• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Historic note
 Front Cover
 Abstract
 Acknowledgements
 Contents
 List of Tables
 Main
 Reference
 Back Cover














Group Title: Circular - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 466
Title: Estimated costs to establish and maintain grasses and legumes in South Florida
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00067086/00001
 Material Information
Title: Estimated costs to establish and maintain grasses and legumes in South Florida
Series Title: Circular
Physical Description: 15 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Otte, John A
Mislevy, P ( Paul ), 1941-
Abbitt, Ben, 1940-
University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1979
 Subjects
Subject: Grasses -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Legumes -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Cattle -- Feeding and feeds -- Economic aspects -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Fertilizers -- Cost effectiveness   ( lcsh )
Turf management -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Sorghum as feed -- Statistics -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Pastures -- Economic aspects -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: J.A. Otte, P. Mislevy and B. Abbitt.
General Note: "7-3M-79"--P. 4 of cover.
Funding: Circular (Florida Cooperative Extension Service) ;
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00067086
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 51208854

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Abstract
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Acknowledgements
        Page 1
    Contents
        Page 1
    List of Tables
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Reference
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Page 29
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida




lOf



Estimated

Grasses


Circular 466



Costs to Establish and Maintain


and Legumes in South


J. A. Otte, P. Mislevy and B. Abbitt


JAN 04 1980


Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville
John T. Woeste, Dean for Extension


Florida












ESTIMATED COSTS TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN GRASSES
AND LEGUMES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
J. A. Otte, P Mislevy, and B. Abbitt *







ABSTRACT

Forages form the backbone of the cattle industry in Florida. Approximately 75% of the total feed requirements
for both beef and dairy cattle are met by forages. As forage lands become lost to recreation, roads, and as housing,
transportation and fuel costs increase, grower management practices are often intensified. The purpose of this
publication is to provide forage production costs which can guide commercial growers and ranchette operators
(small land holders) in establishing and maintaining improved forages in south Florida.
Costs are presented in a budget format for easy comprehension. All cultural practices (procedures involved in
the production of a crop) are listed in sequence of desired operation. The amounts of lime, fertilizer, seed, and
pesticides are commercially recommended rates (or best estimates of research and extension personnel). The
costs for cultural practices such as plowing, disking, spraying,and fertilizing are custom rate charges.






ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors sincerely appreciate all technical information, suggestions, and constructive criticism provided
by W. G. Blue, C. G. Chambliss, H. L. Chapman, Jr., D. W. Jones, R. S. Kalmbacher, E. M. Hodges and J. Holt.
Special thanks are expressed to Mrs. Jane Wilson for typing the final draft.
Cover illustration by Yaeko Duran.




CONTENTS


LIST OF TABLES.................................. .....................
INTRODUCTION .......................................................
OBJECTIVE .........................................................
PRO CED U R E ..........................................................


Page
. . . . .3
.. .. .. ........5
..............5
.. .. .. .. .. .. ..5


REFERENCES ......................................................................28





*J. A. OTTE is former Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, AREC-Bradenton, FL 33508. P. MISLEVY is Associate Professor and Associate
Agronomist (Pasture and Forage Crops), ARC-Ona, FL 33865. B. ABBITT is former Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, AREC-Lake Alfred,
FL 33850.























































































2












ESTIMATED COSTS TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN GRASSES
AND LEGUMES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
J. A. Otte, P Mislevy, and B. Abbitt *







ABSTRACT

Forages form the backbone of the cattle industry in Florida. Approximately 75% of the total feed requirements
for both beef and dairy cattle are met by forages. As forage lands become lost to recreation, roads, and as housing,
transportation and fuel costs increase, grower management practices are often intensified. The purpose of this
publication is to provide forage production costs which can guide commercial growers and ranchette operators
(small land holders) in establishing and maintaining improved forages in south Florida.
Costs are presented in a budget format for easy comprehension. All cultural practices (procedures involved in
the production of a crop) are listed in sequence of desired operation. The amounts of lime, fertilizer, seed, and
pesticides are commercially recommended rates (or best estimates of research and extension personnel). The
costs for cultural practices such as plowing, disking, spraying,and fertilizing are custom rate charges.






ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors sincerely appreciate all technical information, suggestions, and constructive criticism provided
by W. G. Blue, C. G. Chambliss, H. L. Chapman, Jr., D. W. Jones, R. S. Kalmbacher, E. M. Hodges and J. Holt.
Special thanks are expressed to Mrs. Jane Wilson for typing the final draft.
Cover illustration by Yaeko Duran.




CONTENTS


LIST OF TABLES.................................. .....................
INTRODUCTION .......................................................
OBJECTIVE .........................................................
PRO CED U R E ..........................................................


