• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Foreword
 Introduction
 Outline of material in the...
 Topical outline
 Suggested procedure for ...
 Reference
 Bibliography














Group Title: Bulletin - State Department of Education ; 4C
Title: Materials in the Florida state adopted textbooks
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067276/00001
 Material Information
Title: Materials in the Florida state adopted textbooks and in selected supplementary books pertaining to the field of alcohol and narcotics education, with suggested teaching aids
Series Title: Bulletin Florida. State Dept. of Education
Alternate Title: Field of alcohol and narcotics education
Physical Description: 46 leaves : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Echols, Katie Sue
University of Florida
John B. Stetson University
Florida -- State Dept. of Education
Publisher: State Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1948
Edition: Rev. 1948.
 Subjects
Subject: Alcoholism -- Study and teaching -- Bibliography   ( lcsh )
Drug abuse -- Study and teaching -- Bibliography   ( lcsh )
Narcotic habit -- Study and teaching -- Bibliography   ( lcsh )
Genre: non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
Statement of Responsibility: prepared at University of Florida and Stetson University, Katie Sue Echols, consultant.
General Note: Issued originally: 1947.
Funding: Bulletin (Florida. State Dept. of Education) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067276
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 22160524

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover
    Title Page
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
    Foreword
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Outline of material in the textbooks
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Topical outline
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Suggested procedure for ...
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Reference
        Page 44
    Bibliography
        Page 45
        Page 46
Full Text






I 1 1


MATERIALS IN THE FLORIDA STATE ADOPTED TEXTBOOKS

and in Selected Supplementary Books

Pertaining to

THE FIELD OF ALCOHOL AND NARCOTICS EDUCATION

With Suggested Teaching Aids


1947
Revised 1948
Bulletin No. 4C



STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida
Colin English, Superintendent


I -II











IATERIA.LS IN THE FLORIDA STATE ADOPTED TEXTBOOKS
And in Selected Supplementary Books

Pertaining to

THE FIELD OF ALCOHOL AND NARCOTICS EDUCATION
VWith Suggested Teaching Aids





Bulletin No. hC

1947
Revised 1948

















Prepared at
University of Florida
and
Stetson University

Katie Sue Echols, Consultant



STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida

COLIN ENGLISH, State Superintendent of Schools
Joe Hall, Director, Division of Instruction












Jl.l 1'


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page


Foreword

Introduction . .

Outline of Materials in the Textbooks

Topical Outline . .

A Study Course in Alcohol Vlhon Used as

References . *

Bibliography ...... ....


. 0 0 * 4 -0 a a a






a Beverage . .



* a a S I S S













FOREWORD


The State Department of Education cooperates with all groups in developing
programs which will provide the best educational possibilities for each indi-
vidual. We believe that every individual has the right to grow to the highest
and bcst of which he is capable of becoming, and he has the obligation to assist
his fellows in a like pursuit.

In reaching such a goal the individual must develop an inner strength that
will not only fortify him against the hurts, losses and frustrations that are a
part of daily living, but will also render him capable of enjoying the fullness
of life.

Appreciation is expressed to all persons who assisted in the preparation of
this manuscript and particularly to Miss Katie Sue Echols, Consultant, Narcotics
Education, who assumed leadership for the development of plans and programs to
insure its satisfactory completion.

The material from the textbooks was compiled by the members of the Narcotics
Education classes at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, and at
Stetson University, DeLand, Florida, during the summer of 1947. This material
appeared in the first issue of this bulletin in the fall of 1947.

During the summer of 1948, the Narcotics Education class at the University
of Florida added the material from the textbooks that were adopted in 1948.
They also evaluated this material according to recent scientific findings. They
were assisted by four primary and elementary teachers from the Putnam County
Workshop that was being held on the campus. Grateful acknowledgment is expressed
to the following students and teachers for their earnest and thorough work:
Mr. Don-Lee Auleb, Mr. Henry VT. Bishop, Mrs. Olive C. Boyles, Mr. Charles F.
Gribble, Mr. James E. Freeman, Miss Dessie H. Hussey, Mrs. Dora Lowery, Mr. James
R. Powell, Mr. Philip Kingsley Schmidt, Mr. Edwin Shuler, Mr. Arthur H. Smith,
Mrs. Ayleen Smith, Mrs. Eddie Lee Smith, Miss Marion E. Stephens, Mrs. Charlene
S. Strawn, Mr. Eugene L. Taylor., Mrs. Lucile C. Tucker, Mrs. Addie B.'Wheeler,
Miss Vaflita Baldwin, Miss Myrle Eloise Bryant, Mr. Kelsey Blanton, Jr., Mr. Earl'
Cochran, Mr. Frank Ocele Flack, Jr., Miss Helef Douglas, Mrs. Cecil B. Culpepper,
Mr. Cyceil'D. Garrett, Mr. Gordan'H H albert, Miss Muriel Anderson, Mrs. Bertha
L. Hardin, Mrs. Elsie B. Williams, Mr. C. T. Welshinger, Mr. Richard L. Towle,
Mrs. Barbara Thomas, Mr. James W. Sims, M's. Clarissa F. Smith, Mrs. Martha
Sheldon, Miss Doris Pratt, Mrs. Bertha S. Lynch, Mr. Robert McDormont, Miss
Evalyn McEntire, Mr. William A.'Davis, Jr., Mr. Joe W.'Hargrovo, Mrs. Losie'
Johnson, Mrs. Bessie Richardson, LMr. William E. Harlan, ir. Charles S. Wood,
Mrs. Nellie B. Shepard, and MIrs. Sara Swift.












The Department of Narcotics Education seeks to present the best scientific
information available as to the true effects of such substances on the indi-
vidual and on society as a contribution toward the developing of forceful, well-
rounded personalities capable of objective, scientific evaluation of self. This
bulletin has been prepared to assist teachers ahd other groups in providing a
program of narcotics education which is based on scientific information.




State Superintendent of Public Instruction












INTRODUCTION


In many areas of teaching material beyond the experience and understanding
of the child has been repeated over and over in the texts through the primary
and elementary grades. It tends to make the child feel that "he has had that"
and to dislike the subject, thus he may not be willing to study the material
when it does come within his interest range. This is true concerning the mate-
rial about alcohol, narcotics and stimulants.

In the early years the teacher's effort in the area of health is to help
the child learn desirable eating habits that are necessary for the best growth,
acquire the ability to become an accepted member of his group through good work
and play habits, and develop the ability to make worthy decisions for himself.

In teaching about the things that promote and hinder growth some discus-
sion will naturally follow concerning tobacco, alcohol, kola drinks, tea and
coffee. We do not go into detail with the elementary child as to how milk makes
him grow. Why should we tell him at great length how alcohol and narcotics hin-
der his growth? If we do not force this material upon him before he is ready
for it we may be able to lead him to investigate the facts for himself later.
This will then become a real learning experience.

In this as in all areas the teacher's knowledge must far exceed that which
the child can comprehend. She needs a fund of knowledge that will make her
feel secure in directing the thinking of the child toward the answering of his
own questions which arise out of personal experience and community and national
current events.

Our purpose here is to help the teacher secure the best information in this
field for her own growth and to evaluate the material in the texts in light of
recent scientific findings.

In the analysis of Florida's state adopted textbooks that follows, Dr. Roe's
(1) book has been consulted often. An outline of the material on alcohol and
narcotics from each state adopted textbook is given and certain suggestions are
made as to the appropriateness of the material for the grade level and tho
scientific accuracy of the subject matter. The health, science and social stud-
ies books that went out of adoption in 1948 and a few other supplementary books
are included.

Primary and Elementary Grades

In the American Health Series for the primary and elementary grades
the state adopted books are of the 1942 edition. The books were revised
in 1948. The additions or deletions made in the newer revision have been
indicated.

All references in these books to alcohol and tobacco are outlined in
this bulletin. The first mention of these topics is found in the third
grade book. Comments are made to assist the teacher in using this material.


- 1 -












The Burkard, Chambers, and IvMaroney series that went out of adoption two
years ago seem muchto detailed for elementary students and have some of the
common errors listed in this introduction. Outlines of the material in the
fourth and sixth grade books of that series are included in this bulletin.

Junior and Senior High School Grades

Good material in large part is -given in the junior and senior high
school science and health texts.

The social studies books have very little material in this area.
Problems related to alcohol, narcotics and stimulants are vital factors
in our social structure and they should be so taught. Inasmuch as such
material has been omitted from the textbooks the teacher wvri need to
supplement the material. You and Alcohol (6), Accident Facts (7), and
Traffic in Opium (8) will be of help here. In this connection, Dr. Roe (1)
says:

"It has been my observation that our high schools do an
excellent job of interesting children at these ages in social
problems, and the schools should not miss the opportunity of
making clear the effects of inebriety on the community and the
steps which communities could and should take to deal with the
problems of alcohol."

Errors That Are Being Corrected in the Field of Alcohol Study

The Yale School of Alcohol Studies under the direction of Dr. E. M.
Jellinck has taken the lead in scientific investigation in the study of
alcohol. The results of their investigations are bearing fruit in greatly
improved materials appearing in textbooks. Some of the outstanding of
these errors that still appear in some texts are listed here as a group.
Attention is called to them again at the appropriate places in the out-
lines.

1. Diseases are caused by alcohol Every type of body diffi-
culty has been blamed on alcohol as, hardening of the arteries,
sclerosis of the liver, destruction of brain cells, and the causing
of fat in heart muscles. All evidence points to the fact that these
ailments are caused by vitamin deficiency which usually occurs in
the excessive drinker. Dr. Roe (1) says, "To teach this correctly
does not exonerate the alcohol habit but contributes to sound ped-
agogy."

In a few writings social disease has been attributed to alco-
hol. There is no doubt that the person under the influence of
alcohol is in more danger of becoming exposed to venereal disease, but
it is inaccurate to say that alcohol causes venereal disease.

