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Spanish St. Augustine: 1500s to 1700s, Houses of the colonial Spanish period, with a science based theme.

FHC UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067286/00001

Material Information

Title: Spanish St. Augustine: 1500s to 1700s, Houses of the colonial Spanish period, with a science based theme.
Series Title: Spanish Colonial St. Augustine. Lesson Plans.
Physical Description: Book
Creator: McGrath, Colleen

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Saint Augustine (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Florida   ( lcsh )
Colonies -- Spain -- America
Genre: lesson plan
Temporal Coverage: Spanish Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns County -- Saint Augustine -- Historic city
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Abstract: Intended for 4th and 5th grade
Funding: Funded by a grant from the Florida Humanities Council

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Board of Trustees of the University of Florida on behalf of authors and contributors. All rights reserved.
System ID: UF00067286:00001

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067286/00001

Material Information

Title: Spanish St. Augustine: 1500s to 1700s, Houses of the colonial Spanish period, with a science based theme.
Series Title: Spanish Colonial St. Augustine. Lesson Plans.
Physical Description: Book
Creator: McGrath, Colleen

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Saint Augustine (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Florida   ( lcsh )
Colonies -- Spain -- America
Genre: lesson plan
Temporal Coverage: Spanish Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Colonial Period ( 1594 - 1920 )
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns County -- Saint Augustine -- Historic city
North America -- United States of America -- Florida

Notes

Abstract: Intended for 4th and 5th grade
Funding: Funded by a grant from the Florida Humanities Council

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: Board of Trustees of the University of Florida on behalf of authors and contributors. All rights reserved.
System ID: UF00067286:00001


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hepople' Lesson Plans



Spanish St. Augustine: 1500s to 1700s
Houses of the colonial Spanish period, with a science based theme.
Interdisciplinary Unit Social Studies and Science
Prepared by Colleen McGrath

Intended Grade: 4th & 5th

Subject Area: Social Studies, Chemistry, Geology

Correlation to National Standards: (see below)

Objectives:
Become familiar with various types of materials used for construction
of dwellings: coquina, tabby, wattle and daub. (SSB2.2.2 SCD 2.2.1)
Experience laws of physical, chemical change through use of materials.
Explore vocabulary: oxidation, mixture, aggregate, burning, solution, etc.
SCA 1.2.2, SCA 1.2.4. (SCA 1.2.5)
Formulate understanding of sedimentary rocks by studying the formation
and use of coquina. (SCD 1.2.1)
Understand the use of natural resources and native materials in building
dwellings. (SCD 2.2.1)

Approximate Time Required: Four lessons

Materials Required:

Instructions:
Lesson 1: Discuss how houses are constructed
Assess background depth by brainstorming what homes are made of.
Graphic organizer to be used in organizing information:
Today's homes, Native Americans of Florida (a previous unit),
St. Augustine Early Spanish Coquina and Tabby English Wattle and Daub










Lesson 2: Construction with stone in Spanish Florida Coquina
KWL to introduce the concept of coquina and assess prior knowledge
Questions: What is it? Qualities of the rock
How is it formed? Discuss rock cycle, sedimentary rock, pressure, time.
How is it quarried and used to build structures.

Resource materials (Coquina):
Gordon, Elsbeth K, Florida's Colonial Architectural Heritage. University
Presses of Florida, Gainesville, 2003 (The Darkened Age of Wood, pp 56-
77)
http://www.drbronsontours.com/bronsoncoquina.html
http://www.worldandi.com/specialreport/1987/ianuary/sal2398.htm

Lesson 3: The use of tabby in colonial houses Tabby
History behind tabby
What is it?

Science Lesson on Physical /Chemical Change
How to make tabby
Demonstrate components and class will make samples of tabby.
Supplies: oyster shells, lime, sand (other aggregate can work if oyster shells are
not readily available in the area).
Demonstrate physical change:
Whole oyster shells broken into smaller bits
Demonstrate chemical change:
Oyster shells + heat (oxidation) = lime
When oyster (calcium carbonate) is burned at a high temperature the shells are
reduced to a powdered ash (lime)
(CAUTION: This should be only a chalk and talk demonstration. Actual burning in
class would not be recommended! See website.)

Demonstrate mixture: recipe for tabby
1 part aggregate (oyster shells),
1 part sand,
1 part lime
Discuss qualities of mixture
Students receive a baggie to measure the recipe and mix their own tabby.
Pour into milk carton to make slabs. Allow to dry.
How and why was tabby used in construction?

Resource materials (Tabby):
Luis Rafael Arana and Alberl Manucy, The Building of Castillo de San
Marcos. Eastern National Park & Monument Association, 1977, pp 17-24
http://www.co.beaufort.sc.us/bftlib/tabby.htm










Lesson 4: Wattle and Daub Construction
Supplies needed:
As a surprise element, ask students to bring in a collection of sticks (finger
size and smaller),
large twist ties and/or string to lash sticks together,
mud (clay)
Prepare a visual example of a Wattle and Daub wall as the process is described.
Allow students to make their own wattle and daub structures using milk cartons as a
base. If you are feeling rather adventurous maybe sink the wattles into a sand/dirt
lined box to simulate actual early construction.

Discussion opportunities:
What are the positives of this type of construction?
What are the negatives particularly in regard to the moist, damp climate of the area?
What is the permanence of wood wattles sunk into the ground?
What other resources could be used to make these structures more stable over time?
(tabby cement footings). Lime plaster was used to cover inside and out to reduce the
insect population and extend the life of the mud. Roofs usually were peaked and
thatched or flat with a slight pitch to drain rain water. English period brought on second
stories with higher pitched roofs that were covered with hand-hewn wood shingles.

Resources materials (Wattle and Daub, Thatching):
Gordon, Elsbeth K, Florida's Colonial Architectural Heritage. University
Presses of Florida, Gainesville, 2003 (The Darkened Age of Wood, pp 56-
77)
Wattle and Daub
http://www.wealddown.co. uk/poplar-cottage-construction-thatch-wattle-and-
daub.htm
Thatching
http://www.flheritage.com/archaeology/sanluis/reconstruction/