Page
. . . . .3
.. .. .. ........5
..............5
.. .. .. .. .. .. ..5


REFERENCES ......................................................................28





*J. A. OTTE is former Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, AREC-Bradenton, FL 33508. P. MISLEVY is Associate Professor and Associate
Agronomist (Pasture and Forage Crops), ARC-Ona, FL 33865. B. ABBITT is former Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, AREC-Lake Alfred,
FL 33850.












ESTIMATED COSTS TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN GRASSES
AND LEGUMES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
J. A. Otte, P Mislevy, and B. Abbitt *







ABSTRACT

Forages form the backbone of the cattle industry in Florida. Approximately 75% of the total feed requirements
for both beef and dairy cattle are met by forages. As forage lands become lost to recreation, roads, and as housing,
transportation and fuel costs increase, grower management practices are often intensified. The purpose of this
publication is to provide forage production costs which can guide commercial growers and ranchette operators
(small land holders) in establishing and maintaining improved forages in south Florida.
Costs are presented in a budget format for easy comprehension. All cultural practices (procedures involved in
the production of a crop) are listed in sequence of desired operation. The amounts of lime, fertilizer, seed, and
pesticides are commercially recommended rates (or best estimates of research and extension personnel). The
costs for cultural practices such as plowing, disking, spraying,and fertilizing are custom rate charges.






ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors sincerely appreciate all technical information, suggestions, and constructive criticism provided
by W. G. Blue, C. G. Chambliss, H. L. Chapman, Jr., D. W. Jones, R. S. Kalmbacher, E. M. Hodges and J. Holt.
Special thanks are expressed to Mrs. Jane Wilson for typing the final draft.
Cover illustration by Yaeko Duran.




CONTENTS


LIST OF TABLES.................................. .....................
INTRODUCTION .......................................................
OBJECTIVE .........................................................
PRO CED U R E ..........................................................


Page
. . . . .3
.. .. .. ........5
..............5
.. .. .. .. .. .. ..5


REFERENCES ......................................................................28





*J. A. OTTE is former Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, AREC-Bradenton, FL 33508. P. MISLEVY is Associate Professor and Associate
Agronomist (Pasture and Forage Crops), ARC-Ona, FL 33865. B. ABBITT is former Area Economist, Food and Resource Economics Department, University of Florida, AREC-Lake Alfred,
FL 33850.











LIST OF TABLES


Table
1 'Pensacola' bahiagrass establishment cost per acre on south Florida native flatwoods, 1979 ......... 7
2 'Pensacola' bahiagrass annual maintenance cost per acre on south Florida flatwoods, 1979 .......... 8
3 'Pensacola' bahiagrass establishment cost from previously established south Florida
flatwoods pasture, 1979 .......... ................................................... .. 9
4 Digitgrass, stargrass, improved bermudagrass orHemarthria establishment cost per acre on
south Florida flatw oods land, 1979 .......................................................... 10
5 Digitgrass orHemarthria annual maintenance cost per acre on south Florida flatwoods, 1979 ........ 11
6 Stargrass or improved Bermudagrass annual maintenance cost per acre on south Florida
flatwoods, 1979 . ..................... ....... ................................... 12
7 Digitgrass, stargrass, or other perennial grasses established by sprigging, renovation cost
on south Florida flatwoods, 1979 ............ ....................... ...................... 13
8 Aeschynomene overseeding cost per acre into perennial grass pastures on south Florida
flatwoods, 1979 .............................................. .....................
9 Alyce clover or hairy indigo overseeding cost per acre into perennial grass pasture on south
Florida flatw oods, 1979 ............................................................. 15
10 Aeschynomene establishment cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979 .............. 16
11 White or red clover overseeding cost per acre into perennial grass pasture on south
Florida flatwoods, 1979 ................ ................................................ 17
12 Ryegrass overseeding and growing cost per acre into perennial grass pasture on south
Florida flatwoods, 1979 .................. ................. ............................. 18
13 White or red clover establishment cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979 ......... 19
14 White or red clover seeded with ryegrass, establishment and growing cost per acre on
cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979 ................ .................................... 20
15 Ryegrass establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida
flatw oods, 1979 ............................................................................ 21
16 Oats, wheat or rye establishment and growing costs per acre on cultivated south Florida
flatwoods, 1979 ................... ....... ..................................... 22
17 Corn forage establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida
flatwoods, 1979 ...................................................................... 23
18 Pearl millet establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida
flatwoods, 1979 .............. .............. ..................................... 24
19 Forage sorghum establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida
flatwoods, 1979 ........................ .................................... .. ........ 25
20 Grain sorghum establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida
flatw oods, 1979 ................... ................................... .......... 26
21 Sorghum x sudangrass hybrid establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south
Florida flatw oods, 1979 .. ............................................................ 27



















































































