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Group Title: Circular - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 656
Title: Introducing the cash flow statement
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067202/00001
 Material Information
Title: Introducing the cash flow statement
Series Title: Circular Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Alternate Title: Introducing the cash flow
Cash flow statement
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Van Blokland, P. J
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1988?
 Subjects
Subject: Financial statements   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Accounting   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 4).
Statement of Responsibility: P.J. van Blokland.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: Caption title: Introducing the cash flow.
Funding: Circular (Florida Cooperative Extension Service) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067202
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 21765981

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






Circular 65E

~~IN









Contents
Page
Background ........................................................................ 1

What is a Cash Flow? ................................................................. 1

How is a Cash Flow Used? ............................................................ 1

What Does a Cash Flow Look Like? ..................................................... 2

How is a Cash Flow Monitored? ....................................................... 3

Appendix Comments .................................................................. 3

References .................. ................................... ................ 4

Appendix .................................................................... .. 6






























The Author
P.J. van Blokland is Associate Professor, Food and Resource Economics Department, Institute of Food
and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.










Introducing the Cash Flow
PJ. van Blokland


Background
This publication is one in a series outlining the
four basic financial statements used in business
today. These statements are the balance sheet, the
income statement, the cash flow, and the statement
of change in financial position. A fifth publication
shows how these statements link together and a
sixth shows how to use the information provided
by the statements to analyze a farm business.
The essential features and purpose of the cash
flow outlined here should give the reader sufficient
information to complete a cash flow statement
similar to the one shown in the appendix. Farmers,
ranchers, nursery and grove operators, extension
agents, agricultural lenders, and students should
find this publication of interest.
Each publication in the series uses a system
called "Coordinated Financial Statements for
Agriculture" as its foundation (1). The publications
in the series are listed in the reference section
(2, 3, 4, 5, 6).

What is a Cash Flow?
A cash flow is a financial statement that attempts
to predict the future cash receipts and expenses of
a business. Usually, a cash flow runs for a year and
is divided into monthly intervals. It shows (1) the
cash available at different times of the year, (2) the
cash needed during these times, and (3) borrowing
and debt servicing.
Try to think of using a cash flow as a route map
into the future, in the same way as you plan a
route for a holiday trip by car. You know the
destination, how to get there through some planned
itinerary, and that you will stop from time to time
for sightseeing. The same concept applies to com-
pleting the cash flow. Managers attempt to time
cash receipts during the year in order to get results
commensurate with marketing objectives. They try
to allocate cash expenses in the months when there
is surplus cash. They plan borrowing to have the
minimum loans over the shortest time in order to
reduce interest costs. They pay off portions of
operating debts whenever there is cash available.
The cash flow is a planning tool for the future.
Managers need to concentrate on the future, rather
than coping with the past, and should therefore
spend considerable time on their cash flows.


The cash flow starts where the present balance
sheet ends. For example, assume that we are in the
first week of January 1986 and have just completed
the December 31, 1985 balance sheet. The next
step is to plan for 1986. This step involves com-
pleting a monthly cash flow showing the cash
predictions for 1986. The completed cash flow is
then used to produce a pro forma or future balance
sheet (modified cost only) and income statement for
1986 (2, 3, 5). These three sets of future informa-
tion suggest where the business will be a year from
now. The next step is to compare these business
positions with the business objectives, or where we
want to be. If things do not match, it is necessary
to start again with the cash flow and either modify
it or the annual objectives of the business. So the
cash flow is a very useful management tool.
Remember that the cash flow deals only with
cash and ignores all noncash items such as
depreciation and inventory change. Therefore, a
cash flow cannot show the profitability of the
business.

