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Group Title: Circular - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 328
Title: Using tropical ornamentals in garden rooms, enclosed patio and pool areas
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067108/00001
 Material Information
Title: Using tropical ornamentals in garden rooms, enclosed patio and pool areas
Series Title: Circular
Physical Description: 20 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Conover, Charles Albert, 1934-
University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1968
 Subjects
Subject: Plants, Ornamental   ( lcsh )
Landscape plants   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Charles A. Conover.
General Note: "June 1968."
Funding: Circular (Florida Agricultural Extension Service) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067108
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 51255645

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




CIRCULAR 328


al Ornamentals

len rooms,
patio


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE


CHARLES A. CONOVER
ASSISTANT ORNAMENTAL
HORTICULTURIST


JUNE 1968








Using Tropical Ornamentals in
Garden Rooms Enclosed Patio
and Pool Areas


Garden rooms and enclosed
patios and pools present special
planting problems since they
require incorporation of prin-
ciples of interior decoration and
landscape design. Such areas
need to be established with a
basic landscape planting from
which each homeowner can de-
velop a personal design. After
initial plantings are made, indi-
vidual taste may be expressed
through use of speciality plant
material or by use of interior
decorations.
Attractively planted or land-
scaped areas are the result of
careful planning and do not just
happen. During the initial plan-
ning period, decisions need to
be made regarding cost, main-
tenance level, and use require-
ment. Homeowners should re-
member that a good plan may be
ruined by poor execution or lack
of proper maintenance.
An example of one type of
basic planting for a garden room
is found in Figure 1, but similar
ideas can be used for enclosed
patios and pools. Information
on construction of a garden
room can be found in Extension
Circular (# 329) "A Florida
Garden Room Addition for Your
Home." Major traffic and sit-
ting areas need to be determined
and basic features located to


obtain best use within the en-
closed area. Paving or indoor-
outdoor carpeting is used in the
sitting area and on walkways
since grass will not survive in-
tense traffic occurring within
restricted areas. To conserve
space and reduce maintenance,
plantings are located in beds
around the perimeter.
Tall plants should be placed
in the background of beds to
provide a setting for more inter-
esting or exotic specimens and
to add permanence to the set-
ting. An architectural feature
such as a reflection pool, bird
cage, or statue may supply the
central feature or a specialty
plant of particular interest or
beauty may be used. If possible,
plantings should include season-
al flowering plants, specimen
plants of interesting shape or
foliage color, and plants with
fragrant flowers or foliage.
Plant growth inside garden
rooms, enclosed patios, and pool
areas is influenced by factors
such as light, temperature, soil,
watering, and fertilization. The
problems are different when con-
sidering growth outside or in
the home.
Soils used in planting beds
should be high in organic mat-
ter and free of insect, disease,
nematode, and weed pests and








should provide good drainage.
Therefore, proper preparation of
planting beds will aid consider-
ably in producing excellent plant
growth since many native Flor-
ida soils are infertile and un-
satisfactory for growing exotic
plants.
Remove all trash, cement, or
other building materials from
the planting area and check soil
pH before soil preparation is
begun (take a soil sample to
your County Agent's office for a
recommendation). Most Florida
soils are very sandy and need
to be amended with organic ma-
terials such as peat moss, com-
post, or leaf mold to improve
water and fertilizer holding ca-
pacities and to provide good
aeration and drainage. Peat
moss is one of the best materials
for this purpose and an addition
of 1 to 2 inches is recommended.
NOTE incorporation of 2
inches of peat to a 6-inch depth
will produce a soil with 25%
organic matter. The most desir-
able pH range for most tropical
ornamentals is from 5.5 to 6.5.
Soil pH can be adjusted by add-
ing dolomite or sulphur: to raise
pH one unit (from 5.0 to 6.0)
in a soil containing approxi-
mately 25% organic matter add
7 pounds of dolomite per 100 sq.
ft. and to lower pH one unit
(from 7.5 to 6.5) add 2 pounds
of sulphur per 100 square feet.
If soil must be acidified with
sulphur, do not incorporate more
than one pound per 100 square