4









Introduction
Ranchers and dairymen in Florida annually grow
3.0 to 3.5 million acres of forage crops. Historically,
pasture has supported the livestock industry since
the first cattle were introduced into Florida more
than 400 years ago [2]. Many improved pastures are
established on land cleared and planted to vegeta-
bles, while others are established on land cleared spe-
cifically for forages. Renovation of improved pastures
that have reverted from desirable planted species to
common bermudagrass (weed) is a continual process.
Improved forages used in south Florida for beef pro-
duction fall into 4 major groups. They are:
1. Perennial grasses: Bahiagrass, digitgrass, He-
marthria, stargrasses, improved bermuda-
grasses.
2. Annual grasses: Ryegrass, small grains, corn,
sorghum, millet, sorghum x sudangrass hy-
brids.
3. Warm season annual legumes: Aeschynomene,
hairy indigo, alyce clover.
4. Cool season legumes: Red clover, white clover.
Approximately 90% of south Florida's improved
forages are harvested by grazing. The remaining
325,000 acres are harvested as hay, silage, or green
chop.



Objective
Little information is presently available regarding
establishment costs and maintenance costs of south
Florida forage crops. The objective of this circular is
to provide forage production costs which can guide
commercial growers and ranchette operators in es-
tablishing and maintaining improved forages in south
Florida.


Procedure
All production costs and cultural practices are listed
in the normal order of performance. Lime, fertilizer,
seed and herbicide rates, in addition to production
practices presented in this circular, are the best esti-
mates of University of Florida research and exten-
sion personnel associated with forage production.
Fertilizer formulations are suggestions and may vary
provided the total amount of nutrients is supplied.
Soil should be tested annually or prior to growing
specific crops to help determine need for fertilizer and
lime. Soil testing is especially important if field or
forage crops follow vegetables, because additional lime
or fertilizer may not be necessary.


Once production practices for each forage are iden-
tified, budgets are easily built by assigning costs to
each practice. A budget itemizes production prac-
tices, material, and equipment costs needed to carry
out those practices. For example, once quantity of fer-
tilizer needed per acre is determined, fertilizer cost is
calculated by multiplying quantity times fertilizer
price and adding a spreading charge.
Total costs divided by expected yield gives cost per
ton to produce each forage. However, no attempt has
been made to estimate expected yields since this will
vary greatly with fertilization, moisture, soil type,
temperature, and management practices involved.
Comparing production costs for various forages does
give relative costs. However, caution must be used
when comparing relative costs since all forages do not
have equal quality content per ton.
All machinery costs are based on custom rates.
Growers who own their equipment will incur varia-
ble, or cash costs (fuel, oil, labor, etc.) and fixed, non-
cash and cash costs (depreciation, interest, taxes, in-
surance). They may incur less costs by using their
own equipment.
Irrigation costs are based on Florida agricultural
engineering studies [1]. Cultural practices may vary
with the type of irrigation system. Some of the budg-
ets include costs for one type of irrigation system
when another type may actually be used. Costs from
records or for other irrigation systems should be sub-
stituted where needed.
Irrigation costs are shown for some forages which
may be established without irrigation.
Annual interest costs are calculated by totaling the
cash costs per acre and multiplying by a 9.0% interest
rate. This interest rate represents the approximate
current rate charged by agricultural lending insti-
tutions for short-term operating loans. Interest costs
for those forages that require six months of operating
capital are derived by multiplying cash operating
costs by 4.5%, one-half the annual 9.0% rate. Interest
costs are then added to cash operating costs to obtain
total cash costs.
A constant annual land cost of $25 per acre per year
is used. This cost can be considered as a cash rent for
annuals. It can also represent the land owner's oppor-
tunity costs of land investment for perennials. Op-
portunity cost is the amount of income sacrificed, in
this case $25, by using the money invested in land for
producing forage rather than the next best use for the
money. The next best use would be that investment
the producer feels would return him the next highest
income. Therefore, the $25 land cost represents the
return the grower could have obtained had the land
been planted to crops other than forages and leg-
umes. Land costs are added to total cash costs to de-
rive total costs.








The $25 per acre land cost does not necessarily ap-
ply to all crops. In some instances, two crops can be
grown in one year on the same land. For example, a
cool season annual grass, such as ryegrass, can be
planted in the winter. The same land can be planted
to a warm season crop, such as Aeschynomene, in the
summer. In this instance, a $12.50 per acre land cost
would be applied to each crop. If only the cool season
crop was grown (as assumed in this circular) the land
cost would have been $25.00 per acre.
When cool season annuals, such as ryegrass, are
overseeded into perennial grasses, the full $25.00 per
acre land cost is charged to the perennial grass and
no land charge is made against the annuals. The logic
is that the perennial pasture has no other alternative
agricultural use when the perennial grass is not
growing.
Estimated annual costs for maintaining and grow-
ing forages in south Florida are shown in Tables 1-21.