How is a Cash Flow Used?
The following decisions can be made with infor-
mation from the cash flow:
1. Where we plan to go, using projected prices
for the revenue objectives
2. How we are going to get there, using
anticipated costs and returns
3. When we are going to get there, by timing
these anticipated costs and returns
4. When we should borrow money
5. How much we need to borrow
6. When we can pay our debts
7. When we can invest in the business
8. When we can withdraw funds for family living
expenses
For example, suppose one of the farm's objectives
for 1986 is to net $10,000 cash from field crops.
This is decision 1 and involves planning a
marketing strategy for input costs and output
prices. Decision 2 details this strategy for inputs
and outputs by listing items such as corn yield, the
corn price through forward contracting, and the
cash costs of the inputs for growing this corn.
Decision 3 makes the farmer decide when the costs
are to be incurred and when this corn will be sold.
Any monthly cash shortfalls are to be met by using









spare farm cash or by borrowing (decisions 4 and
5). The farmer can schedule debt payments (deci-
sion 6) when he has surplus cash, rather than let-
ting the lender schedule them. This puts the farmer
in the driver's seat and should reduce outstanding
debts.
For example, suppose the farmer's costs are
budgeted to be $5,000 in April and he forecasts no
April sales to cover these costs. But it looks as
though he will have $1,000 cash and $2,000 in a
money market account at that time. So he plans to
borrow around $2,500 to meet the costs, leaving
$500 in cash on hand. In May, he hopes for sales
of $4,000 and costs of $750. He can then budget to
repay the $2,500 and still have something left over.
This is the route map concept at work.
Decision 7 shows whether there is sufficient cash
for investment. The cash flow shows when and if
the farmer can afford things like a new drill or
irrigation equipment. Finally, decision 8 encourages
the farmer to budget enough money for family liv-
ing expenses. This is the first priority of any farm
business and the cash flow shows what the family
living standard can be. If the family needs $1,200
per month to live on, the farmer must find this
cash in his cash flow.


What Does a Cash Flow Look Like?

A complete cash flow is shown in the appendix,
but it will be helpful to first examine a simpler
version. A simple cash flow is shown in Table 1.
This layout has three main sections. These are
cash inflows (A), cash outflows (B), and how the
difference between the two is handled. If there is a
cash surplus, then the farmer can save it in some
way (money market account, savings account, etc.),
invest it, or simply keep it as cash in his closing
cash balance. If there is a cash deficit, then he
must borrow in order to pay the bills listed under
"cash needed" and end up with a positive closing
cash balance.
We must have a positive closing cash balance
simply because it is impossible to walk around
with a negative $7.40 in your pockets. It may be
necessary to borrow additional money to end up
with this positive closing cash balance. We may,
therefore, owe more at the end of the month than
at the beginning, but there still must be physical
cash available. Finally, the closing cash balance at
the end of any month automatically becomes the
opening cash balance at the beginning of the next
month. An April 30 closing cash balance of $120


Table 1: A simple cash flow statement
JAN 1 DEC 31. 1986

April
Opening cash balance
Crop and livestock sales


Other farm cash receipts
Off-farm cash income
TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE

Variable expenses
Fixed cash expenses
Principal and interest paid
Family living expenses
TOTAL CASH NEEDED


(A)


(B)

(+) or (-)


(A) (B) = CASH DIFFERENCE
If (-), then borrowing needed
If (+), then cash reserve deposit


Therefore, closing cash balance









Table 2: A diagrammatic cash flow monitoring sheet


Difference Difference
Projected Actual (+) or (-) Projected Actual (+) or (-)


Opening Cash Balance
Sales
Etc
TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE (A)


Expenses
Etc
TOTAL CASH


NEEDED (B)


CASH DIFFERENCE
New Borrowing
Cash Reserves
Closing Cash Balance


________________________________________L UUL


becomes the May 1 opening cash balance.
Obviously, a real cash flow is a considerably
larger statement than Table 1 shows (see a com-
plete cash flow in the appendix). Most items should
be listed singly. For example, "crop and livestock
sales" are preferably entered as individual enter-
prises such as oranges, soybeans, calves, etc.
Similarly, the variable expenses should be shown
individually as fertilizer, contract spraying, or
temporary labor, rather than as "variable expenses!'
This detail makes analysis much easier. The
amount of detail necessary is decided by the in-
dividual farmer. When a cash flow is constructed,
therefore, we end up with a detailed route map of
our likely cash movements for the year. Like any
route map, it helps to guide us on our way.

