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Group Title: Circular - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 329
Title: A Florida garden room addition for your home
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067107/00001
 Material Information
Title: A Florida garden room addition for your home
Series Title: Circular
Physical Description: 11 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Evans, Samuel F
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1968
 Subjects
Subject: Garden rooms   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Samuel F. Evans.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: June 1968."
Funding: Circular (University of Florida. Agricultural Experiment Station) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067107
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 51255655

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




CIRCL'LAR 329
JUNE 1968


OM ADDITION


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/ FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
-: OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE


SAMUEL F. EVANS
Assistant in Agricultural
Engineering









"A FLORIDA GARDEN ROOM ADDITION"
for Your Home

Samual F. Evans
Assistant in Agricultural Engineering


Introduction
The growing of subtropical plants outside in
central and northern Florida is frequently dis-
appointing since these plants may be injured by
cold. Too many times cool weather necessitates
covering tender plant material or relocating it in
the greenhouse during winter months. The in-
formation presented here is designed to help
tropical garden lovers construct their own shelter
and protect choice plants where they can be en-
joyed.
A typical Florida concrete block home was
chosen for development of this plan, but any
masonry or frame home with a rear yard towards
the south, southeast, or southwest of the house
is suitable. The Garden Room described can be
easily and economically maintained to give hours
of satisfaction to gardeners, since many tropical
plants, such as orchids, bromeliads, bougain-
villaea, papayas, bananas, palms, and others, can
be grown where they are protected from cold.

History
The garden close-at-hand has intrigued man
and occupied his energy for centuries. There the
family and friends can enjoy the fruit, flowers,
and ornamental plants not native to the locality.
From the Hanging Gardens of Babylon to the
elaborate Orangery at Versailles, France, ancient
rulers and wealthy merchants who had the in-
terest and resources to harness the environment,
have constructed and planted gardens of rare
herbs and plants from exotic lands. Today many
large civic centers, such as Mitchell Park in Mil-
waukee and the Botanical Gardens at Denver,
Colorado, contain horticultural conservatories.
Families in Florida have expressed much in-
terest in constructing an enclosed area to prevent
frost damage to favorite species of cold-tender
plant materials. This bulletin is designed to en-
courage such interest.

Architectural and Structural
Considerations
Homeowners must start with what they now
have, and a shelter attached to every home may


not be practical. The orientation and type of
roof application illustrated in this circular is
typical of most Florida homes; however, a roof
with extra gables or protrusions would necessitate
alteration of the structural system. An orienta-
tion on the south, southeast, or southwest is most
desirable, but not absolutely necessary. Sometimes
a detached greenhouse is the only reasonable solu-
tion for proper sunlight, soil drainage, and water
availability. There are many structural systems
available to span garden rooms. Steel joists are
easy to erect and economical; the aluminum box
beam has a finer finish and can be drilled and
mounted to aluminum or wood supports. Treated
Southern Pine and Western Cedar is used for
illustration in this bulletin because of low cost
and availability. Southern Pine is one of the
strongest soft woods and if treated for termites
is economical and attractive when left unpainted.
Western Cedar, although weaker in strength, has
been used with success by commercial plant
growers for greenhouse structures since it is rea-
sonably rot resistant.

Horticultural Considerations
In small self-contained garden areas, a good,
well-drained soil is of utmost necessity, and many
problems in plant growth can be alleviated by
proper preparation of planting beds.
Important factors to plant growth which must
be considered before building include light levels,
soil drainage, and water availability. Large trees
that might cast heavy shade on the Garden Room
should be removed, or a change to a different
covering should be considered. For areas under
constant shade from trees, a clear plastic panel
should be used instead of a translucent one, since
shade levels greater than 50 to 60 percent will
prevent proper growth of many of the more
desirable plants. Soils poorly drained must be
tilled deeply to aid drainage or be amended with
materials such as perlite or a calcined clay which
loosens the soil to aid water movement and aera-
tion. Later construction will prevent running
water lines, so they should be placed and faucets
installed before construction of building has
begun.