feet at a time or more than
once every 6 weeks.
Light levels and quality in
enclosed garden areas are con-
trolled by type of covering, and
plant growth is affected by light
intensity and color of the panels
if a solid covering is used. En-
closure panels should be used
that reduce light intensity to a
level that will allow good plant
growth and aid in keeping the
area cool.
Research has sho w n that
plants grow best under translu-
cent white, yellow, or light
green plastic panels or screen-
ing, which also seems to show
flowering plants off to their
best advantage. Translucent
white is widely used by orchid
and foliage growers and has
proven satisfactory under Flor-
ida conditions. Clear plastic is
not recommended unless painted
with shade paint or used to pre-
vent condensation beneath the
translucent panel, since it al-
lows heat build-up and decreases
usefulness of enclosed areas.
Coverings should reduce sun-
light by 50 to 60 percent as this
level is satisfactory for growing
many tropical plants, including
orchids and bromelaids, and re-
duces heat build-up.
Temperature control is im-
portant in enclosed areas for
plant growth and homeowner
comfort. Provision needs to be
made for heating during cool
months to maintain a minimum
temperature of 40 degrees.








A POSSIBLE GARDEN ROOM PLANT LIST

(opposite page)


Symbol Common Name


Botanical Name


Pygmy Date Palm
Parlor Palm
Lady Palm

Schefflera
Fiddle-leaf Fig

Chenille Plant
Lipstick Vine
Shell Ginger
Anthurium
Aphelandra
Crossandra
Wax Plant
Spathiphyllum
Bird of Paradise
Pine Cone Ginger

Tree Fern
Maiden-hair Fern
Staghorn Fern
Pteris Fern

Pineapple
Bromeliad
Bromeliad

Cattleya Orchid
Nun Orchid
Moth Orchid

Caladium
Calathea
Grape Ivy
Croton
Ti
Dumbcane
Nerve Plant
Prayer Plant
Philodendron
Oyster Plant
Pothos


Phoenix roebelini
Chrysalidocarpus lutescens
Rhapis excelsa

Brassaia actinophylla
Ficus lyrata

Acalypha hispida
Aeschynanthus speciosus
Alpina speciosa.
Anthurium andraeanum
Aphelandra squarrosa
Crossandra infundibuliformis
Hoya carnosa
Spathiphyllum cannaefolium
Strelitzia reginae
Zingiber zerumbet

Alsophila australis
Adiantum cuneatum
Platycerium bifurcatum
Pteris ensiformis 'Victoriae'

Ananas comosus
Billbergia venezuelana
Aechmea chantinii

Cattleya spp.
Phaius grandifolius
Phlaenopsis spp.

Caladium bicolor
Calathea tricolor
Cissus rhombifolia
Codiaeum variegatum
Cordyline terminalis
Dieffenbachia exotica
Fittonia argyroneura
Maranta leuconeura
Philodendron oxycardium
Phoeo discolor
Scindapsus aureus








I










O- -
1

AO







Figure 1. Floor plan arrangement for a typical garden room. A.
Suspended Bird Cage, B. Pool and Cascade, C. Concrete Patio with
Pebble Finish, D. Sunken Seat and Table, E. Work Area Screen, F.
Potting and Storage Area, G. Screen and Pot Holder at Window.








