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LATI NA MERICANIST t he University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies | Volume 42, Number 1 | Spring 2011 U F celebrated 80 years of teaching, research and service in Latin American Studies with a series of commemorative events from March 24-26, 2011. The central event was the Center for Latin American Studies 60th Annual Conference, Looking Forward, Looking Back: Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. The three-day celebration also included the dedication of a historical marker on the Plaza of the Americas, art and cultural exhibits, and a gala reception. Over 250 alumni, staff, students, and current and former faculty took part in this recognition of achievements and moment of reflection. The objective of the conference was to envision how the Center can move forward in the 21st century while building on its rich legacy. The conference included symposia on Latin American business and Latin American history; panels recognizing influential former faculty, Center directors, and alumni; sessions focusing on Latin American communities in the southeast and U.S. policy toward Latin America; and a Latin American career workshop for current students. Fifty MALAS and UF alumni participated as conference speakers (see page 18). The conference opened with a keynote lecture on The New Narcocultura: A Conversation about Mexico by Alma Guillermoprieto, an author and journalist with expertise in the cultural and political life of Mexico and South America. Jos Antonio Ocampo, faculty member at Columbia University and former Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, delivered a luncheon keynote on Latin American Economic Challenges of the New World (see page 3). Four art and cultural exhibits added to the celebration. The UF Harn Museum of Art staged two exhibits of modern and contemporary Latin American works. A collection of maps dating to the 16th and 17th centuries from collector and UF LAS alumnus Steven Keats were displayed in the lobby of Grinter Hall. The exhibit featured cartography of the Americas and the Caribbean by European explorers. Smathers Libraries hosted an exhibit of Latin American Studies historical memorabilia from the Latin American Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American Studies at UF Directors Corner inside: p2 Nolan Fellowship p3 Faculty News & Publications p7 Alumni News & Notes p17 Collection. A showing of photography of the Brazilian Amazon by Charles Wagley, late UF professor of Anthropology, and Richard Pace, Wagleys former student and UF alumnus, were displayed at the Center. Finally, documentary film screenings took place throughout the conference, many of which featured or were produced by UF faculty and students. A highlight of the anniversary was the dedication of a historical marker about Latin American Studies on the southeast corner of UFs Plaza of the Americas. Center Director Philip Williams remarks from the dedication ceremony are printed on page two of this newsletter. The marker states, Established in 1930 as the Institute of Inter-American Affairs, the UF Center for Latin American Studies is the nations oldest academic program dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of the Americas. The Plaza of the Americas was dedicated at the centers first conference in February 1931, and 21 live oaks were planted, one for each of the republics of the Americas at that time. Through the center, UF has strengthened Floridas ties with Latin America by recruiting international students, diversifying the curriculum and collaborating with institutions in the region. Its work spurred the development of one of the leading Latin American libraries and gained early and continuing financial support from the U.S. Department of Education. The gala reception, held at the Florida Museum of Natural History, featured a silent auction, dance lessons by MALAS alumna Juliana Azoubel, and Latin music provided by Ekobios and DJ Luminous (MALAS alumnus Luis Caraballo). In between dancing and enjoying a hors doeuvres buffet, reception attendees generously donated $3,500 to the silent auction benefitting the LAS Alumni Graduate Student Travel Fund. Many thanks to the alumni, faculty, staff and students who made the celebration of 80 years of Latin American Studies a stunning success! Philip Williams (left to right), Center Director, Angel Kwolek-Folland, Associate Provost for Academic Affairs, and Stephen Walroth-Sadurn, President of the LAS Alumni Board, spoke at the LAS historical marker ceremony on March 24, 2011. LAURIE MICHAELSON

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Eighty years ago, the Institute for Inter-American Affairs (the forerunner to the Center) held the closing ceremony for its inaugural conference. The ceremony included a dedication of the Plaza of the Americas, and the planting of 21 live oak trees, representing each of the republics of the Americas at the time. At UFs June commencement the previous year, President John Tigert announced the creation of the Institute, the first Latin American Studies program at a US university. UF must have seemed like an unlikely place at an unlikely time for such a bold initiative a small, all-male, racially segregated, land-grant university located in the Deep South, during a deepening economic depression that forced the country to focus inward. And yet, Pres. Tigert, who had been a Rhodes Scholar and served as US Commissioner of Education, realized the importance of international exchanges and had a clear sense of Washingtons growing relationship with Latin America under the guise of the Good Neighbor Policy. Moreover, given Floridas historical and geographic connections to the region, UF seemed like the perfect place to launch such an initiative. To demonstrate the seriousness of the initiative, during the commencement ceremony when the Institute was announced, Pres. Tigert awarded an honorary degree for the first time to a Latin American citizen, Cuban Ambassador to the US, Dr. Orestes Ferrara. During Tigerts tenure, despite the lack of resources, the Institute made available scholarship opportunities for students from Latin America, and UF signed a collaborative agreement with the University of Havana. Growing from one faculty member in 1930 to a small cluster of Latin Americanists, in 1951, the School of Inter-American Studies superseded the Institute for Inter-American Affairs, initiating M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Latin American Studies. It also began organizing annual conferences, initially with a focus on the Caribbean. Since 1930, close to 2,500 masters theses and doctoral dissertations have been awarded on Latin American topics. Recognizing UFs unique strengths in Latin American Studies, in 1961 the US Department of Education (USDOE) designated the School as a National Resource Center (NRC) in Latin American Studies. In 1963 the Center for Latin American Studies replaced the School for Inter-American Studies. Since then, it is one of the only Centers in the country that has been continuously designated by the USDOE as a Title VI NRC in Latin American Studies. Over the years, our students have gone on to pursue successful careers in academia, government, the military, law, business, and the non-profit sector. UF faculty have made major contributions to the development of the field of Latin American studies. From 1949-1978, the Handbook of Latin American Studies, the premier bibliography on the region, was published by the University of Florida Press. Faculty members edited the Journal of Inter-American Studies from 1959-69 and the Hispanic American Historical Review during the early 60s and again from 1986-1991. The Secretariat of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) was based at the Center for Latin American Studies from 1972 to 1978, and three UF faculty members served as its president. Our Latin American Collection has grown to become one of the finest in the country, housing the largest collection of Caribbean materials in the world. The collection contains over 500,000 volumes, 1,200 journal subscriptions, and 1,900 films. Eighty years ago, who would have thought that President Tigerts unlikely vision would put UF on the map as a pioneer in Latin American Studies and that the Center would go on to become a leader in interdisciplinary research and training. May the next 80 years be as fruitful as the last 80! Long live the Center for Latin American Studies! Viva el Centro! Directors Corner Dr. Philip Williams Center-Based Faculty & Professional Staff Philip Williams Director Hannah Covert Executive Director Efran Barradas (LAS/Spanish & Portuguese) Richmond Brown Associate Director, Academic Programs Emilio Bruna (LAS/WEC) Jonathan Dain (LAS/SNRE) Carmen Diana Deere (LAS/FRE) Aimee Green Program Coordinator Karen Kainer (LAS/SFRC) Ana Margheritis (LAS/Political Science) Mary Risner Associate Director, Outreach & LABE Janet Bente Romero Associate Director of Development, UFF Patricia Delamnica Sampaio, TCD Program Coordinator Marianne Schmink (LAS/Anthropology) J. Richard Stepp (LAS/Anthropology) Welson Tremura (LAS/Music) Pliar Useche (LAS/FRE) Charles Wood (LAS/Sociology) Editor: Hannah Covert, LAS Graphic Designer: University Relations Creative Group 3 Jos Antonio Ocampo Lecture 4 Bacardi Lecture 5 Ottn Sols Lecture 6 New MDP & TCD Directors 7 Faculty News & Publications 8 Outreach News 10 Photos of 80 th Anniversary 12 Student News 14 Field Research Clinics 16 Alumni Career Profile 17 Alumni News & Notes 19 Donors LATI NA MERICANIST t he Volume 42, Number 1 Spring 2011 Center for Latin American Studies 319 Grinter Hall PO Box 115530 Gainesville, FL 32611 352 www.latam.ufl.edu CONTENTS

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SPRING 2011 3 SPRING 2011 3 EVENTS D uring the recent annual conference of the Center for Latin American Studies, Jos Antonio Ocampo delivered the Business Symposium keynote address on the current economic challenges facing Latin America in the wake of the global economic crisis. Currently a professor at Columbia University, Ocampo has served as the Executive Secretary for the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), as the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, and in a number of ministerial posts in the government of Colombia. In his presentation, Ocampo highlighted a number of positive recent trends in Latin America. For example, poverty and inequality have fallen to their lowest levels in decades, and the region has made great strides in improving income distribution. Overall, Ocampo portrayed a cautious optimism about the future for regional economic development. The turmoil of the global economic crisis continues, but Latin America as a whole has adjusted relatively well to the downturn. Ocampo argued that the current financial crisis differs from previous crises in that the region did not default on its external debt. Fiscal stability and the accumulation of foreign exchange reserves allowed many countries to pursue countercyclical policies. Some countries, like Brazil and Peru, benefitted from these policies. Meanwhile, countries like Mexico which followed procyclical policies, performed less well. According to Ocampo, perhaps the greatest concern for Latin America is the decline of global trade. In the immediate aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, global trade fell by 30% the steepest decline in recent world history. Trade has recovered to some extent, but it remains a major concern for a region that has relied heavily on global trade as an engine for economic growth. Ocampo also emphasized the variegated pattern of recovery across the region. In general, South America has weathered the economic crisis better than Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. The latter group clearly suffered from its close ties to the US market. South American economies have recovered through rapid growth in commodity exports. Commodity prices declined sharply in late 2008 but recovered very quickly thereafter. Also, agricultural prices have been more stable than during any previous global recession. Nonetheless, Ocampo is concerned about South America's reliance upon a few major commodity exports and the unbalanced relationship such has produced with China. Latin Americas hopeful future may have been constructed upon the fault lines of its past. Ocampo illuminated both the promise of a new era in Latin America and the fragility of its aspirations. -Contributed by Brian Readout, MALAS student T he Center for Latin American Studies is pleased to announce the creation of the Vivian G. Nolan Graduate Fellowship in Latin American Studies. A very generous gift from Wanda and Charles Denny, the daughter and son-in-law of Vivian Nolan, endows the fellowship program. Income from the fund will support graduate fellowships for students studying indigenous peoples and cultures at the Center for Latin American Studies. Vivian Nolan was an administrative assistant at the Center for Latin American Studies from the early 1960s to 1980s. While at the Center, Mrs. Nolan worked closely with M.J. Hardman, UF Professor of Linguistics, and Charles Wagley, late UF Professor of Anthropology. Besides her centrality to the Centers day-to-day operations, she was known for opening her home to students and visiting faculty from Latin America. She attended Florida State University and was a member of Trinity United Methodist Church in Gainesville. She died at the age of 78 in 2004. Terry McCoy, former Director of the Center stated, Vivian Nolan was a wonderful human being with whom I had the pleasure of working on a daily basis when I joined the Center in 1975 until her retirement in the early 1980s. She was not only the "Jill-of-all-trades" for the Center -serving as the director's executive secretary, office manager and chief fiscal officer -but a beloved member of the Center family. Wherever I travel in Latin America I run into visitors and alumni who remember the warmth with which Vivian, husband Jim and daughters Wanda and Kitty made them feel welcome in Gainesville. It is very much in keeping with Vivian that Wanda and Charles would generously endow a fellowship for students studying the indigenous peoples of the Americas." Additional gifts to the endowment are welcome. See page 20 for information on making a gift. Latin Americas Economic Challenges in an Uncertain World Vivian G. Nolan Graduate Fellowship in Latin American Studies Vivian G. Nolan

