• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Copyright
 Foreword
 Acknowledgement
 Introduction
 Table of Contents
 Philosophy
 Elementary schools
 Secondary schools
 Next steps
 Back Cover














Group Title: Bulletin - State Department of Education ; 5A
Title: A Checklist, an evaluation in physical education
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067277/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Checklist, an evaluation in physical education
Series Title: Bulletin State Dept. of Education
Alternate Title: Evaluation in physical education
Physical Description: 33 p. : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Dept. of Education
Publisher: State Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1961
 Subjects
Subject: Physical education and training -- Evaluation   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Funding: Bulletin (Florida. State Dept. of Education) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067277
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22160543

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Front Matter
        Bookplate
    Title Page
        Title page
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Foreword
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Philosophy
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Elementary schools
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Secondary schools
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Next steps
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Back Cover
        Page 36
Full Text

















AN EVALUATI *
PHYSICAL EDUCATE

BULLETIN 5A
1961

7.o00 9759
STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
STollahassee, Florida
f"IO %5"A THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent
















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OF FLORIDA
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AN EVALUATION IN

PHYSICAL EDUCATION


BULLETIN 5A
1961


STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent






























Copyright 1961

FLORIDA STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA











Foreword


T HE DEVELOPMENT of An Evaluation in Physical Education
represents another phase of our effort to improve the physi-
cal education programs being conducted in Florida's public
schools. The potential contribution of physical education to the
development of children-physically, mentally, and socially-
is unlimited. Many factors have prevented the full realization
of these potentials, and physical education teachers and school
administrators alike have recognized the need for improvement.
The members of the Florida Association for Health, Physical
Education, and Recreation are to be commended for their efforts
to develop this evaluative instrument for use by teachers in
this area of the instructional program. Detailed and frank
evaluation is essential in the development of a planned program
of improvement.
The need for improving the fitness of American youth has
been recognized as being of national concern. President Kennedy
has given personal attention to the problem and has requested
schools to increase their contribution in this area. It is hoped
that this instrument will stimulate and guide school adminis-
trators and physical education teachers toward developing pro-
grams that will make maximum contributions to the improve-
ment of the fitness of Florida youth.
All physical education teachers are urged to redouble their
efforts to improve physical education programs in Florida's
public schools. The use of An Evaluation in Physical Education as
a self-evaluative instrument should provide a basis for con-
tinuing improvement of this important part of the State's over-
all educational program.





THOMAS D. BAILEY
State Superintendent of Public Instruction











Acknowledgments


T HIS SET of evaluative questions was developed to give those
persons concerned with physical education a means of self-
evaluating their principles and practices. It was prepared to help
the individual pinpoint the weaknesses and strengths of his
own program through the accumulative thinking of professional
persons in the field.
There has been a need for direction in procedure and prac-
tices on both the elementary and the secondary levels. The
classroom teacher, the physical education specialist, and the
school administrator have needed guides to improve the program.

Development of the Instrument
More than 300 persons combined their efforts to develop
this evaluative aid. The work of these men and women, who
gave of their time and professional experience, deserves the
highest praise. The encouragement and support given the group
each year by Mr. Zollie Maynard, Consultant in Health and
Physical Education for the Florida Department of Education,
helped these committees to progress with the production. The
enthusiastic interest of Dr. Carl Troester, Jr., Executive Secre-
tary of the American Association for Health, Physical Education,
and Recreation, at the Working Conference in 1953 gave impetus
to the plan.
Special acknowledgment should be made to Dorothy Hicks
Thomason for her leadership in the development of this pub-
lication. She originated the ideas for the project. In 1952, while
president of the Florida Association for Health, Physical Educa-
tion, and Recreation, she appointed the first committee to
gather material to be used to develop the evaluative criteria.
Since 1955, she has served as chairman of this committee, de-
voting many hours working with teachers on various subcom-
mittees. Through her untiring efforts and with the splendid
cooperation of her committee members, An Evaluation in Phys-
ical Education has been completed.









The Florida Department of Education published and dis-
tributed mimeographed copies to 100 pilot schools throughout
the State. These schools were requested to review the material,
use An Evaluation in Physical Education, and analyze its effec-
tiveness as an evaluative aid. The results of this study have been
applied in editing the material for the printed edition.
The editing committee met in the summer of 1957 and again
in 1958. The materials from the Working Conference, the two
tentative copies, and the pilot study were compiled for the
printed edition. This committee took the format decided upon
by the various sections and organized each idea that had been
presented at any time into a complete pamphlet. Catharine
Sample compiled all of the replies from the pilot study, and
the committee analyzed all of the suggestions and incorporated
them in the changes for the printed edition. This committee
also had the task of bringing together all of the parts that
were developed by the sections.
Appreciation is also extended to John P. McIntyre, Cur-
riculum Specialist, State Department of Education, who co-
ordinated the editing and final arrangements for publishing
this bulletin. Others giving assistance were J. K. Chapman,
Frank A. Commander, Howard Jay Friedman, Sam H. Moorer,
W. H. Pierce, B. K. Stevens, and Ed Williamson.