Screen structures should be
covered with clear plastic to
contain heat in areas where low
temperatures occur. For best
plant growth a temperature of
65 degrees is desirable but nor-
mal room temperatures are sat-
isfactory. Heating may be
accomplished by leaving the
door open to the house, or by
using an auxiliary electric
heater or a vented oil or gas
heater. Non-vented oil or gas
heaters should not be used as
plant damage will result in en-
closed areas from vapors given
off during combustion.
Cooling of enclosed areas can
be a problem during warm
months, since heat build-up will
occur under most translucent
plastic coverings. Some provi-
sion should be made to ventilate
the room at its highest point to
allow excess heat to flow from
the room without causing dis-
comfort at living level. Addi-
tional side ventilation might
also be necessary during the
hottest summer months if arti-
ficial cooling is not used. Such
ventilation can be accomplished
by using removable panels, slid-
ing panels, awning windows, or
an exhaust fan. Areas enclosed
with screening usually do not
have heat build-up problems,
but screening restricts air move-
ment, and a fan may be neces-
sary to obtain air circulation.
Tropical plants normally grow
in areas where soil moisture and
humidity are high at all times.


Therefore, watering should be
frequent to keep soil moist but
not so wet that water can be
squeezed from the soil. High
humidity should be maintained
for tropical plants and is most
easily accomplished by sprink-
ling plants and walkways when
humidity is low. Automatic hu-
midifiers are also available from
greenhouse supply companies.
Fertilization of plants in close
proximity to living areas should
be handled differently than in
the rest of the landscape to pre-
vent objectionable odors that
may arise from some fertilizer
materials. Therefore, chemical
or liquid fertilizers are recom-
mended over organic types.
Maintaining tropical plantings
in good condition is not difficult,
and fertilizing four times a year
(winter, spring, summer and
fall) is adequate. The spring
fertilizer application should in-
clude minor elements, which can
be included in the fertilizer or
added separately. Applications
of fertilizer made at other sea-
sons need not include minor
elements unless foliage deficien-
cies are noted.
If chemical fertilizers are
used, apply 2 pounds of an 8-8-8
or 23/ pounds of a 6-6-6 per
100 square feet per application.
When liquid fertilizers are used
add one quart of an 8-8-8 or %
quart of a 10-10-10 to 11,i to
2 gallons of water and apply to
100 square feet of area. After
either type of fertilization thor-








oughly water in applied ferti-
lizers.
Selection of plant materials
for a garden room is important,
since space limitations must be
considered. The enclosed plant
list, however, does not exclude
those plants that may eventually
grow too large (indicated by *),
since many of these are useful
to create tropical effects not ob-
tainable with smaller plants. In
time, some plants may become
too large for use in a garden
room and can be removed. The
homeowner should look at this
problem as an encouragement,


to trying new and different
plant materials.
The following list of plants is
composed of tropical and sub-
tropical plant materials adapted
to growing under reduced light
conditions. Some of the same
plants may grow in full sun, but
they will be listed here if they
grow well under the 50 to 60
percent shade covering recom-
mended in this publication. This
list is not all-inclusive but in-
cludes many of the most at-
tractive and interesting tropical
plants available from nurseries
in Florida.








USE


BROMELIADS

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Bromeliad Green, reddish Variable, pri-
brown, maroon marily reds
and others and yellows
Pineapple Green or varie- Reddish
gated green
and yellow
Bromeliad Variable- Reds, pinks
reds, pinks and others
and others
Bromeliad Reds, greens, Inconspicuous
purples and
others
Bromeliad Green to red- Brightly colored
dish and bracts
variegated
Bromeliad Green, reddish Brightly colored(
and variegated bracts of dif-
forms ferent colors
Flaming Greens, red- Reds, yellows
Sword dish and and oranges
variegated


41



'2 Z
E=
2
.2,
K &4
**^


w
. a


6


Notes
Many species with widely varying
foliage and flower colors.

Many varieties of the edible pine-
apple are available; some are
dwarf.
Upright plants, many species and
varieties.

Low growing plants, many varie-
ties with different foliage colors.


Many species
available.


and varieties


Aechmea
spp.

Ananas
comosus

Billbergia
spp.

Cryptanthus
spp.

Guzmania
spp.

Neoreglia
spp.

Vricsia
Spp.


Many species and varieties.


Many species ani varieties with
different foliage and flower color
available.














FERNS


Scientific
Name
Adiantum spp.

