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Group Title: ARC-A research report - Agricultural Research and Education Center - RH-82-12
Title: Influence of soil drench fungicides on rooting of two foliage plants
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066476/00001
 Material Information
Title: Influence of soil drench fungicides on rooting of two foliage plants
Series Title: ARC-A research report
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Chase, A. R ( Ann Renee )
Agricultural Research Center (Apopka, Fla.)
Publisher: University of Florida, IFAS, Agricultural Research Center-Apopka
Place of Publication: Apopka FL
Publication Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Plants -- Effect of fungicides on -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Plant cuttings -- Rooting -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soil fungicides -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Foliage plants -- Growth -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: A.R. Chase.
General Note: Caption title.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066476
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 71211577

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HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
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Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
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Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
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INFLUENCE OF SOIL DRENCH FUNGICIDES
ON ROOTING OF TWO FOLIAGE PLANTS -

A. R. Chase
University of Florida, IFAS
Agricultural Research Center-Apopka 13
ARC-A Research Report RH-82-12
Un 7
The most prevalent problem encountered in produ i-rghgh-i huaUJ i,',
well rooted cuttings is cutting loss due to disease causing fungi such as
Pythium, Phytophthora, and Rhizoctonia. Protecting cuttings from these
organisms is frequently accomplished through use of soil drench fungicides
and pathogen-free cuttings. Despite such precautions many growers
experience problems such as poor root or shoot formation within a standard
propagation time. Since some fungicides are known to cause phytotoxicity
in certain situations, the influence of some of these chemicals in the
absence of disease was investigated on rooting of Epipremnum aureum (pothos)
and Philodendron scandens oxycardium heartleaff philodendron). Claims have
been made by growers that benomyl (Benlate 50WP), ethazol (Truban 30WP),
and metalaxyl (Subdue 2E) have been responsible for poor cutting quality.
Each of these fungicides was evaluated at recommended rates in the following
two tests.
Cuttings were obtained from commercial growers and rooted in steam-
sterilized potting medium consisting of Canadian peat, cypress shavings,
and pine ark (2:1:1 by volume). The medium was amended th 7.5 lb
Osmocote 0}(19:6:12), 7 lb dolomite, and 1.5 lb Micromax (micro-
nutrient source) per yd3 of medium. Two cuttings were rooted per each
4-inch pot, with 15 pots of each plant type drenched with each fungicide
or water. In Test 1 plants were enclosed in.plastic bags for 4 weeks while
rooting, during which time they were watered once. In Test 2 plants were
grown under mist (15 sec every 30 min from 0800 to 2000 hrs each day) for
4 weeks, and then with water applications twice a week for 2 additional
weeks.
In both tests, rooting of pothos and heartleaf philodendron was not
influenced by the fungicides employed (Tables 1-4). There were, however,
noticeable effects of these fungicides on development of shoots of both
species. The shoot grade evaluation in Test 1 did not show any significant
differences between treatments for heartleaf philodendron (Table 2). However,








in Test 2 (Table 4) which was conducted under mist and for 2 weeks longer
than Test 1, some differences were noted. Use of benomyl alone was the
only treatment to result in a significantly better plant than the control
treatment. In contrast, use of ethazol decreased the number of leaves
formed. These two effects appeared to cancel each other out when both
fungicides were used together, since plants in this treatemnt were not
different than control plants. In Test 1 (Table 1) pothos shoot grade
evaluation again showed that use of benomyl alone stimulated shoot
formation. However, both combination treatments and ethazol alone re-
sulted in somewhat poorer shoot formation compared to controls. The
same general trend was noted in Test 2 (Table 3). In this case, however,
only the benomyl-ethazol drench caused any reduction in number of leaves
produced. Every other treatment gave slightly better shoot development
than the control treatment.
These tests indicate that while these fungicides do not influence
root development of pothos or heartleaf philodendron there are effects on
shoot development. Benomyl apparently stimulated formation of leaves on
both plants. Other fungicides do not consistently affect shoot formation
of pothos since no treatment was appreciably different than the control
in either test. It is possible that the longer period of growth in
Test 2 (Table 3) eliminated the apparent growth reduction seen in some of
the treatments in Test 1 (Table 1). There is a slight indication that
ethazol reduces shoot formation in heartleaf philodendron, but since this
did not occur in both tests it may not be a consistent problem. Each
grower should evaluate his choice of pesticides under his conditions since
potting media, water quality, and cutting source differ widely among
producers. Poor rooting of cuttings may be due to other factors such as
nutritional status of cuttings at the time of harvest and this should be
considered in addition to disease and phytotoxicity effects. Under
conditions of high disease pressure, use of soil fungicides is necessary
and the slight reductions in growth noted in these tests due to certain
chemicals is negligible.







