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 Copyright
 Introduction
 Results and discussion
 Reference
 Table 1: Species number, identity,...
 Tables 2-3: Effect of a floral...






Group Title: ARC-A research report - Agricultural Research and Education Center - RH-82-9
Title: Preliminary evaluation of different Eucalyptus species for use as a cut-foliage crop
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066479/00001
 Material Information
Title: Preliminary evaluation of different Eucalyptus species for use as a cut-foliage crop
Series Title: ARC-A research report
Physical Description: 5 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Henny, R. J
Stamps, R. H ( Robert Huguenor ), 1948-
Rasmussen, Eleanor M
Agricultural Research Center (Apopka, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research Center-Apopka
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Eucalyptus -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Cut foliage -- Postharvest technology -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 2).
Statement of Responsibility: R.J. Henny, R.H. Stamps, and E.M. Rasmussen.
General Note: Caption title.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066479
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71211771

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Results and discussion
        Page 2
    Reference
        Page 2
    Table 1: Species number, identity, and source of seed for Eucalyptus speices used in postharvest vase-life studies involving effects of a floral perservative
        Page 3
    Tables 2-3: Effect of a floral preservative on the postharvest vase-life of Eucalyptus cut stems
        Page 4
        Page 5
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida







1io-t L-

PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT EUCALYPTUS SPECIES

FOR USE AS A CUT-FOLIAGE CROP: II. INCREASING

POSTHARVEST VASE-LIFE OF CUT STEMS USING A

FLORAL PRESERVATIVE
HUf f i 7
R. J. Henny, R. H. Stamps, and E. M. Rasm ssen
University of Florida, IFAS ,,
Agricultural Research Center Apopk, '
ARC-A Research Report RH-82-9 /".
,..- niv.of F-, d
Studies of the postharvest vase-life of several Eucalyptus spec-es--i j.U_

showed some plants with good potential for use as a cut-foliage crop (1).

One of the species involved in these studies was E. nova-anglica which

was chosen initially for its attractive appearance; the foliage color and

leaf shape resemble that of E. cinerea which is commonly used as an

ornamental. However, the postharvest vase-life of several E. nova-anglica

seedlings was short compared to other species (1). This study was conducted

to determine if additions of a floral preservative to the holding solution

would increase the vase-life of E. nova-anglica seedlings as well as three

other species of Eucalyptus (Table 1).

Plant material was collected on October 6th and 20th, 1981 from a 23.3

acre trial planting in Sumter County, Florida. Twenty shoots were harvested

from selected trees during mid-morning and placed in plastic bags for trans-

port to Apopka. Stems were then cut to 18 inches (46 cm) in length and placed

in 2-liter plastic beakers containing either A) deionized water, or B) deionized

water plus 10 gms/liter Floralife preservative. A treatment consisted of

ten stems of a single seedling in each type of solution. Containers were placed

underl50 foot-candles of light from Cool White fluorescent lamps 12 hours per









day at 80 + 1lF (260C). Shoots were examined regularly and discarded

as they discolored or withered. The number of fresh looking stems

remaining in each beaker was recorded over time.

Results and Discussion

Addition of the preservative Floralife )increased significantly

(P<0.01; Wilcoxon's signed rank test) postharvest vase-life of all the

Eucalyptus seedlings tested in this study (Tables 2 & 3). However, with

the preservative, only 2 of 5 E. nova-anglica seedlings were able to have

10 stems survive for 7 days (Tables 2 & 3). Eucalyptus neglecta seedling

13-141 yielded 10 out of 10 stems with fresh appearance after 2 weeks

in the preservative; 7 stems were still fresh after 3 weeks (Table 2).

Even with the addition of a preservative, the postharvest vase-life of

E. nova-anglica may not be consistently long enough for commercial use as

a cut-foliage crop. However, the use of a preservative was beneficial.