Alsophila
australis
Asparagus
plumosus
Asparagus
sprengeri
Asplenium
nidus
Nephrolepis
exaltata
Platycerium
spp.
Polystichum
adiantiforme
Pteris spp.


Common Foliage Flower
Name Color Color


Maidenhair-
fern
Tree-fern

Plumosa-
fern
Asparagus-
fern
Birds-nest-
fern
Boston-fern

Staghorn-
fern
Leather-
leaf
Pteris fern


Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green

Green or varie-
gated green and
white


USE









2 3 4


0

cds
F1o
Ml,5




a6
6


Notes


x x x Many species and varieties avail-
able; leaf shape varies.
x x x Other tree ferns include Cyathea
dealbata and Dicksonia fibrosa.
x x Useful as a filler,very fine texture.

x x x Texture somewhat coarser
than plumosa-fern.
x x x Other species available.

x x x Many varieties available.

x x Spectacular plant, many good spe-
cies available.
x Grows well in heavy shade.

x x Many species available, fine
to medium texture.









USE


FLOWERING

PLANTS


Scientific Common Foliage
Name Name Color


Acalypha
hispida
Achimenes
spp.
o Aeschynanthus
speciosus
Alpinia
speciosa
Anthurium
spp.

Aphelandra
squarrosa
Costs
igneus

Crossandra
infundibuli-
formis


Chenille-
Plant
Achimenes

Lipstick
Vine


Green

Green

Green


Flower
Color
Red

Red, violet
and white
Orange


Shell Green or White and
Ginger variegated purple
Athurium Green and Primarily r
marked with orange and
white white
Aphelandra Green and Yellow
white variegated
Ginger Green Orange-red


Crossandra Green


Apricot


5 6 Notes

Sometimes called red-hot-cattail.

x Many species and hybrids
available.
x x Other species with scarlet flowers
available.
Use only in background-grows to
8 feet-other species available.
x Foliage very attractive.


x Flower is very showy.

Grows to 3 feet in height Costus
speciosus grows to 8 feet and has
white and yellow flowers.
Flower color varies slightly.


ed,













FLOWERING

PLANTS (Cont.)

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Episcia
spp.


Episcia


Hedychium Ginger-
coronarium Lily


Heliconia
spp.

Hoya
carnosa


Many colors Red, blue,
white & others


Green


Heliconia Green


Wax
Plant


Hylocereus Night-
undatus blooming
Cereus


Jacobinia
spp.


Green or gray,
some varie-
gated
Green


Jacobinia Green


Kaemphferia Peacock Green
roscoeana Plant


White

Bracts brightly
colored red,
yellow, etc.
White, pink
or purplish-
maroon
White


Red, yellow,
rose and
orange
Lavender,
pink


cu


2




2


USE




o o
u C


3 4


o






6


Notes
Striking foliage.

Foliage provides tropical effect.

Grow to 3 or 4 feet tall.


A number of species and varieties
available.

Vine-like, will cling to masonry
wall.

Different species and hybrids
available.

Low growing ginger-other
species available.








USE


FLOWERING

PLANTS (Cont.)

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Saintpaulia African
spp. Violet


Green, some
variegated


Gloxinia Green


Spathiphyllum Spathi-
spp. phyllum
Strelitzia Bird-of-
reginae Paradise
Tacca Devil-
chantrieri Flower
Zingiber Pine Cone
zerumbet Ginger


Green

Green


Green


White, red,
pink or
lavender
Many bright
colors
White

Orange and
blue
Black

Pale yellow


x x


5 6 Notes

x Grows best in pots.


x Colors include white, red, violet
and combinations.
Some species have fragrant
flowers.


Strelitzia nicolai is a species with
a white and blue flower.
A strange and interesting flower.

Grows to 2 feet in height-other
species available.