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4 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 4 THE LATI NA MERICANIST EVENTS Bacardi Lecture: The Havana Cigar Goes Global J ean Stubbs, a distinguished British historian who has pub lished widely on Cuba, served as the spring 2011 Bacardi Family Eminent Scholar. During her public Bacardi Family Lecture in early March, The Havana Cigar Goes Global, Stubbs took the audience through a visual journey of El Habano cigar. She demonstrated that the cigar, at different junctures, is linked to discussions of globalization, migration, race, gender, and U.S. politics and policies. In the early 19th century, the city of Havana became the premium tobacco producer, making El Habano cigar the worlds premium cigar. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, however, tobacco producers across the world become enthralled with pro ducing tobacco on par with Havanas quality. Stubbs discussion centered on how other countries attempted to produce a Cuban cigar outside of Cuba and showcased advertisements by cigar manufacturers seeking to attract consumers to their brand. The 1990s are regarded as the revival of the cigar story across the world. Global tobacco growers and cigar makers emerged attempting to produce cigars comparable to or better than the Cuban cigar. For example, Sumatra and Java, Indonesia became major producers of tobacco in the hopes of competing with the Cuban cigar, as did the Dominican Republic. Stubbs showed an advertisement from the Dominican Republic boasting about the high quality of their product, Perfected in the Dominican Re public. Meanwhile, Nicaragua, having imported seeds from Cuba, grows high quality tobacco that is the most comparable to Cubas. In the U.S., tobacco factories already existed in Key West and new factories sprang up in Connecticut. Stubbs displayed images alongside her narration of the journey of tobacco seeds and cigar production to these countries. Stubbs highlighted the connection of cigar production to oth er topics, such as race and gender. Regarding race, Cuban produc ers portrayed their workers as Spanish; however, in reality, black and Asian workers lled factory production lines. To illustrate glo balization, Stubbs shared that factory workers in Connecticut were Jamaican and Puerto Rican, later replaced by Central Americans and Mexicans. Finally, she explained how women were sexual ized in advertisements with depictions of women smoking and hand-rolling cigars in provocative poses. Moreover, despite norms dictating that cigar-smoking is a manly activity, women were targeted as potential cigar smokers, which Stubbs illustrated with an advertisement of Whoopi Goldberg smoking a cigar. Through out the presentation, the cigar story was linked to the social and political context of the producing countries. Stubbs is an Associate Fellow at the Institute for the Study of the Americas, University of London, and Professor Emerita of Caribbean History at London Metropolitan University, where she was the founding Director of the Caribbean Studies Centre. She holds a BA in Government from the University of Essex and PhD in History from the Birkbeck College, University of London. -Contributed by Daisy Prez, MALAS student February 3 Subsidizing Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America: Is that a Development Policy? Ottn Sol s, Hewlett Visiting Fellow for Public Policy, Kellogg Institute for International Studies, University of Notre Dame February 17 Fossil Mammals, Giant Sharks, and Ancient Rainforests: A Once-in-a-Century Opportunity along the Panama Canal Bruce MacFadden, Curator, FLMNH March 3 The Status of Garifuna in Honduras: An Endangered Language? Santiago Ru z, Post-Doctoral Associate, UF Center for Latin American Studies March 17 Open Access at the University of Florida Isabel Silver, Director of Academic and Scholarly Outreach, UF Libraries March 31 Migration Writings and the Imagined Community of Exile Carina Gonzlez, Assistant Professor, UF Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies April 14 Durable Utopias and Peasant Longings: Revolution and Guerrillas in the Mexican Countryside, 1960-1975 Alex Avia, Assistant Professor, Department of History, Florida State University April 28 Challenges Currently Facing Cuba Leslie Y ez, Vice-Rector for Research, University of Havana SPRING 2011 COLLOQUIUM SERIES Jean Stubbs, Spring 2011 Bacardi Family Eminent Scholar in Latin American Studies JESSICA CAICEDO

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SPRING 2011 5 SPRING 2011 5 B uilding on the recent cooperative agreement with the Centro de Pesquisa e Documentao de Histria Contempornea do Brasil (CPDOC) at the Fundaco Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Rio de Janeiro, the Center hosted a seminar on Emergent Brazil in December 2010. The seminar was attended by CPDOC and UF LAS faculty. Presentations were made on political and economic innovation in Brazilian affairs, new Brazilian cultural and urban trends, and Brazil's changing role in Latin American economic and international affairs. Given Brazil's new global role in both the economy and international policy, as well as the recent choice to host the World Cup and the Summer Olympics there, the Center and CPDOC are planning an international conference on the nation's complex domestic evolution and international impact as the focus of the Centers annual conference in 2013. The conference is expected to attract presenters from academia, diplomacy, politics, and business. CPDOC, one of the established, preeminent social science research institutions in Brazil, has particular strengths in history and international affairs and hosts a state-of-the-art archive and publication record for post-1930 Brazil. CPDOC has recently begun training graduate students, opened a branch in Sao Paulo, and begun establishing international institutional relationships with a few, select universities. For more information contact Jeffrey Needell, Department of History (jneedell@ufl.edu). O n November 18, 2010 the Center co-sponsored a conference with the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. The conference focused on immigration enforcement programs in the U.S., and included two roundtables, the first offering an analysis of immigration-related enforcement policies at the national level, the second focused on the experiences of communities throughout the country, where 287(g) agreements and the Secure Communities program have been implemented. The 287(g) program allows state and local law enforcement entities to receive delegated authority from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for immigration enforcement within their jurisdictions. Featured conference speakers included: Maria Hinojosa, senior correspondent, NOW on PBS; David Venturella, executive director, Secure Communities, U.S. ICE; Don Kerwin, Vice President for Programs, Migration Policy Institute; and Daniel Hernndez Joseph, Director General, Protection of Mexicans Abroad, Foreign Relations Ministry (Mexico). The conference was part of a new Center initiative to develop an institute focused on the study of immigration, religion, and social change in the U.S. South and was made possible by a generous grant from the Ford Foundation. For more information contact Manuel Vsquez, Department of Religion (manuelv@ufl.edu). I n early February, Costa Rican economist Ottn Sols spoke at UF as part of the Centers Spring Colloquium Series. Sols has served as Minister of Planning and Economic Policy and a congressman in Costa Rica. He was the co-founder of the Citizens Action Party and ran for president in 2002, 2006 and 2010. In 2010-11, Sols was the Hewlett Visiting Fellow for Public Policy at the Kellogg Institute for International Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He was the Bacardi Family Eminent Scholar in Latin American Studies at UF in 2008. Solis presentation dealt with foreign direct investment in Latin America. According to Sols, the negative consequences of foreign direct investment in emerging economies are rarely addressed. He discussed several such consequences, with emphasis on Costa Rica. First, fiscal and tax practices are not conducive to strengthening national economies and human capital. A large portion of corporations and citizens do not pay taxes. This phenomenon, in combination with a low tax burden (10-18% in Central America), tends to justify a culture of tax evasion. Likewise, when multinational corporations are not required to pay taxes, there is weak resolve on the part of officials to enforce tax laws with national companies. Overall, low levels of tax revenue, and thus public resources, result in stagnant investment in infrastructure and social development. The struggle to remain competitive in the global market creates a vicious cycle, where states provide more and more subsidies for multinational corporations in order to retain them in country. With increased subsidies, however, there is less investment in human capital. Also, free trade agreements, which facilitate foreign direct investment, weaken democracy. Such agreements tend to bypass national legislation, undermining citizens ability to make decisions for their country. Finally, a different idea about development permeates and influences politicians and decision-makers. Individuals act as if their culture is for sale as they seek out multinational corporations who can buy into their country. To Sols, politicians seem less concerned with developing the national economy, such as providing jobs and promoting exports, than with bringing companies into the country and willingly subsidizing their entrance and stay. Given these outcomes, Sols questions why foreign direct investment continues to be viewed as the major development model for developing countries. The race to the bottom, where investors dictate the rules in their favor and developing countries compete to receive investments, will not lead to real development of national economies. As such, Sols recommends that the state play a leading role in leveling the playing field by requiring corporations to pay taxes, invest in human development, and engage in long-term planning. -Contributed by Daisy Prez, MALAS Student Subsidizing Foreign Direct Investment in Latin America: Is that a Development Policy? EVENTS UF-FGV Seminar on Emergent Brazil Center Organizes Conference at the Woodrow Wilson Center on Immigration Ottn Sols

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6 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 6 THE LATI NA MERICANIST F ACUL TY T he Center for Latin American Studies is pleased to announce that Glenn Galloway will join UF in fall 2011 as Director of the MA in Sustainable Development Practice (MDP) Program. Galloway is currently Dean of the Graduate School and Director of the Education Division at the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE) in Costa Rica. Galloway worked for nearly ten years in South America, first with Peace Corps (Colombia) and later as a highland forestry advisor for USAID in Peru and Ecuador. Since 1992, he has worked throughout Central America with CATIE, first as coordinator to a regional Finnish financed forestry and agroforestry research and training program and then as leader to a Swiss financed lowland tropical forest management project working with poor mestizo and indigenous communities in Honduras and Nicaragua. He was appointed to his current position at CATIE in 2003. Galloway participates in international forestry initiatives, serving on the steering committee of the IUFRO World Forests, Society and Environment (WFSE) Special Project and contributing to international processes on forestry education. He has a PhD in Silviculture from the University of Washington and a Masters degree from the University of British Columbia, Canada. The MDP program seeks to link natural, social, health sciences and management to bridge the gaps between specialized disciplines in the formulation and implementation of integrated development policies. In 2009, UF was selected as one of the first two universities in the U.S. to receive funding from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to implement an MDP program. At UF, the program is a joint collaboration of the Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for African Studies. T he Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (WEC) are pleased to announce that Dr. Bette Loiselle will join UF in fall 2011 as Director of the Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD) in the Center and as a Professor of Tropical Ecology in WEC. Loiselle is currently Director of the Division of Environmental Biology at the National Science Foundation. From 1990-2009, Loiselle was a Professor of Conservation Biology at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Her research is in the broad area of evolutionary ecology with particular emphasis on seed dispersal ecology, population dynamics and mating systems of tropical birds, and the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to ecology and conservation. She is particularly interested in examining the importance of biodiversity to ecological processes, such as seed dispersal and plant regeneration, and at unraveling ecological and evolutionary processes that explain female choice in manakins, which are tropical lek-breeding birds. Loiselles research has also explored the application of ecological niche modeling and GIS to predict species distributions both in present and future climates. She has been conducting research in the tropics since 1982. She and her students have worked in many ecosystems throughout the Neotropics as well as central Africa and the tropical forests of Queensland, Australia. Loiselle received her B.A and M.S. from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin. She has taught a variety of courses, including GIS, Public Policy of Conservation and Sustainable Development, Conservation Biology, and field courses in Costa Rica. Glenn Galloway Hired as Director of MDP Program Bette Loiselle Hired as Director of TCD Program JESSICA CAICEDO JESSICA CAICEDO

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SPRING 2011 7 SPRING 2011 7 F ACUL TY Florence E. Babb (Womens Studies & Gender Research) was a discussant for a seminar on Street Economies, Politics and Social Movements in the Urban Global South at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe, NM. She participated in the roundtable on Generations of Knowledge and Research Traditions: 60 Years of Applied Anthropology in the Callejn de Huaylas and Wider Peru and was a panel discussant on Moving Beyond the Actors in Tourism at the Society for Applied Anthropology meeting in Seattle in March. Publications: Out in Public: Lesbian and Gay Activism in Nicaragua. In J. Corrales and M. Pecheny, eds., The Politics of Sexuality in Latin America: A Reader on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights University of Pittsburgh Press, 2010. Emilio Bruna (LAS/WEC) was recognized as the 2011 Graduate Advisor and Teacher of the Year by the UF College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. Allan Burns (Anthropology) was selected as a Doctoral Dissertation Advisor/Mentoring Award winner for 2010-11 by the UF Graduate School. Carmen Diana Deere (LAS/FRE) was the co-organizer of a workshop on gender and international migration sponsored by Feminist Economics and hosted by the Faculty of Economics at the University of the Basque Country in Bilbao, Spain in March. She also delivered lectures to the Economics Department at Tulane University in January and to the Center for Women, Gender and Sexuality at Rice University in April. Susan Gillespie (Anthropology) delivered an invited paper on The Ecstasy and the Agony: The La Venta Excavations" in coordination with the opening of the exhibit "Olmec: Colossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico" at the deYoung Museum in San Francisco in February. David Geggus (History) spoke on Why is Haiti so Poor? for UFs Grimes Lecture Series in January and The Changing Faces of Toussaint Louverture, the keynote address at the annual conference of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era in Tallahassee in March. Publications: The Haitian Revolution in Atlantic Perspective. In N. Canny & P. Morgan, eds., The Atlantic World c.1450-c.1820 New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Karen Kainer (LAS/SFRC) was selected as a Doctoral Dissertation Advisor/Mentoring Award winner for 2010-11 by the UF Graduate School. Publication: Resource Theft in Tropical Forest Communities: Implications for NonTimber Management, Livelihoods, and Conservation (with A. Duchelle, P. Cronkleton, G. Guanacoma & S. Gezan). Ecology and Society 16(1) 2011: 4. Juan Carlos Molleda (Public Relations) Macroencuesta latinoamericana de comunicacin y relaciones pblicas (with A. Moreno, A. Athaydes & A.M. Surez). Organicom 7(13) 2010: 118-141. Gregory Moreland (Spanish & Portuguese Studies) presented the paper Two Students and a Professor Ponder the Question: What Can We Truly Gain from the Study Abroad Experience? (with A. Boudreaux & K. Marulanda) at the CIBER Business Language Conference in Charleston in March. Charles Perrone (Spanish & Portuguese Studies) presented Inter-linguistic 'Anguish' in Recent Lyric" at the Modern Language Association Conference in January. Publication: Paulo Leminski sob a tica da potica transamericana. In M. Sandmann, ed., A pau a pedra a fogo a pique: dez estudos sobre a obra de Paulo Leminski Curitiba: Secretaria de Estado da Cultura do Paran, 2010. Mary Risner (LAS) and Kimberly Fields, a 10th grade teacher at George C. Marshall High School in Virginia, delivered a three-hour K-12 workshop entitled, Preparing Students for the Global Workplace at the annual CIBER Business Language Workshop in Charleston, South Carolina. They also presented Global Perspectives in the Business Curriculum: A 21st Century Priority at the annual National Business Education Association conference in New Orleans. In January, Risner was invited to moderate a teachers panel at the Annual K-12 Language for Business Conference at Florida International University. Marianne Schmink (Anthropology) is a Co-PI, with PI Walter Bowen (IFAS) and Co-PI Steven Sargent (Horticultural Sciences), of a new four-year $7.7 million USAID grant to support, negotiate, plan, coordinate, and implement the USAID-funded component of the Trilateral Cooperation Agreement (Brazil, U.S., & Mozambique) between the U.S. and Brazil. Publications: Deforestation Drivers in Southwest Amazonia: Comparing Smallholder Farmers in Iapari, Peru, and Assis Brasil, Brazil (with A. Almeyda, E. Broadbent, S. Perz, & G. Asner).Conservation and Society, 8 (3) 2010: 157-170; Amazonian Geographies: Emerging Identities and Landscapes (ed. with J. Vadjunec). Special Issue of Journal of Cultural Geography 28(1) 2011; Rubber Tapper Citizens: Emerging Places, Policies, and Shifting Identities in Acre, Brazil (with J. Vadjunec & C. Gomes). Journal of Cultural Geography 28(1) 2011: 73-98; New Amazonian Geographies: Emerging Identities and Landscapes (with J. Vadjunec & A. Greiner). Journal of Cultural Geography 28(1) 2011: 1-15. Brijesh Thapa (Tourism, Recreation & Sport Management) presented the paper, Ecotourists Satisfaction with Travel Experiences and Ecolodges in Costa Rica at the Global Sustainable Tourism Conference in South Africa in November. Publications: Funding Strategies for World Heritage Sites in Least Developed Countries. In P. Messenger & G. Smith, eds., Cultural Heritage Management: A Global Perspective Gainesville, FL: University of Florida Press, 2010; Visitor Perspectives on Sustainable Tourism Development in the Pitons Management Area World Heritage Site, St. Lucia (with L. Nicholas). Environment, Development and Sustainability 12(5) 2010: 839-857. Philip Williams (LAS) and Manuel Vsquez (Religion) co-authored with Tim Steigenga (FAU) and Marie Marquardt (Agnes Scott) a forthcoming book, entitled Living Illegal: The Human Face of Unauthorized Immigration The book will be published by The New Press in late summer. Faculty News and Publications

