• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Essentials in good planning
 Space diagram
 General considerations
 Materials centers in elementary...
 Materials centers in secondary...
 Materials centers in twelve-grade...
 County-wide materials centers
 Sources of additional help
 Index
 Equipment diagrams
 Suggested layouts
 Back Cover














Group Title: Bulletin - State Department of Education ; 22E
Title: Planning materials centers
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067256/00001
 Material Information
Title: Planning materials centers
Series Title: Its Bulletin
Alternate Title: Materials centers
Physical Description: x, 49 p. : plans. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Dept. of Education
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1958
 Subjects
Subject: School libraries -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 31-36.
Funding: Bulletin (Florida. State Dept. of Education) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067256
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 02287344
lccn - a 59009071

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page i-a
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Foreword
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Acknowledgement
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Table of Contents
        Page viii
    Essentials in good planning
        Page ix
    Space diagram
        Page x
    General considerations
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Materials centers in elementary schools
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Materials centers in secondary schools
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Materials centers in twelve-grade schools
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    County-wide materials centers
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Sources of additional help
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Index
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Equipment diagrams
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Suggested layouts
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Back Cover
        Page 56
        Page 57
Full Text
























MATERIALS CENTERS



BULLETIN 22E
1958

7 .09 759 STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
o. ,Z, F Tallahassee, Florida
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent
















UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA
LIBRARIES

























MATERIALS CENTERS


BULLETIN 22E
1958

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Tallahassee, Florida
THOMAS D. BAILEY, Superintendent


;D&Wwwf









Foreword


PLANNING MATERIALS CENTERS has been designed as a
guide for helping architects, administrators, supervisors,
teachers, and school materials personnel determine essential
facilities for housing instructional materials and equipment ade-
quate for the instructional program of the total school.
This bulletin is published so that school personnel and archi-
tects can find answers to such questions as:
1. What materials and equipment should be located in a
central place?
2. What types of activities will occur in this center?
3. How large should the materials center be?
4. What specifications are suggested for the equipment?
In addition to including suggestions for solving many prob-
lems, Planning Materials Centers contains sketches of equipment,
suggested floor plans, specifications for space and equipment, a
bibliography, and an index.
Designing quarters for a materials center from space not
originally intended for these facilities requires ingenuity and
planning in terms of available resources. Since each renovation
is unique, this Guide does not contain a section on remodeled
quarters. However, in planning for remodeled quarters those
concerned should consider the recommendations for adequate
quarters and equipment as outlined in this Guide for new build-
ings in the same type school. In their plans, then, they can imple-
ment and adapt these recommendations in terms of the space
and other facilities that are available in the remodeled quarters.
The Guide has been divided into separate sections for ele-
mentary, secondary, and twelve-grade materials centers so that
persons using it will have no difficulty in distinguishing recom-
mendations for each type of center. The layouts are samples
only, showing ways to use space of particular shapes for the sizes
and types of schools specified. The placement of doors serves only
to orient other adjoining rooms and service areas; the placement








of windows, to suggest ways for securing light, ventilation, and
sufficient wall space. Sample plans contain a variety of ideas as
to use of space. A study of all of them will be most profitable to
those planning materials centers for today's schools.
It is assumed that instructional materials personnel and
architects will work together in studying the services of existing
centers, reviewing plans of centers, and examining the sugges-
tions and all the sample plans in this Guide. The ideas selected
will necessarily be tailored to the needs of each school materials
center as plans take shape. If this Guide is used as a source of
ideas for planning adequate school materials centers, it will have
served its primary purpose.


THOMAS D. BAILEY
State Superintendent of Public Instruction










Acknowledgments


BULLETIN COMMITTEE
Louise Galloway, Assistant Professor, Florida State University,
Chairman
Lucille Cotten, Supervisor, Instructional Materials and Teaching
Aids, Escambia County, Pensacola
Frances Hatfield, Supervisor, Instructional Materials, Broward
County, Ft. Lauderdale
Harry Hunter, Supervisor, Instructional Materials, Marion
County, Ocala
Audrey Newman, Consultant in Instructional Materials, State
Department of Education, Consultant
SPECIAL ASSISTANCE
FOR THE BIBLIOGRAPHY: Members of the Seminar of
Quarters and Equipment for School Libraries and Materials
Centers, under the direction of Louise Galloway, Assistant Pro-
fessor, Library School, Florida State University; Lucille Cotten,
Supervisor of Instructional Materials, Escambia County Schools,
Pensacola, Florida; Raymond Dunmire, Audio-Visual Director,
Thiel College, Greenville, Pennsylvania; Elizabeth Hodges, Su-
pervisor of Library Service, Baltimore County Schools, Towson,
Maryland; Harry W. Hunter, Supervisor of Instructional Ma-
terials, Marion County Schools, Ocala, Florida; Mrs. Lela Keesey,
Librarian, New Smyrna Beach High School, New Smyrna Beach,
Florida; Sallie Nicholson, Librarian, Kate Sullivan Elementary
School, Tallahassee, Florida; Evelyn C. Thornton, Supervisor of
School Libraries, Arlington County Public Schools, Arlington,
Virginia; Wilma Watson, Textbook Manager, Sarasota County
Schools, Sarasota, Florida
FOR THE INDEX: Eunice Keen and Virginia Thomasson, Li-
brarians, Lakeland Senior High School, Lakeland, Florida
FOR THE COVER DESIGN: George Fielder, Student, and Dr.
Julia Schwartz, Associate Professor of Art Education, Art
Education Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee








FOR PERMISSION TO USE ADAPTED DESIGNS OF SPE-
CIAL EQUIPMENT: State Department of Public Instruc-
tion, Raleigh, North Carolina; Fulton County Board of Edu-
cation, Atlanta, Georgia
FOR EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND PREPARATION
FOR PUBLICATION: J. K. Chapman, Howard Jay Fried-
man, and John P. McIntyre, State Department of Education,
Tallahassee

FOR CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM OF THE TENTATIVE
DRAFT OF THIS BULLETIN:
Dr. Maurice R. Ahrens, Professor of Education, University of
Florida, Gainesville
Myron Ashmore, Assistant Superintendent, Broward County, Ft.
Lauderdale
Sara Bell, Director, Instructional Materials, Bay County,
Panama City
J. Vance Duncan, Architect, Ocala
Elizabeth Hodges, Supervisor of Library Service, Baltimore
County Schools, Towson, Maryland
M. Lucia James, Director, Curriculum Laboratory, Florida
A. & M. University, Tallahassee
R. L. Johns, Professor of Education, University of Florida,
Gainesville
Mildred Kerby, Librarian, Ocala High School, Ocala
Edgar Lane, Supervisor of Instructional Materials, Dade County,
Miami
Richard L. Lemon, Architect, Broward County Schools, Ft.
Lauderdale
Charles Lowry, Assistant Superintendent in Charge of School
Planning, Broward County, Ft. Lauderdale
Broward Lovell, Superintendent, Marion County, Ocala
Mrs. Betty Lunnon, Coordinator of Libraries, Dade County,
Miami
Stewart Morrison, Architect, Pensacola
Mrs. Alice Pearce, Librarian, Hardee County Junior-Senior
High School, Wauchula
Mrs. Lois Pilson, Librarian, Miami Shores Elementary School,
Miami Shores
John W. Seay, Director of Instruction, Marion County, Ocala









Louis Shores, Dean, Library School, Florida State University,
Tallahassee
Courtney Stewart, Architect, Ft. Lauderdale
Margaret G. Strassler, Coordinator of Materials, Monroe County,
Key West
Evelyn C. Thornton, Supervisor of School Libraries, Arlington
County Public Schools, Arlington, Virginia
W. J. Woodham, Jr., Superintendent, Escambia County Schools,
Pensacola

AND THESE MEMBERS OF THE
STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION:
U. J. Bennett, Assistant in Surveys
E. B. Browning, Coordinator of Accreditation Services
James Campbell, Assistant Director, Division of Administration
and Finance and Administrator of Capital Outlay and Debt
Service Program
W. E. Combs, Specialist in Secondary Education
Mrs. Lucy Buckles Every, Consultant in Elementary Education
Mrs. Minnie H. Fields, Specialist in Elementary Education
J. T. Kelley, Director, Division of Teacher Education, Certifica-
tion, and Accreditation
W. H. Marshall, General Consultant in Instruction
Sam H. Moorer, Director, Division of Instructional Field Services
Charlotte Stienhans, Consultant, Elementary Education
B. R. Tilley, Assistant in Surveys
T. George Walker, Director, Division of Publications and Text-
book Services
D. E. Williams, General Consultant in Instruction











Table of Contents

Foreword ........................................... iii

Acknowledgm ents ..................................... v

Essentials in Good Planning ........................... ix

Space Diagram ...................................... x

General Considerations ................................ 1


Materials Centers
Elementary Schools ............................... 3
Secondary Schools ............................... 11
Twelve-Grade Schools ............................. 20
County-Wide ...................................... 28


Sources of Additional Help ............................ 31

Index ............................................. 37

Equipment Diagrams ................................. 39

Suggested Layouts ................................... Insert














viii










Essentials in Good Planning

DETERMINE the type and approximate quantity of printed
and audio-visual materials and equipment necessary to
implement your philosophy of a good school program.
Plan quarters to meet the particular needs of your school
and community. This might include screens on the windows of
the materials center if it is to be used for night classes and out-
side entrances for adults and for convenient use by the com-
munity during summer programs.
Plan a center large enough to fill the present and projected
demands for economical and convenient use.
Remodel by adapting available space according to recommen-
dations for new buildings for the same type of school.
Make every foot of space functional by determining relation-
ships of areas and type and placement of equipment.
Involve, in all stages of planning, the County Supervisor of
Instructional Materials as well as the people who will use and
administer the particular materials center.
Contact your Consultant in Instructional Materials, State
Department of Education, for help with problems in planning
and equipping materials centers.