Evaluative Criteria Committee Members
Through the Working Conferences of five years, the con-
tributions of members of the Evaluative Criteria Committees
have been compiled in this report. The members of the com-
mittees follow:
Editing Committee
Dorothy H. Thomason, Henry Deck G. McReynolds
Chairman Barbara Garfunkel Virginia Peck
Peggy Becknell Betty Gurney Catharine Sample
Mabel Caperton Marie Howard Marianna Washer
Guy Colado Louise McMullian
Working Conference Committee
Conrad Rehling, Guy Colado Sam H. Moorer
Chairman C. F. Damron Julie Hale
Tiny Renaker, Barbara Dalsheimer W. P. Patterson
Local Chairman Virginia Flanagan Walton O. Walker
Clifford Boyd Kenneth Miller Zollie Maynard
Mabel Caperton Vincent Granell











Betty Autrey
Clifford Boyd

Pe
Jane Millar,
Co-chairman
Catharine Sample,
Co-chairman
Henry Deck,
Co-chairman


Maria Horner,
Chairman
Betty Gurney,
Recorder
Joy Brown
Ruth Dale


Peggy Becknell,
Chairman
Marie Howard,
Recorder
Mary Alexander


Walton Walker,
Chairman
Betty Crowe,
Recorder
T. J. Bleier


W. P. Patterson,
Chairman
Virginia Peck,
Recorder
Mabel Caperton


Ed Stack,
Co-chairman
Marianna Washer,
Co-chairman
Virginia Mack,
Recorder
Miller K. Adams
Marion Berrian


Guy Colado,
Co-chairman
Louise McMullian,
Co-chairman
Judy Williams,
Recorder


Advisory Group
Mabel Caperton
Grace Fox
Norma Leavitt

rsonnel-Teaching Load-Sche
Barbara Dalsheimer,
Recorder
Connie Ball
Floyd Lay
Dave Lofgren
Zollie Maynard

Secondary Course of Stud
Mildred Gilbert
Frances Hall
Marion Huey
Joan Kemp
Emily Lazenby
Ann Littleton

Elementary Course of Stui
Ed Ballas
Sam Commander
Ronald Ferrero
Marvin Hertz
Bill Lang

Facilities and Equipment
Willie Carter
Ruth Adams Dale
Denton Houk
Ernest Priest
Walter Reid
Safety
Joan Chase
H. G. Danford
Joyce Gibson
Nita Haynes
Jack A. Lasry
Intramurals
Billie Ann Camp
Betty Lee Chambers
Spurgeon Cherry
Betty J. Evans
Frances Harold
Erma Johnson
Jane Leaf
Donald Loucks
Interscholastics
Lou Cappel
Eleanor Ebsary
Crockett Farnell
John J. Flanagan
Ad Gilbert
George Karaphillis


Catharine Sample
Herman Schnell

during
Sam Prather
John Seay
Jimmie Ruth Songer
Felicia West


y
Catherine Norman
Jackie Sierra
Wallace Skrove
Josephine Smith
William Stalnaker

dy
Keith Pitchford
Pat Signorelli
John Staples
Jim Tilton



Dorothy Starbird
D. K. Stanley
W. J. Talt



Mary J. Martin-Vegue
K. Montgomery
June Watson



Billye J. Lowe
Joan Masury
Doris Myendorf
Merla A. Roberson
Ben Shearer
Dorothy Tucker
Becky Waldorp
Anne J. Winter


Danny Litwhiler
Samuel Luce
Cary McDonald
Alice Rodriquez












Introduction


T HIS INSTRUMENT has been prepared by the Florida Asso-
ciation for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation as
an aid to all who teach physical education and to the adminis-
trators in the schools of Florida.

What Is The Purpose?
The purpose of this evaluative instrument is to provide
those who are responsible for the school physical education
program with a practical and simplified method of evaluating
the physical education program. Questions for self-evaluation
are included as an initial step toward improving and develop-
ing the total program.

Who Uses It?
This instrument is especially designed to be used by:
1. The physical education teacher
2. The persons responsible for class, intramural, and
interscholastic programs
3. The coaching staff
4. The school administrative personnel

When Is It Used?
This instrument is designed to be used continuously to work
progressively toward better education through physical edu-
cation.
Pre-school and post-school periods allow time for cooperative
evaluation and coordinated follow-up procedures.

How Is It Used?
The Committee considered using several different methods
of rating the degree to which schools met the various criteria.
They finally selected the Yes or No answer as the one best suited








to the purpose for which the instrument was being designed and
to the criteria as stated. It was felt that the simplicity of such
an answer would concentrate attention upon the criteria and
would more readily indicate areas of weakness and strength.

What Is Done With The Completed Evaluations?
Affirmative answers indicate strengths of the program which
should be maintained and developed further. Negative answers
are to be considered as indications of conditions which should
be improved. Questions considered not applicable indicate need
for further investigation.
It is recommended that the entire physical education de-
partment meet to discuss the results of the completed evalua-
tions. An advisory council or committee of the school faculty
working with the principal is helpful to the physical education
department in developing a more effective school and community
program. When professional assistance is desired, help may be
requested from a county supervisor, the State Department of
Education, or the department of physical education of a college
or university.












Table of Contents

Foreword ............................................ i
Acknowledgments ...................................... ii
Introduction ............................. ................ v
Philosophy ........................................ ... 1
Elementary Schools ..................................... 4
Organization and Procedure ............................... 4
Personnel and Materials ........................... 6
Facilities ..................... ....... ... .... ..... 6
Equipment and Supplies ............... ............ 8
Public Relations ...................................... 8
Course of Study ............. ........... ........ ... 10
Activities ........................................... 10
Secondary Schools ...................................... 12
Organization and Administration ...................... 12
Teaching Load ...................................... 15
Scheduling .......................................... 15
Facilities .................... ..... ............... 16
Equipment and Supplies .............................. 18
Health and Safety in Physical Education ............ 19
Public Relations ............................. ...... 20
Curriculum Planning and Development ................ 21
Sports Activities Program ............................ 24
Intramurals ............................. ............. 27
Interscholastics ....................................... 28
Next Steps ..................................... ....... 32
State Department of Education Publications ........... 32
Other Publications ................................. 33













CHAPTER 1


Philosophy

INDIVIDUAL PHILOSOPHIES differ. However, a sound
philosophy is the basis for a good program. These questions
concern what is believed, not necessarily what is practiced in the
school. The philosophy in this chapter applies to the physical
education program and personnel in both elementary and second-
ary schools.