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8 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 8 THE LATI NA MERICANIST Outreach News Science Outreach Projects at the Center for Latin American Studies O ne of the Outreach Programs new initiatives funded by the Centers 2010-14 Title VI National Resource Center grant is expansion of our K-12 outreach efforts to the natural sciences. Proposed activities include offering summer institutes for science teachers, creating a sciencethemed traveling suitcase, increasing collaboration with the Florida Museum of Natural History, and partnering with the College of Educations (COE) UFTeach program. The goal of UFTeach is to increase the quantity and quality of secondary mathematics and science teachers. This past academic year, the Center worked with a UFTeach student intern, Rachel Shapiro, on developing our science outreach projects. Collaborating with COE and working with Rachel, a fourth-year student majoring in zoology, was a great success. Rachel shares her thoughts on her internship experience below. These past two semesters I had the opportunity to work with the Center for Latin American Studies through an internship offered by UFTeach. UFTeach is an education minor for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors who may be interested in a career in secondary education. The end result of the program is several hours worth of experience in schools teaching lessons, and temporary teaching certification in the state of Florida. With the Center, I was able to work with the Florida Museum of Natural History to help create lesson plans for their dugout canoe exhibit. Seven local schools were provided bus stipends by the Center to visit the museum this year. I also played a small part in helping develop this professional development summer institute for teachers, Ecosystems of Latin America, as well as provided ideas for the science traveling suitcase. This has been an amazing experience for me. At first I was a little disappointed that I could not work more directly with the museum, but after meeting the team and delving into these projects, I am so very glad I had the opportunity to work here. I design lesson plans so often for my education classes, and expected to be doing nearly the same in this internship. I could not have been happier about being wrong. Developing lesson ideas for the museum was a real challenge, as I had to extend my level of expertise in science to see how connections could be made across multiple disciplines. The science suitcase was more challenging; I knew little about Latin American cultures, and tried to find authentic pieces that related both to science and did not just tack on the cultural relations aspect. Sitting in on the planning meetings for Center and FLMNH initiatives was a real eye-opener to another aspect of being a teacher. While I can no longer work with the Center, I do hope that another UFTeach student has an opportunity to do so. It definitely widens your view about how all of the pieces of something seemingly simple, like a field trip, are put together. I would recommend this opportunity to anyone who can get involved so they can see how beneficial it can be to step outside of your boundaries every now and then. First grade students from Littlewood Elementary School in Gainesville visit the dugout canoe exhibit at FLMNH.

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SPRING 2011 9 SPRING 2011 9 OUTREACH T he Centers Outreach Lending Library is pleased to announce the acquisition of the DVD documentary Brother Towns/Pueblos Hermanos directed by Charles Thompson and Michael Davey. The documentary explores the connection through migration between the towns of Jacaltenango, Guatemala and Jupiter, Florida. With footage from both towns, the documentary provides a human look into the local, national and international debate on migration. The acquisition of this documentary adds to the Outreach Lending Librarys growing collection of documentaries featuring immigration to the state of Florida. The library also includes Maya in Exile which highlights Mayan immigrants in Florida; Laviche which investigates the case of Haitian immigrants in Florida; and the documentaries 90 Miles and Lejos de la Isla both of which present the case of Cuban immigration to Florida. -Contributed by Holly Brause, MALAS Student Featured Item: Brother Towns/Pueblos Hermanos T he Centers Outreach Program offered its rst virtual K-12 teacher training program this spring using Elluminate and the Learn Central online educator community. The webinar series was entitled An Introduction to Latin America and featured one-hour sessions on race, religion, and politics in Latin America. The series received a positive response from participants and gave exposure to the Center through the Learn Central network, which includes teachers from the U.S. and around the world. Archived session record ings and resources associated with the webinar series can be found at: http://introlatinamerica.wikispaces.com/. LAS Teacher Training Webinar Series April 19, 2011 Democracy and Justice in Latin America Iran Rodrigues April 26, 2011 More Than "One Drop": Race in Latin America Rosana Resende May 3, 2011 Vodou, Santera, and Candombl: Afro-European Religious Encounters in the Caribbean and Latin America Gerald Murray May 10, 2011 US-Latin American Relations in the Obama Era Philip Williams

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10 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 10 THE LATI NA MERICANIST EVENTS MALAS students enjoy the Gala Reception. RAY CARSON MALAS alumni Nicols Rubio (left to right), Omaira Bolaos, and Meredith Fensom, participate in the career panel on non-profit jobs. Russ Bernard poses with TCD students and alumnae Vivian Ziedemann (left to right), Denyse Mello, Simone Athayde, and Laura Kowler. Erica Felker-Kantor (left to right), Alba Amaya-Burns, and Joan Flocks look at tapestries at the Silent Auction. RAY CARSON

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SPRING 2011 11 SPRING 2011 11 EVENTS Latin American flags were on display at the LAS historical marker ceremony on the Plaza of the Americas, much like when the plaza was dedicated in 1930. Philip Williams (left), Center Director, poses with four previous Directors: Carmen Diana Deere, Chuck Wood, Terry McCoy, and Helen Safa. MALAS alumna Juliana Azoubel (second from left, front row) teaches Gala Reception attendees Brazilian dance. Jorge Pin (BA 1975), an international energy con sultant, speaks at the business symposium. LAURIE MICHAELSON RAY CARSON

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12 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 12 THE LATI NA MERICANIST Chelsea Braden (Political Science) Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS) Thesis: Latino Immigrant Incorporation: A Case Study from Garden City, Kansas Holly Brause (Anthropology) Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS) Thesis: The Culture of Migration in Uruguay Ana de Lima (TCD) Advisor: Nigel Smith (Geography) Thesis: Urbanization and the Consumption of Regional Fruits in Western Brazilian Amazon Kyle Doherty (History) Advisor: Lillian Guerra (History) Thesis: Afro-Cuban Intellectuals and the Doctrine of Mart: The Discursive Battle for Cuba Libre's Soul. Erica Felker-Kantor (Development Studies) Advisor: Charles Wood (LAS) Thesis: Perceptions of Maternal Health Care Among Haitian Women in the Dominican Republic: Do Race and Ethnicity Matter? Clay Giese (Development Studies) Advisor: Charles Wood (LAS) Thesis: Measuring the Effects of Bolsa Familia on Child Mortality in Brazil Whitney Lpez-Hardin (Political Science) Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS) Thesis: Puerto Rican Migration: Hybrid Identities among Return Migrants Leonardo Pacheco (TCD) Advisor: Marianne Schmink (LAS) Thesis: Arising from Trees: Changes, Challenges, and Achievements of the Rubber Tappers Movement Daisy Prez (Political Science) Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS) Thesis: Undermining Civil Society in Mexico After the Transition to Electoral Democracy Jason Taylor (Development Studies) Advisor: Richmond Brown (LAS) Thesis: A Short History of Corporate Accountability: A Commentary on International Legal Personality and an Analysis of Human Rights Litigation in United States Courts Under the Alien Tort Statute Aaron Victoria (Andean Studies) Advisor: Mark Thurner (History) Thesis: The Politics of Indigenous Nationalism: The Case of Bolivia Carly Voight (TCD) Advisor: Nigel Smith (Geography) Thesis: Xate Palm (Chamaedorea sp.) Enrichment in Western Belize: The Ecological Effects of Management in Relation to Understory Plant Species Richness, Diversity, and Composition Alisa Woofter (Development Studies) Advisor: Carmen Diana Deere (LAS/FRE) Thesis: Indigenous Artisans, Gender Roles and Bargaining Power: A Case Study from the Bolivian Highlands MALAS Degrees William Arthur IV MA (Architecture) Lidiane Behlau MA (Urban & Regional Planning) Rose Caraway PhD (Religion) Eryn Duffield MA (Geography) Gabriela Hernndez MFA (Art) Andrea Arevalo (Political Science) Leah Arnold (Journalism) Ashley Bisnow (Psychology) Sebastian Camacho (Marketing) David Concepcin (Political Science) Rafael Cruzado (Business) Andrea DeFreitas (Political Science) Sallie Dehler (Anthropology) Merline Dieujuste (Sociology) Lisa Duckrow (Business) Brook Elmore (Political Science) Maria Feliciano (Political Science) Michael Gaviria (Business) Lauren Gold (Journalism) Bianca Gras (Political Science) Jos Hernndez, Jr. (Anthropology) Kristen Hoffman (Mathematics) Mai Le (Political Science) Amanda Monaco (Political Science) Maria Navarro (Advertising) Caroline Oliveira (Agricultural Operations Mgmt.) Leslie Pappa (Business) Dylan Paul (Geography) Katiusla Ramrez (Biology) Nicole Scholet (Political Science) Jonathon Urrutia (Political Science) Joshua Villanueva (International Studies) Chelsea Weaver (Political Science) Graduate LAS Certificates Undergraduate LAS Minors & Certificates Student NEWS STUDENTS