Remember A School Building Is Used For A Long Time!










NATURAL
VENTILTIOa \

SOUND bARERIE.




OUTDOOR


pQIMA y


MAIN


IT 15 USUALLY B6TTL TO STUDY SPACES TLUOUGU TUi USE OF
A SPACE DIAGR M SIMILAR TO TUE A&OVE, RATUER TWN N N AMNLYSIS OF
A PA .TICULCQ FLOOR. PL&A. bY USING TUIS TYPE OF APPIROCU,
TUE VA-IOUS ROOM USES, TI MIC FLOW, 4 CIRCULATION PRObLEM5
CANM E 08562VID LARQLIU .
INDIVIDUAL SITE PROBLEMS, ORIENTATION WITU RESPECT
TO OTUER SCHOOL ELEMENTS, TUE TYPE OF TERRAIN .k CLIMATE
CAN LL EF CON5IDEiQD WHILE DEVELOPING TIS TYPE OF
DIAGRAM. TUE CO4NVE SIOM TO A CONV6.NTIONAL PR;LIMINWRY
FLOOR PLLN 15 A SIMPLE STEP, ONCE TLIE PACE
DIAGIAM U&S eEEN COMPLETED.









CHAPTER


General Considerations

IN PLANNING any school materials center, the school admin-
istrator, the materials personnel, and the architect will face
several problems common to all materials centers, whether in
elementary, junior high, senior high, or twelve-grade schools.
Ventilation and fenestration, lighting and sun control, the use of
color in decoration, and sound control are problems to be con-
sidered in terms of producing a materials center that will fit the
needs of the particular school. The suggestions that follow are
guides to solving these problems. Those involved in planning
school materials centers should find them helpful.

Ventilation and Fenestration
Facilities designed simply for natural ventilation are prefer-
able, taking maximum advantage of prevailing breezes to pro-
vide effective cross-ventilation. While the arrangement of window
areas is primarily a natural lighting consideration, fenestration
requirements will include adequate provision for natural venti-
lation and wall space needed for shelving and storage.

Lighting and Sun Control
As in classroom design, it is essential to provide optimum
natural lighting conditions including:
1. An adequate level of natural illumination
2. An even distribution of natural light
3. Minimum glare or brightness contrasts
4. Complete, positive sun control
Not only must careful study be given the design of built-in or
architectural control of direct sunlight; the possibilities of sky
glare and reflected glare conditions from adjacent wings or
buildings must also be considered.
The extent of a facility's nighttime as well as daytime use may
affect its artificial lighting requirements. Efficient fixtures, con-








veniently controlled and easily maintained, should be circuited
and switched to permit partial use of artificial light to supplement
natural lighting in large areas.

Decoration
In choosing the colors for walls, ceilings, floors, and furniture
for a materials center, the total effect must be kept in mind so
that the result is harmonious, inviting, and pleasant, and in
conformity with accepted standards for both natural and artifi-
cial light conditions. Reflection factors of ceiling and wall finishes
appropriate to the natural and artificial lighting design must be
provided to assure satisfactory lighting conditions. Light shades
of any colors providing the required reflection factors may be
used in the decorating scheme. Choice of colors for the walls may
depend on the amount and direction of natural light, orientation,
and internal arrangement of rooms or areas as well as personal
preferences.
Wall colors need not be confined to the delicate pastels that
were once considered as the only colors suitable for library
quarters. Muted shades of strong colors often produce extremely
interesting and satisfying surroundings. The use of contrasting
wall textures, especially for areas of general use, can add im-
measurably to the beauty of the materials center. This contrast
may take the form of one wall being brick and all the other walls
being painted in a harmonizing color.
The design of the floor covering should blend with the rest
of the decor. Care should be taken to avoid a broken patchwork
design as it tends to foster a feeling of crowding and distraction.
Moreover, lighter colors and unbroken patterns reduce main-
tenance problems.

Sound Control
The nature and extent of use of the materials center make
it essential to provide a floor covering and ceiling that deaden
and absorb sound. Rubber tile or vinyl tile are satisfactory ma-
terials for the control of sound, ease in walking and standing,
and economic maintenance. The ceiling should be acoustically
treated with sound-absorbent plaster or other acoustical ceiling
materials such as perforated cane-fiber tile, fissured mineral-
fiber tile, textured fiber-glass tile, or others designed for this
purpose.








CHAPTER 2


Materials Centers In Elementary Schools

I N EVERY SCHOOL BUILDING where elementary or high
J school, or combination elementary and high school subjects
are taught, there shall be provision for minimum library facili-
ties to meet regulations that may from time to time be adopted
by the State Board." Section 235.26 (14) Florida Statutes. An
adequate instruction program requires for every child of school
age and his teacher ready access to instructional and develop-
mental materials. In studying these recommendations that fol-
low, planners should place foremost among their considerations
the desirable use to be made of materials center facilities. When
the school materials center is planned with this consideration in
mind, it will serve its purpose as a significant force in the school's
total educational program.

I. Location
A. Near the upper-grade classes or center of the building
B. Where there is a minimum of noise
C. In an area suitably proportioned to accommodate func-
tional and aesthetic quarters
D. On the first floor with a double-door entrance into the main
reading area and a single outside entrance (to corridor or
outside of building) to the work-storage area
E. Where expansion is possible

II. Space Allocations and Equipment Specifications
Specifications are based on the assumption that the desirable
enrollment for an elementary school is not more than 750 pupils.
Schools with fewer than 300 pupils may find it necessary to com-
bine some of these areas.
All elementary materials centers designed to be administered
by one librarian should be planned to accommodate the number








of children indicated, that is, largest class plus 20. However,
when the expected enrollment for a new school exceeds 500
pupils, it will be necessary to allocate space and plan larger facili-
ties to accommodate the increased materials and equipment
needed.

A. Reading Area
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Reading and browsing
b. Reference individual or group work
c. Circulation checking materials in and out
d. Housing of library books, supplementary textbooks,
teachers' professional collections, magazines, news-
papers, pamphlets, and some audio-visual materials
(Some audio-visual materials may also be housed in
the audio-visual storage and workroom.)
e. Displays and exhibits
f. Teaching use of library to groups and individuals
g. Storytelling and listening to recordings in whole class
groups
2. Space Allocation
Large enough to accommodate the largest class (about
35) plus 20, allowing 25-30 square feet per person
3. Equipment
a. Book shelving regular, open-type, adjustable (See
Appendix, Drawing 1.)
(1) Number of sections needed space for at least 10
books per pupil enrolled, allowing 8 books per
shelf foot
(2) At least two sections of standard-height shelving,
10" deep, to take care of oversize books, allowing 6
books per shelf foot
b. Easy and picture-book shelving Approximately 1/3
of shelving for books should be of this type. Allow 12
books per shelf foot. (See Appendix, Drawing 5.)
c. Magazine shelving Number of sections needed -
Each section can accommodate approximately 9 maga-
zines. Two sections are sufficient for most elementary
schools. (See Appendix, Drawing 3.)