Drainage of terraces and planting beds should
be planned and carried out while preparing the
area. Terraces should be drained away from the
house. Water can be collected in one area and
carried to the outside through a drain or a
gravel-filled sump that will take off excess sur-
face water caused from overwatering. Planting
beds should be at least 4 inches higher than
terraces for proper drainage and weeding.
In an enclosed garden of this type provisions
should also be made for environmental control.
In the winter, some supplemental heat may be
necessary to maintain temperature, since opening
the house doors and windows to allow heat to
migrate to the Garden Room may not be suffi-
cient at times. On the other hand, in the summer
the room can he a heat trap. Even though the
plastic cover can screen up to 85 percent of the
sun's heat, proper ventilation is necessary and
should be provided. These specific items will be
discussed in more detail later.
The presentation of all ideas conceivable in
planning a Garden Room is impossible. There-
fore, only priority items will be considered. The
construction of a complete project will take con-
siderable time. So for easy explanation the
construction is divided into two parts, either of
which might be successfully completed on a week-
end. Some of the minor ideas described may be
used for other projects.
The plan and details illustrated in the supple-
ment should be studied carefully in order to
orient the total project in relation to its many
parts. As you read this bulletin you will begin
to see how these parts go together to make a
complete garden room. Throughout this bulletin
alternate solutions will be presented in order
to allow construction of lower cost structures that
are acceptable. Sometimes the tropical gardener
would rather devote his time and attention to
his plants, and a shelter which is inexpensive
is therefore more desirable.
Florida Plan No. 132 illustrated is an example
of a self-contained sheltered garden. The wall
posts and piers have been designed to comply
with all building codes in Florida.

Garden Room Walls and Foundations
First, the Garden Room should be laid out so
that accuracy of construction can be maintained.
This is done with batter boards. Figure No. 1
shows the batter boards set up at the corners
and squared with a carpenter's square. If one


rui ur BATT- BOARP AT Lco


side of the Garden Room is attached to the house
as illustrated in the supplement, the house wall
may be used instead of batter boards on that
side. Batter boards should be set at the same
elevation, as shown in Figure No. 2. The batter


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boards are used as a reference point to keep
the foundation and walls level. After batter
boards are secured in place a nylon line is ac-
curately positioned showing the outline of the
wall. This is done so that the lines can be removed
and replaced when necessary, especially when the
footing trench is dug.
Adequate footings are essential. A 16-inch
wide by 10-inch deep trench should be dug around
the perimeter of the Garden Room. This trench











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FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL B NL.
EXTENSION SERVICE F
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND 7/1 /
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES DRAWN BY
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA T 1;-,
AND USDA COOPERATING CHECKED
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NOTE--*
PATIO AND POOL IVALL FOLLOWS A GENTLE
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AT FOUNTAIN. ONCE FOOTING SL-OPE IS
.STABLI SHED IVALL CA'N S EAI SLY CONSTRUCTED


FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION SERVICE
INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
AND USDA COOPERATING

A FLORIDA
GARDEN ROOM ADDI7TON


JOB No. F.A,

DATE
/ 24-68
DRAWN BY
V/. E. R.
CHECKED BY
5.F. E.
7:2 .F

2 OF 2








should be kept level so that the final wall will
be true. It should be dug approximately 8 inches
deeper than the footing so the top will be below
the finished grade line. After the footing trench
has been dug, two 5/8-inch steel reinforcing rods
should be set in place. (See Figure No. 3.) The
5/8-inch steel rods should be held in place while
concrete is being poured, as shown in Figure
No. 4. Wire can be attached to the steel rods
and suspended from a board spanning the trench
as shown. A 3-inch space should be left between
the steel rods and the bottom of the trench for
good steel coverage and greatest strength.


f-r. 4


The trench should then be filled with 2500 psi
ready-mix concrete. Be sure the distance from
the top of the footing to the level-line is the
same all around the perimeter. This will assure
that the masonry wall will be level. After the
footing has set 24 hours, the wall is ready to
be laid.

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MoCK WALL






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Start laying block at corners moving towards
the middle. Be sure to place mortar the full
width on the footing. Use a corner block with
one flat end at the corner. The best building
block for this Garden Room is a two-cell, solid
end concrete block. Mortar should be placed only
on face of block for succeeding courses. Make
height of wall to fit concrete masonry unit. One
block and one horizontal joint equals 8 inches.