2. Overstatement The tendency in .alcohol teaching has been
to make statistics and stories as large as possible. "The inaccurate


a 2.












statements may be motivated by a fear that unless the largest possible
figure is given, the impression created will not be strong enough to
act as a deterrent. All that can be said about the true consequences
of inebriety is sufficiently grave and does not require exaggerated
enforcement. The latter, in the long run, tends to discredit the
teaching," Dr. Roe (1).

3. Alcohol as a poison Particular care should be taken in using
the word poison when speaking to small children about alcohol. If they
see their parents drink alcoholic beverages with no apparent harm to
them, it sets up confusion in the mind of the child. He may discredit
all teaching about alcohol and about poisons.

"The chief fault to be found with all the discussions of alcohol
as a poison is the complete disregard, in practically all of the
textbooks, of the question of amount. The toxic effects of alcohol
are limited to those amounts which bring about certain concentrations
in the blood. The fault here lies not so much with the textbook writers
themselves,'but with the habit, into which many writers on alcohol
have fallen, of speaking of the effects of alcohol without reference
to quantities. That alcohol in large amounts produces death is a
fact; it does not, however, follow that any amount of alcohol is toxic,"
Dr. Roe (1).

4. Amount In many writings concerning alcohol there is no
reference to the amount of alcohol necessary to produce certain
psychological and physiological effects in the body. This, too, may
set up conflict in the mind of the child who sees his parents drink.

"The actual facts about the misuse of alcohol are sufficiently
disturbing. They do not need embellishing, and to do so is not only
pedagogically unsound, but unwise as well, since it is likely to
result in ultimate defeat of the purpose for which it was done.

"Although a few textbooks do, in some places, distinguish between
the drinking of small amounts and excessive drinking, they rarely
manage to keep this distinction throughout their discussions, but
tend to slip into indiscriminate generalizations. It is well known
that the immediate effects of alcohol vary with the amount in the
blood stream. This is not a difficult concept to teach, and it is
an important one, since disregard of it renders much of the teaching
in the subject meaningless and inculcates sloppy habits of thought.
This particular error permeates almost all of the discussions of the
physiological and psychological aspects. It is certainly much more
the function of our schools to teach precise and logical habits of
thought than to promote the acceptance of a particular solution of
the problem. Whether or not prohibition is the best solution of the
problem, it should be presented only as one of the possible solutions,"
Dr. Roe (1).

5. Alcohol as a stimulant Scientists now agree that alcohol


-3 -










is a depressant and not a stimulant. Most of the texts have stated
that fact, but not all have explained that the feeling of exhiliration
that follows a drink is due to the "taking off the brakes." One
feels relaxed and at ease because his higher brain centers have been
anesthetized and his judgment and self-criticism are lessened. He
feels better than he is. It is well to explain this semblance of
stimulation to high school students.

6. Confusion of terms The scientific studies in alcohol are
new, and the use of terms has not been fully established. The use of
the term narcotic with relation to alcohol is one of these. Dr. Howard
W. Haggard (2) of Yale, one of the foremost scientists in the subject,
thinks that alcohol is an anesthetic. "An anesthetic, is a volatile
substance which, when inhaled, depresses and abolishes the functions
of the brain in descending order." The general term, depressant, may
be the better one to use.

Howard E. Hamlin (3) says in Alcohol Talks from the Laboratory,
"MR. ALCOHOL: .........I am often called a narcotic, but recent
interpretation would classify me more accurately as an ANESTHETIC.
Narcotics, strictly speaking, are chemicals for which the body develops
a 'tolerance.' In other words, they are chemicals for which the body
makes an adjustment that later necessitates larger and larger doses
as one becomes more and more addicted to them. For example, if you
were to take a grain of morphine now it would kill you, but after
additction to it, even 10 would not kill.

"On the contrary I act as an anesthetic like ether which is made
from me. The only difference between our effects is that ether works
faster and its effects are more thorough. We both produce the same
kind of intoxication but not of the same degree. Anesthetics affect
the brain in a descending course. This means that I affect the
cerebrum first and the medulla last, or in the reverse order of their
evolutionary'dcvelopment. The centers of thought, judgement, reason,
self control, etc. are the first of your mental faculties to be
impaired. The functions of breathing and circulation are the last
to be modified, for they are controlled through the medulla.

"Your body does'not develop a tolerance to me as it does to nar-
cotics. For example, whether you are a novice or an habitual drinker
you are affected the same by equal concentrations of alcohol in the
blood. If it becomes 0.3% alcohol, you will stagger in your walk
regardless of your experience or inexperience at drinking. When your
blood is 0.5% alcohol you become unconscious. At 0.6 to 0.8% alcohol,
death occurs, as this is the lethal concentration."

Whichever term is used, anesthetic, depressant or narcotic, the
effects are the same, We need not consume time in arguing such points
while youth needs to receive information that is more vital to them.

7. Too great emphasis on the phyieonr1- ffcT Wiln Uvr. tn


- 4 -










spending too much effort in teaching the physical effects that belong
largely to the excessive drinker and the alcoholic which includes
4,000,000 of our population there are 56,000,000 moderate drinkers
who need to know more about the risk they are taking in making alco-
hol a psychological crutch. They need to know that the advantage they
gain socially from alcohol makes them less and not more of a "real
person". They are using a depressant to make them the "life of the
party" rather than developing their initiative.

The young person needs to know that a small amount of alcohol
that seems to make him a better driver is making him more subject to
accidents.

Tobacco

There is a great need for more scientific study concerning tobacco.
"Tobacco and Health" is recommended to the teachers as good material. Here
again we need to challenge the young person to strive for his maximum
physical and mental development. Lead him to study for himself the obstacle
that tobacco places in the way of that best growth. The fact that a teacher
smokes need not interfere with his encouraging the young person to attain
his full growth and weigh all the evidence before he decides to smoke.

Opium Marijuana

Teaching concerning the more dangerous drugs as opium and its deriva-
tives and marijuana is not as difficult as that concerning alcohol and
tobacco as social sanction is against the use of these drugs outside of
scientific and medical usage.

Sedatives and Stimulants

The use of milder stimulants as, tea, coffee, and kola drinks at times
are taken to the extreme and do considerable injury. Bensidrene to keep
one awake and barbituates to put one to sleep are used much to extensively.

Our aim in teaching is to help young people and adults to solve their
problems by a frontal attack and without goading the body with stimulants
or depend upon narcotics for relaxing it.


-5 -











OUTLINE OF MATERIAL IN THE TEXTBOOKS


3RD GRADE

Everyday Health by Wilson, Baker, Abbott, and Almack. Publishers Bobbs-
Merrill Company, New York, 1942. Chapter IX, pp. 68-74.
(State Adopted)

A. Use and Misuse of Alcohol

1. Helps--alcohol helps to make paint, varnish, ink, and other materials
2. Misuse--inside the body it is harmful

B. Yeast Plants and Alcohol

1. Fruit juices spoil when left in the open air, smell sour, and have a
biting taste due to alcohol,
2. Alcohol made by yeast plants--plants float through air and dust
3. Children experiment by watching yeast make alcohol--they disolve a
cake of yeast in sweetened water--bubbles rise in the jar
4. Children taste and find alcohol makes water bitter. Yeast plants
and sugar have made alcohol
5. Alcohol is poison, but useful as good cleaner and used in paint
and dyes (reference to alcohol as a poison left out of the 1948
revision)
6. Alcohol is not easy to freeze. It is put in radiators to keep them
from freezing. It is used in ink, shoe polish, paint and varnish.
7. Poison--anything taken into the body which will cause sickness or
death. In medicine cabinets poisons should be labeled red with
skull and crossbones. (This statement is not in the 1948 edition).
8. "Beer and wines contain some alcohol. Children should not use these
drinks. Drink fresh fruit juices and milk."

C. Alcohol and Growth

1, Experiments were made to show alcohol harms plants. First plant
was watered and grew. Second plant was not watered and lived a few
days. The third plant was fed alcohol and died.
2. Exhibit of good foods and drinks for growth--fresh fruits and
vegetables from home, also, bread, butter, eggs, cereal, milk,
meat, and water.
3. Is alcohol a food? No. Boys and girls should never put alcohol
in their stomachs, instead drink milk, water, and fruit juices.
(The statement in the place of C in the 1948 edition reads, "Boys
and girls who want to be healthy should not take drinks that
contain alcohol.")












Four primary and elementary teachers who were studying at Gainesville in the
summer of 1948 discussed this material for third grade children. They felt that
the experiment with yeast is more suitable for the sixth or seventh grade and that
there is no reason for discussing paints and varnishes in a health book.

The experiment concerning the nourishing of plants with water and with alcohol
has no relation to alcohol and the human body. Concerning similar experiments,
Dr. Roe says: "Since the experiments as set up do not actually prove anything
about the effects of alcohol inside the body, they represent a type of false
analogy which is one of the most pervasive and unfortunate errors in teaching."

The 1942 edition refers to alcohol as a poison on pages 71 and 73. That
statement is left out of the 1948 edition. It is well that the references were
deleted. "The chief fault to be found with all the discussions of alcohol as a
poison is the complete disregard, in practically all of the textbooks, of the
question of amount. The toxic effects of alcohol are limited to those amounts
which bring about certain concentrations in the blood. The fault here lies not
so much with the textbook writers themselves, but with the habit, into which
many writers on alcohol have fallen, of speaking of the effects of alcohol with-
out reference to quantities. That alcohol in large amounts produces death is a
fact; it does not, however, follow that any amount of alcohol is toxic," says
Dr. Roe. Such discussions belong to more mature students.

The elementary teachers felt that page 73 is good as it is given in the
1948 edition. They felt that the one page is enough for 3rd grade pupils.