d. Counter-height shelving may be placed underneath
windows. Single- or double-faced sections may be used
to define areas within a room. (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 2.)
e. Newspaper holders
(1) One newspaper stick for each paper received
(2) Holder and sticks available from library supply
house or built locally
f. Tables and chairs
(1) Design
Tables should be of sturdy, wooden construction
with non-glare surface and without footrests or
drawers. Mixture of round and rectangular tables
lends informality to the reading area. Chairs should
be of sturdy, wooden construction, equipped with
steel-faced, rubber glides.
(2) Dimensions
Rectangular Round
Height Width Length Diameter
Tables 25" 3' 5' 48"
Chairs 15"
or
Tables 27" 3' 5' 48"
Chairs 17"
(3' x 5' tables seat 6; round 48" tables seat 4.)
g. Charging desk and chair
(1) Design
Desk should be of sturdy, wooden construction with
non-glare surface, rectangular, sitting-height, with
special built-in charging facilities. Chair should
have either a horizontally slatted or a solid back.
Swivel chairs are preferable.
(2) Dimensions
Desk -Length: 44" 72"
Width: 28"- 30"
Height: 30"
Chair-17" high
h. Vertical file
(1) Size three-drawer, legal size
(2) Number minimum of two (The school's curri-
culum will determine additional needs.)








i. Card catalog cabinet
(1) This cabinet must be purchased from a library sup-
ply house. Purchase should be made in five-drawer
units, or multiples thereof, in order that additional
units can be added as collections of materials ex-
pand.
(2) Cards for approximately 1,000 books can be housed
in one five-drawer unit. Each school should have
at least one five-drawer unit.
j. Bulletin boards and display case
(1) At least one bulletin board, 3' x 5' or 3' x 6', plain
frame, no trim; may be recessed in two sections of
shelving (See Appendix, Drawing 7.)
(2) Fiberboard backing is satisfactory.
(3) A glassed-in display case may be recessed in the
corridor wall outside the entrance door to the li-
brary.
k. Book truck
Each library should have at least one; it may be pur-
chased from a library supply house.
1. Revolving-table model dictionary holders
It may be purchased from a library supply house.
m. Informal furniture
Stools and other informal furniture will provide com-
fort, informality, and an attractive appearance.
n. Electrical outlets
Double outlets or electrical wire molding should be
placed in the baseboard of each wall of the room.
B. Conference Room or Rooms
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Conferences
b. Small-group work
c. Listening to recordings in small groups
d. Previewing films and filmstrips
2. Space Allocation
Minimum of 140 square feet; 160-180 square feet, pref-
erably long and narrow, if also used as a preview room
3. Placement
Adjacent and with direct access to reading area, clear








glass partition in wall between conference and reading
areas from 3'4" above floor level to a height of 6' with
adequate ventilation

4. Equipment
a. One 3' x 5' table, 27" high, and 6 chairs, 17" high
b. Standard book shelving as much as space will per-
mit, not to be included in computation of minimum re-
quirement of 10 books per pupil enrolled
c. At least one double electrical outlet or electrical wire
molding in each room
d. Darkening facilities and acoustical treatment, if used
for previewing and listening

C. Work-Storage Area
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Receiving and unpacking materials and equipment
b. Ordering and preparing materials for circulation -
classifying, cataloging, pasting, lettering, lacquering
c. Mending books
d. Preparing bulletin boards and displays
e. Storing magazines
f. Housing supplies and professional aids

2. Space Allocation
A minimum of 300 square feet for the combined work-
storage area

3. Placement
Adjacent and with direct access to main reading area
and to the audio-visual storage area (If ceiling-height
wall separates work area from reading area, it should
contain a clear glass partition from 3'4" above floor level
to a height of 6'.)

4. Equipment
a. Work counter (See Appendix, Drawing 8.)
(1) Sink with running water, hot water provided when
possible
(2) At least two well-placed electrical outlets
(3) Sitting-height work space with top of plastic lamin-








ate or similar material and with drawers for posters
and cabinets for supplies; sufficient kneehole space
for two people (For 18"-20" on wall above work
counter, plastic laminate or similar material should
be installed to protect wall when books are lac-
quered. If there is a solid wall behind the work
counter, it should have hanging cabinets or open,
adjustable shelving not to exceed 7' in height.)
b. Shelving Several types are needed in the work
area; use all available wall space.
(1) Magazines for back issues, 14" deep, adjustable,
7' high
(2) Regular, adjustable library shelving, 8" deep, 7'
high, for books not yet cataloged
c. Desk and chair for librarian
d. Typewriter, typewriter table, and chair
e. One three- or four-drawer metal filing cabinet, legal
size
f. Card catalog cabinet to house shelf list (One drawer
holds 1,000 cards.) It must be purchased from library
supply house.
g. One straight chair, 18" high
h. Wardrobe & storage cabinet (See Appendix, Drawing
9.)
i. Additional electrical outlets or electrical wire molding
in baseboard of each wall

D. Audio-Visual Equipment and Materials Storage Room
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Storing audio-visual materials filmstrips, films, slides,
disc and tape recordings, maps, charts, globes, display
materials, and other materials to be shared among
classrooms
b. Storing audio-visual equipment motion-picture pro-
jectors, filmstrip projectors, opaque and overhead pro-
jectors, record players, tape recorders, and screens
c. Storing supplies for projectors lamps, belts, cords,
reels
d. Processing new materials
e. Inspecting and repairing materials








f. Previewing films and filmstrips and listening to re-
cordings
g. Teaching projectionists the care and use of equipment
2. Space Allocation
Minimum of 200 square feet a long and narrow room,
if it is to be used for previewing and listening (In very
small schools it may be necessary to store audio-visual
equipment in the work-storage area, adding suitable
amount of space according to material to be housed.)
3. Placement
Adjacent to and opening into work area with outside en-
trance to corridor or outside of building so that audio-
visual equipment can easily be taken in and out of storage
areas
4. Equipment
a. Standing-height work counter, 36" 42" high, with top
of plastic laminate or similar material and storage area
for audio-visual equipment underneath and cabinets
for supplies above (Storage cabinets for audio-visual
equipment should accommodate motion-picture pro-
jectors; filmstrip projectors; opaque and overhead pro-
jectors; record players; tape recorders; projection
screens. This cabinet space should be low, not over
4" off floor, so that the heavy equipment does not have
to be lifted far off the floor. Motion-picture projectors
may be kept on roller tables for which space must be
provided. (See Appendix, Drawing 10.) Amount of
audio-visual materials and equipment to be housed
should be determined in consultation with librarian or
audio-visual coordinator at the school or county level.)
b. Storage space for roller-type maps (Provide one set
of hooks so that a map can be unrolled for examina-
tion before it is checked out.)
c. Storage cabinet for recordings (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 6.)
d. At least two conveniently placed double electrical out-
lets or electrical wire molding
e. Darkening facilities and acoustical treatment, if used
for previewing and listening








III. Suggested Layouts
Sample plans have been included in the Appendix to sug-
gest varieties of ways in which space may be used for particular
shapes in the size and types of schools specified. For the elemen-
tary schools suggested layouts are a sample plan for a materials
center in a square space serving a school enrollment of 500 and
another sample plan for a center occupying a rectangular space
and serving a school enrollment of 750.








CHAPTER 3


Materials Centers in Secondary Schools

CCT N EVERY SCHOOL BUILDING where elementary or high
L school, or combination elementary and high school subjects
are taught, there shall be provision for minimum library facilities
to meet regulations that may from time to time be adopted by the
State Board." Section 235.26 (14) Florida Statutes. Reorganiza-
tions of schools' curricula and emphasis upon children's needs
and interests have increased the demands of teachers and their
pupils upon materials centers. The type and organization of the
school will affect the amount and kinds of instructional materials
and the amount of space needed for the materials center. These
factors are important to planners as they consider the organiza-
tion of the school and look forward to a future in which demands
upon the materials center may increase even more rapidly than
they have in the past.

I. Location

A. Not necessarily in the center of the building but near the
center of interclass traffic
B. Adjacent to the study hall if there is one
C. Where there is a minimum of noise
D. In an area suitably proportioned to accommodate functional
and aesthetic quarters
E. On the first floor with a double-door entrance into the main
reading area and a single outside entrance (to the corri-
dor or outside of building) to the work-storage area
F. Where expansion is possible

II. Space Allocations and Equipment Specifications

A. Reading Area








1. Purposes and Activities
a. Reading and browsing
b. Reference individual or group work
c. Circulation checking materials in and out
d. Housing of library books, supplementary textbooks,
teachers' professional collections, magazines, news-
papers, pamphlets, and some audio-visual materials
(Some audio-visual materials may also be housed in
the audio-visual storage and workroom.)
e. Displays and exhibits
f. Teaching use of library to groups and individuals
g. Listening to recordings if listening tables are provided

2. Space Allocation
This area should seat 15% of the first 500 pupils and 10%
of the additional enrollment, allowing 25-30 square feet
per seated user. Space should be provided for a minimum
of 48 seated users. No single reading area should be
planned to accommodate more than 60 seated users.
Multiple reading areas (not necessarily separate rooms)
should be provided when more than 60 pupils are to be
accommodated.