Since costs change and production practices and con-
ditions vary, each grower may adjust cultural prac-
tices, application rates, and costs to represent his
operation. However, caution should be exercised when
drastically changing the above variables since they
have functioned successfully under research and
commercial conditions.
Growers interested in specific forages or legumes
should consult the list of tables to find the forage or
legume of interest.'




'The use of trade names in this publication is solely
for the purpose of providing specific information. It is
not a guarantee or warranty of the products named
and does not signify that they are approved to the ex-
clusion of others of suitable composition.













Table 1. 'Pensacola' bahiagrass establishment cost per acre on south Florida native flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
---------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Stump removal custom bulldozers Acre 1 50.00 50.00
Roto-tilling custom Acre 1 30.00 30.00
Dolomite cost spread Ton 1 17.00 17.00
Pensacola bahia seed Lb. 20 1.00 20.00
Seeding custom Acre 1 2.25 2.25
Disk lightly & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
15-15-15 Cwt. 3 6.40 19.20
FTE 503 (micronutrients)e Lb. 20 0.21 4.20
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Interest $ 148.65 0.09 13.38
Total Cash costs 162.03
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total first year establishment cost 187.03
aCost may vary depending on the number of stumps and other physical factors.
bSimilar tillage may be achieved through the use of a moldboard plow or several diskings.
cAdjust seed cost if using 'Argentine' or 'Paraguay 22' bahiagrass.
dOne application following seedling emergence.
eContains the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%; molybdenum, 0.2%.
















Table 2. 'Pensacola' bahiagrass annual maintenance cost per acre on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years Ton 17.00 4.25
Fertilizer
16-8-8, March Cwt. 3 5.50 16.50
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
16-8-8, mid-September Cwt. 3 5.50 16.50
oo FTE 503 (micronutrients)b Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Interest $ 42.09 0.09 3.79
Total cash costs 45.88
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total annual maintenance cost 70.88
aCost spread.
b20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.












Table 3. 'Pensacola' bahiagrass establishment cost from previously established south Florida flatwoods pasture, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Graze to ground
Plow custom Acre 1 7.50 7.50
Dolomite cost spread Ton 1 17.00 17.00
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Pensacola seed Lb. 20 1.00 20.00
Seeding custom Acre 1 2.25 2.25
Disk lightly & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
16-8-8 Cwt. 3 5.50 16.50
FTE 503 (micronutrients)c Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Rotary mow customd Acre 1 3.50 3.50
Interest $ 76.84 0.09 6.92
Total cash costs 83.76
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total renovation cost 108.76
aSimilar tillage may be achieved by rotavating or proper disking.
bAdjust seed cost if using 'Argentine' or 'Paraguay 22' bahiagrass.
C20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
dThis can also be accomplished by light grazing.











Table 4. Digitgrass, stargrass, improved bermudagrass orHemarthria establishment cost per acre on south Florida flatwoods land, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Stump custom bulldozers Acre 1 50.00 50.00
Roto-tilling custom Acre 1 30.00 30.00
Dolomite cost spread Ton 1 17.00 17.00
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Sprig custom Acre 1 35.00 35.00
Fertilizer
15-15-15 Cwt. 3 6.40 19.20
FTE 503 (micronutrients)e Lb. 20 0.21 4.20
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Herbicides
02,4-D' and Lb. 3 3.65 2.74
(active)
Dicamba Lb. /4 8.85 2.21.
(active)
Interest $ 165.60 0.09 14.90
Total cash costs 180.50
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
Ill. Total establishment cost 205.50
aCost may vary depending on number of stumps and other physical factors.
bSimilar tillage may be achieved through the use of a moldboard plow or several diskings.
SIncludes cutting and baling sprigs from nursery, cost to grow or purchase sprigs not included.
dOne application when grass is 2 inches tall, and follow maintenance recommendation after September.
eContains the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%; molybdenum, 0.2%.
'Do not use 2,4-D on Hemarthria, use 1 Ib. active Dicamba.












Table 5. Digitgrass or Hemarthria annual maintenance cost per acre on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years a Ton 17.00 4.25
Fertilizer
16-8-8, March Cwt. 3 5.50 16.50
FTE 503 (micronutrients)c Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Ammonium nitrate, June Cwt. 2 7.30 14.60
S Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
16-8-8, mid-September Cwt. 3 5.50 16.50
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Interest $ 58.69 0.09 5.28
Total cash costs 63.97
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total annual maintenance cost 88.97
aCost spread.
b Fertilization rates and dates may need to be adjusted according to moisture conditions and if forage is harvested. Do not apply fertilizer if saturated
soil conditions exist. Increase fertilizer rates by 1 to 2 hundred pounds/A if forage isto be harvested.
C20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.