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SPRING 2011 13 SPRING 2011 13 STUDENTS 2011 Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship Recipients The following UF students received U.S. Department of Education Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowships from the Center for Latin American Studies. Sarah Benton (MALAS) Portuguese Anna Brodrecht (Anthropology) Yucatec Maya Crystal Felima (Anthropology) Haitian Creole Alicia Mercado-Harvey (Spanish & Portuguese) Portuguese Jessica Neer (LAS) Portuguese 2011 Study Abroad Scholarships Congratulations to the following students for receiving scholarships to study abroad this summer in Brazil! David Armas (Advertising), Hower Travel Prize, UF in Rio Language and Culture Program Jessica Lorenzo (Business Administration), McCoy Travel Scholarship, UF in Rio Business Program Ki Tung Zhang (International Business), McCoy Travel Scholarship, UF in Rio Business Program Student Funding 2011 Summer Research Grant Recipients The following UF students were awarded funding from the Center for Latin American Studies and the Tropical Conservation and Development program (TCD) to conduct field research in Latin America during summer 2011. Funding of these awards was made possible by the Centers grant overhead funds and the following accounts: TCD Ford Foundation Endowment, the Boonstra Family Research Fellowship, the William Carter Fellowship, the Carol French Doughty Memorial Fund, the Charles Wagley Research Fellowship, the A. Curtis Wilgus Graduate Fellowship, and the Panama Canal Museum Research Fund. The country where the student is conducting research follows the reference to their degree program. Krystal Anderson (MALAS) Ecuador Lindsay Barnes (MALAS) Panama Stephanie Boothby (MA Anthropology) Bolivia Corey David de Souza (PhD Anthropology) Brazil Oscar Gonzlez (PhD SNRE) Peru Elizabeth Gregg (MS SNRE) Peru Tatiana Gumucio (PhD Anthropology) Bolivia Carlos Iiguez (MALAS) Ecuador Alissa Jordan (PhD Anthropology) Haiti Eshe Lewis (MALAS) Peru Camee Maddox (PhD Anthropology) Martinique Jamie Marks (MA/PhD Anthropology) Peru Mario Mighty (PhD Geography) Jamaica Vanessa Mintzer (PhD SNRE) Brazil Marvin Morales (PhD Biology) Venezuela Rachel Mouro (MALAS) Brazil Catalina Pimiento (PhD Biology) Panama Justin Quinn (MA Anthropology) Mexico Angela Revers (MALAS) Venezuela Luciano Soares (PhD Biology) Brazil Thaissa Sobreiro (PhD SNRE) Brazil Esli Surez (MALAS) Mexico Erin Zavitz (PhD History) Haiti Adrian Zeh (MALAS) Panama

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14 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 14 THE LATI NA MERICANIST STUDENTS Field Research Clinic at the Universidad Veracruzana, Mexico H ow can graduate student research results better reach an audience beyond the students graduate committee or those that peruse the shelves of university libraries? How can the knowledge and experience gained by graduate students during the research process be tapped so that incoming students can learn from it? The Latin American Studies Field Research Clinic (FRC) has been an annual event since 2003 (see article on next page). A celebration of Latin America-focused graduate student research, the FRC was conceptualized in response to the questions posed above. In the two-part event, graduate students first meet together by themselves to discuss issues related to the field research process to teach each other and then present their work in poster form to the broader campus community and members of the general public. In 2006, the FRC concept was taken to the Brazilian Amazon and successfully adapted with long-term LAS partner, the Federal University of Acre. This year, the forum was introduced in Mexico at the Centro de Investigaciones Tropicales (CITRO), a graduate research and training center at the Universidad Veracruzana focused on biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. With support from Fulbright Foundation Fellowships and a USAID-HED U.S. Mexico-TIES grant, LAS faculty Karen Kainer, Hannah Covert and Jonathan Dain along with CITRO partners Dr. Citlalli Lopez and Dr. Edward Ellis coordinated the event which was organized, advertised and run by CITRO graduate students. The 1 Foro de Intercambio de Experiencia Estudiantil took place in early April and was a startling success with 32 research posters and over 70 visitors including graduate students, faculty, staff and other attendees. The event was held at CITROs Orchid Research Lab and Garden and generated great interest and enthusiasm. All involved felt that the Foro de Intercambio de Experiencia Estudiantil will become an annual CITRO event. 2011 Poster Competition WINNERS Grand Prize for Best Overall Poster Visitantes florales de Echeveria rosea Lindley (Crassulaceae), en un bosque de pino-encino en Veracruz, Mxico Hctor David Jimeno Sevilla Best Poster for a Research Proposal El Tapir Centroamericano (Tapirus bairdii) en el Uxpanapa, Veracruz Jess Parroqun Prez Best Poster for Research-in-Process Diseo de sistemas agroforestales con base en el manejo tradicional de la milpa y el solar en el municip io de Jess Carranza, Veracruz Juana Ortz Timoteo Best Poster for Completed Research Especies vegetales utilizadas para la produccin de papel amate en la Sierra Norte de Puebla Adolfo de Jess Rebolledo Morales Graduate students at the Universidad Veracruzana participated in the field research clinic. BELINDA CONTRERAS JAIMES

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SPRING 2011 15 SPRING 2011 15 STUDENTS Field Research Clinic at the University of Florida T he Center for Latin American Studies and the Tropical Conservation and Development (TCD) Program awarded more than 30 field research grants for UF graduate students to carry out Masters thesis and pre-dissertation fieldwork in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2010. The ninth annual Field Research Clinic (FRC) provided an opportunity for grant recipients to showcase their work and to disseminate the results of their research to a wide audience of students and faculty members. Held in the Reitz Union, the FRC gave students the chance to find out about the various research projects sponsored by the Center and TCD, and to stimulate debate with students from a broad range of disciplines. The posters showcased projects in 10 disciplines and 19 countries. The FRC highlights the importance of graduate student research and raises awareness among the public about the vital importance of funding provided by the Center. The clinic has gained international recognition, serving as the inspiration for similar events at the Federal University of Acre in Brazil and the Universidad Veracruzana in Mexico this year (see article on previous page). The first half of the clinic consisted of a peer-learning workshop dealing with the fieldwork experience, providing new graduate students with the opportunity to voice their questions and concerns to students who have already completed their fieldwork. The clinic was designed and run by graduate students Jennifer Arnold and Deborah Wojcik. The second half of the clinic was devoted to the research poster competition. The grand prize for best research poster went to Holly Brause (LAS) for her poster, The Culture of Migration in Uruguay. Hollys adviser is Philip Williams (LAS). Posters were evaluated by Marilyn Swisher (Family Youth and Community Sciences), Adri n F lix (LAS), and Jean Stubbs (2011 LAS Bacardi Family Eminent Scholar). The FRC is one of several graduate student support activities sponsored by the Center over the course of the academic year. These events serve to enhance the learning and professional preparation of LAS students. 2011 Poster Competition WINNERS Grand Prize The Culture of Migration in Uruguay Holly Brause (LAS) 2nd Prize Masters Level Land Tenure in Yucatec Mayan Communities Timoteo Mesh (SNRE) 2nd Prize PhD Level Post-Earthquake Hispaniola: Migration, Families, Children and Fosterage Tess Kulstad (Anthropology) 3rd Prize Masters Level Indigenous Artisans, Gender Roles, and Bargaining Power: A Case study from the Bolivian Highlands Alisa Woofter (LAS) 3rd Prize PhD Level People and Fire in Tropical Forests: Cultural Landscapes in Recurrently Burned Conservation Areas in Calakmul, Mexico Claudia Monzn (Geography) Holly Brause (MALAS 2011), winner of the grand prize in the poster competition. ESHE LEWIS

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16 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 16 THE LATI NA MERICANIST ALUMNI What is your current position? S M D: I am a Professor of History at University of Texas at El Paso. I specialize in 20th century Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. I teach courses on South America, Caribbean/Central America, Latin American women and gender, Latin American Jews, and other post-independence topics. SP: I am the President of IP (Instituto de Pesquisas Ecolgicas) and I teach classes for short-term, non-degree programs and a Master's program. NR: I work for the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) in Washington DC as a commodity analyst covering the U.S. rice export markets in the Western Hemisphere and North Asia. Prior to this position, I was part of teams within FAS ensuring the enforcement and implementation of the Dominican RepublicCentral America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) and the United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement. What do you enjoy most about your job? S MD: I especially enjoy the contact with students and the research opportunities. SP: I enjoy seeing our young professionals flourish and become involved in issues that make a difference. When they are able to find what they like and acquire the determination to pursue quali ty in whatever they do, it gives us a feeling that we are on the right track. NR: There are two things I enjoy the most about my job: a) the opportunities to travel to Latin America to understand the market situation and distribution of grains in these countries and b) hav ing access to various resources dealing with international affairs and business. It helps me keep up with current events! How did the MALAS degree help prepare you for your career? S M D: The MALAS program was useful in getting me started on my research path, acquainting me with prominent experts in the field, and awakening interdisciplinary interests. SP: The interdisciplinary approach of the MALAS program influ enced Claudio, my husband, and I when we founded our institu tion IPE. We have integrated theory with practice of the social and the environmental spheres. We particularly used these princi ples when we conceptualized the courses for our Master's pro gram. We teach a seminar course, which is similar to what we experienced at MALAS. In this course, we cover many aspects that are important for conservation, but that are not typically included in a Master's program in Ecology. For example, we discuss envi ronmental ethics, environmental education, community-based ecotourism, conflict resolution, green economy, carbon offsets estimates, and so on. After being exposed to these fields, students are asked to come up with creative alternatives to real problems, usually helping partners reach more sustainable solutions. This may be a little different from the MALAS approach, but the pro gram at UF was innovative when we studied there in the late 80s, and I am afraid it still is when compared with the overall Brazilian academic world. NR: The MALAS degree prepared me in many important ways. For example, it gave me an excellent academic background on the region and helped me further develop my research and communi cation skills. On a personal level, it gave more assurance about the type of work I wanted to do in Latin America. Do you have any memories or interesting stories that you would like to share about your time at the Center or UF? S MD: I especially remember how William Carter, Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at the time, gave me extra encouragement and support. SP: I remember participating in the Amazonian Seminar that Marianne Schmink taught. Each student in the class wrote a final paper on a topic of their own interest and then presented it to the class. One of the students was interested in mosses and I had no idea if she was speaking of an animal, an ethnic group or a climate characteristic. Only when she was finished did I understand she was speaking of a type of plant. So, the diversity in the class was great and helped us learn with open minds, respecting what others had to offer. In family terms, I was happy to have the security of counting on Baby Gator to leave my younger child, Joana. Two days a week I left her very early and picked her up late in the afternoon. I always felt guilty and arrived at the school with a pain in my heart, but she was always happy and many times even said: "Hi Mom, you are already here to pick me up?" This gave me such a good feeling that she was well taken care of while I was busy studying. For a mother, this is critical for all the rest to be achieved. NR: There are so many stories and memories! After seven years in Gainesville, my heart is still there! The best memories at the Center are the times I spent at the Computer Lab on the third floor of Grinter Hall. I never knew who I was going to run into in that room. However, I did know that I was going to discuss ran dom topics about politics, the Gators, projects, classes, professors, trips, and many others. Alumni Career Profile Sandra McGee Deutsch, Suzana Padua, and Nicol s Rubio In this edition of the MALAS Alumni Career Profile, we highlight the careers of three alumni who participated in the annual conference and who are employed in non-profit and public service jobs. They are Sandra McGee Deutsch (MALAS 1973 and PhD History 1979), Suzana Padua (MALAS 1991), and Nicols Rubio (MALAS 2006).

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SPRING 2011 17 SPRING 2011 17 Rhina Bonilla (BS Journalism with LAS Minor 1997; MALAS 2002) worked as a Spanish interpreter for the district schools in Greensboro, NC after graduating from UF. Since 2007, she has worked as a free lance Spanish interpreter and translator. She also does transcriptions, consulting, proofreading and editing. Rhina lives in Mt. Dora, FL. Amy Turner Bushnell (PhD History 1978) has retired to Rhode Island with her hus band, Jack Greene. She holds courtesy appointments in the Department of History at Brown University and at the John Carter Brown Library. In spring 2009, Amy taught a graduate course at the John F. Kennedy Institute at the Free University in Berlin. She was as a fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina in 2009-10. This year, Amy has spent a month apiece at the Rockefeller Library in Colonial Williamsburg and at the International Center for Jefferson Studies in Charlottesville. Christine (Archer) Engels (MALAS 2002) works as an evaluation specialist on a USDA Specialty Crops Project carried out by UF and UC-Davis. She lives in Gainesville with her husband and two children. Erica Felker-Kantor (MALAS 2011) will start a Masters program in international public health at Johns Hopkins University this fall. Michael Gamble (MALAS 1992) began teaching in Alachua County in 1994. He was appointed Principal of Howard Bishop Middle School in 2010. Juanita Ibaez (BA Political Science with LAS Certificate & Minor 2009) is an advisor for gender, conflict and human development for the city of Bucaramanga, Colombia. Bonnie Lincoln (MA Economics 1966) has been appointed for three years to the Project Development Committee of the International Federation of University Women. The committee oversees IFUW's grants promoting the empowerment of women and girls undertaken by member national associations in developing coun tries. Bonnie is a retired Foreign Service Officer. Steven Minegar (BA Political Science/ History 2008; MALAS 2010) will start a PhD program in Political Science this fall at Emory University in Atlanta. Susan Poats (MALAS 1975; PhD Anthropology 1979) is Acting Executive Director of the Corporacin Grupo Randi Randi in Quito, Ecuador. Nicole Sarrine (BA Political Science with LAS Certificate & Minor 2010) is the Special Assistant for Congressional and State Relations for the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. Ellie (Lewis) Sintjago (MALAS 2010) is a Principal Operations Specialist for the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) Sleep Study at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. She plans to enroll in Law School or a PhD program in the fall. Howard Wiarda (PhD Political Science 1965) has been appointed Professor of National Security Policy and the Associate Director for Research and Publications at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies at the National Defense University. Sunni Witmer (MALAS 2009) is finishing a PhD in Musicology/Ethnomusicology at UF. This spring she taught World Music at Rollins College and Latin American Humanities at Valencia College as an adjunct professor. & N EWS NOTES ALUMNI ALUMNI UFs LAS Alumni Board recently elected a new Steering Committee: President: Jos Sariego (BS 1977) Vice-President: Steven Keats (BA & LAS Certificate 1977) Secretary: Meredith Fensom (JD/MALAS 2004) The mission of the UF Latin American Studies Alumni Board is to cultivate stronger relationships between Latinamericanist alumni and the Center for Latin American Studies, enhance the quantity and quality of the Centers program offerings, build the prestige of the Center both nationally and internationally, and assist in acquiring the resources needed to accomplish those goals. New Steering Committee of the LAS Alumni Board Stephen Walroth-Sadurn (left), outgoing President of the LAS Alumni Board, Philip Williams, Center Director (center), and Jos Sariego (right), incoming President of the LAS Alumni Board, enjoy the Gala Reception at the 60th Annual Conference. RAY CARSON