1. Is there a written statement of the physical YES NO
education philosophy of the school? D Ol
2. Has this philosophy been developed as an inte- YES NO
gral part of the total school philosophy? jI

3. Were the understandings, attitudes, and appre- YES NO
ciations necessary for living in our democratic so- RO
city considered in developing the philosophy?
4. Has this philosophy been formulated through YES NO
cooperative planning of all concerned? I D

5. Is the physical education program closely re- YES NO
lated to the health, recreation, and safety education ] LII
programs?
6. Are administrative policies relating to the physi- YES NO
cal education program planned, written, and made R O
available to all school personnel?
7. Do physical education teachers adapt methods of YES NO
instruction to different teaching situations? F R








8. Is each student evaluated in terms of his prog- YES NO
ress and achievement? F 1l
9. Is the organization designed to provide for the YES NO
most effective use of facilities, equipment, and per- F]
sonnel?
10. Does the school attempt to provide a varied YES NO
program of physical education, regardless of what- 0
ever sub-standard conditions might exist?
11. Is the program planned in such ways that the YES NO
worth and dignity of individual students are re- F]
spected?
12. Is the program designed to meet the needs of YES NO
youth by providing opportunity for vigorous mus- F]
cular activities?
13. Do the physical education activities serve as YES NO
laboratory experiences for the health and safety ] F]
programs?
14. Does the program provide opportunity for the YES NO
development of skill in, and knowledge of, physical j F
education activities for use in leisure time?
15. Is there an intramural program planned to pro- YES NO
vide opportunities for all to participate? 1 ]
16. Is the interscholastic program planned to meet YES NO
the needs and interests of the pupils and of the M DO
community?
17. Is the welfare of the participant at all times an YES NO
essential concern in the program? Fjj j
18. Are equipment and supplies purchased with YES NO
considered judgment as to program needs and avail- F jFj
able funds?
19. Is the use of audio-visual materials considered YES NO
an important part of pupils' learning experiences? M M
20. Is there a planned public relations program for YES NO
interpreting the physical education program to the ]
community?









21. Is a concentrated effort made to use all avail- YES NO
able school and community resources? D R
22. Is there continuous evaluation of the program YES NO
aimed at improvement in terms of accomplishing ] [R
school objectives?












CHAPTER 2


Elementary Schools

T HIS CHAPTER pertains to the classroom teacher as well as
to the physical education specialist in the elementary school.

Organization and Procedure
1. Is a 30-minute, minimum, physical education YES NO
period provided daily for all children? j D-

2. Are minimum and maximum teaching loads for YES NO
the physical education teacher the same as those for
the classroom teacher? -
3. Is a physical education specialist available? YES NO

If there is:
a. Does he coordinate the physical education YES NO
program? R [O

b. Is time allotted for planning with the class- YES NO
room teachers? O

4. Do classes provide opportunity for each child YES NO
to participate to the maximum? M
5. Is a variety of activities offered to meet the in- YES NO
dividual differences, needs, and interests of the [- ]
pupils?
6. Is the program planned to fit the development YES NO
level of each class? M] [I







7. Are pupils given the opportunity to help choose YES NO
and plan their activities? I E
8. Are opportunities provided for pupils to par- YES NO
ticipate in an evaluation of the program? \ j
9. Is opportunity provided for each child to achieve YES NO
some measure of success during each physical edu- 1 F]
cation period? L
10. Does each child have opportunities to develop YES NO
leadership? D [O
11. Does each child have opportunities to learn the YES NO
value of teamwork? F [1
12. Do teachers limit disciplinary measures to YES NO
actions other than restriction from physical educa- 0- F]
tion activities?
13. Is a medical excuse required for children who YES NO
cannot participate regularly in the daily physical [F]
education program?
14. Are provisions made for children who are tem- YES NO
porarily or permanently restricted from participat- I
ing in the regular program of physical education?
15. Has the child's adapted program been approved YES NO
by his physician? | M
16. Are medical records of children on adapted YES NO
programs kept current? I] M
17. Are activities constantly supervised to avoid YES NO
possible accidents from unnecessary roughness and ] F -]
other hazards?
18. Are there separate areas on the playground YES NO
where various groups of children may play in ] F
safety, without interference from other groups of
children?
19. In case of injury, is first aid readily available YES NO
and promptly given by a qualified person?







20. Is a standard accident report form used? YES NO

21. Are accurate records kept and data from acci- YES NO
dent reports used in planning the physical education O I
program?

Personnel and Materials
1. Is the person responsible for teaching physical YES NO
education specifically trained in this area? D D
2. Do the classroom teacher and the specialist YES NO
work cooperatively in planning the physical educa- -
tion program?
3. Is there a local supervisor or other resource YES NO
person available as a consultant? IF [

4. Are there any provisions for in-service educa- YES NO
tion? M
5. Have all teachers had instruction in safety and YES NO
first aid? O]
6. Are teachers informed with respect to legal YES NO
liability concerning accidents? ] F
7. Does the principal make provisions for the YES NO
teacher to observe other elementary school physical ] F
education programs?
8. Is Bulletin 21, Source Materials for Teaching YES NO
Physical Education in the Elementary Schools, used F]
as a guide?
9. Are professional elementary physical education YES NO
resource materials available for use in all activities -
for program planning?
Facilities
1. Is the auditorium, cafetorium, or any large va- YES NO
cant room available, when needed, for activities F- F
suitable to its use?