4TH GRADE

Health by Doing by Burkard, Chambers, and Eiaroney. Publisher: Lyons and
Carnahan, New York, 1936.
(Out of adoption)

A. Unit 16--"A Dangerous Enemy", pp. 218-228, refers to alcohol as a cruel
ruler. The subtitles are:

1. WVhat is Alcohol?
2. Why is Alcohol Dangerous?
3. Avoid Alcoholic Drinks
4. Knowing that You Know

B. Unit 17--"The Tobacco Habit and Dangerous Drugs", pp. 229-237, relates
a short history of the beginning of the use of tobacco by the American
Indians. The subtitles are:

1. The Peace Pipe
2. Especially Harmful for Children
3. Success in School
4. Health
5. Character


-7-












6. Work
7. Safety
8. Courtesy
9. Dangerous Drugs
10. Avoid Tobacco and Dangerous Drugs
11. Knowing that You Know


Health at Home and School The American Health Series by Wilson, Pryor,
and Almacko Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1943.
(State Adopted)

There is only one sentence in this book which refers to alcohol in any
way. This reference is in the section, "How Desert People Live," on page 173.
Quote, "True Arabs do not drink wine nor any kind of alcohol." There is one
reference to tobacco. This reference is in the section, "Indian Food," on
page 159.

The additions on pages 203 and 204 in the 1948 edition are largely '
satisfactory. Scientists agree however, that alcohol is not a stimulant,
but a depressant.


5TH GRADE

Health at Work and Play The American Health Series by Wilson, Pryor, and
Almack. Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1942. Safeguarding
Growth and Health from Alcohol and Tobacco. pp. 98-119.
(State Adopted)

A. Pat's Report: Alcohol and Tobacco--What They are and Where They Come From

B. Mr. Hart's Talk: Alcohol and Tobacco--Their Effects on Growth, Speed,
and Strength

C. Dr. William's Talk: The Effects of Alcohol and Tobacco on Health

D. Jane's Talks The Story of Frances Willard

E. Things To Do

The material in this book is scientifically sound. The following
additions were made in the 1948 editions

A. Rules for careful driving, p. 46

B. Suggestion that the class study cigarettes, p. 70

C. Your program as a worker, pp. 218, 219


-8-











6TH GRADE


Growing Healthfully The American Health Series by Wilson, Pryor, and
Almack. Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, iew York, 1942.
(State Adopted)

A. Athletes avoid drinking and smoking, p. 213

B. Tobacco smoke irritates the throat, pp. 53-54


The material presented here is good, but very limited. As suggested by
the elementary teachers the experiment concerning the forming of alcohol, by
yeast plants, in fruit juices that have been exposed to the air (described
in 3rd grade book) may be used in the sixth grade.

The following additions were made.to the 1948 edition:

A. Two Important Hazards to Health, pp. 303-304

B. Checking important facts about looking into the future, p. 308

C. Tobacco smoke irritates the throat, pp. 53-54

D'. Training for sports and games, p. 213

The Body and Health by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney. Publisher: Lyons
and Carndhan, New York, 1936.
(Out of adoption)

Unit I. Foods and Health

A. Some Useful Aids to Digestion-Other Aids to Digestion

1. Avoid use of alcoholic drinks, p. 76
2. Alcohol is not a food, p. 76.

B. The Liver--alcohol can do serious damage, p. 78.

Unit V. The Pilot

A. Harmful Effects of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs, pp. 233-251

1. Alcohol Affects the Body*
2. Alcohol Especially Affects'the Nervous System*
3. Alcohol is a TNarcotic Drug, not a Stimulant.
4. Effects of Alcohol upon Judgement-and Self-Control
5. Effects upon the Feelings
6. Efforts upon the Skills
7. Alcohol and Athletics (football and baseball)


-9-













8. Alcohol and Machinery-accidents: locomotive, automobile, and
airplane
9. Effects of Alcohol upon Mental Work
10. Effects upon Family and Social Life

B. Tobacco Affects the Body

1. Introduction
2. A Poison in Tobacco
3. Some Effects of Tobacco upon the Body
4. Athletes are Forbidden to Smoke.
5. Tobacco .Interfers with Montal W'ork.
6. Many Employers Object to It.
7. Counting the Costs of Smoking

C. Some Other Harmful Drugs

1. Patent Medicines
2. Narcotic Drugs: Opium, Morphine, Cocaine, and Heroin
3. Danger of being in company with others that use it


7TH GRADE

Exploring Science'- by Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott and
Company, New York, 1946.
(State Adopted)

A. Alcohol

1. Effects of Alcohol on Athletes, p. 336
2. Effects of Alcohol on Auto Accidents, p. 338
3. Effects of Alcohol on the Brain, pp. 336-337
4. Effects of Alcohol on Chances of Getting a Position, pp. 338-339
5. Effects of Alcohol on Length of Life, p. 338
6. Effects of Alcohol on Sickness, p. 337

"Alcohol is the direct cause of certain diseases of the heart, liver,
kidneys, and nervous system," p. 337. Once more we have the statement that
alcohol is the direct cause of diseases when such disorders are caused by
nutritional deficiencies which occur often in the alcoholic.

B. Tobacco

1. Effects of Tobacco on Athletes, p. 340
2. Effects of Tobacco on Body, p. 340


- 10 -












The material here is largely good. The statement on page 340, "It
seems that smoking is an altogether undesirable habit," will likely be
questioned by some child who sees his parents derive enjoyment from smoking.
You may help the child weigh the evidence from every angle, including the
financial cost. Ask him to have his parents comment on the statement.
Parents, teachers, and thinking young people will agree that it is
altogether undesirable for the growing boy or girl.

Exploring Our Woild by Powers, Neuner, Bruner, and Bradley. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1948,
(Out of adoption)

Page 83 explains the freezing point of alcohol. It explains why
alcohol is used in anti-freeze.

Health Progress The American Health Series by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor,
and Almack. Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1948.
(Not Adopted)

A. Glenn Cunningham did not smoke nor use alcohol, p. 33.

B. Effect of alcohol and tobacco on nerves, pp. 73-74

C. Effect of alcohol and tobacco on heart, pp. 133-136

D. Effect of alcohol and tobacco on liver and kidneys, p. 236

E. The making of alcohol connected with Louis Pasteur's discovery of
bacteria, p. 291

F. Health in Practice, pp. 336-338

G. Protecting Your Well-Being, pp. 341-342

While the material in this book is limited it is well integrated, and
the statements are placed where they carry weight with the students. The
reference to Glenn Cunningham on page 23 is good.

In the section on "Reflex Action and Body Control", the statement
would be strcngthcnod if the sentence on page 73, "It takes water from them
and destroys essential parts of the cell body;" was changed to read, "It
anesthetizes the nerve cells and renders them incapable of doing their
best work, or in large amounts any work as long as alcohol remains in the
blood." The teachers can add that correction or lead students to find it
without shaking the student's confidence in the text by stating simply that
the newer information is being discovered all the time in every subject and
we want to be alert to find it.


- 11 -













The same is true concerning the statement on page 236--"The use of
alcohol may have serious effects on both liver and kidneys." This may
be passed over unless the students may ask the question, "Ho'7 does alcohol
affect the organs?" The teacher then may refer them to Dr. H. W. Haggard
(2) in Alcohol, Science and Society, where he says that any permanent
damage to any tissue is due to malnutrition which is common in the excessive
drinker. As one drinks more he tends to eat less which means that his body
is poorly nourished, thus it is more subject to disease.

The material on tobacco, pages 336-338, and on alcohol, 341-342, is
adequate.


Helping the Body in Its Work by Andress, Goldberger, and Hallock.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, New York, 1939.
(Out of adoption)

A. The White Corpuscles and Their Duties, p. 32

1. Alcohol as an antiseptic
2. Lowers body tciperature
3. Alcoholic beverages hinder white corpuscles

B. Prevent Chilling of the Body, p. 38

1. Notion of giving warmth a mistake
2. Lowers temperature
3. Death rate in pneumonia high in drinkers

C. Taking Care of the Heart, p. 45

1. Overwork it
2. Hay change cells of heart muscles to fat and affect circulation

D. Can Alcohol Help Us to Solve our Problems? pp. 160-162

1. Has immediate effect
2. Tests show lowering of ability to solve problems, p. 161
3. Effects judgement--people do things they would not otherwise
4. Used as an escape mechanism

The work on alcohol with three minor exceptions is specially good.
It is regrettable that an e-;ually good treatment on tobacco is not given.

The three exceptions are:

1. The reference to the injury to white corpuscles on page 32, there
is little evidence that blood cells are injured. That would be a
stronger statement if it read, "But alcohol then into the body
interfere with all body processes. From the digestive system,


- 12 -













On page 135 the following statement occurs: "Because marijuana has
only recently become a menace, its possession and sale are not regulated
by the anti-narcotiic acts now in force." The copyright date of that book
is 1939. Marijuana is now controlled by the federal narcotic laws.


The United States in the Western World by Wallace W. Atwood. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1946.
(State Adopted)

A. Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, p. 49

1. Tobacco mentioned as one of the products

B. How much rain satisfied the farmers? p. 66

1. Tobacco mentioned as one of the crops that needs considerable rain

C. Tobacco, p. 77

1. The early colonists in Virginia were the first to undertake the
cultivation of tobacco. Leading states in the production of
tobacco are named. The amount grown in the United States is
compared with that of other nations.

D. The Southern Manufacturing Section, p. 202

1. Tobacco mentioned as one of the raw materials produced

E. In the West Indies, p. 210

1. Cuba given as an important producer of tobacco and manufacturer of
cigars
2. In puerto Rico, too, tobacco is an important crop.

The statements here are purely concerned with geographic factors.