Table 6. Stargrass or improved Bermudagrass annual maintenance cost per acre on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years Ton 17.00 4.25
Fertilizer
16-8-8, March Cwt. 4 5.50 22.00
FTE 503 (micronutrients)c Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Ammonium nitrate, June Cwt. 2 7.30 14.60
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
16-8-8, mid-September Cwt. 4 5.50 22.00
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Interest $ 69.69 0.09 6.27
Total cash costs 75.96
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total annual maintenance cost 100.96
aCost spread.
bFertilization rates and dates may need to be adjusted according to moisture conditions and if forage is harvested. Do not apply fertilizer if satu rated
soil conditions exist. Increase fertilizer rates by 1 to 2 hundred pounds/A if forage is to be harvested.
C20 lbs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.









Table 7. Digitgrass, st&rgrass, or other perennial grasses established by sprigging, renovation cost on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Graze to ground, suppress existing sod, dalapon Lb. 7 1.40 9.80
Custom spray Acre 1 3.00 3.00
Plow-custom Acre 1 7.50 7.50
Dolomite-cost spread Ton 1 17.00 17.00
Disk Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Spriga Acre 1 35.00 35.00
Herbicides
2,4-Db and Lb. / 3.65 2.74
(active)
Dicamba Lb. 4 8.85 2.21
. (active)
Custom spray Acre 1 3.00 3.00
Fertilizer
16-8-8 Cwt. 3 5.50 16.50
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Interest $ 102.84 0.09 9.26
Total fixed costs 112.10
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
lil. Total renovation cost 137.10
SIncludes cutting and baling sprigs from nursery, cost to grow or purchase sprigs not included.
bDo not use 2,4-D onHemarthria, use 1 lb. active Dicamba when grass plants are well established.
cOne application when grass is 2 inches tall, and follow maintenance recommendation after September.
d20 Ibs applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.











Table 8. Aeschynomene overseeding cost per acre into perennial grass pastures on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Naked seed Seed in hull
Aeschynomene Aeschynomene
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A
---------------------------Dollars ------------------------
I. Cash costs
Graze grass to 2 in. b
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years Ton 1/4 17.00 4.25 4.25
Naked Aeschynomene seed Lb. 5 0.85 4.25 N/A
Aeschynomene seed in hull Lb. 30 0.40 N/A 12.00
Inoculation $3/cwt. of seed 0.15 0.90
Custom seeding Acre 1 2.25 2.25 2.25
Disk & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
0-10-20 Cwt.. 3 4.85 14.55 14.55
FTE 503 (micronutrients)e Lb. 4 0.21 0.84 0.84
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 30.29 0.045 1.36 N/A
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 38.79 0.045 N/A 1.75
Total cash costs 31.65 40.54
II. Fixed costs
Land land costs charged to grass
III. Total cost 31.65 40.54
aDo not use naked seed unless adequate moisture is consistently available for 30 days.
b Keep cattle on grass for two weeks after Aeschynomene emergence or untilAeschynomene seedlings are 11/2 inches tall.
cCost spread. If dolomite has been applied to grass every 4 years, additional dolomite is not required for grass-Aeschynomene combination.
dWhen Aeschynomene is 4 to 6 inches tall.
e20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.











Table 9. Alyce clover or hairy indigo overseeding cost per acre into perennial grass pasture on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Alyce clover Hairy indigo
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A
---------------------------Dollars--------------


I. Cash costs
Graze grass to grounda
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years b
Alyce clover seed
Hairy indigo seed
Inoculation
Custom seeding
Disc & cultipack custom
Fertilizer"
01 0-10-20
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d
Custom apply
Interest 9% for 6 months
Interest 9% for 6 months
Total cash costs
II. Fixed costs
Land
II. Total cost


Ton 1
Lb. 10
Lb. 12
$3/cwt. of seed
Acre 1
Acre 1


Cwt.
Lb.
Acre
$
$


3
4
1
31.19
33.29


land costs charged to grass


aKeep animals on grass for two weeks after legume emergence or until legume seedlings are 1 /2 inches tall.
bCost spread. If dolomite has been applied to grass every 4 years, additional dolomite is not required for grass-legume combinations.
cWhen legume plants are 4 to 6 inches tall.
d20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%,
molybdenum, 0.2%.


17.00
0.30
0.42

2.25
4.00

4.85
0.21
2.00
0.045
0.045


4.25
3.00
N/A
0.30
2.25
4.00

14.55
0.84
2.00
1.40
N/A
32.59


32.59


4.25
N/A
5.04
0.36
2.25
4.00

14.55
0.84
2.00
N/A
1.50
34.79


34.79











Table 10. Aeschynomene establishment cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Naked seed Seed in hull
Aeschynomene Aeschynomene
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A
---------------------------Dollars----------------------
I. Cash costs
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years Ton /4 17.00 4.25 4.25
Heavy disk custom Acre 1 6.00 6.00 6.00
NakedAeschynomene seed Lb. 5 0.85 4.25 N/A
Aeschynomene seed in hull Lb. 30 0.40 N/A 12.00
Inoculation $3/cwt. of seed 0.15 0.90
Custom seed Acre 1 2.25 2.25 2.25
Disk lightly & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00 4.00
S Fertilizer
S0-10-20d Cwt. 3 4.85 14.55 14.55
FTE 503 (micronutrients)e Lb. 4 0.21 0.84 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00 2.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 38.29 0.045 1.72 N/A
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 46.79 0.045 N/A 2.11
Total cash costs 40.01 48.90
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00 25.00
III. Total Cost 65.01 73.90
aDo not use naked seed unless adequate moisture is consistently available for 30 days.
bCost spread.
eOr an equivalent tillage method.
dWhen plants 4-6 inches tall.
e20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.