2. Can the classroom be used on rainy days or at YES NO
other times when the need arises? El
3. Is the play area for the primary children separ- YES NO
ated from that of the intermediate children? L 11
4. Is play apparatus definitely separated from other YES NO
established play areas? N [O
5. Are provisions made for adapting facilities for YES NO
elementary use? O I LI
6. Are the play areas suitable for multiple use? YES NO
DLI
7. Do the teachers plan for effective use of avail- YES NO
able facilities? [ I
8. Are the play areas so designed that a teacher can YES NO
supervise more than one group at a time? 1 n-
9. Are all facilities maintained properly by a YES NO
designated person other than the teacher or a child? L E-
10. Are adequate facilities provided for storage of YES NO
equipment for daily use and for off-season storage? ] LI
11. Are the play areas free from obstructions and YES NO
hazards? n j
12. Is the play area level, not terraced? YES NO
DD
13., Is it surfaced with material which is not likely YES NO
to cause serious injury? L I LI
14. Are play areas well apart or physically sep- YES NO
arated from walkways and driveways to the school [ -
building?
15. Wherever traffic or other hazards exist ad- YES NO
jacent to the playground, is the playground pro- [L 1
tected by a fence at least five feet high?







16. Is effective use made of available community YES NO
facilities in addition to school facilities? D I

Equipment and Supplies
1. Are there sufficient funds set aside in the regu- YES NO
lar school budget for equipment and supplies? L
2. Are faculty members involved in planning the YES NO
purchase and use of physical education equipment [7 F
and supplies?
3. If the Parent Teacher Association or any other YES NO
organization has available funds for school use, does [j7
the physical education department share in the allo-
cation of the funds?
4. Is a designated person inspecting and keeping YES NO
the equipment in repair? ID
5. Does the principal designate a person to be re- YES NO
sponsible for ordering equipment? [] -
6. Are the equipment and supplies purchased in YES NO
accordance with inventory and anticipated needs? L
7. Are bulletin boards, charts, pictures, and other YES NO
visual aids used as part of the program? 1- LI
8. Are the physical education classes able to use YES NO
the audio-visual equipment available for the regular L I
classroom?
9. Is the physical education program considered in YES NO
the purchase of audio-visual materials? l L
10. Are audio-visual materials purchased as a part YES NO
of the planned physical education program? L] LI

Public Relations
1. Is the atmosphere in the class such that teacher YES NO
and students respect one another?I L






2. Does the public relations program involve par- YES NO
ents, teachers, and children? [ I
3. Is a consistent effort made to interpret the pro- YES NO
gram to the public? 7 F]
4. Does the public relations program include the
use of these media:
a. Radio? YES NO
D I
b. Television? YES NO

c. Newspaper? YES NO
D D
d. Informal talks? YES NO
D M
e. Open house? YES NO
D I
f. Demonstrations? YES NO

5. Does the teacher participate in community af- YES NO.
fairs? L1
6. Is there willing cooperation with other faculty YES NO
and school personnel? [I -
7. Does the school share physical education facili- YES NO
ties with the community? 1 ]
8. Does the community share its facilities with the YES NO
school? ]
9. Are there opportunities for parents, teachers, YES NO
and children to participate together? I I

9






Course of Study
1. Does the course of study include written aims YES NO
and objectives designed to contribute to the educa- -F F
tion of all children?
2. Is the course of study planned to carry out the YES NO
philosophy and objectives of the physical educa- F
tion program?
3. Is the outline of the total physical education pro- YES NO
gram on file in the administrative and supervisory FD
offices of the county?
4. Is the course of study planned with other mem- YES NO
bers of the faculty? L II
5. Is the course of study planned with the prin- YES NO
cipal? FO
6. Does the course of study allow for flexibility? YES NO
D M
7. Is the course of study evaluated periodically YES NO
and revised accordingly? I LI

Activities
1. Does the program provide for optimum develop- YES NO
ment and participation for every child? L 11
2. Does the program include activities from the
following areas:
a. Directed play? YES NO
De]
b. Small group games? YES NO
D O
c. Large group games? YES NO

d. Team games? YES NO
1D






e. Body mechanics? YES NO
DD
f. Rhythmic activities? YES NO
DD
g. Stunts and tumbling? YES NO
DD
h. Apparatus activities? YES NO
DD
i. Self-testing activities? YES NO
DD
j. Individual and dual activities? YES NO
DD
k. Classroom games? YES NO
DD
3. Does the program provide for progressive learn- YES NO
ing of fundamental skills? ]
4. Does the program include activities which are YES NO
correlated with those of other subject areas? 1 D
5. Do the activities provide opportunity for boys YES NO
and girls to play together in all grades? D O
6. Do the activities provide opportunity for boys YES NO
and girls to play separately in the intermediate F] F
grades?
7. Do the activities in the program provide satis- YES NO
fying experiences for the children? D D
8. Do these activities provide for an increased YES NO
knowledge of the skills involved? ] ]'