7TH AND 8TH GRADES

America Land of Freedom'- by Gertrude Hartman. Publisher: D. C. Heath
and Company, Boston, 1946.
(State Adopted)

A. Early Days in Virginia, pp. 49-50

B. Plantation Days in the South, p. 91

C. Land of Plenty, p. 486


- 13 -













alcohol enters the blood stream, where it goes rapidly to all parts
of the body. Body tenmerature is lowered because of the relaxed
nerves that control the capillaries in the skin. Blood flows to the
skin and heat is lost."
2. On page 45 the statement is made that alcohol also may change some
of the muscle cells to fat. There is no evidence that this is true.
"Any effect on the heart is largely due to vitamin deficiency, and
should be thus explained," Dr. Roe (1).
3. In the very good section concerning, "Can Alcohol Help Us Solve
Problems," pp. 160-162, the amount of beer taken by the subject and
the age of the subject should be stated.


The Healthy Home and Community by Andress, Goldberger, and Hallock.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939.
(Out of adoption)

A. Alcohol On the Witness Stand, pp. 114-128

1. How Does Alcohol Affect the Body?
2. Does Alcohol Sharpen the Senses?
3. Does Alcohol Lessen Fatigue?
4. Does Alcohol Help People to Work Better?
5. Is Alcohol "Good Medicine"?
6. Is Alcohol Nutritious?
7. Does Alcohol Have Any Affect on Length of Life?
8. Is Alcohol a Help or a Burden to the Community? Revenue from and
cost to government? pp. 128-129

B. Tobacco On the Witness Stand, pp. 129-131. Amount of nicotine absorbed?
p. 129.

C. The Case Against Opium, Cocaine, and ihrijuana, pp. 131-135--Tjhat is
.ierijuana? States that there is no federal marijuana law. There is one
now.

D. The Dangers of Self-Iledication, pp. 135-137

This book gives considerable space to alcohol, tobacco, opium, cocaine,
marijuana and self-medication. The treatment is scientific and objective.
Two corrections are indicated.

The approach to the alcohol problem is particularly good in this text.
The one exception is given below. There is little evidence as to how alcohol
effects the nerves. It is much easier to measure the results that follow
the taking of alcohol than it is to determine how the effects are produced.
lore study is being done in this area.

"The effects of alcohol on nervous tissue is believed to be due to the
fact that the fatty substance in the nerve cells readily absorbed alcohol,"
p. 116.


- 14 -













D. Chart showing the principal agricultural resources of the United States.
Tobacco is showm as the principal crop of five states: South Carolina,
North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee, p. 480.

The above topics contain descriptions of the part that the growing of
tobacco played in the development of these areas.


8TH GRADE

Our World Changes by Bruner, Neuner, and Bradley. Publisher: Ginn and
Company, Atlanta, 1940.
(Out of adoption)

Enemies of good health, pp. 456-464

A. Overindulgence, p. 320

B. The immediate effects of alcohol, pp. 456-459

C. Alcohol and automobiles, p. 459

D. Alcohol and the skilled workman, p. 459

E. The effect of heavy drinking, p. 459

F. Alcohol and machine age, p. 460

G. The case against smoking, p. 460

H. The use of drugs as medicine, p. 462

The statements here are scientifically accurate and appeal to the
student to guard his health.


Enjoying Science by Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott and
Company, New York, 1946.
(State Adopted)

P. 224, one paragraph under the topic, "How do Salesmen Appeal to the Desire
to Feel Adequate." Very well stated.


Modern Ways to Health The American Health Series by Wilson, Bracken,
Pryor, and Almack. Publisher: Bobbs-Mlerrill Company, New York, 1948.
(State Adopted)

A. Alcohol used for sterilizing thermometers, p. 76


- 15 -











B. Alcohol rubdown for bed patients, p. 83


C. Learning about alcohol and tobacco, pp.115-134

1. Two Problems
2. Nicotine and Tobacco--per cent of nicotine absorbed
3. Smoking by Adults
4. Alcoholic Drinks
5. Effects on Body Functions
6. Alcohol and Health
7. Alcohol and Automobile Accidents
8. Different opinions about alcohol

D. Alcohol and Driving, p. 243

The presentation of the material concerning alcohol and tobacco is
scientific and objective. It gives information clearly and states that no
person should drink before he is twenty-one. His decision then should be
based on a critical view of all the dangers and expenses involved.

Two young men in the 1948 class took exception to the following state-
ment; they felt that it justified smoking too much: "The bodies of some
individuals who smoke regularly become accustomed to the presence of nicotine;
thus this drug may not affect them so much as it does other persons," p. 118.
This would not alter the possibility that many individuals are injured by
the drug. The material in this book is very good with this exception.


9TH GRADE

Usjin Sci.nce by S:-ith 'nd Tr'.fton. Publish r: J. P. Lippincott and
Colpeny, Atl'nto., 1939.
(State Adopted)

A. Alcohol

1. As a solvent, p. 136
2. In thermometers, p. 151
3. Drugs and mental health, pp. 496-499

Errors:

"Normal people do not drink alcohol to excess, and most of them do not
drink at all," p. 497. This statement could well be challenged by the'thinking
9th grade student; there are 60 million drinkers in our Nation, with 4,000,000
excessive drinkers. Frank discussion on such points leads to clear thinking
and better evaluation of the problem.

B. Tobacco, pp. 500-501


- 16 -












The statements concerning tobacco are of the highly propagandized tone.
The teacher will need other material to aid the students here. "Tobacco
and Health" (4) is recommended.

C. Patent Medicines, pp. 494-496, 502

1. What are patent medicines, pp. 494-496
2. Mental ill health, p. 502

This section is well written.


Florida Wealth or Waste by Florida State.Department of Education, Tallahassee
Florida, 1946,
(State Adoptod)
Growing of tobacco, p. 140


Building of Our LifeTogether by Arnold and Banks. Publisher: Row,
Peterson and Company, New York, 1939.
(Out of adoption)

A. Liquor Control--social aspects, p. 543

The ninth grade adopted social studies texts are excellent materials
with which to correlate information in the field of alcohol and narcotics
study. Little material is'given but there is need for better understanding
of the relation of alcohol, narcotics, and stimulants to social welfare,


Be Healthy by Crisp. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott and Company, New York,
1938. pp. 432-450.
(Out of adoption)

A. Tobacco

1. What is it
2. Its effects on the heart, respiratory system, blood, etc.
3. Whether one should smoke
4. From economic standpoint
5. In consideration of others

It would be well to include some economic studies as to the average
cost per year to the moderate and to the heavy smoker; also give a clear
picture of the unhealthful and often untrue statements that appear in much
of the tobacco industry's advertising.

B. Alcohol

1. What is it
2. In the body


- 17 -











3. Is it a food (here information should be discovered as to the
dangers of nutritional deficiency in connection with large
amounts of alcohol)
4. And body warmth
5. And the nervous system
6. And the machine age
7. And the automobile
8. In medical practice
9. Moderate use of it
10. A traffic menace

C. Mild stimulants: coffee, tea, softdrinks, etc.

D. Other drugs: cocaine, opium, hashish, marijuana

This book gives a very fine treatment of the subject under the general
heading, "Interfering with the Safety Brakes."


10TH GRADE

Everyday Biology by Curtis, Caldwell, and Sherman. Publisher: Ginn and
Company, New York, 1946.
(State Adopted)

A. Alcohol

1. Effects of

(a) on the circulatory system, p. 371
(b) .on digestion, pp. 514-515
(c) effects on muscular work, p. 522
(d) on the nervous system, pp. 428-429

2. Percentages of alcohol in liquors and patent medicines (it was
interesting to note that the patent medicines rank between wine
and whiskey), p. 514
3. Social implications, p. 523 (one small illustration)

B. Narcotics, pp. 534-535

1. Paragraph under narcotics which contains pertinent information on
all forms of drugs
2. IMay become a habit through the uses of patent medicine

C. Tobacco, effects of

1. In cases of anemia, p. 374
2. On digestion, p. 515
3. On respiration, p. 519
4. Upon the nervous system, pp. 428-429


- 18 -












D. Patent medicines, pp. 532-535


1. For deafness, p. 524
2. For increasing or decreasing weight, pp. 512-513
3. Percentages of alcohol in, p. 514

The material here is limited but good.


Problems in Biology by Hunters Publisher: The American Book Company,
New York, 1940.
(Out of adoption)

A. What is the truth about stimulants and narcotics? pp. 350-354

1. Stimulants
2. Is alcohol a food
3. Is alcohol a poison
4. Danger from alcohol
5. The effects of alcohol on the mortality of offspring
6. Susceptibility to disease increased by alcohol
7. Death rates in different occupations
8. Use of tobacco

B. How does the Pure Food and Drugs Act work? pp. 355-357

1. Drugs
2. Bracers
3. Heart depressants
4. Cure alls

C. Effect of alcohol upon blood, p. 402

D. What are some effects of the drink habit? pp. 449-453

1. The drink habit
2. The economic effect of alcohol poisoning
3. The relation of alcohol to efficiency
4. The relation of alcohol to crime
5. Alcohol and crime
6. Alcohol and pauperism


11TH GRADE

The Making of American Civilization by Beard and Beard. Publisher:
MacMillian Company, New York, 1937-1939.
(Out of adoption)


- 19 -











The liquor traffic is attacked--prohibition amendment (18th)
passed in 1917. "WJar Measure" prohibiting manufacture and importation
of spirituous liquors for beverage purposes, p. 773.

President Hoover in 1929 appointed a National Commission on Law
Enforcement and Observation, p. 850.