How is a Cash Flow Monitored?
All route maps guide rather than dictate. So what
happens if things don't work out as planned? Sup-
pose our anticipated April calf sales of 80 calves at
350 lb and 68 per lb, turn out to be 74 calves at
330 lb and 651: per lb. We need to check how we
are doing from month to month so that we can
cover any deviations and, if necessary, alter the
remaining part of our route map. We need a
monitoring device, and Table 2 illustrates a
simplified one.
Now all this involves work. But we usually spend
considerable time planning a driving trip into the
unknown. We should also spend time in planning


our business future. If we are too optimistic, then
we have to change our projections. The monitoring
work sheet does this for us so that we can stay on
top of things.

Appendix Comments
The appendix shows a cash flow with several
accompanying schedules (1, pp. 74-83). The
schedules are the essential scratch paper for the
cash flow itself. They must be completed first. The
information to complete them comes from the
previously completed financial statements and from
the farmer's records. The operation is difficult to
complete and has very limited value if there are no
records of the business. But we have to start
somewhere. Starting now is infinitely better than
not having started at all.
The figures in the cash flow come largely from
the completed schedules. You can trace many of
them by looking at the schedules and then finding
the appropriate cash flow rows. For example, look
at the livestock sales on page 10 and see
where they are entered in row 3 of the cash flow.
Or, see the various crop costs on page 9 and
find the entries under "operating expenses" in rows
17 through 27 of the cash flow. Other cash flow
figures, such as the opening cash balance on
January 1, 1984, come from the December 31, 1983
balance sheet. So do the starting debts listed in
rows 59 through 62. It all links together and
thereby provides the manager with an essential tool
for managing the future of a business.


APRIL


YEAR-TO-DATE









References


1. Frey, Thomas L., and Danny A. Klinefelter. "Coor-
dinated Financial Statements for Agriculture," Agri
Finance, 2nd edition. Skokie, IL. 1980.

2. van Blokland, P.J. Introducing the Balance Sheet,
Extension Circular No. 651. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, Instutute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611.


3. van Blokland, P.J. Introducing the Income Statement,
Extension Circular No. 645. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611.


4. van Blokland, P.J. Introducing the Statement of Change
in Financial Position, Extension Circular No. 658.
Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

5. van Blokland, P.J. Linking the Financial Statements,
Extension Circular No. 657. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611.

6. van Blokland, P.J. Introducing Farm Business Analysis,
Extension Circular No. 655. Florida Cooperative
Extension Service, University of Florida, Gainesville,
FL 32611.












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APPENDIX


CASH FLOW STATEMENT

1 Projected for 19X
O Actual for 19_ A j Nae Bll 8rown
Date completed q o j a 1, 1h y.|To l 2 1b.|&h
1 Beginning cash balance (demand deposits plus currency) "[1 oo Operating Receipts: 750
2 Crops and feed "151535, 8:t$30
3 Livestock and poultry 2 t. Z 11, 4_lt _
4 Products: livestock and poultry
5 Custom work
6 Government payments and patronage dividends l O
7 Hedging account withdrawals l n h l e- "_ j-