References

1. Henny, R. J., R. S. Stamps, and E. M. Rasmussen. 1982. Preliminary

evaluation of different Eucalyptus species for use as a cut-foliage

crop: I. Postharvest vase-life of cut stems. ARC-Apopka Research

Report RH-82-5. 7 pp.









day at 80 + 1lF (260C). Shoots were examined regularly and discarded

as they discolored or withered. The number of fresh looking stems

remaining in each beaker was recorded over time.

Results and Discussion

Addition of the preservative Floralife )increased significantly

(P<0.01; Wilcoxon's signed rank test) postharvest vase-life of all the

Eucalyptus seedlings tested in this study (Tables 2 & 3). However, with

the preservative, only 2 of 5 E. nova-anglica seedlings were able to have

10 stems survive for 7 days (Tables 2 & 3). Eucalyptus neglecta seedling

13-141 yielded 10 out of 10 stems with fresh appearance after 2 weeks

in the preservative; 7 stems were still fresh after 3 weeks (Table 2).

Even with the addition of a preservative, the postharvest vase-life of

E. nova-anglica may not be consistently long enough for commercial use as

a cut-foliage crop. However, the use of a preservative was beneficial.

References

1. Henny, R. J., R. S. Stamps, and E. M. Rasmussen. 1982. Preliminary

evaluation of different Eucalyptus species for use as a cut-foliage

crop: I. Postharvest vase-life of cut stems. ARC-Apopka Research

Report RH-82-5. 7 pp.












Table 1. Species number, identity, and source of seed for

Eucalyptus species used in postharvest vase-life studies

involving effects of a floral perservative.


Species
number Species Seed Source

1333 camphora Tumbarumba Creek, New South Wales

1435 maidenii Badajoz Province, Spain

1440 neglecta Omeo, Victoria

1441 neglecta Buckland Valley, Victoria

1442 neglecta Buckland Valley, Victoria

1332 nova-anglica Ebor, New South Wales








Table 2. Effect of a floral preservative on the postharvest vase-life

of Eucalyptus cut stemsz

Average
Seedling Species Days postharvest vase-life
number number Species 4 7 10 14 21 (days)

17-155 1435y maidenii 10w 7 0 0 0 6.1
17-155 1435x maidenii 10 6 2 1 0 6.8

13-141 1441Y neglecta 10 10 10 0 0 10.0
13-141 1441x neglecta 10 10 10 10 7 18.9

27-169 1332y nova-anglicav 9 2 0 0 0 4.2
27-169 1332x nova-anglica 10 6 5 2 2 9.5

35-224 1332y nova-anglica 10 10 0 0 0 7.0
35-224 1332X nova-anglica 10 10 9 7 2 13.9
47-223 1332y nova-anglica 10 1 0 0 0 4.3
47-223 1332x nova-anglica 10 9 9 3 0 10.6


z10 stems per treatment harvested October 6,

YStems held in deionized water.


1981.


XStems held in deionized water plus 10 gms/liter Floralife.

WNumber of stems still appearing fresh.

VTrees with same species number but different seedling number are
separate seedlings from the same initial seed lot.








Table 3. Effect of a floral preservative on the postharvest vase-life

of Eucalyptus cut stems


Average
Seedling Species Days postharvest vase-life
number number Species 3 7 10 14 (days)

52-225 1333y camphora 10 2w 2 0 4.4
52-225 1333x camphora 10 7 5 0 7.3

47-164 1440Y neglecta 10 8 2 0 6.8
47-164 1440x neglecta 10 10 10 3 11.2

51-53 1442Y neglect 10 10 3 0 7.9
51-53 1442x neglecta 10 10 4 0 8.2

37-201 1332y nova-anglicav 10 0 0 0 3.0
37-201 1332X nova-anglica 10 8 0 0 6.2

47-223 1332y nova-anglica 10 0 0 0 3.0
47-223 1332X nova-anglica 10 10 7 2 9.9


Z10 stems per treatment harvested October

YStems held in deionized water.


20, 1981.


XStems held in deionized water plus 10 gms/liter Floralife.
WNumber of stems still appearing fresh.

VSeedlings with same species number but different seedling number are
separate seedlings from the same initial seed lot.




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