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18 THE LATI NA MERICANIST 18 THE LATI NA MERICANIST Latin American History at UF Sandra McGee Deutsch (PhD 1979, MALAS 1973), University of Texas at El Paso Paul Hoffman (PhD 1969), Louisiana State University Sherry Johnson (PhD 1995), Florida International University Allan Keuthe (PhD 1967), Texas Tech Jane Landers (PhD 1988), Vanderbilt University Marixa Lasso (PhD 2002), Case Western Reserve University Murdo MacLeod (PhD 1962), University of Florida Kym Morrison (PhD 2003), University of Massachusetts, Amherst David Sowell (PhD 1986), Juniata College Blair Turner (PhD 1985), Virginia Military Institute Latin American Business Symposium Alan Behmoiras (BS 1989), 18 Industries, Inc. Steven Keats (BS 1977), Kestrel Liner Agencies Oscar Luzuriaga (BS 1991), Latin American Agribusiness Development Corporation Jorge Pin (BA 1975), international energy consultant Jos Sariego (BS 1977), HBO Latin America Group Stephen Walroth-Sadurn (BS 1980), Walroth-Sadurn & Mendoza-Tirado Latin American Career Workshop Omaira Bolaos (PhD 2008, MALAS 2003), Rights and Resources Institute Nadine Brown (JD 1997, MALAS 1998), Law Office of Nadine A. Brown Rebecca Caballero (JD 2005, MALAS 2002), Law Office of Rebecca Caballero Louise Canuto (BS 2009), TransMedia Group Kirsten Clanton (JD/MALAS 2005), Southern Legal Counsel Meredith Fensom (JD/MALAS 2004), Allen F. Johnson & Associates Evan George (JD 2003, MALAS 2004), Law Office of Evan D. George Kathy Newman (BSBA 1976), Cheery, Bekaert & Holland Levy Parajn (MS 2004, MALAS 2006), Cross Keys Captial Nicol s Rubio (MALAS 2006), Foreign Agricultural Service, USDA The Legacy of Charles Wagley Emilio Morn (PhD 1975), Indiana University Richard Pace (PhD 1987), Middle Tennessee State University William Vickers (PhD 1976), Florida International University Florida Immigration Studies at UF Maria Miralles (PhD 1992), PHI/USAID Bryan Page (PhD 1976), University of Miami Legacy of UF Scholars Lisandro Prez (PhD 1974), John Jay College, CUNY Brent Richards Weisman (PhD 1987), University of South Florida Howard Wiarda (PhD 1965), University of Georgia Caribbean Studies at UF Kathleen Deagan (PhD 1974), University of Florida Anthony Maingot (PhD 1967), Florida International University Andean Studies at UF Mercedes Prieto (PhD 2003), FLACSO-Ecuador Latin American Art and Culture at UF Juliana Azoubel (MALAS 2007), Universidade Federal de Paran U.S. Policy toward Latin America Frank Almaguer (BA 1967), former US Ambassador to Honduras P.K. (Ken) Keen (MALAS 1986), U.S. Southern Command Frank McNeil (BA 1954), former US Ambassador to Costa Rica Implementing the TCD Approach Omaira Bolaos (PhD 2008, MALAS 2003), Rights and Resources Institute Claudio Padua (PhD 1993, MALAS 1987), Escola Superior de Conservaco Ambiental e Sustentabilidade Suzana Padua (MALAS 1991), Instituto de Pesquisas Ecolgicas Susan Poats (PhD 1979, MALAS 1975), Grupo Randi Randi, Ecuador The Study of Indigenous Languages at UF Howard Beck (PhD 1990), University of Florida Sue Legg (PhD 1978), University of Florida History of the Center for Latin American Studies Paul Losch (MALAS 2002), University of Florida Richard Phillips (MALAS 1981), University of Florida Fifty UF LAS alumni were panelists at the 60th Annual Conference. They were joined on the panels by current and former UF faculty. Listed below are the conference panels, names, year of graduation, and places of employment of the alumni participants. Annual Conference Alumni Participants

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SPRING 2011 19 SPRING 2011 19 Thanks To Our Donors The Center for Latin American Studies would like to express its gratitude for the generosity of those who have responded to our mailings and to the University of Florida Foundations annual appeal. Gracias to the following people! Latin American Studies Fund Christopher Baker & Karen Schwartz Ellen Barclay Carmen Diana Deere Donald & Geraldine Fraser Mark & Deborah Kisker Richard & Wanda Oberdorfer Paul P rez Jos & Ann Starr Sariego Chaitram Singh Eduardo Silva Eytan Starkman Eugene Taggart Carol French Doughty Memorial Fund Philip Williams & Victoria Condor-Williams Ford Foundation Endowment for Tropical Conservation and Development TCD Student Group Panama Canal Museum Research Fund Panama Canal Museum Schmink Fund for Innovation in Tropical Conservation and Development Amy Duchelle Raissa Guerra Philip Williams & Victoria Condor-Williams Vivian G. Nolan Graduate Fellowship Wanda & Charles Denny New Milenio Americas Society Member Carmen Diana Deere The Center for Latin American Studies would love to hear from its ALUMN I If you have not already done so, please complete our electronic Alumni Update Form online at: http://www.latam.ufl.edu/Alumni/update.stm We're on Facebook and LinkedIn! Center for International Business Education & Research Florida Museum of Natural History Food and Resource Economics Latin American Business Environment Program Latin American Studies MA in Latin American Studies School of Forest Resources & Conservation School of Natural Resources & Environment Spanish and Portuguese Studies Tropical Conservation & Development Program Wildlife Ecology & Conservation UF Acronymns CIBER FLMNH FRE LABE LAS MALAS SFRC SNRE SPS TCD WEC

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NonProfit Org. U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit No. 94 Gainesville FL Center for Latin American Studies 319 Grinter Hall P.O. Box 115530 Gainesville, FL 32611 My gift is to benefit: Boonstra Family Research Fellowship (014091) Carol French Doughty Memorial Fund (016269) Colonel Farris Scholarship (005067) LAS Alumni Graduate Student Travel Fund (012521) Latin American Studies Fund (011147) McCoy Travel Scholarship Fund (014527) Nolan Graduate Fellowship in LAS (016143) Safa Graduate Student Travel (013515) Schmink Fund for Innovation in TCD (016259) Wagley and Carter Fellowships (004763) Gift Amount: $500 $250 $100 $50 $ _________________ Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ City/State/Zip _____________________________________ Email ___________________________________________ Method of payment: Check (Make check payable to: UF Foundation, Inc.) Please send your check with this form to: UF Foundation Gift Processing Department P.O. Box 14425 Gainesville, FL 32604-2425 Credit Card Call the UF Foundations Gift Processing toll-free number with your credit card information: 1-877-351-2377 This secure line is staffed weekdays from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Or Access the Centers online giving page: https://www.uff.ufl.edu/OnlineGiving/ CenterforLatinAmericanStudies.asp We rely on contributions from our friends and alumni to support certain special activities such as student travel to conferences and seed support for larger fund-raising efforts. If you would like to make a donation to the Center, please fill out the form below. Giving to the Center for Latin American Studies


Latinamericanist
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PDF VIEWER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066464/00022
 Material Information
Title: Latinamericanist
Alternate Title: University of Florida latinamericanist
Portion of title: Latin americanist
Abbreviated Title: Latinamericanist
Physical Description: v. : ; 28-36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies
University of Florida -- Center for Latin American Studies
Publisher: Center for Latin American Studies,
Center for Latin American Studies
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla
Publication Date: 2011
Frequency: semiannual[<1992->]
3 no. a year[ former ]
biweekly[ former <, sept. 28, 1964->]
semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Periodicals -- Latin America   ( lcsh )
Study and teaching (Higher) -- Periodicals -- Latin America -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 3, 1964)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Suspended between v. 35, no. 1 (fall 1999) and v. 36, no. 1 (spring 2005).
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 36, no. 2 (fall 2005).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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g LATINAMERICANIST

University of Florida Center for Latin American Studies I Volume 42, Number 1 I Spring 2011


Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American Studies at UF


UF celebrated 80 years of teaching, research and service in
Latin American Studies with a series of commemorative
events from March 24-26, 2011. The central event was the Center
for Latin American Studies' 60th Annual Conference, "Looking
Forward, Looking Back: Celebrating 80 Years of Latin American
Studies at the University of Florida." The three-day celebration also
included the dedication of a historical marker on the Plaza of the
Americas, art and cultural exhibits, and a gala reception. Over 250
alumni, staff, students, and current and former faculty took part in
this recognition of achievements and moment of reflection.
The objective of the conference
was to envision how the Center
can move forward in the 21st
century while building on its rich
legacy. The conference included
symposia on Latin American
business and Latin American
history; panels recognizing
influential former faculty, Center
directors, and alumni; sessions
focusing on Latin American
communities in the southeast and
U.S. policy toward Latin America;
and a Latin American career
workshop for current students. f
Fifty MALAS and UF alumni
participated as conference
speakers (see page 18).
The conference opened with a
keynote lecture on "The New
Narcocultura: A Conversation A Philip Williams (leftto right), Center
abot M Ala Provost for Academic Affairs, and Stepl
about Mexico" by Alma .
e Alumni Board, spoke at the LAS historic
Guillermoprieto, an author and
journalist with expertise in the
cultural and political life of Mexico and South America. Jose
Antonio Ocampo, faculty member at Columbia University and
former Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin
America and the Caribbean, delivered a luncheon keynote on "Latin
American Economic Challenges of the New World" (see page 3).
Four art and cultural exhibits added to the celebration. The UF
Harn Museum of Art staged two exhibits of modern and
contemporary Latin American works. A collection of maps dating
to the 16th and 17th centuries from collector and UF LAS alumnus
Steven Keats were displayed in the lobby of Grinter Hall. The
exhibit featured cartography of the Americas and the Caribbean by
European explorers. Smathers Libraries hosted an exhibit of Latin
American Studies historical memorabilia from the Latin American


Direc
ien V
al ma


Collection. A showing of photography of the Brazilian Amazon
by Charles Wagley, late UF professor of Anthropology, and
Richard Pace, Wagley's former student and UF alumnus, were
displayed at the Center. Finally, documentary film screenings took
place throughout the conference, many of which featured or were
produced by UF faculty and students.
A highlight of the anniversary was the dedication of a historical
marker about Latin American Studies on the southeast corner of
UF's Plaza of the Americas. Center Director Philip Williams'
remarks from the dedication ceremony are printed on page two of
this newsletter. The marker
states,
Established in 1930 as the
Institute of Inter-American
I A Affairs, the UF Center for
Latin American Studies is the
nation's oldest academic
program dedicated to the
interdisciplinary study of the
Americas. The Plaza of the
Americas was dedicated at the
center's first conference in
February 1931, and 21 live
oaks were planted, one for
each of the republics of the
SAmericas at that time.
Through the center, UF has
I strengthened Florida's ties
with Latin America by
recruiting international
tor, Angel Kwolek-Folland, Associate students, diversifying the
/alroth-Sadurni, President of the LAS
curriculum and collaborating
irker ceremony on March 24, 2011.
with institutions in the region.
Its work spurred the
development of one of the leading Latin American libraries and
gained early and continuing financial support from the U.S.
Department of Education.
The gala reception, held at the Florida Museum of Natural
History, featured a silent auction, dance lessons by MALAS
alumna Juliana Azoubel, and Latin music provided by Ekobios
and DJ Luminous (MALAS alumnus Luis Caraballo). In between
dancing and enjoying a hors d'oeuvres buffet, reception attendees
generously donated $3,500 to the silent auction benefitting the
LAS Alumni Graduate Student Travel Fund.
Many thanks to the alumni, faculty, staff and students who
made the celebration of 80 years of Latin American Studies a
stunning success!