Capital Receipts:
9 Breeding stock eto ~ 2 (19 a_ o__
10 Machinery and equipment "-oo 840.
11
Non-Farm Income:
12 Of-farm wagesao 0 < c 5 o? a_
13 interest and dividends 4T=,> (71
14
15
16 TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE dd lines 1 thru 1s) | &t 9i I,6 I., .
Operating Expenses:
17 Labor hired (including employer taxes) 1,20C ( \_
18 Repairs machinery and equipment o oo I o
19 Repairs buildings and improvements I aaz (f0 40 000
20 Rents and leases 1(d:O tto IoO
21 Seed pol- S- E *
22 Fertilizer and lime tp-t 1S o lo, 7 _____
23 Chemicals clvgiYth drwast'
Custom machine hire (i oOo _
25 Supplies too 717ao 100 tloo '_o0
26 Livestock expense (breeding, vet., etc.) 1L70 _-V o 'oo_
27 Gas, fuel, oil _________ LO o t
28 Storage and custom drying -
29 Taxes (real estate and personal property) Spe o?
30 Insurance (property, liability, crop) ,_o'-o ( ___ _
31 Utilities (electricity, gas, telephone) e),+ (>_1 "0 z cpy*e
32 Marketing and transportation expense -
33 Auto (farm share) I O o0 I
34 oo 4-- "_c
35
36 Total Cash Operating Expenses to:g>>8 O (ORq 4'
Livesock and Feed Purchases:
37 Feeder livestock
38 Breeding livestock 00 0 C. loo,
39 Feed purchased o a a t q
Capital Expenditures:
40 Machinery and equipment pek, csOo 'Q17 t ('Jot:>
41 Building and improvements
42
Other Expenditures:
43 Hedging account deposits 7oo to
44 Gross family living withdrawals "F I-7 0 -1q ->
45 Non-farm business and investments
46 Income tax and social security q 1 -c -
47
48 Intermediate and long term loan payments principal G?' "0 a5,T ?0
49 --interest1 l t
50 TOTAL CASH REQUIRED (add lines 36 thru 49) I d 1
51 CASH AVAILABLE LESS CASH REQUIRED (16-50) .
52 Inflows from savings COO a '
53 Cash position before borrowing O il
Money to be borrowed
54 operating loans, c0o 30,000
intermediate and long term loans
55 Operating loan payments principal Zin ___ o,O
56 interest o c
57 Outflows to savings "Tt,00, ,< a o 3 00,
58 Ending cash balance I 5, 4 511 50.S 6 Lt.
Loan Blances: (at end of period)
59 Current year's operating loans

60 Previous year's operating loans

61 Intermediate and long term loans 3,,.0 o<,Z o,? Z< 2
62 Total Loans n( o 3 2i ,qZ 2 1.2o


4 Total outflows (50+55
is Budetina error (163-1


+56+57+581 )1
44)


4'If 14R (.


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19
20
f __ __-__ ____ q 21
-"1_[ > "____=, j 3322
23
L(c (c3 1 24
,So }5' aoK 1o IoOa lo O 150 LC aTO 25
150 -S0 P 506 ac >o -r C. 1 2 b oo 15o 126
tfle Inc c faor .3apo 300 0 7o 7/o ( 00> (Coo 27
28
,otigno ~ t.,I 29
aI I I 5 30
3o 0 0 5a- 3 -" 3oo 3==p5 8e 31
32
/cO ( 34
35
t 1 t715 1 lo I :od 0 S3 Clio 3 32 i:36

37
_qCO ( 38
etSO oto5 pOa95 RcBa t-5 (5 Q -985 5 a5 4 394

41




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47

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It, 11 i, 17 74 ', o 47.752. 5 1o 1, 2. (4(.5 lo06 so
-ns ,l,.,ow ass t,96o M7 88 nf3.T21 15.P@'851

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It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce
it in any manner.


BUDGET SHEET FOR CROP PRODUCTION


Field Seed Fertilizer Chemicals

Crop To Yield Total Rate Per Rate Per Rate Per
Be Grown No. Acres Per Acre Production Variety Acre Total Analysis Acre Total Kind Acre Total
oworm: ( 9o las ,ag bu Soo .3 bo a 8-6-c, aoo C T. .51- SY)-pt Sog5o.
F 0-45-0 aoa 9T. AtLt-in Q/3 Ib. 150 b.
So-o-C:o oo = T. Larsb=-n 8 f3 lb. lBSob.
forn, 5lo e a to ao ,,oo 5It b5 4 eagl?-o aoo Ib T. 5o-t.n 3 Ye b. gA.-
o -435-0 ovoo IT PtTz.ir< i3 Ib. \? \b.
_o-o-too IP W he-+ 3- 40 5 =?toL oge (.5u ( 0o 5-10-30 300 (oT.
(o-3,-f o lcx T.
35-0-0 900 jT:
CD (DC) __ ______ __--_ -o-__ -ft--

o8 -40o 3a0oobu _'cog I11,. tao lb.
( bo R0o 0o bu

Sri: CY1 lQ as I 15 -15co .31u 3t, Sa--0 &oo a rr. 3S-b/ 5 3Y-ph5 5 l.
S oo CY2) la5s 3'15c, aCl- 1 3b \8 05-5-0 ooo aIT. hrn l /3Ib. 35o Ib.
5 ;3 Ca)t>5 \g15bo 5X98 .S3b 9 o0-0-b gooo0 atT. Lorsban ? /6lb. Is(tolb.
.5cb6ieinS 3 ltao Lo ct"O \j WrynG. t bo a lo \___ ____nel /soib. \4II.
___ o 5 a) 40 occo bu___ seor alb. 1io lb.