Table 11. White or red clover overseeding cost per acre into perennial grass pasture on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

White clover Red clover
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A
---------------------------Dollars----------------------
I. Cash costs
Graze grass to 2 inches
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years Ton 1/3 17.00 5.67 5.67
White clover seed Lb. 4 2.50 10.00 N/A
Red clover seed Lb. 7 1.50 N/A 10.50
Inoculation $3/cwt. of seed 0.12 0.21
Custom seeding Acre 1 2.25 2.25 2.25
Disk & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
0-10-20 Cwt. 5 4.85 24.25 24.25
FTE 503 (micronutrients)b Lb. 7 0.21 1.47 1.47
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepagec Acre 1 15.00 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 64.76 0.045 2.91 N/A
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 65.35 0.045 N/A 2.94
Total cash costs 67.67 68.29
II. Fixed costs
Land land costs charged to grass
III. Total overseed cost 67.67 68.29
aCost spread. Apply lime to maintain 1500 lb. calcium oxide/acre.
b If micronutrients have been applied within the last year, apply 7 Ibs./A. If no micronutrients have been applied during the last year, apply 20 Ibs./A.
Contains the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%; molybdenum, 0.2%.
cSource: Harrison [1].









Table 12. Ryegrass overseeding and growing cost per acre into perennial grass pasture on south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Graze grass to 2 inches
Ryegrass seed Lb. 20 0.20 4.00
Custom seeding Acre 1 2.25 2.25
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years Ton 17.00 4.25
Disk & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
10-10-20b Cwt. 5 5.15 25.75
FTE 503 (micronutrients)c Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitrated Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
00 Am. Nitratee Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitrate' Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 90.37 0.045 4.07
Total cash costs 94.44
II. Fixed costs
Land land costs charged to grass
Ill. Total cost 94.44
aCost spread.
bApply after seedling emergence.
C20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
dApply 30 days after first fertilizer application.
eApply after first grazing, omit if grass is dark green.
'Apply after second grazing, omit if grass is dark green.










Table 13. White or red clover establishment cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

White clover Red clover
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A
---------------------------Dollars----------------------


I. Cash costs
Heavy disk custom
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years b
Disk custom
White clover seed
Red clover seed
Inoculation
Custom seeding
Cultipack custom
Fertilizer
0-10-20C
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d
Custom apply
Irrigation, seepage
Interest 9% for 6 months
Interest 9% for 6 months
Total cash costs
II. Fixed costs
Land
III. Total cost


Acre 1
Ton 1/3
Acre 1
Lb. 4
Lb. 8
$3/cwt. of seed
Acre 1
Acre 1


Cwt.
Lb.
Acre
Acre
$
$


Acre


5
7
1
1
73.01
75.13


aOran equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread. Apply lime to maintain 1500 lb. calcium oxide/A.
cOne application at seeding, adjust lime and fertilizer rates if following vegetables.
d If micronutrients have been applied within the last year, apply 7 Ibs./A. If no micronutrients have been applied during the last year, apply 20 Ibs./A.
Contains the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%; molybdenum, 0.2%.


6.00
17.00
3.25
2.50
1.50

2.25
3.00

4.85
0.21
2.00
15.00
0.045
0.045


25.00


6.00
5.67
3.25
10.00
N/A
0.12
2.25
3.00

24.25
1.47
2.00
15.00
3.29
N/A
76.30

25.00
101.30


6.00
5.67
3.25
N/A
12.00
0.24
2.25
3.00

24.25
1.47
2.00
15.00
N/A
3.38
78.51

25.00
103.51








Table 14. White or red clover seeded with ryegrass, establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

White clover Red clover
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A
---------------------------Dollars---------------


I. Cash costs
Heavy disk custom
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years
Ryegrass seed c
Custom seeding d
White clover seed
Red clover seed
Inoculation
Custom seeding
Disk & cultipack custom
Fertilizer
10-10-20e
FTE 503 (micronutrients)f
Custom apply
Am. Nitrateg
Custom apply
Irrigation, seepage
Interest 9% for 6 months
Interest 9% for 6 months
Total cash costs
II. Fixed costs
Land
III. Total cost