3. Equipment
a. Shelving
(1) Book shelving standard, adjustable library shelv-
ing (See Appendix, Drawing 1.)
(a) Number of sections of shelving needed space
for at least 10 books per pupil enrolled, allowing
8 books per shelf foot
(b) Counter-height shelving may be placed under-
neath windows. Single- or double-faced sections
may be used to define areas within a room. (See
Appendix, Drawing 2.)
(c) At least three sections of standard-height shelv-
ing, 10" deep, to take care of oversize books, al-
lowing 6 books per shelf foot
(2) Magazine shelving (See Appendix, Drawing 3.)
Each section will accommodate approximately 12
magazines. A sufficient number of continuous sec-
tions should be provided to house 10 magazines for









the first 100 pupils enrolled and 5 more magazines
for each additional 100 pupils.
b. Newspaper rack
(1) One newspaper stick for each paper received
(2) Holder for newspaper sticks constructed locally or
purchased from a library supply house
(3) Either a separate piece of equipment or built into
the shelving (See Appendix, Drawing 4.)
c. Tables and chairs
(1) Design
Tables should be of sturdy, wooden construction
with non-glare surface and without footrests or
drawers. A mixture of round and rectangular tables
will lend informality to the reading room. Chairs
should be of sturdy, wooden construction and
equipped with noiseless tips.
(2) Dimensions
If the materials center is used by both junior and
senior high school pupils, there may be some varia-
tion in sizes of furniture.
Rectangular Round
Height Width Length Diameter
Tables
Junior High
School 28" 3' 5' 48"
Senior High
School 30" 3' 5' 48"
Chairs
Height
Junior High School 17"
Senior High School 18"
(3' x 5' tables seat 6; round 48" tables seat 4.)
d. Circulation desk
(1) Design
The size and shape of the charging desk will largely
depend upon the size of the main library room
and the purposes which the charging area will serve.
The desk may be either sitting height or standing
height. It may be built by a local expert cabinet-
maker or purchased from a library supply house. It
should be of sturdy, wooden construction with non-









glare surface. It may be fitted with a depressible
book truck or a slot and a bin underneath for re-
turning books. There should be shelving and drawer
space underneath and at least two sections or regu-
lar shelving on the wall behind the desk.
(2) Dimensions
(a) Desk length appropriate for size of room; sit-
ting height, 30"; standing height, 39"
(b) Chair or stool for use behind charging desk
e. Vertical file
(1) Size: three- or four-drawer legal size
(2) Number needed: minimum of two (The need for
additional files will be determined by the type of
classroom instruction.)
f. Card catalog cabinet
(1) This cabinet must be purchased from a library sup-
ply house. Purchase should be made in multiples of
five-drawer units so that additional units may be
added as needed.
(2) Cards for approximately 1,000 books can be housed
in one five-drawer unit. Each school should have
at least one five-drawer unit.
g. Bulletin boards and display case
(1) At least one 3' x 5' or 3' x 6', plain frame, no trim;
may be recessed in two sections of shelving (See
Appendix, Drawing 7.)
(2) Fiberboard backing is satisfactory.
(3) A glassed-in display case may be recessed in the
corridor wall outside the entrance door to the li-
brary.
h. Atlas and dictionary stands
(1) A stand with space for a dictionary on top and
several atlases below will be useful in the high
school library and may be purchased from a library
supply house.
(2) Revolving-table model dictionary holders may also
be used, may be purchased from a library supply
house.
i. Book truck
One should be provided for the small school; two or









more for the large school; they may be purchased from
a library supply house.
j. Informal furniture
Such furniture will provide comfort, informality, and
an attractive appearance.
k. Electrical outlets
Double outlets or electrical wire molding should be
placed in the baseboard of each wall of the reading
room.

B. Conference Room or Rooms
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Conferences
b. Small-group work
c. Previewing films and filmstrips
d. Listening to recordings in small groups
2. Space Allocation
a. Minimum of 140 square feet for each conference area
b. Two or more conference rooms for larger schools (One
of these should be rectangular, 160 to 180 square feet,
preferably long and narrow, sound- and light-control-
led, for viewing films and filmstrips.)
c. Folding partitions between conference rooms possibly
desirable where more than one conference room is
planned
3. Placement
Adjacent and with direct access to the reading room, clear
glass partition on wall between conference and reading
areas from 3'4" above floor level to height of 6' with ade-
quate ventilation
4. Equipment
a. One 3' x 5' table, 30" high, and 6 chairs, 18" high
b. Standard book shelving-as much as space will permit;
not to be included in computation of the minimum re-
quirement of 10 books per pupil enrolled
c. At least one double electrical outlet or electrical wire
molding in each conference room
d. Darkening facilities and acoustical treatment, if used
for previewing and listening








C. Work-Storage Areas (These areas may be separate.)
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Receiving and unpacking materials and equipment
b. Preparing materials for circulation pasting, lettering,
lacquering
c. Mending books
d. Preparing bulletin boards and displays
e. Storing magazines
f. Housing supplies and professional aids
2. Space Allocation
A minimum of 250 square feet for the combined work
and storage areas
3. Placement
Adjacent and with direct access to main reading area
and to the audio-visual areas (If ceiling-height wall sepa-
rates work area from reading area, it should contain a
clear glass partition from 3'4" above floor level to a height
of 6'.)
4. Equipment
a. Work counter area (See Appendix, Drawing 8.)
(1) Sink with running water; hot water provided when
possible
(2) At least two well-placed electrical outlets
(3) Standing- or sitting-height work space with top of
plastic laminate or similar material and with deep
shelves underneath for supplies and cabinets above
(For 18" 20" on wall above work counter, plastic
laminate or similar material should be installed to
protect wall when books are lacquered. Sufficient
kneehole space for two people, if sitting height is
used. Space above work counter, if a solid wall,
should have hanging cabinets or open, adjustable
shelving not to exceed 7' in height.)
b. Typewriter, typewriter table, and chair
c. Straight chairs, 18" high, or stools for student assistants
d. Shelving
Several types are needed in the work area. Use all
available wall space.









(1) Magazines for back issues, 14" deep, 7' high, ad-
justable
(2) Standard, adjustable library shelving, 8" deep, 7'
high, for books in process of being cataloged
e. Storage cabinets for posters, charts, and other large
flat materials
A cabinet either with drawers (11/2" in depth) or with
shelves and door (3' wide, 2' deep, 11/2" between
shelves)
f. Wardrobe & storage cabinet (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 9.)
g. Additional electrical outlets or electrical wire molding
in baseboard of each wall
D. Office (possibly combined with work and storage areas)
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Making up new orders
b. Checking in new materials and supplies
c. Cataloging materials
d. Typing orders, cards for catalog, and other records

2. Space Allocation
a. Minimum of 120 square feet
b. Minimum of 370 square feet for total space when com-
bined with the work-storage area in small materials
centers
3. Placement
Adjacent and with convenient access to work area and
reading area (Clear glass partitions from 3'4" above floor
level to height of 6' in walls between this area and all
other areas in the materials center to facilitate super-
vision)
4. Equipment
a. Several sections of standard book shelving, 8" deep,
7' high along solid wall, 3'4" high along glass-partitioned
wall
b. Desk and chair for librarian
c. Typewriter, typewriter table, and chair
d. One three- or four-drawer metal filing cabinet, legal
size








e. Card catalog cabinet to house shelf list (One drawer
holds 1,000 cards.) It must be purchased from library
supply house.
f. One straight chair, 18" high
E. Audio-Visual Equipment and Materials Storage Room
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Storing audio-visual materials filmstrips, films, slides,
records, disc and tape recordings, maps, charts, globes,
display materials, and other materials to be shared
among classrooms
b. Storing audio-visual equipment motion-picture pro-
jectors, filmstrip projectors, record players, tape re-
corders, and screens
c. Storing supplies for projectors lamps, belts, cords,
reels
d. Processing new materials
e. Inspecting and repairing materials
f. Previewing films and filmstrips and listening to record-
ings
g. Teaching projectionists the care and use of equipment
2. Space Allocation
Minimum of 200 square feet a long, narrow room, if it
is to be used for previewing
3. Placement
Adjacent to and opening into work area with outside
entrance to corridor or outside of building so that audio-
visual equipment can be taken easily in and out of
storage area
4. Equipment
a. Standing-height work counter, 36" 42" high, with top
of plastic laminate or similar material and storage area
for audio-visual equipment underneath and cabinets
for supplies above. Storage cabinets for audio-visual
equipment should accommodate motion-picture pro-
jectors, filmstrip projectors, opaque and overhead pro-
jectors, record players, tape recorders, and projection
screens. This cabinet space should be low, not over 4"
off floor, so that this heavy equipment does not have
to be lifted far off the floor. Motion-picture projectors
may be kept on roller tables for which space must be









provided. (See Appendix, Drawing 10.) Amount of
audio-visual materials and equipment to be housed
should be determined in consultation with the librarian
or audio-visual coordinator at the school or county
level.
b. Storage space for roller-type maps. Provide one set of
hooks so that a map can be unrolled for examination
before it is checked out.
c. Storage cabinet for recordings (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 6.)
d. At least two conveniently placed double electrical out-
lets or electrical wire molding
e. Darkening facilities and acoustical treatment if used
for previewing and listening
F. Photographic Darkroom
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Studying photography
b. Producing graphic and photographic materials for
classes and student publications
2. Space Allocation
At least 100 square feet preferably a square room
3. Placement
a. Readily accessible to all groups desiring to use it
b. Adjacent to the department that is to assume respon-
sibility for its use (This may be adjacent to the ma-
terials center, the science department, the industrial
arts department, or another related department.)
4. Equipment
Consult references in bibliography and persons experi-
enced in equipping and operating this facility.

