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Group Title: ARC-A research report - Agricultural Research and Education Center - RH-82-5
Title: Preliminary evaluation of different eucalyptus species for use as a cut-foliage crop
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066482/00001
 Material Information
Title: Preliminary evaluation of different eucalyptus species for use as a cut-foliage crop
Series Title: ARC-A research report
Physical Description: 7 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Henny, R. J
Stamps, R. H
Rasmussen, Eleanor M
Agricultural Research Center (Apopka, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research Center-Apopka
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Eucalyptus -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Cut foliage -- Postharvest technology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: R.J. Henny, R.H. Stamps, and E.M. Rasmussen.
General Note: Caption title.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066482
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71212760

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Table 1: Species number, species and seed source of Eucalyptus species used in postharvest vase-life studies
        Page 4
    Tables 2-4: Postharvest vase-life of cut stems from several Eucalyptus species
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida










PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT EUCALYPTUS SPECIES
FOR USE AS A CUT-FOLIAGE CROP: I. POSTHARVEST
VASE-LIFE OF CUT STEMS


R. J. Henny, R. H. Stamps, and E. M. Rasmussen
University of Florida, IFAS lJ
Agricultural Research Center Apopka
F.A.ARC-A Research Report RH-82-5 .
1.F.VA.S.- Univ, of Fs.: i 3 3


Introduction of different types of Eucalyptus for use as cut-foliage -.. ,'."

could benefit commercial producers in Florida by giving them a larger crop

selection. Also, it may be possible to grow some types of Eucalyptus

without shading or freeze protection which is required for leatherleaf

fern production. Postharvest holding ability of freshly cut stems needs

to be determined as one means of evaluating the commercial potential of

any new cultivar of Eucalyptus. To be successful, cut stems and foliage

should maintain their fresh appearance for several days when held in water.

This study was conducted to determine if selected species of Eucalyptus had

an acceptable postharvest vase-life and if there were differences between

species.

The source of material used in this study was a large planting of

Eucalyptus near Center Hill in Sumter County, Florida. It is part of a

cooperative project between the United States Forest Service and the St.

Regis Paper Company. The planting contains 16,939 seedlings from 186 seed

lots encompassing 42 species of Eucalyptus. Some 60-140 seedlings from

each seed lot are planted in a randomized design covering 23.3 acres.









Materials and Methods

The species used in this study (Table 1) were initially chosen for

their potential ornamental value and stems were harvested on three separate

dates: September 22, October 6, and October 20, 1981. Ten stems were har-

vested from each selected tree during mid-morning, placed in plastic bags,

and transported to Apopka. Stems were trimmed to 18 inches (46 cm) in

length, transferred to 2-liter plastic beakers filled with deionized water,

and placed under 150 foot-candles of light from Cool White fluorescent

lamps 12 hours per day at 800 10F (260C). Shoots from each tree were

held in the same beaker and discarded as they became discolored or began to

wither. The number of fresh looking stems remaining in each beaker was re-

corded periodically.

Results

In Experiment 1, 7 of 9 species had 100% survival at 7 days (Table 2).

One E. deanei, 1 E. viminalis and 3 E. neglecta seedlings had at

least 7 stems remaining after 10 days. After 2 weeks, all stems had been

discarded except 1 from E. amplifolia and 8 from E. neglecta seedling

number 15-153. Two stems from seedling 15-153 survived 3 weeks.

In Experiment 2, E. neglecta seedlings 15-153 had 7 stems remaining

after 3 weeks and 5 stems after 4 weeks (Table 3). Only stems of one other

plant (E. neglecta seedling 44-170) survived for 2 weeks. However, E.

deanei seedling 24-170 and E. neglecta seedling 13-141 had 10 good stems

after 10 days postharvest while E. grandis had 6. None of the plants in

this experiment held up well for 10 days postharvest, although several

held up well for 7 days postharvest.








Only 1 of 2 E. neglecta seedlings had 10 stems survive 7 days in water

in Experiment 3 (Table 4). One E. nova-anglica seedling produced 9 of 10

stems with a vase-life of 7 days. Five other E. nova-anglica showed a poor

vase-life with few lasting 7 days. None of the stems in this experiment

held up well for 10 days.

Discussion

Although insufficient plant material prohibits statistical analysis of

these results, there appears to be differences in the postharvest vase-life

between species of Eucalyptus. Selections within E. neglecta, E. deanei,

and E. viminalis had longer vase-life than other species. In particular, E.

neglecta seedling 15-153 had a much longer vase-life than other species or

other E. neglecta seedlings in both Experiment 1 and 2.