CHAPTER 3


Secondary Schools

THIS CHAPTER deals with important aspects of the physi-
cal education program in the secondary school. It covers the
phases of organization and administration, health and safety
in physical education, public relations, curriculum planning and
development, and the sports activities program.
Organization and Administration
This phase of the secondary school physical education pro-
gram is subdivided into questions that deal with personnel,
teaching load, scheduling, facilities, and equipment and supplies.
1. Do those who teach physical education full YES NO
time meet the state certification requirements for [ [M
physical education?
2. Do staff members have the personality charac- YES NO
teristics that promote effective teaching?] [ F
3. Do staff members maintain a high degree of
total fitness through:
a. Ability to meet physical demands without YES NO
undue fatigue? M F-
b. Periodic medical examinations? YES NO
MDM
c. Correction of remediable defects? YES NO

d. Good body mechanics? YES NO
SD






e. Worthy use of leisure time? YES NO
DD
f. Emotional maturity? YES NO
DD
g. Social adjustment? YES NO
O I
h. Spiritual growth? YES NO
D D
4. Do instructors demonstrate effective teaching
through:
a. Knowledge of program objectives? YES NO
DO I
b. Knowledge of subject matter? YES NO
Dl
c. Competent performance skills? YES NO
DR
d. Attention to individual needs and interests YES NO
of pupils? E [1
e. Effective class management procedures? YES NO
D D
f. Good teaching methods? YES NO
OD
g. Systematic class organization? YES NO
D l
h. Written daily plans? YES NO
O O
i. Study of records? YES NO
DD
j. Accurate reporting on department's work and YES NO
needs? R R-






k. Use of continuous and valid evaluating tech- YES NO
niques? |
1. Professional conduct demonstrated by:
(1) Mature, responsible behavior in com- YES NO
petitive situations? D D
(2) Punctuality in professional duties? YES NO
DD
(3) Appropriate dress for the activity? YES NO

(4) Use of correct English? YES NO
]DD
(5) Good health habits? YES NO
DD
5. Do teachers show professional growth by:
a. Participating in:
(1) Professional organizations-local, state, YES NO
sectional, and national? D D
(2) Meetings, conferences, and workshops? YES NO
DD
(3) Clinics and coaching schools? YES NO
DD
(4) In-service education programs? YES NO
DD
(5) Research? YES NO

(6) Community, school-community, and fac- YES NO
ulty activities? ]7 D :
b. Contributing to professional literature? YES NO
DD







c. Reading literature pertinent to the field? YES NO
D E
d. Continued study? YES NO

e. An awareness of new trends in the field? YES NO
D I
6. Do teachers know and use available resource YES NO
personnel? R

Teaching Load
1. Are state accreditation standards observed in YES NO
regard to maximum daily teaching load? I [
2. Are state accreditation standards observed in YES NO
regard to number of students per class? I
3. Is each teacher scheduled for a planning period YES NO
per day? I L
4. Is provision made for coordinated planning in YES NO
equalizing the teaching load? I [I
5. Are the after-school activities considered a part YES NO
of the teaching load? I [L
6. If after-school activities are not a part of the YES NO
teaching load, is there a salary supplement? L I LI

Scheduling
1. Does the scheduling committee in the school in- YES NO
clude a representative from the physical education I I
department ?
2. Are students enrolled in the physical education YES NO
program on the same basis as they are enrolled in ] RL
other subjects?
3. Are women responsible for all phases of the YES NO
girls' program? D







4. Does the scheduling of classes allow for adapt- YES NO
ing the program of instruction to teaching skills in f [F1
progression by grade level?
5. Are provisions made for scheduling into an YES NO
adapted program those students with temporary or F- M-
permanent medical restrictions?
6. Are coeducational classes included in schedul- YES NO
ing plans? [- [I
7. Are boys' and girls' classes scheduled coopera- YES NO
tively for effective use of facilities? 1-i

Facilities
1. Does the outdoor play area provide enough YES NO
space for conducting an adequate program of out- OF
door physical education activities?
2. Is the outdoor play area satisfactorily surfaced YES NO
and maintained for the type of activity offered in F F-1
that area? '
3. Are play areas free from obstructions and haz- YES NO
yards? D I
4. Are the play areas suitable for varied uses? YES NO
DDII
5. Are sufficient outdoor areas available to accom- YES NO
modate the largest classes? L I I
6. Is there an aquatic facility available? YES NO
OID
7. Are sufficient indoor areas available to accom- YES NO
modate the largest classes? M D
8. Are adequate dressing rooms available? YES NO
D-1
9. Are adequate shower and other sanitary facili- YES NO
ties available? ] I







10. Is stationary apparatus placed where it will not YES NO
be a hazard? D F-
11. Are these facilities adequately maintained by
a designated person, other than teachers or pupils:
a. Shower and locker space? YES NO
DDO
b. Indoor facilities? YES NO
M R
c. Outdoor facilities? YES NO
D D
12. Are facilities provided for storage of equipment YES NO
for daily issue and for off-season storage? Ij L
13. Are audio-visual facilities available for use in YES NO
class instruction? M [-
14. Are community facilities available:
a. During school? YES NO

b. After school? YES NO
MD1
15. Do teachers plan for effective and safe use of YES NO
available facilities? 1LI
16. Are new or additional facilities planned coop- YES NO
eratively with members of the community, faculty, F
and architect?
17. Are radiators, upright supports, water fountains, YES NO
and other obstructions in the gymnasium and spe- -I M
cial activity rooms recessed, screened flush with the
wall, or padded and properly marked?
18. Are floors free of splinters and treated to pro- YES NO
vide a non-slip surface? LI D







19. Are gymnasium windows, light fixtures, and YES NO
clocks screened or otherwise protected to prevent f F]
breakage?
20. Is the play area protected by a fence at least YES NO
five feet high wherever traffic or other hazards exist 7
adjacent to the play area?
21. Are showers either equipped with a standard- YES NO
type mixing valve or supplied with tempered water O O
(about 110 degrees) controlled through a thermo-
stat?
22. Are all electrical switches and appliances in YES NO
locker rooms and shower rooms moisture-proof and O O
shock-proof? I