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"ii^ Pri F'ING[ I

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Build up corners using mason's level to keep
plumb end straight.
Stretch a line between corners to keep con-
crete blocks level. To make the job easier, a
1-inch by 2-inch board with saw marks 8 inches
apart helps to space courses at corners. Mortar
joints should be 3/8-inch thick. The concrete
block should be reasonably dry when laid in
the wall. (See Figure No. 7.)
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A reinforced precast concrete sill should be
placed in wall where openings will be left for
windows as shown in the plan and in Figure
No. 8. The piers which hold the roof beams and
the bracing wall on the end are continued up
to wall-plate height. These piers should have
a solid bottom lintel block filled with concrete
and 1/2-inch steel reinforcing rods to horizontally
strengthen the wall. (See Section BB of draw-
ings.)


A masonry wall tie such as Duro-wall should
be placed every second course for reinforcing.
These wall ties can be bought at the lumber.








yard or where the concrete block units were pur-
chased. Also, where each opening in the wall
occurs there should be vertical reinforcing on
either side. This is usually done by putting a
1/2-inch steel rod in the vertical cell and filling
the cell with concrete as shown in Figure No. 9.
See the floor plan for exact location of the wall
reinforcing.


Joints in the walls and piers are tooled after
mortar has become quite stiff. A rounded or
vee-shaped tool is run along joints to compact
mortar on the wall faces. The joints should be
tooled on both sides of wall to give a good finish
as shown in Figure No. 10. After the walls and
piers are in place and the window sills have been
set you can allow the project to dry until the
next weekend.


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from back fill which is tamped against a 2 x 8
held in place and removed before pouring con-
crete.
A 3/8-inch by 6-inch steel anchor bolt should
be installed at 6 feet on center around the wall
to tie down the plate. After the footing and
foundation wall have set for 7 days they will
be ready for the installation of the treated pine
2 x 4 plate.


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If the tropical gardner feels a less elaborate
structure is desirable, the masonry piers and
heavy beams may be replaced with a system
using wood posts. This type of structural system
can have a smaller running footing. A treated
2 x 4 pine plate is attached to the footing with
the 4x 4. posts attached to this plate. Then No.
14 galvanized insect screen is stapled over these
posts enclosing the Garden Room as shown in
Figure 11.
The footing can be formed on the outside from
the side of the trench and on the inside by stak-
ing a 1-inch by 8-inch form board with 1 x 4
stakes at 6 feet on center around the trench as
shown in Figure 12. The outside wall is formed


Garden Room Shelter
This is probably the most difficult project of
all in respect to time and materials. Prior to be-
ginning, scout the neighborhood for potential
helpers who can be contacted at critical points
in construction. The exterior walls and supports
are in place, due to the preceding project, and
the illustrated construction system has been found
to be simple, flexible, and easily adapted to most
existing homes.
The beams must be constructed so that there
is at least a 1:12 slope to the roof. This can be
calculated as shown in Figure No. 13. The height,
"w", of the beam above the home roof is de-
termined by the ventilation window height. A




















14. 1 .

ventilator window made from aluminum jalo
windows must fit the opening. A standard
inch-high window is used, and, including a
inch flashing curb at the house roof, the t
height used is 2 feet 10 inches. (See Sec
B-B of the drawings.) Therefore, the 1:12 s
determines the wall pier height (y). Also,
ease of construction, the shelter roof slope sh
be equal to that of the house roof as long a
is greater than 1:12.
To determine size and shape of beams r
to Table 1 for span and spacing. The maxin
span should be 18 feet. The gardener can de
mine what size beam to use by doing a ro
layout of plan. Then choose the beam from T;
1. We have chosen for the Garden Room il
treated two 2 x 12 and two 2 x 4 pine boards
a beam. These can be securely nailed toget
on the ground and then raised into place.
At the house roof, remove the shingles d
to the roof sheathing from the edge of the o'
hang to a point directly over the interior
of the house wall. Now attach a 2-inch by 6-i
pine plate to the sheathing directly above
house wall as shown in Figure No. 14. This p
will receive the beam when it is put into pl
Also, a 2-inch by 8-inch treated pine plate sho
be put on top of masonry wall piers and contain
around perimeter of wall to support beams.


usie
24-
10-
otal
tion
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for
would
s it

efer
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ter-
ugh
able


The two beams for this Garden Room can be
easily nailed together on the ground and lifted
into position. The two 2 x 12 timbers chosen
for this Garden Room should be nailed together
with sixteenpenny galvanized nails placed at 16
inches on center, 11/ inches from top and bottom.
The 4 x 4 post should be toe-nailed to the bottom
edge of the beam flush with the top end. The
bottom edge of the beam where it rests upon the
pier plate should be cut so it has a good flush
bearing. The whole assembly may be raised.
nailed into place, and braced. Then the 2 x 4
nailer strips should be nailed to either side, as
shown in Figure 15. Take care to allow 30 inches
to protrude beyond pier so that the outer purlins
can be nailed to them, completing the shelter
roof.