American Government by MacGruder. Publisher: Allyn and Bacon, Atlanta,
1944.
(State Adopted)

A. Transportation of liquor from one state to another, p. 76

B. Liquor and narcotics contribute to deliquency, p. 639.

C. Internal revenue, p. 216

D. Alcoholic drinks through the ages, quotation, p. 660

E. Liquor laws, 21st amendment, pp. 661-662


11TII AND 12TI GRADES

Life and Health -'by Wilson, Bracken, Almack. Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill
Company New York, 1945.
(State Adopted)

A. Safeguarding the circulatory system, p. 137

B. Narcotics and anesthetics, pp. 257-258

C. Alcohol and tobacco

1. Alcohol breaks down controls, p. 259
2. The public suffers, p. 260
3. The case against tobacco, p. 261

D. The dangerous marijuana, p. 252

E. Curbing automobile accidents, p. 403

F. Preventing and treating shock, p. 436

G. Counteracting the effect of internal poisoning, p. 437

H. Calling the doctor, patent medicine, p. 373

The material in this book is scientific and well integrated.


- 20 -












The outstanding criticism is one of omission. There is no mention of
alcohol or tobacco in the section on mental health. To lead young people
to solve their own problems without resorting to artificial crutches is a
vital responsibility of the educator. For help in this area the teacher
may refer to The Alcohol Problem Visualized (5) and Alcohol Talks from the
Laboratory (3).


Health and Human Welfare by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney. Publisher:
Lyons and Carnahan, Atlanta, 1944.
(Out of adoption)

A. Introduction, pp. 342-344

1. 1What Is a Narcotic?
2. Effects on Nerve Cells and Nervous System

B. Beverage alcohol, pp. 344-370

1. Nature and General Effects
2. Effects on Cells
3. A Narcotic, Not a Stimulant
4. Effects on Nervous System

(a) Alcohol and Accidents
(b) A Habit Forming Drug

5. Effects on

(a) circulation, respiration, excretion, physical endurance and
skill, and mental efficiency

6. Alcohol and Disease

(a) statistics

7. A Great Social Evil
8. Real Value of Alcohol
9. Summary
10. References

C. Narcotics, pp. 373-397

1. Alkaloids
2. Tea, Coffee, and Other Beverages
3. Tobacco Products:

(a) Effects on the Body
(b) Athletics
(c) Scholastic Marks


- 21 -











(d) Misleading Advertising
(e) Additional Considerations (Self-Control, Deference to Others,
Fire Hazards, Irritability, Waste of Money, Loss and Injury
by Fire, Habit-Forming Drug)

4. Narcotic Drugs:

(a) Definition and Body Effects
(b) Names (and identity) of Narcotics
(c) Effects upon the Nervous System
(d) Physical Basis of the Habit
(e) Special Warning to High School Students
(f) Effects upon Character
(g) How Narcotics Lead to Crime
(h) The Traffic in Narcotics
(i) Narcotic Conditions in America
(j) Narcotics in Patent Medicine
(k) Sources of Narcotic Addiction
(1) Legislative Control
(m) A United Front Needed
(n) Summary (Narcotic Drugs)
(o) References

This book represents all that is good and bad concerning the teaching
about narcotics. All references here are to the 1944 edition.

The introduction, page 459, which is largely well stated indicated that
alcohol does not produce unconsciousness. In large amounts it does produce
unconsciousness.

On page 460 the assumption that alcohol attacks the lipoid of the nerve
cells has no foundation in scientific study. The second paragraph on that
page is well stated except for the opening phrase, "In similar fashion."
The same errors concerning damage to cells is repeated on pages 462 and 463.

The section, "A Narcotic, Not a Stimulant," is good on page 463 and two
lines on 464. The remainder is not borne out by the evidence.

In the section, "Further Effects on the Nervous System," pages 464-467,
there is much repetition. The last paragraph is a good statement that
covers all that the previous part of the section repeats unnecessarily.

The section on alcohol and accidents, pages 467-469 is good.

The section, "A Habit-Forming Drug," classes alcohol with other
narcotics but does not state that alcohol habit formation is psychological
rather than physical. With the use of narcotics as opium, the conditioning
is physical.

The text goes on with descriptions of how alcohol effects circulation,
respiration, and excretion. These have the common error of blaming alcohol
directly when malnutrition is at the root of all these difficulties.


- 22 -











12TH GRADE

Society'Faces the Future by Ruth Wood Gavian. Publisher: D. C. Heath and
Company, Atlanta, 1938.
(State Adoptcd)

"The Menace of Propaganda", pp. 529-531


Sportsmanlike Driving Published by American Automobile Association,
Washington 6, D. C., 1947.
(State Adopted)

A. Alcohol

1. Cause of accidents, p. 55
2. Driving after taking, pp. 54-55
3. Effect on reaction time, pp. 54-55, 74
4. Impairs judgement, pp.'54-55
5. Texts for intoxication, pp. 55-58

The material is scientifically sound.


Challenges to American Youth by Joseph Irvin Arnold. Publisher: Row,
Peterson and Company, Evanston, Illinois, 1946.
(State Adopted)

A. Conferences, treaties and organizations, p. 476

During its existence the League of Nations was helpful in dealing on
a voluntary basis with many economic problems and social problems including
traffic in opium and liquor.

B. Mental Disease, p. 558

C. Mental Health, pp. 566-568

The writers of this text are to be congratulated upon'including material
on alcohol in the chapter given to Mental Health. However, some of the
errors common to writings about alcohol have been included, namely:

A. "Alcohol paralyzes the white corpuscles of the blood which preserve
health. Muscles, nerves, liver and even protoplasm are harmed by it.
It is a narcotic that is a harmful drug. It is not merely a stimulant,"
p. 566.

"Other causes are the diseases of childhood, syphilis and alcoholism in
parents--probably because syphilis and alcoholism destroy cells which
have to do with the building of the brain," p. 558.


- 23 -











There is no conclusive evidence that the functioning of white corpuscles
is injured by alcohol.

The nerves are anesthetized by alcohol and thus cannot do their best
work as long as alcohol remains in the blood. Any permanent damage done to
muscles, brain cells, nerves, liver and protoplasm is due to malnutrition
which usually occurs in the excessive drinker due to the fact that he eats
very little,

B. "Perhaps worst of all, alcohol may affect the germ plasm of the parent
or parents, and cause the infant to begin life as a defective," p. 566

Again it is not the damage to the germ plasm that hinders prenatal child
development but the lowered physical stamina of the parents through mal-
nutrition, mental unrest, and generally unsatisfactory living conditions.

The major interest of adolescents centers around how he can get along
well with people, be popular, get a date, get a job. All of these vital
factors revolve around the matter of mental health. The high school student
will be interested in how alcohol and tobacco effects his well being. He
will ask such questions as:

1. Do I have to drink and smoke to be popular?
2. Thy do people drink?
3. What makes alcoholics?
4, How may I help my older friend vwho is an alcoholic?

The teacher may get good help hero from "Alcohol Talks from the Labor-
atory" (3) and "Alcohol Problem Visualized" (4).

Living Chemistry by Ahrens, Bush and Easley. Publisher: Ginn and Company,
Boston, 1945,
(State Adopted)

A, Physical properties by which you may identify a substance, p. 18

1. Boiling point of alcohol

B. What derivatives, or substitution products of methane are possible? p. 133

1. Formation of alcohol

C. Relationship of an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, p. 134

D. Anesthetics, narcotics, hypnotics, pp. 212-29

1. Anesthetics
2. What are anesthetics
3. The action of general anesthetics within the body
4. The making of ether and other anesthetics


- 24













5. The best anesthetic
6. What are narcotics
7. Alkaloids
8. The effect of narcotics on the body
9. The narcotic traffic
10, Local anesthetics--gifts of chemists
11. The use of local anesthetics
12. The history of local anesthetics
13. What are hypnotics?
14. The chemical nature of a hypnotic
15. Urea as a source of hypnotics
16. A word of caution

E. Stimulants, pp. 219-223

1. Alcohol
2. What is alcohol?
3. How is alcohol made?
4. Is alcohol a stimulant?
5. How does alcohol affect the body?
6. Coffee and tea
7. Tobacco

The material here is scientifically and pedagogically sound. The
scientific facts are well given, and they are effective when applied to life
situations.


- 25 -












TOPICAL OUTLINE


Alcohol

A. What Alcohol Is--How It is Made

3RD GRADE

Everyday Health by Wilson, Abbott, and Almack, Publisher:
Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1942. p. 68.
(State Adopted)

4TH GRADE


Health b Doing by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney.
Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936, p. 219,
(Out of adoption)


Publisher:


7TH GRADE

The Healthy Home and Community by Andress, Goldberger, and
Hallock. Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. p. 114.
(Out of adoption)

Health Progress by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1943. p. 291.
(State Adopted)

9TH AND 10TH GRADES

Be Healthy by Crisp. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott Company,
MeTw York, 1938. p. 440.
(Out of adoption)


Living Chemistry by Aherns, Bush, and Easley.
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1946. p. 220.
(State Adopted)


Publisher:


B, What Alcohol Does to the Mind

4TH GRADE


Living Healthfully by Charters, Smiley, and Strang.
MacMillian Company, New York, 1936. p. 138.
(Not adopted)


Publishers


Health by Doing by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney. Publisher:
Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936. p. 220.
(Out of adoption)


- 26 -












5TH GRADE


Health at Work and Play by Wilson, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1942. p. 113.
(State Adopted)

6TH GRADE

The Body and Health by Burkard, Chambers, and rfaroney.
ubElisher: Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936. pp. 236, 241-243.
(Out of adoption)

7TH GRADE

Exploring Science Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J. P.
Lippincott and Company, New York, 1946. pp. 336-338.
(State Adopted)

Helping the Body in Its Work by Andress, Goldberger, and
Hallock. Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. p. 160.
(Out of adoption)

Health Progress by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1943. p. 73.
(State Adopted)

8TH GRADE

Modern Ways to Health by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1943. p. 127.
(State Adopted)

Enjoying Science by Smith and Trafton. Pubilsher: J. P.
Lippincott and Company, New York, 1946. p. 224.
(State Adopted)