S___________ _____In
___t o o_______________________________________ ocres of corn______





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It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce
it in any manner.


US MMARY OF CROP COSTS


FERTILIZER SEED_ CHEMICALS

Total Total Total
Analysis Quantity $/Unit Cost Mo. Variety Quantity $/Unit Cost Mo. Kind Quantity $/Unit Cost Mo.
8-a-o \o- $ $ I $ 19 t Re-. S~o'o L $ ?tp $ laq(, "b. M-r-zt'a- \l o \b. $ .-18 $ aq Har
o-4 -o ioT. 1-8 Lt-(o (c.t-. 7J5 6' a)3- g(P,4 o,0+n toyol. t-. to RSo "
o0-o-o loT. S 950 Ct-. 3(8 -04 6 1a "j -za(o1. 0 8(0 [l I
a-jo0-c 3 oT. ioo boo Scpt a9sn (L/ 18b 4 4141 c" tefAoa 3LP4At. pa.90 >o 4 oa
1(-3q-0 aT 1t5 310o 5eet. !59g C/P)9j -48 ;ILD Sevrcor t1o lb. 6. 5 i(og -
35-o-o T. k ae a- aIr- 8co--- 0b ,Co 'D-5o o 07 gp AKazt i'/)3: b-. 1-78 t.Q 13
8a-C-o YC),1tT U81( 0to( Apr. bt,- 8, 9 lo[(oe H-Y / 3o--to-v Y) S,0,a. 143.lo 550 0
0-Q5-0 )9 (T-. 1118 154 U->. coc-fi C'/aQ)>o6 q 445 Lornboea, f,)lg.o l. .-g -7gg3 k
o-o-too C')doT. 5 ct 8T 06) TY4py;l P.P.-o 48q 4





GAS, FUEL, OIL CUSTOM MACHINE HIRE LABOR HIRE
Total Total Total
Kind Quanity $/Unit Cost Mo. Job Quantity $/Unit Cost Mo. Job Quantity $/Unit Cost Mo.
$ $ to C=w. St-t LoTi 3.Po c$ too Oc a ,Ivn1e-Ii Loch 3 3.oo oo > 00 $1
,- Sj 8o 4Apr. plo-m 80 r .oo 3ao Oc-.
Sooo a-y o,..- 9Mhr. 4-.o 30 CO4-.


S-(oo J._____-__r


hk 80in,-_____7o .

(__ _0 VDs r _+.
'o 4 c> 6v,-
;3co > ,





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Copyright Law to reproduce
it in any manner.
BUDGET SHEET FOR LIVESTOCK


Beginning Inventory Purchases No. No. Sales Ending Inventory
Kind INo. Wt/Hd Value Mo. INo. Wt/Hd$/Unit Cost Raised Died IMo. No. Wt/Hd$/Unit Value No. Wt/Hd Value
Kind No. Wt/Hd Value_ Mo. No. Wt/Hd $/Unit Cost Raised Died Mo. No. Wt/Hd $/Unit Value No. Wt/Hd Value


FEEDER STOCK-LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY
I .. .r .


It ?(- 1t50 -Go0 ____I

n b 0 51 Iko
St- S aS S pl ______
Hk-+. ho5s oa 190 13,7 __1
tp H -7-1175
1s- g '58do
-308
900
'I


_1 eb c 4al^ 0' oa a8 150 S"1s2
o ___ ___ __ ^? c01 [1,1lf
I Feb. a8 -1oo 143 Gla" A S 1- 50 C-o8


0 iFeb aok 000 -.a \1iBeO5
I Ppr. )5) 3ao -45 15, 543
oa one- a a.o 45 \ __,t8
8 a. 8 ao ia iq 3o
9 Oc-I 5l1 a7 Q-4a -, 1948 19t, HIo BL-'t
A LDec. \189 ao 40 14,18 \q 40q 5880