III. Suggested Layouts
Sample plans have been included in the Appendix to sug-
gest varieties of ways in which space may be used for particu-
lar shapes in the sizes and types of schools specified. For the
secondary schools suggested layouts are a sample plan for a
materials center in a rectangular space serving a school enroll-
ment of 500 and another sample plan for a center occupying a
modified square space and serving a school enrollment of 1,500.









CHAPTER 4


Materials Centers in Twelve-Grade Schools

C"I N EVERY SCHOOL BUILDING where elementary or high
I school, or combination elementary and high school subjects
are taught, there shall be provision for minimum library facilities
to meet regulations that may from time to time be adopted by the
State Board." Section 235.26 (14) Florida Statutes. In planning
materials centers for twelve-grade schools, planners face nu-
merous and complex problems. The needs and interests of the
teachers and pupils to be served present a wide range of differ-
ences; materials needed and services expected will also cause
difficulties in designing a materials center satisfactory to all who
will use it. The following recommendations will serve as guides
in reaching decisions concerning some of these problems.

I. Location
A. In respect to high school and upper elementary classrooms
and accessible to the primary classrooms
B. Adjacent to the study hall if there is one
C. Where there is a minimum of noise
D. In an area suitably proportioned to accommodate functional
and aesthetic quarters
E. On the first floor with a double-door entrance into the main
reading area and a single outside entrance (to the corridor
or outside of building) to the work-storage area

F. Where expansion is possible
II. Space Allocations and Equipment Specifications
A. Reading Area
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Reading and browsing
b. Reference individual or group work









c. Circulation checking materials in and out
d. Housing of library books, supplementary textbooks,
teachers' professional collection, magazines, news-
papers, pamphlets, and some audio-visual materials
(Some audio-visual materials may also be housed in
the audio-visual storage and workroom.)
e. Displays and exhibits
f. Teaching use of library to groups and individuals
g. Storytelling and listening to records in whole class
groups

2. Space Allocation
Minimum space to accommodate 60 seated users and
maximum space for 75, allowing 25-30 square feet per
seated user

3. Equipment
a. Shelving
(1) Book shelving standard, adjustable library shelv-
ing, not to exceed 6' in height (See Appendix,
Drawing 1.)
(a) Number of sections of shelving needed space
for at least 10 books per pupil enrolled, allow-
ing 8 books per shelf foot
(b) At least three sections of standard-height shelv-
ing, 10" deep to take care of oversize books, al-
lowing 6 books per shelf foot
(c) Counter-height shelving may be placed under-
neath windows. Single- or double-faced sections
may be used to define areas within a room. (See
Appendix, Drawing 2.)
(d) Easy- and picture-book shelving (See Appendix,
Drawing 5.) Approximately 1/3 of shelving for
elementary books should be of this type. Allow
12 books per shelf foot.
(2) Magazine shelving, 6' high (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 3.) Each section will accommodate approxi-
mately 12 magazines. A sufficient number of contin-
uous sections should be provided to house 10
magazines for the first 100 pupils enrolled and 5
more magazines for each additional 100 pupils.









b. Newspaper rack
(1) One newspaper stick for each paper received
(2) Holder for newspaper sticks constructed locally or
purchased from a library supply house
(3) Either a separate piece of equipment or built into
the shelving (See Appendix, Drawing 4.)
c. Tables and chairs
(1) Design
Tables should be of sturdy, wooden construction
with non-glare surface and without footrests or
drawers. A mixture of round and rectangular
tables will lend informality to the reading room.
Chairs should be of sturdy, wooden construction and
equipped with noiseless tips.
(2) Dimensions
Since the materials center is used by both elemen-
tary and secondary pupils, there will be some varia-
tion in size of furniture.
Rectangular Round
Height Width Length Diameter
Tables 25" 3' 5' 48"
27" 3' 5' 48"
29" 3' 5' 48"
Chairs 15"
17"
(3' x 5' tables seat 6; round 48" tables seat 4.)
d. Charging desk and chair
(1) Design
Desk should be of sturdy, wooden construction with
non-glare surface, rectangular, sitting-height, with
special built-in charging facilities. Chair should
have either a horizontally slatted or a solid back.
Swivel chairs are preferable.
(2) Dimensions
Desk Length: 44" 72"
Width: 28" 30"
Height: 30"
Chair 17" high
e. Vertical files
(1) Size: three- or four-drawer, legal size
(2) Number needed: minimum of two (The need for









additional files will be determined by the type of
classroom instruction.)
f. Card catalog cabinet
(1) This cabinet must be purchased from a library
supply house. Purchase should be made in multi-
ples of five-drawer units so that additional units
may be added as needed.
(2) Cards for approximately 1,000 books can be housed
in one five-drawer unit. (Each school should have
at least one five-drawer unit.)
g. Bulletin boards and display case
(1) At least one 3' x 5' or 3' x 6', plain frame, no trim;
may be recessed in two sections of shelving (See
Appendix, Drawing 7.)
(2) Fiberboard backing is satisfactory.
(3) A glassed-in display case may be recessed in the
corridor wall outside the entrance door to the li-
brary.
h. Atlas and dictionary stands
(1) A stand with space for a dictionary on top and
several atlases below will be useful and may be
purchased from a library supply house.
(2) Revolving-table model dictionary holders may be
purchased from a library supply house.
i. Book truck
At least one (They may be purchased from a library
supply house.)
j. Informal furniture
Such furniture will provide comfort, informality, and
an attractive appearance.
k. Electrical outlets
Double outlets or electrical wire molding should be
placed in the baseboard of each wall of the room.

B. Conference Room or Rooms
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Conferences
b. Small-group work
c. Previewing films and filmstrips
d. Listening to recordings in small groups









2. Space Allocation
a. Minimum of 140 square feet
b. Two or more conference rooms for larger schools (One
of these should be rectangular, 160 to 180 square feet,
preferably long and narrow, sound- and light-con-
trolled, if used for viewing films and filmstrips.)
c. Folding partitions between conference rooms possibly
desirable where more than one conference room is
planned
3. Placement
Adjacent and with direct access to the reading room, clear
glass partitions in wall between conference and reading
areas from 3'4" above floor level to a height of 6' with
adequate ventilation
4. Equipment
a. One 3' x 5' table, 27" high, and 6 chairs, 17" high
b. Standard book shelving as much as space will per-
mit, not to be included in computation of the minimum
requirement of 10 books per pupil enrolled
c. At least one double electrical outlet or electrical wire
molding in each room
d. Darkening facilities and acoustical treatment if used
for previewing and listening

C. Work-Storage Area
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Receiving and unpacking materials and equipment
b. Preparing materials for circulation classifying,
cataloging, pasting, lettering, lacquering
c. Mending books
d. Preparing bulletin boards and displays
e. Storing magazines
f. Housing supplies and professional aids
2. Space Allocation
A minimum of 300 square feet for the combined work
and storage areas
3. Placement
Adjacent and with direct access to main reading area
and to the audio-visual room (If ceiling-height wall









separates work area from reading area, it should contain
a clear glass partition from 3'4" above floor level to a
height of 6'.)
4. Equipment
a. Work counter (See Appendix, Drawing 8.)
(1) Sink with running water; hot water provided when
possible
(2) At least two well-placed electrical outlets
(3) Standing- or sitting-height work counter with top
of plastic laminate or similar material and with
drawers for posters and cabinets for supplies; suf-
ficient kneehole space for two people, if sitting
height is used (For 18"-20" on wall above work
counter, plastic laminate or similar material should
be installed to protect wall when books are lac-
quered. Space above work counter, if a solid wall,
should have hanging cabinets or open adjustable
shelving not to exceed 7' in height.)
b. Shelving
Several types are needed in the work area. Use all
available wall space.
(1) Magazines for back issues, 14" deep, 7' high, ad-
justable
(2) Standard, adjustable library shelving, 8" deep, 7'
high, for books in process of being cataloged
c. Additional electrical outlets or electrical wire molding
in baseboard of each wall
d. Desk and chair for librarian
e. Typewriter, typewriter table, and chair
f. One three- or four-drawer metal filing cabinet, legal
size
g. Card catalog cabinet to house shelf list must be pur-
chased from library supply house. (One drawer holds
1,000 cards.)
h. Straight chairs, 18" high, or stools for student assistants
i. Wardrobe & storage cabinet (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 9.)