Our World Changes by Powers, Bruner, Neuner, and Bradley.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. p. 457.
(Out of adoption)

9TH AND 10TH GRADES

Be Healthy by Crisp. "Publisher: J. P. Lippincott and Company,
New York, 1938. p. 444.
(Out of adoption)

10TH GRADE

Everyday Biology by Curtis, Caldwell, and Sherman. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1946. pp. 428-429.
(State Adopted)


- 27 -













11TH AND 12TH GRADES


Life and Health by Wilson, Bracken, and Almack. Publisher:
Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1945. pp. 259-260, 436.
(State Adopted)

Living Chemistry by Ahrens, Bush, and Easley. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Boston, 1946. pp. 219-220.
(State Adopted)

Challenges to American Youth by Joseph Irvin Arnold. Publisher:
Row, Peterson and Company, Evanston, Illinois, 1946. pp. 558, 566-
(State Adopted)

C. What Alcohol Does to the Body

3RD GRADE

Everyday Health by Wilson, Abbott, and Almack. Publisher:
Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1942. p. 73.
(State Adopted)

4TH GRADE

Health by Doing by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney. Publisher:
Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936. pp. 222, 224.
(Out of adoption)

5TH GRADE

Health at Work and Play by Wilson, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: BobBs-Merrill Company, New York, 1942. pp. 111-115.
(State Adopted)

6TH GRADE

Body and Health by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney. Publisher:
Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936. pp. 233-238.
(Out of adoption)

Growing Healthfully by Wilson, Pryor, and Almack. Publisher:
Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1942. p. 213.
(State Adopted)

7TH GRADE

Exploring Science by Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J. P.
Lippincott and Company, New York, 1946. pp. 336-338.
(State Adopted)


- 28 -












Helping the Boly in its Work by Andress, Goldberger, and Hallock.
Publisher: Gian and Company, Atlanta, 1939. pp. 38, 45, 160.
(Out of adoption)

Healthy Home aud Comngnity by Andress, Goldberger, end Hallock.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. pp. 114-118.
(Out of adoption)

Health Progrg3s by Wilson, Bracken, Pryorand Almack.
Publisher: Boobs-H.errill Company, New York, 1943. pp. 135, 236.
(Stato Ad:pt d)

8TH GRADE

Modern ''eyj to Health by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor, and Almack.
Publish'iT- Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1943. pp. 124-134.
(Stat Arl opt3d)

Our W7','.d Changes by Powers, Bruner, Nuener, and Bradley.
Publisher: Ginn and Ccnmpany, Atlanta, 1940. pp. 456-457.
(Out; (f adoption)

9TH GRAD:

UnderF standing the Universe by Franklin B. Carroll. Publisher:
Joh 0'. Winston Company, Philadelphia, 1939. pp. 520-534.
(Out of adoption)

9TH AND 10TH GRADES

Be Healthy by Crisp. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott Company,
New York, 1938. p. 440.
(Out of Adoption)

10TH GRADE

Everyday Biology by Curtis, Caldwell, and Sherman. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. pp. 514-515, 522.
(State Adopt ed)

Problems in Biology by Hunter. Publisher: American Book
Company, Atlanta, 1935. pp. 353-354.
(Out of adoption)

11TH AND 12TH GRADES

Life and Health by Wilson, Bracken, Almack. Publisher: Bobbs-
Merrill Company, New York, 1945. pp. 137, 259-261, 437.
(State Adopted)


- 29 -













Health and Human Welfare by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney.
Publisher: Lyons and Carnahan, Atlanta, 1937. pp. 344-372.
(Out of adoption)

Living Chemistr by Ahrens, Bush, and Easley. Publishers
Ginn and Company, Boston, 1946. p. 220.
(State Adoptedj

D. Alcohol and the Community--Accidents

7TH GRADE

EMlopring Science by Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J. P.
Lippincott and Company, New York, 1946. p. 338.
(State Adopted)

He,?.thyk Hone and Community by Andress, Goldberger, and Hallock,
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. p. 118.
(Out of adoption)

8TH GRADE

Our World Changes by Powers, Bruner, Neuner, and Bradley.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. p. 460.
(Out of adoption)

9TH AID 10TH GRADES

Be Health by Crisp. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott Company,
New York, 1938, p. 440.
(Out of adoption)

10TH GRADE

Everyday Biology by Curtis, Caldwell, and Sherman. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. p. 523.
(State Adopted)

Problems in Biology by Hunter. Publishers American Book
Company, Atlanta, 1935. pp. 352-353.
(Out of adoption)

11TH AND 12TH GRADES

Life and Health by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-lIerrill Company, New York, 1945. pp. 260, 403.
(State Adopted)

Health and Human Welfare by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney.
Publisher: Lyons and Carnahan, Atlanta, 1937. pp. 351-353.
(Out of adoption)
30 -













Sportsmanlike Driving Published by the
Association, Washington 6, D. C., 1947.
(State Adopted)


American Automobile
pp. 55-58.


E. Alcohol and Narcotics and the Nation

Secondary


The Making of American Civilization by Beard and
Publisher: EacLMillian Company, New York, 1937-39.
(Out of adoption)


Beard.
pp. 773,


Challenges to American Youth by Joseph Irvin Arnold.
Publ~ her: Row, Peterson and Company, Evanston, Illinois,
p 476.
(State Adopted)


850.


1946.


American Gner3rrment by IfacGruder. Publisher:
Atra:a,',"bs-,. pp. 76, 216, 639, 661-662.
(State Adopted)

Soci.etv Faces the Future by Ruth Wood Gavian.
Heath and Company, Atlenta, 1938. pp. 529-531.
(State Adopted)


Building Our Life Together
Row, Peterson and Company,
(Out of adoption)


Allyn and Bacon,


Publisher:


D. C.


- by Arnold and Banks. Publisher:
New York, 1938. p. 543.


F. Total Abstinence vs Moderate Drinking

5TH GRADE


Health at Work and Play -
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill
(State Adopted)


by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor
Company, New York, 1942.


and Almack.
p. 112.


8TH GRADE

The Healthy Home and Community by Andress, Goldberger, and
Hallck. Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. p. 128.
(Out of adoption)

Modern Ways to Health by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-LIerrill Company, New York, 1943. pp. 131-134.
(State Adopted)


- 31 -












9TH AND 10TH GRADES


Be Healthy by Crisp. Publisher: J. P. Lippincott and Company,
New York, 1938. p. 445.
(Out of adoption)

Living Chemistry by Ahrens, Bush, and Easley. Publishers
Ginn pnd Company, Atlanta, 1946. p. 220.
(State Adopted)


Tobacco


4TH GRADE


Health by Doing by Burkard, Chambers, and Mlaroney.
Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936. pp. 231-237.
(Out of adoption)


Publisher:


Health at Home and School by Wilson, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-Herrill Company, New York, 1942, p. 159.
(State Adopted)

5TH GRADE

Health at Work and Play by 'Jilson, Pryor and'Almack. Publisher:
Bobbs- errill Company, New York, 1942. p. 159.
(State Adopted)
6TH GIADE

Body and Health by Burkard, Chambers and 1iaroney. Publisher:
Lyons and Carnahan, New York, 1936. pp. 244-248.
(Out of adoption)


7TH GRADE


Exploring Science by Smith and Trafton.
Lippincott and Company, New York, 1946.
(State Adopted)


Publisher:
p. 340,


The Healthy Home and Community by Andress, Goldberger, and
Hallock. Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. pp. 112,
129-131.
(Out of adoption)

Health Progress by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-lerrill Company, New York, 1943. pp. 115-122,
134-135.
(State Adopted)


- 32 -


J. P.











Using Science by Smith and Trafton. Publisher:
Tippincott and Company, New York, 1946. p. 340.
(State Adopted)


J. P.


Our World Changes by Powers, Bruner, Neuner, and Bradley.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. pp. 320, 460-461.
(Out of adoption)

9TH GRADE


Understanding the Universe by Franklin B. Carroll.
John C. Winston Company, 1939. p. 481.
(Out of adoption)

9TH AND 10TH GRADES


Be Healthy by Crisp. Publisher:
New York, 1938. pp. 292, 435-439.
(Out of adoption)


Publishers


J. P. Lippincott and Company,


10TH GRADE


Everyday Biology'- by Curtis, Caldwell, afid Sh&rman.
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. pp. 374, 515, 519,
(State Adopted)


Publisher:
428-429.