Acre 1
Ton 1/3
Lb. 10
Acre 1
Lb. 4
Lb. 8
$3/cwt. of seed
Acre 1
Acre 1


Cwt.
Lb.
Acre
Cwt.
Acre
Acre
$
$


Acre


5
7
1
1.2
1
1
87.27
89.39


1


6.00
17.00
0.20
2.25
2.50
1.50

2.25
4.00

5.15
0.21
2.00
7.30
2.00
15.00
0.045
0.045


25.00


6.00
5.67
2.00
2.25
10.00
N/A
0.12
2.25
4.00

25.75
1.47
2.00
8.76
2.00
15.00
3.93
N/A
91.20

25.00
116.20


6.00
5.67
2.00
2.25
N/A
12.00
0.24
2.25
4.00

25.75
1.47
2.00
8.76
2.00
15.00
N/A
4.02
93.41

25.00
118.41


aOran equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread. Apply lime to maintain pH 5.7 or higher.
c If seeding with wheat, use 1 bu. at $7/bu., if seeding with rye, use 1 bu. at $7/bu., if seeding with oats, use 1.5 bu. at $3/bu.
dThis custom seeding can be omitted if seeding is done with a grain drill, which will seed small grains and clover simultaneously.
eAfter seedling emergence. Adjust lime and fertilizer rates if following vegetables.
'If micronutrients have been applied within the last year, apply 7 Ib./A. If no micronutrients have been applied during the last year, apply 20 Ibs./A.
Contains the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%; molybdenum, 0.2%.
g After first harvest.







Table 15. Ryegrass establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A

----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Heavy disk custom Acre 1 6.00 6.00
Dolomite, 1 ton every years Ton 17.00 4.25
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Ryegrass seed Lb. 20 0.20 4.00
Custom seeding Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Disk + cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
10-10-20c Cwt. 5 5.15 25.75
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d Lb. 4 0.21 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Ammonium Nitratee Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Ammonium Nitrate' Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Ammonium Nitrateg Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 99.37 0.045 4.47
Total cash costs 103.84
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total cost 128.84
aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
cWhen plants are 2 inches tall. Adjust lime and fertilizer rates if following vegetables.
d20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
eAfter first grazing.
fAfter second grazing, omit if grass is dark green.
gAfter third grazing, omit if grass is dark green.







Table 16. Oats, wheat, or rye establishment and growing costs per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Oats Wheat Rye
Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A Cost/A Cost/A
--------------------------Dollars---------------------
I. Cash costs
Heavy disk custom Acre 1 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00
Dolomite, 1 ton every 4 years Ton 1/4 17.00 4.25 4.25 4.25
Oats seed Bu. 2.5 3.00 7.50 N/A N/A
Wheat seed Bu. 2 7.00 N/A 14.00 N/A
Rye seed Bu. 2 7.00 N/A N/A 14.00
Custom seedling Acre 1 2.25 2.25 2.25 2.25
Disk & cultipack custom Acre 1 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00
Fertilizer
10-10-20c Cwt. 5 5.15 25.75 25.75 25.75
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d Lb. 4 0.21 0.84 0.84 0.84
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitratee Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76 8.76 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitrate' Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76 8.76 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitrate Cwt. 1.2 7.30 8.76 8.76 8.76
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 99.87 0.045 4.49 N/A N/A
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 106.37 0.045 N/A 4.79 N/A
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 106.37 0.045 N/A N/A 4.79
Total cash costs 104.36 111.16 111.16
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00 25.00 25.00
III. Total cost 129.36 136.16 136.16
aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
cPlants 2 inches tall.
d 20 Ibs. applied every 5 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper,
3.0%; molybdenum, 0.2%.
eAfter first grazing.
'After second grazing, omit if plants are dark green.
gAfter third grazing, omit if plants are dark green.




Table 17. Corn forage establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Plow custom Acre 1 7.50 7.50
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years b Ton 1/3 17.00 5.67
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Seed Unitc /3 50.00 16.67
Mesurol Lb. 1/6 8.00 1.33
Furidan 10 G Lb. 20 0.64 12.80
Custom seeding Acre 1 6.00 6.00
AAtrex Lb. 2 3.65 7.30
(active)
Lasso Lb. 2 3.58 7.16
(active)
Custom spray Acre 1 3.00 3.00
Fertilizer
5-10-20 Cwt. 10 5.00 50.00
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d Lb. 7 0.21 1.47
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitratee Cwt. 3 7.30 21.90
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitrate' Cwt. 3 7.30 21.90
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 186.95 0.045 8.41
Total cash costs 195.36
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total cost 220.36
aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
c1 unit = 80,000 seeds.
d 21 Ibs. applied every 3 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
eWhen plants are 10 inches tall.
'When plants are 25 inches tall.











