Vanguard, and going a mile up or somewhat more by the
riverside, we might discern on the other side of the river over against us, a fort, which
newly had been built by the Spaniards, and some mile or there about above the fort, was a
little town or village without walls, built of wooden houses: we forthwith prepared to
have ordinance for the battery, and one piece was a little before the evening planted, and
the first shot being made by the Lieutenant general himself at their Ensign, strake through
the Ensign, as we afterwards understood by a French man, which came unto us from
them. One shot more was made, which strake the foot of the fort wall, which was all
massive timber of great trees like masts. The lieutenant general was determined to pass
the river this night with four companies, and there to lodge himself entrenched as near the
fort, as that he might play with his muskets and smallest shot upon any that should
appear: and so afterwards to bring and plant the battery with him, but the help of mariners
that sudden to make trenches could not be had, which was the cause that this
determination we remitted until the next night.

In the night the Lieutenant general took a little rowing Skiff, and half a dozen well armed,
as Captain Morgan, and Captain Sampson, with some others besides the rowers, and went
to view what guard the enemy kept, as also to take knowledge of the ground. And albeit
he went as covertly as might be, yet the enemy taking the Alarm, grew fearful that the
whole Force was approaching to the assault, and there fore with all speed abandoned the
place after the shooting of some of their pieces. They thus gone, and he being returned
unto us again, but nothing knowing of there flight from their fort, forthwith came a
French man being a Fifer (who had been prisoner with them) in a little boat, playing on
his fife the tune of the Prince of Orange his song, and being called unto by the guard, he










told them before he put foot out of the boat, what he was himself, and how the Spaniards
were gone from the fort, offering either to remain in hands there, or else to return to the
place with them that would go.

Upon this intelligence the General, the Lieutenant general, with some of the Captains in
one skiff, and the Vice admiral with some others in his skiff, and two or three Pinnaces
furnished of soldiers with them, put presently over towards the fort, giving order for the
rest of the Pinnaces to follow. And in our approach, some of the enemy bolder than the
rest, having stayed behind their company, shot off two pieces of ordinance at us: but on
shore we went, and entered the place without finding any man there.

When the day appeared, we found it built all of timber, the walls being none other than
whole masts or bodies of trees set upright and close together in manner of a pale, without
any ditch as yet made, but who intended with some more time, for they had not yet
finished all their work, having begun the same some three or four months before: so as to
say the truth, they had no reason to keep it, being subject to both fire and early assault.

The platform whereon the ordinance lay, was whole bodies of long pine trees, whereof
there is great plenty, laid across on one the other, and some little earth amongst. There
was in it thirteen or fourteen great pieces of brass ordinance, and a chest unbroken up,
having in it the value of some two thousand pounds sterling, by estimation of the King's
treasurer, to pay the soldiers of that place, who were a hundred and fifty men.

The fort thus won, which they call St. Johns fort, and the day opened, we assayed to go to
the town, but could not by reason of some rivers and broken ground which was between
the two places: and therefore enforced to embark again into our Pinnaces, we went thither
upon the great main river, which is called as also the town by the name of St. Augustine.

At our approaching to land, there was some that began to show themselves, and to bestow
some few shot upon us, but presently withdrew themselves. And in their running thus
away, the Sergeant Major finding one of their horses ready saddled and bridled, took the
same to follow the chase, and so over going all his company, was (by one laid behind a
bush) shot through the head, & falling down therewith, was by the same two or three
more, stabbed in three or four places of his body with swords and daggers, before any
could come near to his rescue. His death was much lamented, being in very deed an
honest wise Gentleman, and a soldier of good experience, and of as great courage as any
man might be.

In this place called St. Augustine, we understood the King did keep as is before said, one
hundred and fifty soldiers,...































































































































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