FZ"S -T:T-P .s- -
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epsTe. s ar


lus- After beams are in place, recheck spacing, nail
for to plate on shelter wall pier, place purlin between
;her each pair of beams at 24 inches on center and
temporarily nail them into place to stabilize the
own structural system at the proper centers. Figure
ver- No. 15 shows the beam with the purlins nailed
side into place. With beam firmly anchored to plates
nch with metal straps as shown on plans, temporary
the spacers can be removed. Then proceed to nail
late permanent purlins in place on proper centers
ace. (generally a maximum of 2 feet for most areas
)uld of Florida).
ued From this point on, it is just a matter of fin-
ishing. The recommended roof covering is an
8-foot x 2-foot polyvinyl 8-ounce translucent
white, yellow or light green corrugated panel.
To eliminate condensation drip a second layer of
plastic can be nailed to the bottom of purlins
for a ceiling. (See Figure No. 16.)
Make sure plastic has a non-discoloring addi-
tive that also retards penetration of ultraviolet
light. Instructions for attaching will, in all prob-
ability, be furnished. Generally, one galvanized
1%-inch fastener with a self-tapping screw at
6-inch intervals is sufficient to attach plastic to
purlins.
Wood or glass jalousies should be installed in






















the space between house roof and shelter cover
as shown in the drawings. These will provide
good air circulation and carry off excess heat.
(See Section 13-B of the drawings.)
Of primary importance is the replacing of the
roofing material at the joint between shelter
cover and house roof (Figure No. 14). Metal
flashing should be placed with a minimum rise
of 8 inches to take care of the temporary buildup
of water during a heavy rain. Lap the original
roofing over the flashing and carefully seal. Suffi-
cient care cannot be emphasized enough at this
point.
For the family with a low budget, the same
structural system may be used with the plastic
panel roof; however, No. 14 aluminum or plastic
screen can be used in place of windows as shown
in the illustrated structure. For most areas of
Florida, an insert can be made of 6 mil poly-
ethylene plastic, as shown in Figure No. 17, to
clip between supports for cold protection. An
existing screened porch also can be protected
this way and utilized as a garden room.
A plastic roof can be added to screened porches
which have only a screened cover if additional
supports are placed under beams and purlins.


The roof supports, which provide a better venti-
lation system, can be attached to the house as
shown in Figure No. 14. If the existing porch
roof screen is adequate and has at least a 1:12
roof pitch, the roof plastic can be attached to
purlins a maximum spacing of 2 feet on center
nailed to the existing roof supports.
If this more economical option is chosen, using
wood supports as shown in Figure 17, smaller
beams can be chosen from Table 1. For example:
if the 4 x 4 posts are 3 feet 4 inches apart the
beams chosen should rest directly over these
posts. (See Figure 12 for plate and foundation
details with construction description.) If we look
under spacing at 3 feet 4 inches we will find
that we can use a 2-inch by 10-inch or combi-
nation D in pine with a span of 14 feet. A 2-inch
by 8-inch pine beam would be too light since
the point of intersection lies above and to the
left of the curve.
The roof spans and spacing of existing struc-
tures may be checked by comparison with the
enclosed chart for span and spacing of roof sup-
port beams, also. This will assure you that your
garden room structure will meet building code
requirements.
To aid the homeowner in the proper choice of
plant material for his garden room, Extension
Service Circular 328, "Using Tropical Ornamen-
tals in Garden Rooms and Enclosed Patio and
Pool Areas," has been prepared with a compre-
hensive plant list. The list of plants is composed
of tropical and subtropical plant materials
adapted to growing under reduced light condi-
tions. This list is not all-inclusive, but it includes
many of the most attractive and interesting
tropical plants available from nurseries in Flor-
ida.

















0
0











g z
E "
o
Sl

s|? -
Oill



g' 0 *<
M "-
t^"t
o g 0

801




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C-o

0
aci
"yS


26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 II 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 I
SPAN


TABLE I.


CALCULATION OF BEAM AND

PURLIN SIZES


FEET




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