BREEDING AND LAYING STOCK


$ I$


33115 K [(o (SOOD tNc I t 01 0 I soo
Jk.oL 8 a3 o 3zco,_ __ 9o_



ars 53 31o (c-_ 3 50 Soo qoo _0


(olo-115 $ Q5 ?aSo


0 )une- 1I 7oo ?P Lpta oP 150o 15do
o Apr. ;' 5 e 0 l 3 o qa-to

8 o 5T Po5(0
0 c+a 3 00 aCt 55 C
o o--(- 3 __ '10 3 350

4ei-Fr-5 30


q',o $ ll. 115


4FS I 1 aod ~4.~i~


(00 I tC0 I %),, C,











Beginning
Inventory
Quantity Value


This form is copyrighted.
It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce it
in any manner.


Produced


Purchases
Quantity $/Unit


Cost


C _L






': ,oo _

h o 5T 0to -r
I o u3t1 (DoT jM 3000


I. -- A -


I.


Livestock
Kind No.


Corn, bu.


LIVESTOCK FEED REI


yr I


Supplement


Hay, tons


Old


A N F T


New IOld


Tons


Silage, tons


Period
On Feed


Ccolye, 5gr .-l.n Lcoo _____ 365
C' 5, :a.-1D:. (,= aooS 5
c 5Loo .-3 oo "_____ 15


Bo(L5


33_____ i~co laoc_____


Developed by Thomas L. Frey and Danny A Klinefelter, Dept. of Agricultural Economics Cooperative Ext Service, University of Illinois 1980 AGRI FINANCE Available from Agr Finance, 5520-G Touhy Ave.. Skokie, IL 60077.


BUDGET SHEET FOR CROP USAGE AND FEED REQUIREMENTS


Ending
Inventory


Sales


Farm Use


Feed Seed Mo. Quantity $/Unit Value Quantity Value





oor 1aoT. 3S-40




N_ 550o by (.50 35, 15) ______ i_____


SoT.
oT. ..... ...
o::il-j ;k--co bu. -ciO Loc-0:n, C>





L:::::ii: lill:ii:i


QUIREMENTS


V I I-


I I I 1


New






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It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce it
in any manner.


CAPITAL EXPENDITURES AND REPAIRS


Purchases & Capital Repairs Operating Repairs

Number or Machinery Buildings and Machinery Buildings and
Description Quantity Month and Equipment Improvements and Equipment Improvements
Overokt- l T ,-.- or1 $ I $
T'aj,-t ko bu dWitinas I AuG _





BlI l (tZb w- 5000 e

____________"o+ i _________n 4o-0___sO Qo i~gao


Deoeilped by Thmas L. Fray and Danny A. Klineletter, Dept of Agricultural Economics. Cooperative Ext Service. University of Illinois. @1980 AGRI FINANCE Available rom Agn Finance. 5520-G Touhy Ave. Skokie. IL 60077.




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It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce it
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INTERMEDIATE AND LONG TERM LOAN PAYMENTS










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It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce it
in any manner.


FAMILY LIVING BUDGET
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec TOTAL
Food a s5 aaS s a a59s 5 a 5 1[50o aa~ Oa5 as oa n5 1o
Household operating expenses oo coo 55 65 45 -5 4~-t5 -1 55 S (o oo L,0o
Household equipment and furnishings -to "100l
House repairs _
Rent
Clothing 50 o 0 5 I21 100 ____c __
Personal 315 35 35 3S 3 3 55 35 35 35 3 55 31 0ao
Entertainment and recreation -io 40 40 o 0 o o 40 o qo 90 o -0 3o0 (I90 1150,
Education and reading materials__ ___ __ t5 35 __ _5
Medical care and drugs ,5 s aS aas Z oo 0 305 ,s a a 5 -.5 15
Church and charity 90 t9C o 90 90 o o o 90 I To q0 90 \\v0
Personal gifts 5e So 5o c n :o 5 o ILo .
Utilities (non-farm) n5 \\ 11t 115 LI5 lt I\5 \W15 \ \15 H15 (I _\:380
Transportation and auto (non-farm) )cx too I 1 00 loo ( o 100 (o I. loo o40o toA i390'0
Personal & recreational vehicle purchases
Medical and disability insurance 4coq 400 400Io Ll
Life insurance poo Roo lRO,