Table 18. Pearl millet establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Plow custom Acre 1 7.50 7.50
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years Ton 1/3 17.50 5.67
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Furidan 10 G Lb. 20 0.64 12.80
Seed Lb. 10 0.50 5.00
Custom seeding Acre 1 6.00 6.00
Fertilizer
5-10-20c Cwt. 8 5.00 40.00
FTE 503 micronutrientss) d Lb. 7 0.21 1.47
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitratee Cwt. 1.5 7.30 10.95
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 111.64 0.045 5.02
Total cash costs 116.66
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Totalcost 141.66
aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
cAt seeding.
d21 lb. applied every 3 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
eWhen plants are 10 inches tall. If additional harvests are planned apply 150 Ibs. ammonium nitrate after each harvest.








Table 19. Forage sorghum establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Plow custom Acre 1 7.50 7.50
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years Ton '/3 17.00 5.67
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Furidan 10 G Lb. 20 0.64 12.80
Seed Lb. 16 0.50 8.00
Custom seeding Acre 1 6.00 6.00
AAtrex Lb. 2 3.65 7.30
(active)
Custom spray Acre 1 3.00 3.00
Fertilizer
5-10-20c Cwt. 10 5.00 50.00
1 FTE 503 (micronutrients)d Lb. 7 0.21 1.47
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitratee Cwt. 3 7.30 21.90
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 145.89 0.045 6.57
Total cash costs 152.46
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
III. Total cost 177.46
aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
c Before seeding.
d 21 Ibs. applied every 3 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
eWhen plants are 10 inches tall. If additional harvests are planned, apply 300 lb. ammonium nitrate after each harvest.










Table 20. Grain sorghum establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
-------- Dollars ------------
I. Cash costs
Plow custom Acre 1 7.50 7.50
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years Ton 1/3 17.00 5.67
Disk custom Acre 1 3.25 3.25
Furidan 10 G Lb. 20 0.64 12.80
Seed Lb. 16 0.50 8.00
Custom seeding Acre 1 6.00 6.00
AAtrex Lb. 2 3.65 7.30
(active)
Custom spray Acre 1 3.00 3.00
Fertilizer
5-10-20c Cwt. 8 5.00 40.00
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d Lb. 7 0.21 1.47
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Am. Nitratee Cwt. 3 7.30 21.90
Custom apply Acre 1 2.00 2.00
Irrigation, seepage Acre 1 15.00 15.00
Interest 9% for 6 months $ 135.89 0.045 6.12
Total cash costs 142.01
II. Fixed costs
Land Acre 1 25.00 25.00
II. Total cost 167.01
aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
cAt seeding.
d 21 Ibs. applied every 3 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
eWhen plants are 10 inches tall.







Table 21. Sorghum x sudangrass hybrid establishment and growing cost per acre on cultivated south Florida flatwoods, 1979.

Item Unit Quantity Price Cost/A
----------- Dollars ------------


I. Cash costs
Plow custom a
Dolomite, 1 ton every 3 years
Disk custom
Furidan 10 G
Seed
Custom seed
AAtrex

Custom spray
Fertilizer
5-10-20c
FTE 503 (micronutrients)d
Custom apply
Am. Nitratee
Custom apply
Am. Nitrate'
Custom apply
Irrigation, seepage
Interest 9% for 6 months
Total cash costs
II. Fixed costs
Land
III. Total cost


Acre
Ton
Acre
Lb.
Lb.
Acre
Lb.
(active)
Acre


Cwt.
Lb.
Acre
Cwt.
Acre
Cwt.
Acre
Acre
$


Acre


1
/3
1
20
16
1
2

1

8
7
1
1.5
1
1.5
1
1
134.69


1


7.50
17.00
3.25
0.64
0.30
6.00
3.65

3.00


5.00
0.21
2.00
7.30
2.00
7.30
2.00
15.00
0.045


25.00


7.50
5.67
3.25
12.80
4.80
6.00
7.30


3.00


40.00
1.47
2.00
10.95
2.00
10.95
2.00
15.00
6.06
140.75

25.00
165.75


aOr equivalent tillage method.
bCost spread.
0 Before seeding.
d 21 Ibs. applied every 3 years; containing the following elemental content: iron, 18.0%; zinc, 7.0%; manganese, 7.5%; boron, 3.0%; copper, 3.0%;
molybdenum, 0.2%.
eWhen plants are 10 inches tall.
'After first harvest. If additional harvests are planned apply 150 Ibs. of ammonium nitrate after each harvest.



































References

[1] Harrison, Dalton S. Irrigation Systems for Agricultural Crop Production in Florida. University of Florida Agricul-
tural Engineering Extension Report 75-2.

[2] Pierce, JoAnn Bell (editor). Agricultural Growth in an Urban Age. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, February 1975.
























































7-3M-79


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the public about costs of maintaining grasses
and legumes.


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available upon request. Please submit details of the request to
C. M. Hinton, Publication Distribution Center, IFAS Building
664, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611.


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
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and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
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