Equipment and Supplies
1. Are sufficient funds set aside in the regular YES NO
school budget for equipment and supplies? O R
2. Are physical education personnel involved in YES NO
planning and budgeting for the purchase of physical -7 O
education equipment and supplies?
3. Is the budget for the physical education depart- YES NO
ment based on an inventory and on anticipated l [-
needs? -
4. Is the equipment purchased with regard to the YES NO
planned program of both boys and girls? O] R
5. Is a qualified person designated by the principal YES NO
for ordering equipment and supplies? 1] R
6. Is a designated person inspecting and keeping YES NO
the equipment in good condition? R R7
7. Do teachers plan for effective and safe use of YES NO
available equipment? L [
8. Is audio-visual equipment available for class YES NO
instruction? FL [







9. Is the safety factor considered in selecting equip- YES NO
ment? ? I-

Health and Safety in Physical Education
1. Is the physical education department represent- YES NO
ed on the school health council? 1 11
2. Are there policies for classifying students for YES NO
participation in an adapted program? O IW
3. Are students who have been absent from school YES NO
as a result of severe injury or illness required to [ -
have a physician's permission before participating
in regular activities?
4. Does the school have planned procedures for
the care of emergencies which include:
a. The responsibility for giving immediate care? YES NO
O II
b. Notifying parents? YES NO
O R
c. Getting students home or to a place of safety? YES NO
D] R
5. In case of injury, is first aid readily available YES NO
and promptly given by a qualified person? O] R
6. Is opportunity provided for pupils to be insured YES NO
against accidents? R 1]
7. Is a standard accident report form used? YES NO
D]1
8. Are accurate records kept and data derived from YES NO
accident reports used in planning for the improve- -f R
ment of the program?
9. Are physical education teachers informed with YES NO
respect to legal liability concerning accidents? F-1







10. Is a member of the physical education depart- YES NO
ment on the school safety council? F'
11. Are playground, gymnasium, pool, and shower- YES NO
room activities constantly supervised to avoid pos- D 0
sible accidents as a result of unnecessary rough-
ness?
12. Are conspicuous notices of regulations, possible YES NO
hazards, and special precautions posted in these Fl
special areas?
13. Are materials on safety available in the physi- YES NO
cal education teacher's library or school library? j D
14. Are existing and potential hazards reported to YES NO
the principal in writing? ]

Public Relations
1. Is the atmosphere in the class such that the YES NO
teacher and students respect one another? ] D I
2. Does the public relations program involve par- YES NO
ents, teachers, and students? E1
3. Is a consistent effort made to interpret the pro- YES NO
gram to the public? j
4. Does the public relations program include the
use of these media:
a. Radio? YES NO

b. Television? YES NO
D D
c. Newspaper? YES NO
DE
d. Informal talks? YES NO
OD







e. Open house?


f. Demonstrations?


5. Does the teacher participate in community af-
fairs?

6. Is there willing cooperation with other faculty
and school personnel?

7. Does the school share physical education facili-
ties with the community?

8. Does the community share its facilities with the
school?

9. Are there opportunities for parents, teachers,
and students to participate together?

Curriculum Planning and Development
1. Are provisions made for meeting individual
needs, interests, and abilities of students in regard
to:
a. Maturity?


b. Skill?


c. Grade?


d. Atypical needs?

2. Has effective administrative or supervisory
leadership been provided in developing the course
of study?


YES
D
YES
D
YES
D
YES


YES


YES


YES
YE


YES
D
YES


D
YES
D
YES

YES
F]


NO


NO


NO


NO


NO


NO


NO
NO


NO

NO


NO


NO

NO
NO







3. Are the written philosophy and objectives of YES NO
the physical education department filed in the coun- F f]
ty office?
4. Is the program planned to carry out the stated YES NO
philosophy and objectives of the department? I ]

5. Is the course of study planned cooperatively by YES NO
a committee including administrators, teachers, and O 7
students in terms of objectives, needs, and interests?
6. Is the course of study available in the princi- YES NO
pal's office? I D
7. Is the course of study available to students? YES NO
O D
8. Is Bulletin 5, A Guide to Teaching Physical Ed- YES NO
ucation in Secondary Schools, Florida State Depart- -F IO
ment of Education, available in the physical educa-
tion department?
9. Are copies of the State-adopted textbook, Phy- YES NO
sical Education for High School Students, American
Association for Health, Physical Education, and
Recreation, available in numbers to accommodate
the largest class?
10. Are available resource personnel and a variety YES NO
of resource materials used in developing the course [F
of study?
11. Does the physical education staff study and re-
vise the course of study through:
a. Checklists? YES NO
D O
b. Questionnaires? YES NO
D O
c. Student evaluations of the course of study? YES NO
D D






d. Surveys of the availability and use of com- YES NO
munity facilities? JZ
e. Study of current professional literature? YES NO
DD
12. Do the evaluation techniques used influence YES NO
professional practices and procedures? I I
13. Does the course of study provide for learning YES NO
useful in everyday living? j LI
14. Does the course of study include:
a. Adapted activities? YES NO
DD
b. Aquatics? YES NO
DD
c. Coeducational activities? YES NO
ODI
d. Conditioning activities? YES NO
DD
e. Dual and individual sports? YES NO

f. Provisions for elective activities? YES NO
DD
g. Recreational activities? YES NO
IDD
h. Rhythmic activities? YES NO

i. Stunts and tumbling? YES NO

j. Team sports? YES NO
O-I







15. Are provisions made for students who are ter- YES NO
porarily or permanently restricted from participat- F
ing in the regular program of physical education?
16. Are provisions made for developing the program YES NO
on the unit plan to include a variety of activities? D I
17. Are provisions made within units for individual YES NO
differences in learning? D ]
18. Does the program provide for progression in the YES NO
teaching of skills and techniques in each activity? 1
19. Is instruction in coeducational activities shared YES NO
between the qualified men and women teachers? R -
20. Is provision made for students to participate in YES NO
activities of their own choice within the required F-1
program?
21. Is an elective program provided in the 11th or YES NO
12th grades? [I D
22. Are students allowed to choose activities within YES NO
the elective program? -71
23. Is the grading system consistent with the phi- YES NO
losophy of the total school program? Fj
24. Are many factors considered in determining YES NO
each student's grade in physical education? I D]
25. Is safety instruction included in the planning YES NO
and teaching of all activity units?