inside: p2 Director's
Corner


p3 Nolan
J Fellowship


7 Faculty News
S& Publications


p 17 Alumni News
& Notes


U UNIVERSITY of
UF IFLORIDA









*Irecior'sCornermu


j Eighty years ago, the Institute for Inter-American Affairs (the forerunner to
the Center) held the closing ceremony for its inaugural conference. The
ceremony included a dedication of the Plaza of the Americas, and the planting
of 21 live oaktrees, representing each of the republics of the Americas at the
time. At UF's June commencement the previous year, President John Tigert
announced the creation of the Institute, the first Latin American Studies
program at a US university.
SUF must have seemed like an unlikely place at an unlikely time for such a
bold initiative a small, all-male, racially segregated, land-grant university
located in the Deep South, during a deepening economic depression that
A Dr. Philip Williams forced the country to focus inward. And yet, Pres. Tigert, who had been a
Rhodes Scholar and served as US Commissioner of Education, realized the
importance of international exchanges and had a clear sense of Washington's growing relationship
with Latin America under the guise of the Good Neighbor Policy. Moreover, given Florida's historical
and geographic connections to the region, UF seemed like the perfect place to launch such an
initiative. To demonstrate the seriousness of the initiative, during the commencement ceremony when
the Institute was announced, Pres. Tigert awarded an honorary degree for the first time to a Latin
American citizen, Cuban Ambassador to the US, Dr. Orestes Ferrara. During Tigert's tenure, despite
the lack of resources, the Institute made available scholarship opportunities for students from Latin
America, and UF signed a collaborative agreement with the University of Havana.
Growing from one faculty member in 1930 to a small cluster of Latin Americanists, in 1951, the
School of Inter-American Studies superseded the Institute for Inter-American Affairs, initiating M.A.
and Ph.D. degrees in Latin American Studies. It also began organizing annual conferences, initially
with a focus on the Caribbean. Since 1930, close to 2,500 masters theses and doctoral dissertations
have been awarded on Latin American topics. Recognizing UF's unique strengths in Latin American
Studies, in 1961 the US Department of Education (USDOE) designated the School as a National
Resource Center (NRC) in Latin American Studies. In 1963 the Center for Latin American Studies
replaced the School for Inter-American Studies. Since then, it is one of the only Centers in the
country that has been continuously designated by the USDOE as a Title VI NRC in Latin American
Studies.
Over the years, our students have gone on to pursue successful careers in academia, government,
the military, law, business, and the non-profit sector. UF faculty have made major contributions to the
development of the field of Latin American studies. From 1949-1978, the Handbook of Latin American
Studies, the premier bibliography on the region, was published by the University of Florida Press.
Faculty members edited the Journal of Inter-American Studies from 1959-69 and the Hispanic
American Historical Review during the early 60s and again from 1986-1991. The Secretariat of the
Latin American Studies Association (LASA) was based at the Center for Latin American Studies from
1972 to 1978, and three UF faculty members served as its president. Our Latin American Collection has
grown to become one of the finest in the country, housing the largest collection of Caribbean
materials in the world. The collection contains over 500,000 volumes, 1,200 journal subscriptions, and
1,900 films.
Eighty years ago, who would have thought that President Tigert's unlikely vision would put UF on
the map as a pioneer in Latin American Studies and that the Center would go on to become a leader
in interdisciplinary research and training. May the next 80 years be as fruitful as the last 80! Long live
the Center for Latin American Studies! Viva el Centro!


4LATINAMERICANIST

Volume 42, Number 1
Spring 2011


Center for Latin American Studies
319 Grinter Hall
PO Box 115530
Gainesville, FL 32611-5530
352-392-0375
www.latam.ufl.edu




Center-Based Faculty & Professional Staff
Philip Williams Director
Hannah Covert Executive Director


Efrain Barradas (LAS/Spanish &
Portuguese)
Richmond Brown Associate Director,
Academic Programs
Emilio Bruna (LAS/WEC)
Jonathan Dain (LAS/SNRE)
Carmen Diana Deere (LAS/FRE)
Aimee Green Program Coordinator
Karen Kainer (LAS/SFRC)
Ana Margheritis (LAS/Political Science)
Mary Risner Associate Director, Outreach
& LABE
Janet Bente Romero Associate Director of
Development, UFF
Patricia Delam6nica Sampaio, TCD
Program Coordinator
Marianne Schmink (LAS/Anthropology)
J. Richard Stepp (LAS/Anthropology)
Welson Tremura (LAS/Music)
Pliar Useche (LAS/FRE)
Charles Wood (LAS/Sociology)


Editor: Hannah Covert, LAS
Graphic Designer: University Relations
Creative Group


3 Jose Antonio Ocampo Lecture
4 Bacardi Lecture
5 Ott6n Solis Lecture
6 New MDP & TCD Directors
7 Faculty News & Publications
8 Outreach News


10 Photos of 80th Anniversary
12 Student News
14 Field Research Clinics
16 Alumni Career Profile
17 Alumni News & Notes
19 Donors


TF Center for
UA Latin American Studies
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA






I EVENTS I


Latin America's Economic Challenges

in an Uncertain World


During the recent annual conference of the Center for Latin
American Studies, Jose Antonio Ocampo delivered the
Business Symposium keynote address on the current economic
challenges facing Latin America in the wake of the global economic
crisis. Currently a professor at Columbia University, Ocampo has
served as the Executive Secretary for the Economic Commission for
Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), as the United Nations
Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, and in a
number of ministerial posts in the government of Colombia.
In his presentation, Ocampo highlighted a number of positive
recent trends in Latin America. For example, poverty and inequality
have fallen to their lowest levels in decades, and the region has made
great strides in improving income distribution. Overall, Ocampo
portrayed a cautious optimism about the future for regional
economic development.
The turmoil of the global economic crisis continues, but Latin
America as a whole has adjusted relatively well to the downturn.
Ocampo argued that the current financial crisis differs from previous
crises in that the region did not default on its external debt. Fiscal
stability and the accumulation of foreign exchange reserves allowed
many countries to pursue countercyclical policies. Some countries,
like Brazil and Peru, benefitted from these policies. Meanwhile,
countries like Mexico which followed procyclical policies, performed
less well.


According to Ocampo, perhaps the greatest concern for Latin
America is the decline of global trade. In the immediate aftermath
of the 2008 financial crisis, global trade fell by 30% the steepest
decline in recent world history. Trade has recovered to some extent,
but it remains a major concern for a region that has relied heavily on
global trade as an engine for economic growth.
Ocampo also emphasized the variegated pattern of recovery across
the region. In general, South America has weathered the economic
crisis better than Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. The
latter group clearly suffered from its close ties to the US market.
South American economies have recovered through rapid growth in
commodity exports. Commodity prices declined sharply in late 2008
but recovered very quickly thereafter. Also, agricultural prices have
been more stable than during any previous global recession.
Nonetheless, Ocampo is concerned about South America's reliance
upon a few major commodity exports and the unbalanced
relationship such has produced with China.
Latin America's hopeful future may have been constructed upon
the fault lines of its past. Ocampo illuminated both the promise of a
new era in Latin America and the fragility of its aspirations.

-Contributed by Brian Readout, MALAS student


Vivian G. Nolan Graduate Fellowship in

Latin American Studies


The Center for Latin American Studies is pleased to announce the creation of the Vivian G.
Nolan Graduate Fellowship in Latin American Studies. A very generous gift from Wanda
and Charles Denny, the daughter and son-in-law of Vivian Nolan, endows the fellowship program.
Income from the fund will support graduate fellowships for students studying indigenous peoples
and cultures at the Center for Latin American Studies.
Vivian Nolan was an administrative assistant at the Center for Latin American Studies from the
early 1960s to 1980s. While at the Center, Mrs. Nolan worked closely with M.J. Hardman, UF
Professor of Linguistics, and Charles Wagley, late UF Professor of Anthropology. Besides her
centrality to the Center's day-to-day operations, she was known for opening her home to students
and visiting faculty from Latin America. She attended Florida State University and was a member
of Trinity United Methodist Church in Gainesville. She died at the age of 78 in 2004.
Terry McCoy, former Director of the Center stated, "Vivian Nolan was a wonderful human
being with whom I had the pleasure of working on a daily basis when I joined the Center in 1975
until her retirement in the early 1980s. She was not only the "Jill-of-all-trades" for the Center --
serving as the director's executive secretary, office manager and chief fiscal officer -- but a beloved
member of the Center family. Wherever I travel in Latin America I run into visitors and alumni
who remember the warmth with which Vivian, husband Jim and daughters Wanda and Kitty
made them feel welcome in Gainesville. It is very much in keeping with Vivian that Wanda and
Charles would generously endow a fellowship for students studying the indigenous peoples of the
Americas."
Additional gifts to the endowment are welcome. See page 20 for information on making a gift.


A Vivian G. Nolan


SRN 2013






1EVENTSI


Jean Stubbs, I
Spring 2011 Bacardi Family
Eminent Scholar in Latin
American Studies


February 3 Subsidizing Foreign Direct Investment in
Latin America: Is that a Development Policy?
Ott6n Solis, Hewlett Visiting Fellow for Public Policy,
Kellogg Institute for International Studies, University of
Notre Dame

February 17 Fossil Mammals, Giant Sharks, and
Ancient Rainforests: A Once-in-a-Century Opportunity
along the Panama Canal
Bruce MacFadden, Curator, FLMNH

March 3 The Status of Garifuna in Honduras: An
Endangered Language?
Santiago Ruiz, Post-Doctoral Associate, UF Center for
Latin American Studies

March 17 Open Access at the University of Florida
Isabel Silver, Director of Academic and Scholarly
Outreach, UF Libraries

March 31 Migration Writings and the Imagined
Community of Exile
Carina Gonzalez, Assistant Professor, UF Department of
Spanish and Portuguese Studies

April 14 Durable Utopias and Peasant Longings:
Revolution and Guerrillas in the Mexican Countryside,
1960-1975
Alex Avina, Assistant Professor, Department of History,
Florida State University

April 28 Challenges Currently Facing Cuba
Leslie Y6iez, Vice-Rector for Research, University of
Havana


Bacardi Lecture:

The Havana Cigar Goes Global


Jean Stubbs, a distinguished British historian who has pub-
lished widely on Cuba, served as the spring 2011 Bacardi
Family Eminent Scholar. During her public Bacardi Family
Lecture in early March, "The Havana Cigar Goes Global," Stubbs
took the audience through a visual journey of El Habano cigar.
She demonstrated that the cigar, at different junctures, is linked
to discussions of globalization, migration, race, gender, and U.S.
politics and policies.
In the early 19th century, the city of Havana became the
premium tobacco producer, making El Habano cigar the world's
premium cigar. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, however,
tobacco producers across the world become enthralled with pro-
ducing tobacco on par with Havana's quality. Stubbs' discussion
centered on how other countries attempted to produce a Cuban
cigar outside of Cuba and showcased advertisements by cigar
manufacturers seeking to attract consumers to their brand.
The 1990s are regarded as the revival of the cigar story across
the world. Global tobacco growers and cigar makers emerged
attempting to produce cigars comparable to or better than the
Cuban cigar. For example, Sumatra and Java, Indonesia became
major producers of tobacco in the hopes of competing with the
Cuban cigar, as did the Dominican Republic. Stubbs showed an
advertisement from the Dominican Republic boasting about the
high quality of their product, "Perfected in the Dominican Re-
public'. Meanwhile, Nicaragua, having imported seeds from Cuba,
grows high quality tobacco that is the most comparable to Cuba's.
In the U.S., tobacco factories already existed in Key West and
new factories sprang up in Connecticut. Stubbs displayed images
alongside her narration of the journey of tobacco seeds and cigar
production to these countries.
Stubbs highlighted the connection of cigar production to oth-
er topics, such as race and gender. Regarding race, Cuban produc-
ers portrayed their workers as Spanish; however, in reality, black
and Asian workers filled factory production lines. To illustrate glo-
balization, Stubbs shared that factory workers in Connecticut were
Jamaican and Puerto Rican, later replaced by Central Americans
and Mexicans. Finally, she explained how women were sexual-
ized in advertisements with depictions of women smoking and
hand-rolling cigars in provocative poses. Moreover, despite norms
dictating that cigar-smoking is a "manly" activity, women were
targeted as potential cigar smokers, which Stubbs illustrated with
an advertisement of Whoopi Goldberg smoking a cigar. Through-
out the presentation, the cigar story was linked to the social and
political context of the producing countries.
Stubbs is an Associate Fellow at the Institute for the Study
of the Americas, University of London, and Professor Emerita of
Caribbean History at London Metropolitan University, where she
was the founding Director of the Caribbean Studies Centre. She
holds a BA in Government from the University of Essex and PhD
in History from the Birkbeck College, University of London.