Table 1. Effect of soil drench fungicides on shoot
of Epipremnum aureum (pothos), Test 1.


and root development


Rate Average # roots Average shoot grade
Treatment per gallon per cutting per cutting

Water --- 1.6 ac 2.5 ab
benomyl 2.3 g 2.0 a 2.8 b
metalaxyl 1.0 ml 1.4 a 2.4 ab
ethazol 3.4 g 0.9 a 2.0 a
benomyl 2.3 g 1.3 a 2.2 a
metalaxyl 1.0 ml
benomy.1 2.3 g 1.2 a 2.2 a
ethazol 3.4 g

a = Means are given for a total of thirty cuttings.
b = Shoot development was rated on the following scale: 1 = no shoot;
2 = shoot less than 1 cm long; 3 = shoot emerged from the potting
medium; and 4 = shoot fully formed with one open leaf.
c = Numbers in the same column followed by the same letter were not
statistically different using Duncan's Multiple Range Test at the
5% level of significance.




Table 2. Effect of soil drench fungicides on shoot and root development
of Philodendron scandens oxycardium heartleaff philodendron), Test 1.

Rate Average # roots Average shoot gradeb
Treatment per gallon per cutting per cutting

Water --- 1.8 ac 2.2 a
benomyl 2.3 g 1.4 a 2.1 a
metalaxyl 1.0 ml 1.8 a 2.1 a
ethazol 3.4 g 1.2 a 2.2 a
benomyl 2.3 g 1.6 a 2.4 a
metalaxyl 1.0 ml
benomyl 2.3 g 1.2 a 2.0 a
ethazol 3.4 g

a = Means are given for a total of thirty cuttings.
b = Shoot development was rated on the following scale: 1 = no shoot;
2 = shoot less than 1 cm long; 3 = shoot emerged from the potting
medium; and 4 = shoot fully formed with one open leaf.
c = Numbers in the same column followed by the same letter were not
statistically different using Duncan's Multiple Range Test at the
5% level of significance.








Table 3. Effect of soil drench fungicides on shoot
of Epipremnum aureum (pothos) in Test 2.


and root formation


Rate Average root gradea Average # leaves
Treatment per gallon per cutting per cutting

Water --- 2.7 ab 3.2 ab
benomyl 2.3 g 3.0 a 3.7 b
metalaxyl 1.0 ml 2.5 a 3.6 b
ethazol 3.4 g 2.6 a 3.4 b
benomyl 2.3 g
metalaxyl 1.0 ml 2.6 a 3.5 b
benomyl 2.3 g
ethazol 3.4 g 2.2 a 2.6 a

a = Means are given for a total of thirty cuttings. Root development for
each cutting was rated on a scale of 1 = no roots, 5 = excellent roots.
b = Numbers in the same column followed by the same letter were not
statistically different using Duncan's Multiple Range Test at the 5%
level of significance.


Table 4. Effect of soil drench fungicides on shoot and root formation
of Philodendron scandens oxycardium heartleaff philodendron) in Test 2.

Rate Average root gradea Average # leaves
Treatment per gallon per cutting per cutting

Water --- 1.9 ab 2.0 bc
benomyl 2.3 g 2.1 a 2.4 c
metalaxyl 1.0 ml 2.1 a 1.9 bc
ethazol 3.4 g 1.8 a 1.4 a
benomyl 2.3 g
metalaxyl 1.0 ml 1.9 a 2.0 bc
benomyl 2.3 g
ethazol 3.4 g 2.0 a 1.8 ab

a = Means are given for a total of thirty cuttings. Root development was
rated on a scale of 1 = no roots to 5 = excellent roots.
b = Numbers in the same column followed by the same letter were not
statistically different using Duncan's Multiple Range Test at the 5%
level of significance.




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