Sports Activities Program
1. Does a spirit of cooperation exist among players YES NO
on the various teams? 1
2. Is there an enthusiastic school spirit among YES NO
members of the student body? 1 M







3. Is the will to win-through all-out effort and YES NO
fair play-supported and encouraged? F1
4. Is the sports program so planned and so organ- YES NO
ized that there is steady progress among partici- jF []
pants toward improved sports achievement? I
5. Are suggestions from the principal regarding YES NO
possible ways of improving the athletic program j] '
carefully considered by members of the athletic
staff?
6. Does an atmosphere of mutual respect, under- YES NO
standing, and cooperation exist between members [-
of the athletic staff and the principal?
7. Is the principal informed of troublesome situ- YES NO
nations or occurrences? ] R,

8. Does the spirit of friendly cooperation exist be- YES NO
tween members of the athletic staff and other teach- F O
ers in working for the welfare of the students and
for the entire school program?
9. Are school staff meetings attended by members YES NO
of the athletic staff or a representative? O]
10. Do a sense of loyalty and a spirit of coopera- YES NO
tion exist among the various coaches in the athletic ] ]
program?
11. Do other school personnel such as the dietician YES NO
and maintenance men work cooperatively with ] F
members of the athletic and physical education
staff?
12. Is there a well-equiped medical kit with an YES NO
attendant well-trained in its use available at all F]
practice sessions and athletic contests? .
13. Is it standard procedure and well understood YES NO
that each player report all injuries immediately to R- ]
his coach?
14. Are injured players examined by a physician YES NO
prior to returning to participation in a sport? O O-







15. Are provisions adequate for having the student YES NO
body understand and appreciate the place of the f- ]
athletic program in the school?
16. Do the rules, regulations, and procedures of the YES NO
athletic program reveal that the welfare and the F-
safety of players are primary considerations?
17. Is the athletic program conducted in terms of YES NO
an annual budget? ] ]
18. Are all financial transactions recorded? YES NO
D D
19. Is a budget of equipment needs developed by YES NO
members of the athletic staff and approved by the F ]
principal or the athletic director?
20. Is buying done systematically, at regular times, YES NO
and through standard procedures?
21. Are inventories of equipment made regularly YES NO
and especially before purchasing new equipment? D D
22. Where possible, is standardized equipment that YES NO
is easily replaced, purchased? j [
23. Is equipment stored so that it is well ventilated? YES NO
DD
24. Are sports managers provided with a list of YES NO
duties to perform? 1
25. Are indoor facilities, such as toilets and lockers, YES NO
cleaned daily with an effective disinfectant? D D
26. Is there a system whereby clothing and articles YES NO
are protected from theft? 1
27. Are facilities planned and maintained for max- YES NO
imum safety? IM
28. Are all community facility resources used as YES NO
effectively as possible? D







29. Are all personnel concerned with the athletic
program familiar with the laws concerning legal
liability?
30. Is a copy of the State Department of Education
guide, Athletic Coaching in Florida Schools, avail-
able to members of the coaching staff?

Intramurals
1. Are intramural activities an outgrowth of the
class program?
2. Is there a time other than the regular physical
education class period set aside for intramurals?
3. Are students allowed any choice of activities?

4. Does the intramural program provide for a de-
velopment of neuromuscular skills beyond the reach
of the instructional program?
5. Does the program show evidence of good organ-
izational practices with regard to:
a. Scheduling?

b. Levels of competition?

c. Orderly game conduct?

d. Forfeits and postponements?

e. Posting, and keeping records?

f. Publicity?

6. Is there emphasis on carry-over recreation activ-
ities appropriate to the age of the student?


YES NO


YES NO
DD F


YES NO
DE
YES NO

YES NO
DD
YES NO
]DD


YES
D
YES
D
YES
D
YES
D
YES

YES

YES
D1


NO
D
NO
D]
NO
D
NO
NO
NO

NO

NO
Dl







7. Do students have opportunity to help in plan- YES NO
ning the intramural program? D

8. Does the intramural program reach the greatest YES NO
percentage of participants possible? B

9. Are opportunities offered for coeducational ac- YES NO
tivities? [j F]

10. Does a teacher have the responsibility for the YES NO
organization and supervision of the program? F] ]

Interscholastics
1. Are team members encouraged to develop de- YES NO
sirable health habits? 1 1 [O1

2. Do coaches set a high standard of personal YES NO
grooming for team members? D [

3. Have the principal and other faculty members YES NO
been involved in working out the objectives and M m
procedures of the interscholastic program?
4. Is a relatively high quality of academic work YES NO
demanded from players? F R

5. Are parents informed of the athletic policies YES NO
regarding training rules, prevention and care of in- E
juries, eligibility rules, regulations governing trips
out of town, the time and length of practices, finan-
ces, equipment, and the conduct of the athletic pro-
gram?
6. Are such matters as scheduling, expanding the YES NO
athletic program, and selection of coaching person- []
nel handled by the school authorities without pres-
sure by outside organizations?
7. Are relationships between sporting goods sales- YES NO
men and members of the athletic staff conducted on L O
a business-like, impersonal basis?