These results indicate that further studies are needed within the genus

Eucalyptus regarding selection of suitable plants for use as cut-foliage

crops. Attempts to asexually propagate seedlings which have ornamental

potential as well as good postharvest vase-life are underway. Special at-

tention is being given to E. neglecta, E. deanei, and E. viminalis.

An additional desirable attribute of E. neglecta is its excellent cold

hardiness as indicated by no apparent freeze damage in 1981 or 1982. Re-

searchers from the U.S. Forest Service and St. Regis Paper Company also

contend that E. neglecta is one of the hardiest species of Eucalyptus.









Table 1. Species number, species and seed source of Eucalyptus species

used in postharvest vase-life studies.

Species
number Species Seed source


1461

1333

1318

1319

1321

121

1435

1440

1441

1442

1328

1332

1469

715

189

1393


amplifolia

camphora

deanei

deanei

deanei

grandis

maidenii

neglecta

neglecta

neglecta

nova-anglica

nova-anglica

pillingaensis

robusta

saligna

viminalis


Buladelah, New South Wales

Tumbarumba Creek, New South Wales

Mitchell, New South Wales

Windsor, New South Wales

Blatherarm Creek, New South Wales

Babcock, PP

Badajoz Province, Spain

Omeo, Victoria

Buckland Valley, Victoria

Buckland Valley, Victoria

Deepwater, New South Wales

Ebor, New South Wales

Western Creek SF, Queensland

Fraser Island, Queensland

Orlando, Florida

New Zealand









Table 2. Postharvest vase-life of cut stems from several Eucalyptus species


Seedling Species Days postharvest
numbery number Species 7 10 14 21

28-223 1461 amplifolia 10x 5 1 0

26-222 1319 deanei 8 0 0 0

27-223 1321 deanei 10 9 0 0

19-177 121 grandis 10 2 0 0

15-153 1441 neglecta 10 10 8 2

44-170 1441 neglecta 10 7 0 0

66-189 1441 neglecta 10 7 0 0

14-142 1443 nova-anglica 5 1 0 0

15-253 1443 nova-anglica 6 0 0 0

27-169 1443 nova-anglica 4 0 0 0

22-170 1469 pillingaensis 10 0 0 0

17-177 189 saligna 2 1 0 0

57-166 1463 St. Johnii 10 0 0 0

42-169 1393 viminalib 10 7 0 0


zl0 stems per species harvested September 22, 1981.

YTrees with a different seedling number but the same
from the same seed lot.

XNumber of stems still appearing fresh.


species number originated








Table 3. Postharvest vase-life of cut stems from several Eucalyptus speciesz


Seedling Species Days postharvest
numbery number Species 4 7 10 14 21 28

24-170 1318 deanei 10x 10 10 0 0 0

19-177 121 grandis 10 10 6 0 0 0

17-155 1435 maidenii 10 7 0 0 0 0

13-141 1441 neglecta 10 10 10 0 0 0

15-153 1441 neglecta 10 10 10 10 7 5

44-170 1441 neglecta 10 9 9 4 0 0

10-124 1442 neglecta 10 4 0 0 0 0

27-169 1332 nova-anglica 9 2 0 0 0 0

35-224 1332 nova-anglica 10 10 0 0 0 0

47-233 1332 nova-anglica 10 1 0 0 0 0

53-185 1332 nova-anglica 10 0 0 0 0 0

22-172 715 robusta 10 10 0 0 0 0


zlO stems per


species harvested October 6, 1981.


YTrees with a different seedling number but the same species number originated
from the same seed lot.

xNumber of stems still appearing fresh.








Table 4. Postharvest vase-life of cut stems from several

Eucalyptus speciesz


Seedling Species Days postharvest
numbery number Species 7 10 14

52-225 1333 camphora 2x 2 0

47-164 1440 neglecta 8 2 0

31-53 1442 neglecta 10 3 0

51-195 1328 nova-anglica 5 3 0

27-169 1332 nova-anglica 9 3 0

30-55 1332 nova-anglica 0 0 0

34-211 1332 nova-anglica 2 0 0

35-224 1332 nova-anglica 4 0 0

37-201 1332 nova-anglica 0 0 0

47-233 1332 nova-anglica 0 0 0


zl0 stems per species harvested October 20, 1981.

YTrees with a different seedling number but the same
species number originated from the same seed lot.

XNumber of stems still appearing fresh.




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