-Contributed by Daisy Perez, MALAS student


4 THE LATINAMERICANIST






I EVENTS I


Subsidizing Foreign Direct

Investment in Latin America:

Is that a Development Policy?
In early February, Costa Rican
economist Ott6n Solis spoke at
UF as part of the Center's Spring
Colloquium Series. Solis has served as
Minister of Planning and Economic
Policy and a congressman in Costa
Rica. He was the co-founder of the
Citizens Action Party and ran for
president in 2002, 2006 and 2010. In
2010-11, Solis was the Hewlett Visiting
Fellow for Public Policy at the Kellogg
Institute for International Studies at
the University of Notre Dame. He was
A Ott6n Solis the Bacardi Family Eminent Scholar in
Latin American Studies at UF in 2008.
Solis' presentation dealt with foreign direct investment in
Latin America. According to Solis, the negative consequences
of foreign direct investment in emerging economies are rarely
addressed. He discussed several such consequences, with
emphasis on Costa Rica. First, fiscal and tax practices are not
conducive to strengthening national economies and human
capital. A large portion of corporations and citizens do not
pay taxes. This phenomenon, in combination with a low tax
burden (10-18% in Central America), tends to justify a culture
of tax evasion. Likewise, when multinational corporations are
not required to pay taxes, there is weak resolve on the part of
officials to enforce tax laws with national companies. Overall,
low levels of tax revenue, and thus public resources, result in
stagnant investment in infrastructure and social development.
The struggle to remain competitive in the global market
creates a vicious cycle, where states provide more and more
subsidies for multinational corporations in order to retain
them in country. With increased subsidies, however, there is
less investment in human capital. Also, free trade agreements,
which facilitate foreign direct investment, weaken democracy.
Such agreements tend to bypass national legislation,
undermining citizens' ability to make decisions for their
country.
Finally, a different idea about development permeates and
influences politicians and decision-makers. Individuals act as
if their culture is for sale as they seek out multinational
corporations who can "buy" into their country. To Solis,
politicians seem less concerned with developing the national
economy, such as providing jobs and promoting exports, than
with bringing companies into the country and willingly
subsidizing their entrance and stay.
Given these outcomes, Solis questions why foreign direct
investment continues to be viewed as the major development
model for developing countries. The "race to the bottom;'
where investors dictate the rules in their favor and developing
countries compete to receive investments, will not lead to real
development of national economies. As such, Solis
recommends that the state play a leading role in leveling the
playing field by requiring corporations to pay taxes, invest in
human development, and engage in long-term planning.

-Contributed by Daisy Perez, MALAS Student


Center Organizes Conference

at the Woodrow Wilson Center

on Immigration
n November 18, 2010 the Center co-sponsored a conference
with the Mexico Institute at the Woodrow Wilson
International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. The conference
focused on immigration enforcement programs in the U.S., and
included two roundtables, the first offering an analysis of
immigration-related enforcement policies at the national level, the
second focused on the experiences of communities throughout the
country, where 287(g) agreements and the Secure Communities
program have been implemented. The 287(g) program allows state
and local law enforcement entities to receive delegated authority from
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for immigration
enforcement within their jurisdictions. Featured conference speakers
included: Maria Hinojosa, senior correspondent, NOW on PBS;
David Venturella, executive director, Secure Communities, U.S. ICE;
Don Kerwin, Vice President for Programs, Migration Policy Institute;
and Daniel Hernandez Joseph, Director General, Protection of
Mexicans Abroad, Foreign Relations Ministry (Mexico). The
conference was part of a new Center initiative to develop an institute
focused on the study of immigration, religion, and social change in
the U.S. South and was made possible by a generous grant from the
Ford Foundation. For more information contact Manuel Vasquez,
Department of Religion (manuelv@ufl.edu).


UF-FGV Seminar on

Emergent Brazil

Building on the recent cooperative agreement with the Centro
de Pesquisa e Documentacao de Hist6ria Contemporanea do
Brasil (CPDOC) at the Fundacao Getulio Vargas (FGV) in Rio de
Janeiro, the Center hosted a seminar on "Emergent Brazil" in
December 2010. The seminar was attended by CPDOC and UF LAS
faculty. Presentations were made on political and economic
innovation in Brazilian affairs, new Brazilian cultural and urban
trends, and Brazil's changing role in Latin American economic and
international affairs. Given Brazil's new global role in both the
economy and international policy, as well as the recent choice to host
the World Cup and the Summer Olympics there, the Center and
CPDOC are planning an international conference on the nation's
complex domestic evolution and international impact as the focus of
the Center's annual conference in 2013. The conference is expected to
attract presenters from academia, diplomacy, politics, and business.
CPDOC, one of the established, preeminent social science research
institutions in Brazil, has particular strengths in history and
international affairs and hosts a state-of-the-art archive and
publication record for post-1930 Brazil. CPDOC has recently begun
training graduate students, opened a branch in Sao Paulo, and begun
establishing international institutional relationships with a few, select
universities. For more information contact Jeffrey Needell,
Department of History (jneedell@ufl.edu).


SRN 2015






I FACULTY I


Glenn Galloway

Hired as Director of MDP Program


The Center for Latin American Studies is pleased to announce
that Glenn Galloway will join UF in fall 2011 as Director of
the MA in Sustainable Development Practice (MDP) Program.
Galloway is currently Dean of the Graduate School and Director of
the Education Division at the Tropical Agricultural Research and
Higher Education Center (CATIE) in Costa Rica.
Galloway worked for nearly ten years in South America, first with


Peace Corps (Colombia) and later as a highland forestry advisor for
USAID in Peru and Ecuador. Since 1992, he has worked throughout
Central America with CATIE, first as coordinator to a regional
Finnish financed forestry and agroforestry research and training
program and then as leader to a Swiss financed lowland tropical
forest management project working with poor mestizo and
indigenous communities in Honduras and Nicaragua. He was
appointed to his current position at CATIE in 2003. Galloway
participates in international forestry initiatives, serving on the
steering committee of the IUFRO World Forests, Society and
Environment (WFSE) Special Project and contributing to
international processes on forestry education. He has a PhD in
Silviculture from the University of Washington and a Master's degree
from the University of British Columbia, Canada.
The MDP program seeks to link natural, social, health sciences
and management to bridge the gaps between specialized disciplines
in the formulation and implementation of integrated development
policies. In 2009, UF was selected as one of the first two universities
in the U.S. to receive funding from the John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur Foundation to implement an MDP program. At UF, the
program is a joint collaboration of the Center for Latin American
Studies and the Center for African Studies.


Bette Loiselle

Hired as Director of TCD Program


The Center for Latin American Studies and the Department of
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation (WEC) are pleased to
announce that Dr. Bette Loiselle will join UF in fall 2011 as Director
of the Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD) in
the Center and as a Professor of Tropical Ecology in WEC. Loiselle is
currently Director of the Division of Environmental Biology at the


National Science Foundation.
From 1990-2009, Loiselle was a Professor of Conservation Biology
at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Her research is in the broad
area of evolutionary ecology with particular emphasis on seed
dispersal ecology, population dynamics and mating systems of
tropical birds, and the application of Geographic Information
Systems (GIS) technology to ecology and conservation. She is
particularly interested in examining the importance of biodiversity
to ecological processes, such as seed dispersal and plant regeneration,
and at unraveling ecological and evolutionary processes that explain
female choice in manakins, which are tropical lek-breeding birds.
Loiselle's research has also explored the application of ecological
niche modeling and GIS to predict species' distributions both in
present and future climates. She has been conducting research in the
tropics since 1982. She and her students have worked in many
ecosystems throughout the Neotropics as well as central Africa and
the tropical forests of Queensland, Australia. Loiselle received her
B.A and M.S. from University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and
her Ph.D. from University of Wisconsin. She has taught a variety of
courses, including GIS, Public Policy of Conservation and
Sustainable Development, Conservation Biology, and field courses in
Costa Rica


6 THE LATINAMERICANIST






FACULTY I


Faculty News and Publications


* Florence E. Babb (Women's Studies &
Gender Research) was a discussant for a
seminar on "Street Economies, Politics and
Social Movements in the Urban Global South"
at the School for Advanced Research in Santa
Fe, NM. She participated in the roundtable on
"Generations of Knowledge and Research
Traditions: 60 Years of Applied,. ,-.11 i. .1.. -
in the Callej6n de Huaylas and Wider Peru"
and was a panel discussant on "Moving Beyond
the Actors in Tourism" at the Society for
Applied,, 11 .. ....1.. meeting in Seattle in
March. Publications: Out in Public: Lesbian
and Gay Activism in Nicaragua. In J. Corrales
and M. Pecheny, eds., The Politics of Sexuality
in Latin America: A Reader on Lesbian, Gay,
Bisexual, and Transgender Rights. University of
Pittsburgh Press, 2010.

* Emilio Bruna (LAS/WEC) was recognized as
the 2011 Graduate Advisor and Teacher of the
Year by the UF College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences.

* Allan Burns ( i.i1l... ...1.._- i was selected as
a Doctoral Dissertation ,,.. I. I i I i.. 1 .,
Award winner for 2010-11 by the UF Graduate
School.

* Carmen Diana Deere (LAS/FRE) was the
co-organizer of a workshop on gender and
international migration sponsored by Feminist
Economics and hosted by the Faculty of
Economics at the University of the Basque
Country in Bilbao, Spain in March. She also
delivered lectures to the Economics
Department at Tulane University in January
and to the Center for Women, Gender and
Sexuality at Rice University in April.

* Susan Gillespie ( ,.ilI,......1.._- ) delivered
an invited paper on "The Ecstasy and the
Agony: The La Venta Excavations" in
coordination with the opening of the exhibit
"Olmec: Colossal Masterworks of Ancient
Mexico" at the deYoung Museum in San
Francisco in February.

* David Geggus (History) spoke on "Why is
Haiti so Poor?" for UF's Grimes Lecture Series
in January and "The Changing Faces of
Toussaint Louverture," the keynote address at
the annual conference of the Consortium on
the Revolutionary Era in Tallahassee in March.


Publications: The Haitian Revolution in
Atlantic Perspective. In N. Canny & P. Morgan,
eds., The Atlantic World c.1450-c.1820. New
York: Oxford University Press, 2011.

* Karen Kainer (LAS/SFRC) was selected as a
Doctoral Dissertation .. . -i I iii..,i '"
Award winner for 2010-11 by the UF Graduate
School. Publication: Resource Theft in Tropical
Forest Communities: Implications for Non-
Timber Management, Livelihoods, and
Conservation (with A. Duchelle, P. Cronkleton,
G. Guanacoma & S. Gezan). Ecology and
Society, 16(1) 2011: 4.

* Juan Carlos Molleda (Public Relations)
Macroencuesta latinoamericana de
comunicaci6n y relaciones publicas (with A.
Moreno, A. Athaydes & A.M. Suirez).
Organicom, 7(13) 2010: 118-141.

* Gregory Moreland (Spanish & Portuguese
Studies) presented the paper "Two Students
and a Professor Ponder the Question: 'What
Can We Truly Gain from the Study Abroad
Experience?'" (with A. Boudreaux & K.
Marulanda) at the CIBER Business Language
Conference in Charleston in March.

* Charles Perrone (Spanish & Portuguese
Studies) presented "Inter-linguistic 'Anguish' in
Recent Lyric" at the Modern Language
Association Conference in January.
Publication: Paulo Leminski sob a 6tica da
po6tica transamericana. In M. Sandmann, ed.,
A pau a pedra a fogo a pique: dez estudos sobre a
obra de Paulo Leminski. Curitiba: Secretaria de
Estado da Cultura do Parand, 2010.

* Mary Risner (LAS) and Kimberly Fields, a
10th grade teacher at George C. Marshall High
School in Virginia, delivered a three-hour K-12
workshop entitled, "Preparing Students for the
Global Workplace" at the annual CIBER
Business Language Workshop in Charleston,
South Carolina. They also presented "Global
Perspectives in the Business Curriculum: A 21st
Century Priority" at the annual National
Business Education Association conference in
New Orleans. In January, Risner was invited to
moderate a teachers' panel at the Annual K-12
Language for Business Conference at Florida
International University.