8. Do mutual understanding and cooperation exist YES NO
between members of the coaching staff and sports ]
writers?
9. Are sports writers provided with the necessary YES NO
pre- and post-game information? ] 1
10. Is every attempt made to provide sports writers YES NO
with information that is correct to the best of the -1 |
coaching staff's knowledge?
11. Are radio and television broadcasters provided YES NO
with spotters and correct information concerning j F
the players' identification, weight, background, and
related data?
12. Are coaches from other schools treated by the YES NO
staff of your school with the consideration that you -]
would like to receive?
13. Is the visiting coach informed of the time of the YES NO
game, dressing facilities, jersey color, officials, din- [ ]
ing facilities, and other accommodations?
14. Are the officials' decisions respected and con- YES NO
troversies discussed in an orderly and dignified F FO
manner?
15. Are periodic checks of equipment made for YES NO
safety and for detecting and replacing damaged F F
articles?
16. Are players required to wear clean uniforms YES NO
and underclothing? O D I
17. Do all game facilities conform to specifications? YES NO
D O
18. Are all preparations for contests made well in YES NO
advance of the game? F M
19. Is there a written procedure or checklist for the YES NO
preparation of games? D MI
20. Are athletic teams transported only in bonded YES NO
public carriers? -1 [M







21. Is there an itinerary prepared for all trips? YES NO
--11

22. Is the game contract checked prior to the game YES NO
so that nothing might be overlooked? '-

23. Is a standard of dress demanded for players YES NO
when they are on trips? -

24. Are the requirements for athletic awards writ- YES NO
ten so that they are clearly understood by all, in- [ I
cluding the general public?
25. Do groups outside the school present athletic YES NO
awards? [ M
26. Are letters of the same size awarded for all YES NO
sports? F
27. Are awards presented soon after the end of the YES NO
playing season? I
28. Does a medical doctor check all phases of ath- YES NO
letic injury before a sports participant is allowed to [ i
participate in a game?
29. Do all teachers in charge of any interscholastic YES NO
athletic activity meet minimum certification stand- M- l
ards in physical education?
30. Is a medical examination given each student YES NO
prior to the initial training season of the sport in ] I -
which he participates?

31. In case of injury or illness is a medical release YES NO
obtained before the athlete is allowed to participate 1 [l
further?
32. Are the candidates for varsity sports provided YES NO
with adequate and safe equipment? M I
33. Does the school assume financial responsibility YES NO
for injuries sustained through interscholastic ath- -] -
letic competition?







34. Do the high school boys have a representative YES NO
or balanced sports program? -[ ]
35. Do the high school boys have a representative YES NO
or balanced game schedule? R R
36. Is travel to interscholastic contests limited to YES NO
reasonable and practical distances? L
37. Are the finances of this program planned with YES NO
administrative supervision? [Il RI
38. Does the varsity athlete have the same oppor- YES NO
tunity as other students to participate in the phy- I
sical education program?
39. Is there coordination of facilities between inter- YES NO
scholastic and intramural programs? jjj
40. Do both boys and girls have adequate oppor- YES NO
tunity to use facilities for sports? R L
41. Are AAHPER Division for Girls' and Women's YES NO
Sports rules used for girls' extramural activities? R
42. Are girls' extramural games an outgrowth of YES NO
intramurals? O- I
43. Are women officials used for all extramural YES NO
games for girls? O RL
44. Do girls participate in events on sports days? YES NO

45. Do student groups participate in planning girls' YES NO
extramural activities? R 1IO
46. Are women teachers upholding AAHPER Divi- YES NO
sion for Girls' and Women's Sports standards? R Rl
47. Is the coaching of girls' teams the direct respon- YES NO
sibility of women teachers? j~
48. Is the welfare of the participant an essential YES NO
consideration in the interscholastic program? R L











CHAPTER 4


Next Steps


A FIRST STEP in improving a school's physical education
program is to use this checklist as an evaluative instrument.
Answering the questions in the checklist under the various
headings helps individuals pinpoint the strengths and weak-
nesses of their physical education program. As indicated in the
introduction, affirmative answers indicate strengths which should
be maintained and developed further. Negative answers are to
be considered as indications of conditions which should be im-
proved. Questions considered not applicable indicate needs for
further investigation. When completed in line with these sugges-
tions, the checklist then serves as a basis for planning improve-
ment of the program.
As a second step it is recommended that the entire physical
education department in the school meet to discuss the results
of the completed evaluations. An advisory council or committee
of the school faculty working with the principal is helpful to the
physical education department in developing a more effective
school and community program.
As a third step the council or committee should develop plans
for improving the program in light of the strengths and weak-
nesses revealed by the evaluations. If professional help is de-
sired, a county supervisor, the State Department of Education,
or the department of physical education of a college or univer-
sity may be requested to give advice and assistance.

State Department of Education Publications
Several publications of the State Department of Education
provide additional information concerning the physical education
program in Florida's public schools. They are:








A Guide to Teaching Physical Education in Secondary
Schools, Bulletin No. 5, 3rd Edition, 1948.
Better Health for Florida's Children, Bulletin No. 4-E, 1957.
A Guide: Athletic Coaching in Florida Schools, 1959.

Other Publications
Teachers, supervisors, and administrators will find these pub-
lications helpful as references:
Bunn, John. Scientific Principles of Coaching. Englewood
Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1954.
Clarke, H. Harrison. Application of Measurement to Health
and Physical Education. Third Edition. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.:
Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1959.
Hughes, William L. and French, E. Administration of Physical
Education for Schools and Colleges. New York: The Ronald
Press Co., 1954.
Nixon, Eugene W. and Cozens, Frederick W. Introduction to
Physical Education. Fifth Edition. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders
Publishing Co., 1959.








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