D. Audio-Visual Equipment and Materials Storage Room
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Storing audio-visual materials-filmstrips, films, slides,









disc and tape recordings, maps, globes, display ma-
terials, and other materials to be shared among class-
rooms.
b. Storing audio-visual equipment motion-picture pro-
jectors, filmstrip projectors, record players, tape re-
corders, and screens
c. Storing supplies for projectors lamps, belts, cords,
reels
d. Processing new materials
e. Inspecting and repairing materials
f. Previewing films and filmstrips and listening to record-
ings
g. Teaching projectionists the care and use of equipment

2. Space Allocation
Minimum of 200 square feet and, if used for previewing,
should be a long, narrow room (In very small schools
it may be necessary to store audio-visual equipment in
the work-storage area, adding suitable amount of space
according to material to be housed.)
3. Placement
Adjacent to and opening into work area with outside en-
trance to corridor or outside of building so that audio-
visual equipment can easily be taken in and out of storage
area

4. Equipment
a. Standing-height work counter, 36" to 42" high, with
top of plastic laminate or similar material and storage
area for audio-visual equipment underneath and cab-
inets for supplies above. Storage cabinets for audio-
visual equipment should accommodate motion-picture
projectors, filmstrip projectors, opaque and overhead
projectors, record players, tape recorders, and projec-
tion screens. This cabinet space should be low, not
over 4" off floor, so that this heavy equipment does not
have to be lifted far off the floor. Motion-picture pro-
jectors may be kept on roller tables for which space
must be provided. (See Appendix, Drawing 10.)
Amount of audio-visual materials and equipment to be









housed should be determined in consultation with li-
brarian or audio-visual coordinator at the school or
county level.
b. Storage space for roller-type maps. Provide one set
of hooks so that a map can be unrolled for examination
before it is checked out.
c. Storage cabinet for recordings (See Appendix, Draw-
ing 6.)
d. At least two conveniently placed double electrical out-
lets or electrical wire molding
e. Darkening facilities and acoustical treatment, if used
for previewing and listening
E. Photographic Darkroom
1. Purposes and Activities
a. Studying photography
b. Producing graphic and photographic materials for
classes and student publications
2. Space Allocation
At least 100 square feet preferably a square room
3. Placement
a. Readily accessible to all groups desiring to use it
b. Adjacent to the department that is to assume respon-
sibility for its use (This may be adjacent to the ma-
terials center, the science department, the industrial
arts department, or another related department.)

4. Equipment
Consult references in bibliography and persons experi-
enced in equipping and operating this facility.


III. Suggested Layouts
Sample plans have been included in the Appendix to sug-
gest varieties of ways in which space may be used for particular
shapes in the sizes and types of schools specified. For the twelve-
grade schools a sample plan is suggested for a center occupying
a modified rectangular space and serving a school enrollment of
500.








CHAPTER 5


County-Wide Materials Centers

THE INDIVIDUAL SCHOOL MATERIALS CENTER cannot
satisfy all the needs for instructional materials; therefore, a
central materials collection serving a group of schools is a satis-
factory answer. Usually, a central collection serves a county
school system. This system-wide materials center could supple-
ment the services provided in the individual schools with a film
library and a professional library. It could also include supple-
mentary and exhibit collections of filmstrips, slides, recordings,
sample copies of trade books, textbooks, and other materials and
equipment. Facilities for the production of graphic and photo-
graphic materials might be desirable to include in new building
plans for a county materials center.

The physical facilities of the county materials center would
depend upon the kinds of services to be offered, the materials to
be housed, and the number of schools to be served.


I. Location

A county materials center should be located where it is con-
venient for use by the instructional personnel teachers, ad-
ministrators, and instructional supervisors. If there is a county
school administrative building or buildings, it is desirable to
have the materials center in this area.

In general, the county materials center serves the staffs of all
the schools in the same manner that the materials center in
the individual school serves its staff and pupil personnel.

Therefore, space similar to that in individual school materials
centers is a requisite for the county materials center. The size
of a center will be determined by the extent of the services
to be offered, the volume of materials and equipment to be
housed, and the number of schools and of instructional per-
sonnel.








II. Space Allocations
A. Housing Materials
1. Provide for each type of materials and equipment: pro-
fessional library, films, filmstrips, slides, recordings, re-
cording tapes, models, museum objects, vertical file ma-
terial, and other materials and equipment.
2. The amount of each type of material would determine the
space needed.
B. Distributing Materials
Distribution of materials is one of the main functions of
the county materials center. This involves several processes:
booking, shipping, and repairing.
1. Booking or scheduling materials requires office and desk
space according to the size of the center and the system
used.
2. Packing and shipping materials are especially important.
Storage facilities are needed in this area for shipping
cases, boxes, and other necessary equipment. Some cen-
ters place packaged materials in mail bags to be delivered
by truck or school bus; some use the U. S. Mail; others
have materials picked up by individuals coming to the
center. These activities necessitate adequate provision for
parking space in the school administrative area.
3. Repairing materials, especially films, is an essential ac-
tivity requiring space.
C. Previewing and auditioning by individual teachers or small
groups
D. Conference rooms for large or small groups as needed
E. Offices and work areas are necessary for the professional
and clerical staff to administer the center effectively.
F. Production facilities for graphic and photographic materials
to be produced locally

III. Specifications for Equipment
A. Housing Area
1. Shelving
Books (See Appendix, Drawings 1, 2, 5.)
Magazines (See Appendix, Drawing 3.)








2. Film racks
3. Filmstrip and slide cabinets
4. Cabinets for disc and tape recordings (See Appendix,
Drawings 6, 10.)
5. Storage cabinets with adjustable shelves for models and
museum objects
6. Vertical files (legal size, 3- or 4-drawer units)
B. Distribution Area
1. Booking desk designed in terms of system used
2. Storage cabinets with adjustable shelves for equipment
3. Storage cabinets with adjustable shelves for shipping
cases
4. Counter or table area for packaging materials (designed
in terms of local needs)
5. Inspection and repair table (minimum dimensions:
30" x 40")
C. Preview and Audition Areas
1. Projection table
2. Wall screen
3. Bulletin board
4. Armchairs
D. Conference Areas
1. Tables (rectangular: 3' x 5'; round: 48" diameter;
height: 30")
2. Chairs (18" high)
3. Bulletin board
4. Exhibit cases
E. Office Area
1. Desks and chairs
2. Filing cabinets, legal size
3. Book shelving
4. Typewriter, typewriter table, and chair
F. Production Area
Consult references in bibliography and persons experienced
in equipping and operating this type of facility.









APPENDIX 1


Sources of Additional Help


I. Resource Persons

A. County Supervisors of Instructional Materials

B. School Librarians Experienced in Planning Materials
Centers

C. Consultant in Instructional Materials, State Department of
Education, Tallahassee, Florida

D. State School Architect, State Department of Education,
Tallahassee, Florida

II. Library Supply Houses and School Equipment Companies

For names and addresses of some commercial companies from
whom library equipment may be purchased, consult the sec-
tion, "Dealers and Commercial Services," in The Materials
Center (Bulletin 22C, Department of Education, Tallahassee,
Florida), pp. 93-101.

HI. Selected Bibliography


Fargo, Lucile F. The Library in
the School. Chicago: American
Library Association, 1947. pp.
202-244. $4.00.
Directions are given for planning
the library to fit the school with
recommendations for space re-
quired for reading, conference,
work, and storage rooms. Gives
floor plans and directions for
building equipment on pages
202-244. Not as up to date as
some pamphlets but still au-
thoritative. (New edition now in
process.)
Gardiner, Jewel. Administering Li-
brary Service in the Element-
ary School. 2d ed. Chicago:
American Library Associa-


tion, 1954. $3.50.
A chapter on the physical setup
of the library gives a good over-
all discussion of space allot-
ments, equipment, arrangement,
and furniture needed for an ele-
mentary library.
Morgan, Willard D., and Lester,
Henry M. Graphic Graflex
Photography. New York: Mor-
gan and Lester Publishers,
1954. $4.80. (Developing, Print-
ing, and Enlarging).
On pages 131-163 is a short
summary of darkroom housing
and equipment needs along with
some darkroom procedures. Sug-
gestions are concise and very
helpful.