Sinningia
to speciosa








USE


FOLIAGE

PLANTS

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color'


Aglaonema Green and
white or cream
variegations
Alocasia Variable


Aspidistra Cast-iron Green or varie-


elatior


Begonia
spp.
Caladium
bicolor
Calathea
spp.
Cissus
spp.


plant


gated green and
white


Foliage or Many colors
Rex Begonia and variegated
Caladium Variable

Calathea or Green, Maroon,
Zebra plant others
Grape Ivy Variable


. '




2




F.,


Notes
Many different species, some
produce a red berry-like fruit.

Foliage colors of green, maroon
and others in various patterns.


Many species
foliage effect.


used primarily for


Over a hundred varieties with
different foliage colors exist.
Many species with different leaf
patterns and foliage colors.
Many species with different foliage
colors and shapes exist.


1 Although some foliage plants have noticeable flowers they are grown primarily for their foliage and therefore
flower information is omitted.


Aglaonema
spp.

I- Alocasia
S spp.














FOLIAGE

PLANTS (cont.)


Scientific Common Foliage
Name Name Color


Codiaeum
variegatum
Colocasia
esculenta
I--i
^ Columnea
spp.
Cordyline
terminalis
Crassula spp.

Cyanotis
kewensis
Dieffenbachia
spp.
Dizygotheca
kerchoveana
Dracaena
Rpp.


Croton

Elephant
Ear
Columnea

Ti

Jade-plant


Flower
Color


Variable

Green

Green

Green and
maroon
Green


Cyanotis Brownish
purple
Dumb Cane Variegated
green and cream
False-Aralia Bronze-
Purple
Dracaena Variable


2
2.


USE




S &C



3 4 5


-a
.5




6


Notes


Infinite number of foliage colors
and patterns available.


Species available with red,
orange or pink flowers.
Foliage colors primarily green
and maroon.
Many species and varieties
available.
Makes an excellent hanging
basket.
Many species with different leaf
patterns.


Dracacna godscfflana, and
). sandlfriana are some of
the best.













FOLIAGE

PLANTS (Cont.)

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Fatsia
japonica
Fittonia
S argyroneura
W Hoffmannia
spp.
Kalanchoe
spp.

Maranta
spp.
Monstera
deliciosa
Pandanas
utilis*

Peperomia
spp.


Fatsia

Nerve
plant
Hoffmannias


Green

Green, netted
white veins
Variable


Kalanchoe Variable


Prayer
plant
Monstera


Green, maroon
patterns
Green


Screw Green or varie-
Pine gated green
and white
Peperomia Variable


* Plants that will become too large as they mature.


USE


ga


2 3
23 4 S


-I 4-4-+-+-


Notes


Fittonia verschaffeltii is green
with red veins.
Foliage colors of green, bronze,
purple-red and others.
Many species available; foliage
mainly bluish green and may
be flecked with maroon.
Different species have different
foliage colors and combinations.
Sometimes called philodendron.

Mature specimens become quite
large.

Foliage colors of green, bronze,
white and others.













FOLIAGE

PLANTS (cont.)

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Philodendron
spp.


SPilea
spp.
Podocarpus
elongata*
Polyscias
spp.


Rhipsalis
spp.
Rhoco
discolor
Sarscvicria
spp.


Philodendron



Pilea

Fern
Podocarpus
Aralia



Mistletoe
cactus
Oyster-
plant
Snake
plant


Green or
shades of
maroon

Variable

Green

Green or
variegated
green and white
or cream
Green

Green and
maroon
Variable


* Plants that will become too large as they mature.


.S .


2


USE
I I


0

~I


6 a
6a
6


Notes


x x x x x x Upright and vining types available
-includes many species and some
hybrids. Leaf size and shape quite
variable.
x x x Pilea cadierei, the aluminum plant,
is one of the most popular species.
x x x Other species of podocarpus can be
used.
x x x A number of different species and
varieties available.


x x x Many different species available.

Some variegated varieties are
available.
x x Foliage colors of green, yellow,
white and shades in various
patterns.












FOLIAGE

PLANTS (cont.)

