Title: Abundant flower and seed production from aglaonema breeding stock following gibberellic acid (ga3) treatment
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066797/00001
 Material Information
Title: Abundant flower and seed production from aglaonema breeding stock following gibberellic acid (ga3) treatment
Physical Description: Book
Creator: Henny, R. J.
Affiliation: University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences -- Agricultural Research and Education Center-Apopka
Publisher: Agricultural Research and Education Center-Apopka, IFAS, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1999?
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Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066797
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Abundant Flower and Seed Produced from Aglaonema Breeding Stock Following Gibberellic Acid (GA3) Treatment


Abundant Flower and Seed Produced from

Aglaonema Breeding Stock Following Gibberellic

Acid (GA3) Treatment




by R.J. Henny

In a previous issue of Foliage Digest a single foliar spray with 100-400 parts per million (ppm)
Gibberellic acid (GA3) was reported to induce flowering in Aglaonema Commutatum 'Treubii' plus
several other species and cultivars. Since then, GA3 treatment has become an important part of our
foliage breeding program where we treat breeding stock with a single spray of 250 ppm GA,. The
solution is made by adding 2 tablespoons ProGibbO (3.91% a.i.) per gallon of water Tween 20 is used
as a wetting agent to aid coverage and plants are sprayed once until runoff on both sides of the foliage to
insure adequate coverage.

This procedure was used to treat several Aglaonema stock plants on November 10, 1982. The first open
blooms were observed in the middle of April, 1983, at which time crosspollination was started. In the
past, Aglaonemas produced 5-7 blooms per main stem following treatment with 250 ppm GA3, while
untreated plants usually yielded 3-4 flowers. In this instance, however, some plants in 8-inch pots with 3-
4 main stems produced over 60 inflorescences. A few plants, initially pollinated in mid-April, were still
flowering in August. These plants contained nearly mature seeds as well as newly pollinated flowers
(Figure 1).

Aglaonema usually flower naturally in April, May and June under our greenhouse conditions in Central
Florida. Flower buds begin to form in Dieffenbachia in January and February, as can be seen by
dissection and microscopic examination of the growing point and usually flower during the spring.
Because of their slower growth rate, it is possible that Aglaonema begin to initiate flower primordia in
November or December. Thus, it is likely that Aglaonema have increased sensitivity to GA3 treatment at
this time and produce more flowers than at other periods of the year.

Although it would require several experiments to determine the exact reason for the dramatic flowering
response we observed on the 60+ plants treated in this test, one point is self-evident. GA3 treatment of
Aglaonema to induce flowering is a critical part of any attempt to breed these plants. Equally important
as the plants' producing normal flowers, is the fact that different species and hybrids flower together
following GA3 treatment. This is critical because of the inability to store Aglaonema pollen. We have
been able to attempt crossing of different species only due to GA3 treatment; there is enough variation in
the natural flowering cycle of some plants to prevent such pollinations. Also, the large number of




Abundant Flower and Seed Produced from Aglaonema Breeding Stock Following Gibberellic Acid (GA3) Treatment


flowers produced per plant has enabled us to conserve greenhouse space and still produce enough seeds
to allow genetic analysis of various important traits.

Gibberellic acid treatment of Aglaonema may also be important to producers not involved in breeding.
Some cultivars of Aglaonema produce apornictic seed-seeds which are identical genetically to the
female parent. Production of apornictic seed does not require hand pollination. By using a GA, spray on
these types of plants it should be possible to greatly improve seed production by increasing the number
of flowers per plant. This should be applicable to some of the Aglaonema Commutatum cultivars which
are sometimes produced from seed.


'Agricultural Research Center-Apopka, Rt. 3, Box 580, Apopka, FL 32703.

*Use of trade names does not imply a recommendation of these products over others with similar
active ingredients.




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