National Council on Schoolhouse
Construction, Research and
Publications Committee. Guide
for Planning School Plants.
Nashville, Tennessee: National
Council on Schoolhouse Con-
struction, 1953. $2.00.
The present edition (The Guide
has been published under vari-
ous titles since 1930.) empha-
sizes principles and goals of
planning for individual parts of
school buildings with specific
information concerning light-
ing, heating, ventilation, floor-
ing, and fire regulations.

National Education Association,
Department of Audio-Visual
Instruction. Boston Confer-
ence Proceedings 1952, A Re-
port by the Action Planning
Committee, Section 3. Build-
ings and Equipment. Wash-
ington, D. C.: Department of
Audio-Visual Instruction, Na-
tional Education Association,
1952.
Standards of lighting, space,
ventilation, heating, and other
physical factors are discussed
and recommended for audio-
visual facilities. The standards,
however, are readily adaptable to
most institutional rooms and
buildings.

Rufsvold, Margaret I. Audio-Visual
School Library Service: A
Handbook for Librarians. Chi-
cago: American Library As-
sociation, 1949. $2.75.
Excellent information concern-
ing housing and equipping small
high school audio-visual cen-
ters. The information listed in
the bibliography is somewhat
dated as well as certain sugges-
tions on equipment and budget.
The book needs revising.

Schuller, Charles F. (ed.) The
School Administrator and His
Audio-Visual Program. Wash-
ington, D. C.: Department of
Audio-Visual Instruction, Na-
tional Education Association,
1954. $3.75.
Sometimes called the DAVI
Yearbook. Many of the problems


arising from housing and
equipment deficiencies are dis-
cussed by the various contribu-
tors to this book.

Pamphlets and Bulletins
Acoustical Materials Association.
Theory and Use of Architec-
tural Acoustical Materials.
New York: The Association,
1950. $.25.
Excellent pamphlet on acoustics
for the beginner
American Library Association.
American Association of
School Librarians. Committee
on Planning School Library
Quarters. Dear Mr. Architect.
rev. ed. Chicago: American Li-
brary Association, 1952. $.50.
Describes the activities which
take place within the school li-
brary and recommends space
and facilities needed. Detailed
and specific floor plans and di-
rections for building equipment
are included.
American Library Association.
Committee on Post War Plan-
ning. School Libraries for To-
day and Tomorrow. Chicago:
American Library Association,
1945. $1.00.
States philosophy, gives national
standards, defines functions, and
describes the ideal physical set-
up of the school library.
Darkroom Construction for Profes-
sional, Photomechanical, and
Industrial Use. Rochester, New
York: Eastman Kodak Com-
pany, 1951. $.35.
This is the best, single source of
information found concerning
darkrooms in general.
Douglas, Mary P. Planning and
Equipping the School Library.
(Publication No. 257). Ra-
leigh, North Carolina: State
Department of Public Instruc-
tion, 1949. $.25.
Recommendations and specifi-
cations are given for planning
library quarters in new build-
ings and in renovated older
buildings. Includes suggestive
floor plans, diagrams, and line
drawings.









Florida. State Department of Ed-
ucation. The Materials Cen-
ter. (Bulletin No. 22C). Tal-
lahassee, Florida: State De-
partment of Education. $1.50.
(Free to Florida schools.)
A comprehensive pamphlet con-
taining directions for the ac-
quisition, preparation, and
housing of books and audio-
visual materials at both the lo-
cal and the county level. Floor
plans and diagrams for shelv-
ing and other built-in equip-
ment are given on pages 102-
118.

Galvin, Hoyt R. (ed.) Planning a
Library Building: The Major
Steps. Proceedings of the In-
stitute sponsored by the
American Library Association
Buildings Committee at St.
Paul, Minnesota, June 19-20,
1954. Chicago: American Li-
brary Association, 1955. $3.00.
Articles by outstanding librar-
ians and architects on program-
ming, preliminary planning,
and working drawings for li-
brary buildings. Much valuable
information applicable to school
library planning in the sections
on college and public libraries.
A short section on school li-
braries.

Illinois Library Association. Plan-
ning Board. Subcommittee on
Library Service to Schools.
Planning School Library
Quarters: A Functional Ap-
proach. Chicago: American
Library Association, 1950.
$1.50.
Gives practical and "tested"
helps for administrators, li-
brarians, and architects planning
a school library. Excellent gen-
eral treatment of the subject,
as well as chapters on such
special topics as sound control,
lighting, color, and window
treatment.


Indiana. Department of Public In-
struction. Audio-Visual Pro-
gram. (Bulletin No. 218). In-
dianapolis: Indiana Depart-
ment of Public Instruction,
1956.
Chapter VI describes audio-
visual facilities for classrooms,
schools, and school systems.
Indiana. Department of Public In-
struction. Planning Schools
for Better Projection: Recom-
mendations for Buildings to
Facilitate an Audio Visual
Education Program. Indiana-
polis: Indiana Department of
Public Instruction, 1955.
Mimeographed material con-
taining information on light
control, ventilation, and storage
facilities.
Kentucky. Department of Educa-
tion. Functional School Li-
braries: Quarters and Equip-
ment. Frankfort, Kentucky:
Department of Education, XX
(July, 1952). Free.
Sound advice on building and
remodeling libraries in schools
of various sizes. Excellent cov-
erage, many floor plans and
working drawings.
National Education Association.
Department of Audio-Visual
Instruction. Planning Schools
for Use of Audio-Visual Ma-
terials No. 4, Audio-Visual
Centers in Colleges and Uni-
versities. Washington, D. C.:
Department of Audio-Visual
Instruction, National Educa-
tion Association, 1955. $1.50.
Excellent booklet concerning
audio-visual and photographic
services for the large and small
college. Much of the informa-
tion concerning lighting, equip-
ment, housing plans, ventilation,
and administration would be
helpful to the materials center
planner.









National Education Association.
Department of Audio-Visual
Instruction. Planning Schools
for Use of Audio-Visual Ma-
terials No. 3, The A-V In-
structional Materials Center.
Washington, D. C.: Depart-
ment of Audio-Visual Instruc-
tion, National Education As-
sociation, 1954. $1.00.
Excellent booklet concerning
audio-visual materials service
for high schools and materials
centers. Of special interest is
.the bibliography of additional
sources of information, equip-
ment manufacturers' addresses,
pictures and drawings of facili-
ties in use, and specific recom-
mendations for housing the ma-
terials center.
Planning the School Library. Buf-
falo, New York: Remington
Rand, Inc. Free.
A brochure based on more than
sixty years of experience in li-
brary planning. Includes several
floor plans and many illustra-
tions.

Stanford Junior University. School
Planning Conferences. 1952
Report. Stanford, California:
Stanford Junior University,
1952.
Contains good sections on day
lighting, artificial lighting, color,
furniture and equipment, and
thermal environment.
Virginia State Board of Educa-
tion. School Library Guide.
Vol. XXXVIII (September,
1955), No. 5. Richmond, Vir-
ginia: Commonwealth of Vir-
ginia, 1955. Free.
Chapter XIV and a part of the
Appendix give regulations and
recommendations for Virginia's
school library quarters. Also
applicable for others' needs.
Virginia State Board of Education.
School Planning Manual. Vol.
XXXVII (November, 1954),
No. 7. Richmond, Virginia:
State Department of Educa-
tion, 1954.


Sections 2211 and 2212 specif-
ically give diagrams and specif-
ications concerning school li-
brary quarters and equipment.


Magazine Articles

Behrens, R. H. "Planning and
Equipment of a Photographic
Classroom," American School
Board Journal, CXIV Febru-
ary, 1947), pp. 46-48.
Although this article is intended
for the classroom type of dark-
room, much of the information
included emphasizes the need of
a darkroom, the physical layout
of a large darkroom in general,
and the basic equipment list
which would be usable by almost
all high school darkrooms.

Birren, Faber. "The Psychology
of Color for the School
Room," Nation's Schools, LVII
(April, 1956), pp. 92-94.
Explains the relation of color to
emotion and what colors are
best for different grade levels,
including those appropriate for
school libraries.