Additions to personal investments
Additions to retirement accounts [_5_
Gross Family Living Withdrawals t[ o 'tqc 15(o 113 8 ~5 8s0 \qco i'n k.La 1 180 o~4-0 ,8t1~
Developed by Thomas L Frey and Danny A. Klnefeler. Dept. of Agricultural Economics, Cooperative Ext Service. University of Illnois 1980 AGRI FINANCE Available from Agri Finance 5520-G Touhy Ave Skokie. IL 60077






This form is copyrighted.
It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce it
in any manner.


Item from Cash Flow Statement


1 Beginning cash balance

Operating Receipts:
2 Crops and feed
3 Livestock and poultry
4 Products: livestock and poultry
5 Custom work
6 Government payments and patronage dividends
7 Hedging account withdrawals
8

Capital Receipts:
9 Breeding sioci
10 Machnrerv and equipment
11
Non-Farm Income-
12 Oilliarm wages
13 Inleresi and dividend d,
14- 1
16 TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE iadd lines 1 thru 15

Operating Expenses:
17 LtbOr nired inC ludrjn employer ia3es)
18 Repairs mai:ninery and equipment
19 Repairs DUidinQs ,and improvemenli
20 Rents ano leases
21 Seed
22 Fertilizer and lime
23 Chemicals
24 Custom machine hire
25 Supplies
26 Livestock expense (breeding, vet., etc.)
27 Gas, fuel, oil
28 Storage and custom drying
29 Taxes (real estate and personal property)
30 Insurance (property, liability, crop)
31 Utilities (electricity, gas, telephone) [farm share]
32 Marketing and transportation expense
33 Auto (farm share)
34-35
36 Total Cash Operating Expenses


Month of:


Amount
Budgeted


Actual
Results


Variance
(+ or -)


Year-to-Date Totals


Amount
Budgeted


Actual Variance
Results I (+ or -)


MONITORING WORKSHEET






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It is a violation of the U.S.
Copyright Law to reproduce it
in any manner.
MONITORING WORKSHEET CONTINUED
Month of: Year-to-Date Totals
tem from Csh Fo ttmnt Amount Actual Variance Amount Actual Variance
Item from Cash Flow Statement
Budgeted Results (+ or -) Budgeted Results (+ or -)

Livestock and Feed Purchases:
37 Feeder livestock
38 Breeding livestock
39 Feed purchased

Capital Expenditures:
40 Machinery and equipment
41 Building and improvements
42

Other Expenditures:
43 Hedging account deposits
44 Gross family living withdrawals
45 Non-larm Dusiness and investments
46 Income lax and social security
47
48 Term loan payments principal
49 inleresl
50 TOTAL CASH REQUIRED (add lines 36 thru 49)
51 CASH AVAILABLE LESS CASH REQUIRED (16 501
52 Inflows Irom savings
53 Cash position Delore borrowing

Money to be borrowed
54 operating loans
intermediate and long term loans
55 Operating loan payments principal
56 interest
57 Outflows to savings
58 Ending cash balance

Loan Balances: (at end of period)
59 Current year's operating loans


60 Previous year's operating loans


61 Intermediate and long term loans
62 Total Loans








































































This publication was produced at a cost of $288.25, or 58.0 cents per copy to provide information about the
financial statements used in business. 12-500-89


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES, G.L.
Zachariah, director, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, publishes this information to further the purpose of the
May 8 and June 30, 1914 Acts of Congress: and is authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to
individuals and institutions that function without regard to race. color, sex, age, handicap or national origin Single copies of extension
publications (excluding 4-H and youth publications) are available free to Florida residents from county extension offices. Information on bulk
rates or copies for out-of-state purchasers is available from C M Hinton. Publications Distribution Center, IFAS Building 664, University of .-,-.
Florida, Gainesville. Florida 32611. Before publicizing this publication, editors should contact this address to determine availability.




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