Problems in Biology by Hunter. Publisher: American Book
Company, Atlanta, 1935. p. 354.
(Out of adoption)

Secondary

Florida Wealth or Waste by Florida State Department of Edu-
cation,'State Textbook and Library Service, George T. Walker,
Manager, Tallahassee, Florida, 1946. p. 140.
(State Adopted)

Society Faces the Future by Ruth Wood Gavian. Publisher:
D. C. Heath and Company, Atlanta, 1938. pp. 529-531.
(State Adopted)

11TH AND 12TH GRADES

Life and Health by Wilson, Bracken, Pryor, and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill Company, New York, 1945. pp. 261-262.
(State Adopted)

Health and Human Welfare by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney.
Publisher: Lyons and Company, New York, 1937. pp. 376-531.
(Out of adoption)


- 33 -











Living Chemistry by Ahrens, Bush, and Easley. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1946. p. 223.
(State Adopted)


Habit Forming Drugs

4TII GRADE

Livin I Healthfully'- by Charters, Smiley, and Strang. Publisher:
l.aclilliam Company, "er York, 1936. p. 139.
(Not adopted)

7TH GRADE

Helping the Body in its Work'- by Andiess, Goldberger; Iallock.
Publishers Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. pp. 732, 205.
(Out of adoption)

Healthy Home and Comunity by Andress, Goldberger, and Hallock.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. pp. 112, 133-134.
(Out of adoption)

8TH GRADE

Our TTorld Changes by Powers, Bruner, Neuner, and Bradley.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. p. 320.
(Out of adoption)

Using Science by Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J. P.
Lippincott and Company, INTe York, 1946. pp. 496-499,
(State Adopted)

9TH AiD 10TH GRADES

Be Healthy by Crisp. Publisher: J.'P. Lippincott and Company,
ITer York, 1930. pp. 447, 452, 456-459, 472.
(Out of adoption)

10TH GPRDE

Everyday Biology by Curtis, Caldvell, and Sherman. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. p. 534.
(State Adopted)

Problems in Biology by Hunter. Publisher: American Book
Company, NIew York, 1935. p. 355.
(Out of adoption)


- 34 -








11TH AND 12TH GRADES


Life and Health by Wilson, Dracken, Pryor; and Almack.
Publisher: Bobbs-LIerrill Company, New York, 1945. pp. 257-258.
(State Adopted)

Health and Human WTelfare by Bur3ard, Chambers, and Maroney.
Publisher: Bobbs-Ilerrill-Conmany, 1937, pp. 383-396.
(Out of adoption)


Living Chemistry by Ahrens, Bush, and Easley.
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1946. pp. 215-216.
(State Adopted)


Publisher:


Patent medicine

6TH GRADE


Body and Health by Burkard, Chambers, and Maroney.
Lyons and Carnahan, Atlanta, 1936. pp. 248-250.
(Out of adoption)


Publisher:


7TH GRADE

Healthy Home and Community by Andress, Goldberger, and Hallock.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1939. p. 135-137.
(Out of adoption)

8TH GRADE

Our World Changes by PowerB, Bruner, Neuner, and Bradley.
Publisher: Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. p. 463.
(Out of adoption)

9TH GRADE

Using Science by Smith and Trafton. Publisher: J; P.
Lippincott and Company, New York, 1946. pp. 494-496, 502.
(State Adopted)

Understanding the Universe by Frahklin B. Carroll,
Publisher: John C. YTinston Company, Philadelphia, 1939.
pp. 480-481.
(Out of adoption)

10TH GRADE

Everyday Biology by Curtis, Caldwell, and Sherman. Publisher:
Ginn and Company, Atlanta, 1940. pp. 512-513, 532-534, 535.
(State Adopted)
35 -








11TII AID 12TH GRADES


Life and Health by Wilson, Pracken, and Almack.
Bobbs-:ierrill Company, iKew York, 1965. p. 373.
(S;rcto Adopted)


Publisher:


Health and Human Welfare by Burkard, Chambers, and Ivaroney.
Publisher: Lyons and Carnahan, Atlanta, 1937. pp. 562-565.
(Out of adoption)


Methods of Teaching


Practically every textbook listed gives
teacher and suggested classroom procedures.
be listed here as the list would be much too


help for the
They will not
long.


- 36 -








Suggested Procedure For

A STUDY COURSE IN ALCOHOL WHEN USED AS A BEVERAGE
For use in Junior and Senior High Schools
Course may be covered in a period of one or two weeks
or correlated with regular classroom work


Basic Text: ALCOHOL TALKS FROM THE LABORATORY, by Howard E. Hamlin,
Supervisor, Health and
Narcotics, State Depart-
ment of Education, 1945
Waltham Road, Columbus,
Ohio


Lesson I

EIr:CLEDi-CL IS POWER

A. Read the foreword for an introduction to the author. Vlo is he? Why did
he write the pamphlet?

B. What does the booklet contain? Road aloud the titles in the table of
contents. Give opportunity for comments or questions.

C. In preparation for the study of the booklet have the class read it through
silently.


Lesson II

THE TRUTH SHALL M1KE YOU FREE

A. Discuss auditorium program or hall display, or both, to be given at the
end of the study. The following are suggestions for individual or group
student activities.

1. Charts Or graphs'may'be made from the statistics or facts given on
pages 5, 7, 8, 9, 13, 16, 17, 27.
2. Make original slides and drawings to be shown with stereoptican or
reflectoscope.
3. Original posters or reproductions of small pictures that give effects
of the use of alcohol in the body.
4. Illustrated booklets showing student responses to the study.

B* Read pages 3-10 aloud or silently.


- 37 -










Alcohol Talks About Himself


1. Why does alcohol increase thirst rather than quench it? (Due to
dehydrating action when alcohol touches the mucus membrane of the
throat)
2. After absorption into the blood why is the dehydrating effect
slight? (The blood and otherboy fluids dilute the alcohol so)
3. Where is alcohol proud of his record? (In art, science, medicine,
and industry)
4. What is one theory as to the "headache" experienced by drinkers
"the morning after?" (The brain being largely water it absorbs
much alcohol and thus the brain is pinched in the skull)
5. What does the word"proof" on whiskey labels mean? (The proof is
always twice the alcohol volume per cent concentration)
6. Why do some people seem to get intoxicated more easily than others?
(a. Relative amounts of total water in the body,
(b. relative experience with alcohol,
(c. psychological differences)
7. What is the scientific name and formula for beverage alcohol?
(Ethyl alcohol 02150H)
8. What are the names of the other members of the alcohol family?
(Methyl, Propyl, Butyl, and Amyl)
9. In what order does alcohol affect the brain? (It affects first the
higher centers, viz the seat of judgement, self control, reason,
memory, sensation, and voluntary movement. Breathing and circulation
are the last to be modified.)
10. Does the body develop a tolerance for alcohol? (No, a 0.3% con-
centration in the blood causes staggering in both the novice and the
habitual drinker.)

My Effects Last As Long As I Am In Your Blood

11. How soon after drinking does alcohol affect behavior? (Behavior is
affected as soon as alcohol reaches the brain--15 to 20 minutes.)
12. How long does the effect last? (As long as any alcohol remains
in the blood)
13. The average man's body can dispose of a pint of 100? proof whiskey
in about what time? (Approximately 24 hours)
14. Why is alcohol oxidized so slowly? (It is only in the liver that
it can be broken down.)

I Am Not a Practical Food

15. Is alcohol a practical food? (No, because
(a) oxidization is too slow
(b) oxidization occurs only in the liver
(c) energy produced cannot help with muscular work
(d) burned in preference to fats and sugars
(e) while producing heat it anesthetizes the braifi centers that
control the size of blood vessels in the skin, thus more heat
is lost through radiation.
(f) its food qualities are responsible for nutritional deficiencies)


- 38 -










Lesson III

THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM

A, Rapid review of the questions on lesson II

B. Ask for any comments, newspaper articles or radio reports.

C. Reports on special projects

D. Read pages 10-13 aloud or silently.

E. Read sections from general science, health, home economics books on
digestion, on alcohol and its effects on digestion.

F. Read same books on depressants and stimulants, use dictionary.

You are Mistaken if You Think I Aid Digestion

1. What are the mechanical processes included in digestion? (Chewing,
swallowing and peristalsis)
2. Does alcohol aid hunger contractions(peristalsis)? (It temporarily
abolishes these movements)
3. Why does this inactivity cause indigestion? (The action of bacteria
that were in the food)
4. What are the chemical processes of digestion? (Ten special enzymes
break down the complex molecules of carbohydrates, fats and proteins)
5. Does alcohol increase the flow of digestive juices? (Yes, but it is
of inferior quality since it is largely water)
6. What effect does it have on enzymes? (Lessens their power)

I Am A Depressant Not A Stimulant

1. Does alcohol pep one up and make him the life'of the party? (Many
people do become more excited, more talkative, more jovial, but their
talk is less critical, often silly and vulgar)
2. Why is one often ashamed when told of the things he said while affected
by alcohol? (Alcohol depresses the higher centers of the brain, both
judgment and memory are impaired)
3. Is the term "tight" an appropriate one for a drunk person? (No, he
is loose both in talk and behavior)
4. Where is the power of inhibition located in the brain? (In a group
of nerve cells in the cerebrum called the "supra-segmental" neurons)
5. What use do high pressure salesmen make of alcohol? (The prospective
buyer has his resistance lowered by a cocktail or two)
6. Give some evidences that the lower brain centers are depressed. (Faster
pulse, dilatation of the blood vessels in the skin, enlargement of the
pupils of the eyes)
7. What does alcohol do to your standard of accomplishment? (It makes
one satisfied with mediocre performance, while the euphoric effect
makes one think he is doing superior work)
8. What does scientific testing show concerning speed and accuracy?
(Lowered in both physical and mental processes)


- 39 -











Lesson IV

TOWARD STOUT HEARTED MEN AND WOMEN

A, Review the work up to date. List the following key words on the board. Ask
the class to tell what connection they have with the subject.

digestion, mechanical processes, chemical processes, enzymes,
bacteria, stimulant, depressant, judgment, memory, "supra-
segmental" neurons, dilatation of blood vessels.

E. Ask for reports on personal readings or projects.

C. Have a special display of a statement from an outstanding athlete. It
may be beautifully written on the blackboard in colored chalk.

D. Talk by local traffic officer or doctor.

E. Read pages 13-18*

I Jeopardize Your Chances in Athletic Sports

1. Why have coaches said repeatedly that athletes must not tangle with
alcohol? (It impairs self control and slows reaction time)
2. What is "reaction time"? (Denotes the time between the application
of a stimulus and the response to it--the sound of the gun and the
jump)
3. How long may alcohol in the blood slow "reaction time"? (From 1/5
to 4/5 second)
4. Give two ways in which alcohol impairs the action of the heart.