Copeland, Emily A. "Appeal to Re-
cruits Showing Them a
Library," Library Journal,
LXXXI (June 15, 1956), pp.
1583-1585.
Model library may be borrowed
for $2.50 from author (Head,
Department of Library Science,
Florida Agricultural and Me-
chanical University, Tallahas-
see, Florida.)

Douglas, Mrs. Mary Peacock.
"Materials Aspects of the
School Library," Wilson Li-
brary Bulletin, XXIX (Nov-
ember, 1954), pp. 225-227.
An excellent presentation of the
many considerations which must
be taken into account to deter-
mine adequate school library
facilities.









Ellsworth, Ralph E. "Library Ar-
chitecture and Buildings," Li-
brary Quarterly, XXV (Janu-
ary, 1955), pp. 66-75.
Gives lines of influence-subject
arrangement, "modular" con-
struction; libraries physically
inviting, informal, and easy to
use; geographic or sectional;
new theories of administrative
procedure; new building meth-
ods and materials.
Erbes, Raymond G. "Housing
the School Library," Nation's
Schools, LIII (April, 1954), pp.
63-76.
Based on the work of the Com-
mittee on Planning School Li-
brary Quarters of the AASL,
this comprehensive article gives
helpful hints in planning for
functional library facilities.
(Text and pictures are not al-
ways consistent.)
-. "If Librarians Planned the Li-
braries," Illinois Libraries,
XXXVI (January, 1954), pp.
15-20.
Mentions the outstanding fea-
tures as stated by librarians of
some of our newly constructed
libraries throughout the county.
Also, lists features which were
found not too desirable in the
hope some school librarian plan-
ning new quarters might read
them and be reminded to guard
against these features.
Evaul, C. B. "Planning Photo-
graphic Facilities for Second-
ary Schools," Nation's Schools,
XL (September, 1947, pp. 53-
54.
Mr. Evaul presents the photo-
graphic program at John Mar-
shall High School, Rochester,
New York. Although interested
primarily in classroom facilities
for photography, the plans in-
clude a faculty darkroom which
can be adapted to production
needs.
Harris, Ben M. "Are Modern
Classrooms Lighted for Better
Learning?" American School
Board Journal, LXXXI (Sep-
tember, 1955), pp. 49-50.


Throws light on misconceptions
about classroom illumination.

Ketch, J. M. "Library Lighting,"
Light, XXIII (March-April,
1954), pp. 15-21.
Photographs show wide variety
of lighting for various sections
as well as for special needs of
libraries.

"Modular Construction," Library
Journal, LXXX (December 1,
1955), pp. 2728-2730.
Angus Snead Macdonald re-
evaluates modular construction
ten years after publishing his
initial article.

Pillard, Matthew J., and Gibbons,
Kenneth. "Let's Take a Look
at New Schools," School Exe-
cutive, LXXV (June, 1956),
pp. 61-91.
Trends in shapes, materials,
lighting, functions to make
schools "beautiful not like
schools at all."

"The School Library: A Materials
Center," American Library
Association Bulletin, L (Feb-
ruary, 1956), pp. 81-90.
A teacher, a principal, a library
supervisor, and a school librar-
ian discuss the library as the
center for instructional mater-
ials. Their comments are in-
valuable for those charged with
the responsibility of providing
and planning housing for the
activities and equipment neces-
sitated by this trend.

Sellew, Roland W. "What In-
formation Should Educators
Furnish the Architect?" Am-
erican School Board Journal,
CXXX (May, 1955), pp. 49-50.
Explains the necessity for con-
tinuous and careful communica-
tion between educators and the
architect in order that the edu-
cational program and its needs
are clearly conveyed to the ar-
chitect, thereby enabling him to
translate these needs into func-
tional design.








"Ten Principles of Good Light-
ing," Architectural Forum,
CII (March, 1955), p. 226.
Gives good background material
on lighting.
Tyler, J. W. "Physical Require-
ments of the Elementary
School Library," School Exe-
cutive, LXXIII (September,
1953), pp. 71-72.
The specific suggestions in this
article may be helpful to the
architect, the administrator, and
the librarian whose task it is to
plan cooperatively school library
quarters.
Wagner, R. W. "Photography in
the High School," Educational
Screen, XXIII, (February,
1944), pp. 59-61.
This is the best single presenta-
tion of why high schools need
photographic darkrooms. Spe-
cific information about the
darkroom is very limited.
"Williamsburg Junior High
School," American School
Board Journal, CXXXIII
(July, 1956), p. 37.
An example of natural lighting
by use of glass block, clerestory
and projected windows, and
plastic skydomes.

Leaflets
Douglas, Mary Peacock. A Yard-
stick for Planning School
Libraries. Available from


Southern Desk Company,
Hickory, North Carolina. Free.
A very useful leaflet giving es-
sential information in capsule
form.


Filmstrips
School Library Quarters. Chicago:
American Library Association,
1952. 35 mm., 98 frames, with
captions and color. $15.00.
Views of school libraries in Ful-
ton County, Georgia.

Specifications and Blueprints
Baltimore County, Maryland,
Board of Education. Elemen-
tary and Secondary School
Library Specifications. Towson
4, Maryland: Baltimore Coun-
ty Board of Education. Free.
Specifications for elementary
and secondary school libraries,
floor plans for typical libraries,
and working drawings for equip-
ment.
McJenkin, Virginia. Standard De-
tails for Libraries. Atlanta,
Georgia: Fulton County Board
of Education, 1953. Free.
Actual blueprints of all built-in
equipment needed for storage of
library and audio-visual equip-
ment as well as other equipment
for the workroom. Specifications
are given for figuring space
needed for elementary and high
school libraries.










Index


Audio-visual equipment and ma-
terials storage:
county-wide materials center,
30; elementary schools, 8-9;
secondary schools, 18; twelve-
grade schools, 25-27.
Audio-visual equipment and ma-
terials storage:
drawings, 44, 48
Book shelving. (See Shelving:
Books)
Bulletin board: Recessed:
drawings, 45
Cabinet: Wardrobe and storage:
drawings, 47.
Conference Rooms:
county-wide materials center,
29; elementary schools, 6-7;
secondary schools, 15; twelve-
grade schools, 23-24.
County-wide materials centers:
location, 28; space allocation,
29; specifications for equip-
ment, 29-30.
Decoration, 2.
Elementary schools: Materials
centers:
location, 3; areas and equip-
ment, 3-9.
Equipment:
county-wide materials centers,
elementary schools, 3-9; sec-
ondary schools, 12-19; twelve-
grade schools, 20-27.
Floor plans (Layouts) :
elementary schools, 10, 51-52;
secondary schools, 19, 53, 54;
twelve-grade schools, 27, 52.
Furnishings. (See Equipment)
Layouts. (See Floor Plans)
Lighting and sun control, 1.
Magazine shelving. (See Shelving:
Magazines)
Offices:
county-wide materials center,
29; elementary schools, 7-8;
secondary schools, 17-18;
twelve-grade schools, 24-25.


Photographic darkrooms:
county-wide materials center,
29; secondary schools, 19;
twelve-grade schools, 27.
Reading areas:
elementary schools, 4; second-
ary schools, 11-12; twelve-
grade schools, 20-23.
Remodeled quarters (Materials
centers), iii.
Secondary school materials cen-
ters:
location, 11; areas and equip-
ment, 11-19.
Shelving: Books: Dimensions:
regular, adjustable, 39; coun-
ter-height, 40; easy and picture
book, 43; oversize, 4, 12.
Shelving: Books: Number of sec-
tions:
county-wide materials center,
elementary schools, 4; second-
ary schools, 12; twelve-grade
schools, 21.
Shelving: Books:
drawings, 39, 40, 43.
Shelving: Magazines: Dimensions:
drawing, 41.
Shelving: Magazines: Number of
sections:
elementary schools, 4; second-
ary schools, 12-13; twelve-
grade schools, 21.

Sound Control, 2.

Twelve-grade school materials
centers:
location, 20; areas and equip-
ment, 20-27.
Ventilation and Fenestration, 1.

Work-Room Counter:
drawing, 46.

Work-storage areas:
county-wide materials center,
30; elementary schools, 7-8;
secondary schools, 16-17;
twelve-grade schools, 24-25.















































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"22" SERIES OF STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
BULLETINS

Other State Department of Education Bulletins
in the "22" Series on Instructional Materials are:
22A Recommended Library Books for Florida Schools, 1948
22B The Audio-Visual Way, 1948 (out of print)
22C The Materials Center, 1955
22D Recommended Library Books for Florida Schools, 1955
(out of print)
22E Planning Materials Centers, 1958
22F Field Trips, scheduled for completion, 1958
22G Maps and Globes, scheduled for completion, 1959

49








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