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Scindapsus
spp.
Strobilanthes
dyerianus
Syngonium
spp.


Pothos

Strobi-
lanthes
Nephthytis


Trevesia Trevesia
palmata
Xanthosoma Xanthosoma
lindenii
Yucca Spineless
elephantipes* Yucca
* Plants that will become too


Green and
cream or white
Purple

Variable


Green

Green and white
variegated
Green

large as they mature.


USE



Q- B
- .-
0>

2M 4
F| I~ E

2s 3
2 3 4


Co


g'
i,

a
6 '
6


Notes


Foliage has an irridescent effect.

Foliage colors of green, grey,
white and cream-mostly
variegated.


Some varieties also available.















ORCHIDS

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Cattleya
spp.

SDendrobium
spp.


Epidendrum
spp.


Cattleya
Orchid

Dendrobium
Orchid


Epidendrum
Orchid


Green



Green



Green


Lavender,
white and
yellows
Many differ-
ent colors


Many colors


Oncidium Dancing Green, some Yellow and
spp. Ladies reddish brown and
white and
brown


Moth
Orchid


Green


Brown with
lavender lip


Green, or White, pink
mottled vreen and some


USE






2 3 4-


0
6 1
0'





6


Notes


x x x Other colors available; height 18
to 24 inches.

x x x Some grow to 7 feet in height;
dwarf types are satisfactory for
wall plaques.
x x x x Flowers to several feet in height
with some reed types.
x x Flower spikes may reach 7 feet
in height.


x x Terrestial orchid, flower spikes to
3 feet in height.
x x x Plants to 6 inches in height and
flower spikes to 3 feet.


'huaius Nun
grandifolius Orchid


Phala c'opsis
8pp.














PALMS

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color

Chamaedorea Parlor Palm Green
elegans
Chrysalido- Madagascar Green
carpus Palm
lutescens*
Licuala Licuala Green
grandis* Palm
Phoenix Pygmy Date Green-gray
roebeleni Palm
Ptychosperma Seaforthia Green
elegans Palm
Ptychosperma Macarthur Green
macarthuri* Cluster Palm
Rhapis Lady Green
excels Palm

Plants that will become too large as they mature.


41






2


USE






0
o 4


3 4


0







6


Notes


x x x Chamaedorea erumpens is another
good dwarf palm.
x x x A good clump-forming palm, may
eventually grow too large.

x x x Attractive small palm when young,
may grow large with age.
x x x x Good dwarf palm.

x x x Small palm, but may grow large
with age.
x x x Good dwarf clump-growing palm.

x x x x Slender dwarf clump-growing
palm. Rhapis humilis, the Slender
lady palm, is also satisfactory.









USE


TREES

Scientific Common Foliage Flower
Name Name Color Color


Araucaria Norfolk-
excelsa* Island-Pine


Brassaia
S actinophylla'*

Ficus
elastic*


Ficus
lyrata*
Fortunlcla
spp.*


Green


Schefflera Green


Rubber-
Plant


Fiddle- leaf-
Fig


Variable




Green


Kumquat Green


0


6g
b->


e=

6


Notes


x x x Attractive tree; will eventually
grow too large
x x x Will out-grow garden room; rose
red flowers appear only on large,
older plants.
x x x Some varieties have variegated
green-white or green-yellow
foliage. New growth on some
is wine colored.
x x x Will grow too large with age.

x x x Many varieties, fruit production is
lowered by lower light level
indoors.


* Plants that will become too large as they mature.



(OOP(I''IATIVEI EXTENSION WORK IN AGR;ICI(IIITItIIli AND) IIOME ECONOMICS
(AcI ofi May H8 nd June 31), 1914)
Ajlr'IclltuI rl Extenllnlin \St'vic', IJIlv'ril. y of Florida,
ii I lnltld .Stnt.s ,I rii'n, nt oif Agirlc ll.ur.,' C(oop ratinllgI
M. 0. W\llkln, Directlor




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