(a. Weakens the force of the contraction phase
(b. prolongs the relaxation phase)

Safe Drivers Don't Drink

5. Many drivers do not know what two important facts?

(a. Alcohol produces a euphoria that makes them think they are
driving expertly when they aren't
(b. alcohol is not a stimulant)
6. What does Dr. Greenberg of the Yale School of Alcohol Studies say
about alcohol and driving? (Any driver with any amount of alcohol
in his blood should stay out of the driver's seat)

My Contribution to Crime Never Stops

7. According to the F. B. I. what fraction of all crimes is connected
with alcohol? (1/3)
8. What percent of the people committed to New York State jails had been
drinking? (67%)


- 40 -












In Modern Medicine I am Used Less and Less

9. Why has the use of alcohol as a medicine declined? (New drugs
are more effective)
10. In the treatment of sugar diabetes what has superseded alcohol?
(Insulin)
11. Why was alcohol once thought to be good for the treatment of pneumonia?
(The more rapid heart beat produced--now known to weaken the heart)
12. What is now used to treat pneumonia? (Sulfa drugs and penicillin)
13. Why is alcohol no longer used for colds? (It dilates the blood vessels
over the whole body and accelerates the heart when the opposite con-
ditions should prevail)


Lesson V

THE LAST OF LIFE FOR WHICH THE FIRST WAS MADE

A. Discuss charts made on previous lessons.

B. Reports of any radio programs, newspaper articles or personal projects.

C. Get figures from several large life insurance agencies as to the effect
of alcohol on life expectancy. A local insurance agent may discuss the
matter with the group.

D. Let each student write for five minutes on the question, "Does alcohol
affect my chances of success in life?" Read and discuss some of these.

E. Read pages 19-27.

I Endanger Life Expectancy

1. According to statistics compiled by leading insurance companies
how much is life expectancy shortened by the use of alcohol?
(10 to 13 years)

I Am a Large Contributor to the Breakdown of the Home

2. What connection is there between alcoholism and marriage

(a, 53% of men alcoholics never marry)
(b. of the other 47% only 23% live with their families)

3. How can alcohol's contribution to this sad picture begin? (With
that first social drink that looks so innocent)

Alcoholics are Made, Not Born

4. What were the results of the study of 61 persons made possible by the
State Charities Aid Association of New York City? (This study does
not support the idea that alcoholism is inherited)


- 41 -












5. Give two other natural conditions that have been eliminated as causes.
(Biological and climatic factors)
6. What seems to be the fundamental cause of alcoholism? (It is basically
social)
7. What can one always do when pressure is put upon him to drink? (Say
"No, thank you", and forget it)

Pages 22-27 may be read aloud and discussed freely with profit.


Lesson VI

PENNY AND POUND WISE

A. What is the price of a bottle of beer? Mulitply that by 7, and that by 52,
and that by 50. What are some of the things that you really want that could
be bought with the amount of money you don't spend for beer?

BE Make many other problems related to personal, local and world affairs.

C. Read the last section of the booklet--pages 27-30,

I Am Shocked at your Sense of Economics

1. Find the figures for your local community as to the money spent on
alcohol.
2. Write a paragraph on "The Drinking of Alcohol a Sign of Immaturity,"


Lesson VII

SOCIAL MATURITY

A. Discuss charts and graphs, make arrangements for displaying the best from
each class in front hall or auditorium, in churches and in local or district
fairs.

B, Write the article, "Should I Use Alcohol as a Beverage". Why? (About 100
to 300 words). May be finished out of class if the students want more time.


Lesson VIII

THE WILl, TO BE IM BEST

A, Have articles read aloud, and the best ones selected for the auditorium
program.

B. Have display of advertisements. Discuss the truth or falsity found in each.

C. Ask class to bring in any newspaper articles, advertisements, poems or stories
that will help them in the study.

42 -











D. How many places in tovn sell alcoholic drinks? Find or estimate the amount
of money spent on them in one year.

E. Discuss the constructive things that could be done for the city with the
amount of money

F. If your high school does not have one, discuss the desirability of forming
an Allied Youth Post for the purpose of continued study of the alcohol
problem.


Lesson IX and X

AND TO STRENGTHEN MY FRIEND

If two weeks are being devoted to this study, and if the outline given above
has b6en followed, the last two days will'be needed to complete individual re-
ports, and for the making of plans for the auditorium or hall display.

To the Teacher: A brief statement of the course as given in classes will
be greatly appreciated. Please make any suggestions as to how the course may
be improved. I wish to help you in every way in keeping this subject before
people in a progressive, vital and interesting manner. Please call on me. Your
cooperation in this work is deeply appreciated.


- 43 *s










REFERENCES


1. Roe, Dr. Anne, A Survey of Alcohol Education in Elmentary and High
Schools in'the United States. From: Quarterly Journal of Studies
on Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, lN'or Haven, Connecticut,
2. Haggard, Dr. IIo-nard .', "Tho'Physiological Effects of Large and Small
rAmounts of Alcohol", Alcohol,'Sceonce and Society. From: Quart6rly
Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162, Yalo Station, Nowv Haven,
ConnecUicut.
3. Iamlin, Howard E,, Alcohol Talks from the Laboratory. From: 1945
Iaaltham R6od, Columbus 8, Ohio.
4. Steinhaus, Arthur H. and Gruidocrman, Florence I.i,, Tobacco'and Health,
Association Pross, 347 1fadison'Avenuc, INw York, Now York.
5. The Alcohol Problem Visualized, From: National Forum Incorporated,
Chicago, Illinois.
6. You and Alcohol, Radio Symposium, Series Novmbcr 1946-February 1947.
Colurcbia Broadcasting Company, 485 1iadison Wvenue, N'ew York 22, Now
York,
7. Accident Facts,' national Safety Council, Incorporated, 20 North VWacker
Street, Chicago,"Illinois.
8. Traffic in Opium; 1945 and 1946 report, United States Treasury Depart-
mont, Washington, D, C.


- 44 -











BIBLTOGRAPHY


A. General

1. Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol. From: Quarterly Journal of
Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut.
Subscription, 1 year, '3.00.
2. Alcohol, Science and Society, Twenty-nine lectures with discussions
as given at Yale Summner School of Alcohol Studies. From: Quarterly
Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, New Haven,
Connecticut. xii-473 pp., cloth, $5.00.
3. Alcohol Addiction and Chronic Alcoholism. Volume I of Effects of
Alcohol on the Individual. From: Quarterly Journal of Studies on
Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, MNw Haven, Connecticut. Edited by
Dr. E. M. Jellinek, xxiii-336 ppo, cloth, -4.,00.
4. Studies of Compulsive Drinkers. Case Histories--Psychological Test
Results. From: Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162
Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut. By Wortis, Sillman and Halpern.
96 pp., paper, $1.00.
5. Recent Trends in Alcoholism and in Alcohol Consumption. From:
Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, New
Haven, Connecticut. By Dr. E. M. Jellinek. iv-42 pp., paper, 10.50.
6. Sociology and the Problems 6f Alcohol. Foundations for a sociological
study of drinking behavior. From: Quarterly Journal of Studies on
Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut. By Selden De
Bacon. 76 ppo, paper, $0.75.
7. Inebriety, Social Integration and Marriage. "From: Quarterly Journal
of Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut.
By Soldon D. Bacon. 76 pp., paper, $0.75.
8. Adult Adjustment of Foster Children of Alcoholic and Psychotic
Parentage. By Anne Roe and B. Burks. From: Quarterly Journal of
Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut.
xii-164 pp., paper, $2.00.
9. Some Economic Asoects of Alcohol Problems. By B. Y. Landis. Ffom:
Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Box.2162, Yale Station, New
Haven, Connecticut. 48 pp., paper. $0.50.
10. Phases in the Drinking History of Alcoholics. Analysis of an Alcoholics
Anonymous Survey. 'By E. i.. Jellinek. From: Quarterly Journal of
Studies on'Alcohol, Box 2162, Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut.
xii-88 pp., paper, $1.00.
11. Alcohol Explored. By H. W. Haggard and'E. M. Jellinek. From:
Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Box 2162, Yale Station, New
Haven, Connecticut. 297 pp., cloth, $2.75,
12. Lay Supplement Series. (average 16 pp.,) Each booklet, 10 cents.
Tomplete set, $1.00. From: Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol,
Box 2162 Yale Station, New Haven, Connecticut.


- 45 -












a. The Problems of Alcohol
b. Facts and Delirium Tremens
c. The Nature of Alcoholic Beverages and the Extent of Their Use
d. Alcohol'and Industrial Efficiency
e. Alcohol, Heredity and Germ Damage
f. Alcohol and Length of Life
g. What Happens to Alcohol in the Body
ho Alcoholic Beverages as a Food and their Relation to Nutrition
i. Facts on Cirrhosis of the Liver
j. The Drinker and the Drunkard
k. How Alcohol Affects Psychological Behavior
1. The Rehabilitation of Inebriates

13. Accident Facts. National Safety Council, Incorporated, 20 North Wacker
Drive, Chicago, Illinois. 112 pp., paper, $0.50.

B. Education (In addition to the above)

1. Alcohol Talks from the Laboratory; 10 cents per copy when ordered from
the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida.
2. Lesson Plan on Alcohol'Talks from the Laboratory. State Department of
Education, Tallahassoe, Florida, Free to Florida teachers.
3. A Survey of Alcohol Educati6n in Elementary and High Schools in the
United States. By Ante Roop From: Quarterly Journal of Studies,
Box 2162 Yale Station, Heew Haven,.Connecticut. $l.00o
4. Suggestions for Instruction Conc6rning Narcotics and Stimulants. Iddhb
Department of Public Instruction, Boise Idaho, Bulletin A-2, Revised,
0.40,
5. Manual for Teaching Health for the Schools of Mississippi State
Department of Education, Jackson, Mississippi, i0.50O
6. Temperance Education. Bulletin 316, Michigan Department of Public
Instruction, Lansing, Michigan, 0.25.
7. It's Up To You. Hiltner Association Press, 347 Madison Avenue, New
York 17, New York. 10 cents per copy,
8. The International Student. Office of Publication, Westerville, Ohio,
Subscription $1.00 per year-l1.50 for two years.


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