* Marianne Schmink ( .1 I..!...1.._-) is a
Co-PI, with PI Walter Bowen (IFAS) and Co-PI
Steven Sargent (Horticultural Sciences), of a
new four-year $7.7 million USAID grant to
support, negotiate, plan, coordinate, and
implement the USAID-funded component of
the Trilateral Cooperation Agreement (Brazil,
U.S., & Mozambique) between the U.S. and
Brazil. Publications: Deforestation Drivers in
Southwest Amazonia: Comparing Smallholder
Farmers in Iniapari, Peru, and Assis Brasil,
Brazil (with A. Almeyda, E. Broadbent, S. Perz,
& G. Asner).Conservation and Society, 8 (3)
2010: 157-170; Amazonian Geographies:
Emerging Identities and Landscapes (ed. with J.
Vadjunec). Special Issue of Journal of Cultural
Geography, 28(1) 2011; Rubber Tapper Citizens:
Emerging Places, Policies, and Shifting
Identities in Acre, Brazil (with J. Vadjunec & C.
Gomes). Journal of Cultural Geography, 28(1)
2011: 73-98; New Amazonian Geographies:
Emerging Identities and Landscapes (with J.
Vadjunec & A. Greiner). Journal of Cultural
Geography, 28(1) 2011: 1-15.

| Brijesh Thapa (Tourism, Recreation & Sport
Management) presented the paper,
"Ecotourists' Satisfaction with Travel
Experiences and Ecolodges in Costa Rica" at
the Global Sustainable Tourism Conference in
South Africa in November. Publications:
Funding Strategies for World Heritage Sites in
Least Developed Countries. In P. Messenger &
G. Smith, eds., Cultural Heritage Management:
A Global Perspective. Gainesville, FL: University
of Florida Press, 2010; Visitor Perspectives on
Sustainable Tourism Development in the
Pitons Management Area World Heritage Site,
St. Lucia (with L. Nicholas). Environment,
Development and Sustainability, 12(5) 2010:
839-857.

* Philip Williams (LAS) and Manuel Visquez
(Religion) co-authored with Tim Steigenga
(FAU) and Marie Marquardt (Agnes Scott) a
forthcoming book, entitled Living 7ii.,i The
Human Face of Unauthorized Immigration. The
book will be published by The New Press in
late summer.


SRN 2017























TT











A First grade students from Littlewood Elementary School in Gainesville visit the dugout canoe exhibit at FLMNH.


One of the Outreach Program's new initiatives funded by
the Center's 2010-14 Title VI National Resource Center
grant is expansion of our K-12 outreach efforts to the
natural sciences. Proposed activities include offering
summer institutes for science teachers, creating a science-
themed traveling suitcase, increasing collaboration with the
Florida Museum of Natural History, and partnering with the
College of Education's (COE) UFTeach program. The goal
of UFTeach is to increase the quantity and quality of
secondary mathematics and science teachers.
This past academic year, the Center worked with a
UFTeach student intern, Rachel Shapiro, on developing our
science outreach projects. Collaborating with COE and
working with Rachel, a fourth-year student majoring in
zoology, was a great success. Rachel shares her thoughts on
her internship experience below.
These past two semesters I had the opportunity to work
with the Center for Latin American Studies Ii .','gl an
internship irt. .J by UFTeach. UFTeach is an education
minor for science, 4. .,..,- i, engineering, and mathematics
majors who may be interested in a career in secondary
education. The end result of the program is several hours'
worth of experience in schools teaching lessons, and temporary
teaching certification in the state of Florida. With the Center, I
was able to work with the Florida Museum of Natural History
to help create lesson plans for their dugout canoe exhibit. Seven
local schools were provided bus stipends by the Center to visit


the museum this year. I also played a small part in helping
develop this professional development summer institute for
teachers, E..;) ,r,. ,., of Latin America," as well as provided
ideas for the science traveling suitcase.
This has been an amazing experience for me. At first I was
a little disappointed that I could not work more directly with
the museum, but after meeting the team and delving into these
projects, I am so very glad I had the opportunity to work here.
I design lesson plans so often for my education classes, and
expected to be doing nearly the same in this internship. I could
not have been happier about being wrong. Developing lesson
ideas for the museum was a real clilllcngc, as I had to extend
my level of expertise in science to see how connections could be
made across multiple disciplines. The science suitcase was more
clallcg,:g,g I knew little about Latin American cultures, and
tried to find authentic pieces that related both to science and
did not just "tack on" the cultural relations aspect. Sitting in
on the planning meetings for Center and FLMNH initiatives
was a real eye-opener to another aspect of being a teacher.
While I can no longer work with the Center, I do hope that
another UFTeach student has an opportunity to do so. It
definitely widens your view about how all of the pieces of
something seemingly simple, like a field trip, are put ..g. i, I
would recommend this opportunity to anyone who can get
involved so they can see how beneficial it can be to step outside
of your boundaries every now and then.


8 THE LATINAMERICANIST






I OUTREACH I


Featured Item:l
Brte Tonlaelo arao


The Center's Outreach Lending Library is
pleased to announce the acquisition of
the DVD documentary Brother Towns/Pueblos
Hermanos, directed by Charles Thompson and
Michael Davey. The documentary explores the
connection through migration between the
towns of Jacaltenango, Guatemala and Jupiter,
Florida. With footage from both towns, the
documentary provides a human look into the
local, national and international debate on
migration. The acquisition of this documentary
adds to the Outreach Lending Library's growing
collection of documentaries featuring
immigration to the state of Florida. The library
also includes Maya in Exile, which highlights
Mayan immigrants in Florida; Laviche, which
investigates the case of Haitian immigrants in
Florida; and the documentaries 90 Miles and
Lejos de la Isla, both of which present the case
of Cuban immigration to Florida.

-Contributed by Holly Brause, MALAS Student


"Brother Towns reveals
the very human people
involved migrants,
workers, families, and
poticol leaders -
in the notional and
international debate
over immigration, all
trying to figure out how
todotherightthing."
Kevin R. lonson, Dean,
UC Davis School of Law


4'iL!u!J~J3 4'UwcrS~


*4


LAS Teacher Training Webinar Series

T he Center's Outreach Program offered its first virtual K-12 teacher training program this spring using Elluminate and the Learn
Central online educator community. The webinar series was entitled "An Introduction to Latin America" and featured one-hour
sessions on race, religion, and politics in Latin America. The series received a positive response from participants and gave exposure to
the Center through the Learn Central network, which includes teachers from the U.S. and around the world. Archived session record-
ings and resources associated with the webinar series can be found at: http://introlatinamerica.wikispaces.com/.


April 19, 2011
Democracy and Justice in Latin America
Iran Rodrigues

April 26, 2011
More Than "One Drop" Race in Latin America
Rosana Resende


May 3, 2011
Vodou, Santeria, and Candombl6: Afro-European Religious
Encounters in the Caribbean and Latin America
Gerald Murray

May 10, 2011
US-Latin American Relations in the Obama Era
Philip Williams


SRN 2019


1~;--~ ---,--- -Y--"'------------ ------ ---I---I IL




I EVENTS I


A Erica Felker-Kantor (leftto right), Alba Amaya-Burns,
and Joan Flocks look at tapestries at the Silent Auction.


V '.r-''- .'0 ,3
*^ *' c


A MALAS alumni Nicolas Rubio (left to right), Omaira
Bolaios, and Meredith Fensom, participate in the career
panel on non-profit jobs.


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I EVENTS I


A Ph Williams (
PhpWilliams (left),o Center Director, poses with four
previous Directors: Carmen Diana Deere, Chuck Wood,
Terry McCoy, and Helen Safa.


Lo .

eA *J


A ~J I

RcJ.~


EARS


ORI(tl Studies


A Jorge Pifi6n (BA 1975), an international energy con-
sultant, speaks atthe business symposium.


SRN 201


... .....






I STUDENTS


Student NEWS


Undergraduate LAS Minors & Certificates


Andrea Arevalo (Political Science)
Leah Arnold (Journalism)
Ashley Bisnow (Psychology)
Sebastian Camacho (Marketing)
David Concepci6n (Political Science)
Rafael Cruzado (Business)
Andrea DeFreitas (Political Science)
Sallie Dehler (Anthropology)
Merline Dieujuste (Sociology)
Lisa Duckrow (Business)
Brook Elmore (Political Science)
Maria Feliciano (Political Science)
Michael Gaviria (Business)
Lauren Gold (Journalism)


Bianca Gras (Political Science)
Jos6 Hernandez, Jr. (Anthropology)
Kristen Hoffman (Mathematics)
Mai Le (Political Science)
Amanda Monaco (Political Science)
Maria Navarro (Advertising)
Caroline Oliveira (Agricultural Operations Mgmt.)
Leslie Pappa (Business)
Dylan Paul (Geography)
Katiusla Ramirez (Biology)
Nicole Scholet (Political Science)
Jonathon Urrutia (Political Science)
Joshua Villanueva (International Studies)
Chelsea Weaver (Political Science)


Graduate LAS Certificates
William Arthur IV, MA (Architecture)
Lidiane Behlau, MA (Urban & Regional Planning)
Rose Caraway, PhD (Religion)
Eryn Duffield, MA (Geography)
Gabriela Hernandez, MFA (Art)

MALAS Degrees


Chelsea Braden (Political Science)
Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS)
Thesis: Latino Immigrant Incorporation: A
Case Study from Garden City, Kansas

Holly Brause (Anthropology)
Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS)
Thesis: The Culture of Migration in Uruguay

Ana de Lima (TCD)
Advisor: Nigel Smith (Geography)
Thesis: Urbanization and the Consumption
of Regional Fruits in Western Brazilian
Amazon

Kyle Doherty (History)
Advisor: Lillian Guerra (History)
Thesis: Afro-Cuban Intellectuals and the
Doctrine of Marti: The Discursive Battle for
Cuba Libre's Soul.

Erica Felker-Kantor (Development Studies)
Advisor: Charles Wood (LAS)
Thesis: Perceptions of Maternal Health
Care Among Haitian Women in the
Dominican Republic: Do Race and Ethnicity
Matter?


Clay Giese (Development Studies)
Advisor: Charles Wood (LAS)
Thesis: Measuring the Effects of Bolsa
Familia on Child Mortality in Brazil

Whitney L6pez-Hardin (Political Science)
Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS)
Thesis: Puerto Rican Migration: Hybrid
Identities among Return Migrants

Leonardo Pacheco (TCD)
Advisor: Marianne Schmink (LAS)
Thesis: Arising from Trees: Changes,
Challenges, and Achievements of the
Rubber Tappers Movement

Daisy P6rez (Political Science)
Advisor: Philip Williams (LAS)
Thesis: Undermining Civil Society in Mexico
After the Transition to Electoral Democracy

Jason Taylor (Development Studies)
Advisor: Richmond Brown (LAS)
Thesis: A Short History of Corporate
Accountability: A Commentary on
International Legal Personality and an
Analysis of Human Rights Litigation in
United States Courts Under the Alien Tort
Statute


Aaron Victoria (Andean Studies)
Advisor: Mark Thurner (History)
Thesis: The Politics of Indigenous
Nationalism: The Case of Bolivia

Carly Voight (TCD)
Advisor: Nigel Smith (Geography)
Thesis: Xate Palm (Chamaedorea sp.)
Enrichment in Western Belize: The
Ecological Effects of Management in
Relation to Understory Plant Species
Richness, Diversity, and Composition

Alisa Woofter (Development Studies)
Advisor: Carmen Diana Deere (LAS/FRE)
Thesis: Indigenous Artisans, Gender Roles
and Bargaining Power: A Case Study from
the Bolivian Highlands


12 THE LATINAMERICANIST





I STUDENTS I


Student Funding


2011 Summer Research Grant Recipients

The following UF students were awarded funding from the Center for Latin American Studies and the Tropical
Conservation and Development program (TCD) to conduct field research in Latin America during summer 2011. Funding
of these awards was made possible by the Center's grant overhead funds and the following accounts: TCD Ford Foundation
Endowment, the Boonstra Family Research Fellowship, the William Carter Fellowship, the Carol French Doughty Memorial
Fund, the Charles Wagley Research Fellowship, the A. Curtis Wilgus Graduate Fellowship, and the Panama Canal Museum
Research Fund. The country where the student is conducting research follows the reference to their degree program.


Krystal Anderson (MALAS) Ecuador
Lindsay Barnes (MALAS) Panama
Stephanie Boothby (MA Anthropology) Bolivia
Corey David de Souza (PhD Anthropology) Brazil
Oscar Gonzalez (PhD SNRE) Peru
Elizabeth Gregg (MS SNRE) Peru
Tatiana Gumucio (PhD Anthropology) Bolivia
Carlos liiiguez (MALAS) Ecuador
Alissa Jordan (PhD Anthropology) Haiti
Eshe Lewis (MALAS) Peru
Camee Maddox (PhD Anthropology) Martinique
Jamie Marks (MA/PhD Anthropology) Peru


Mario Mighty (PhD Geography) Jamaica
Vanessa Mintzer (PhD SNRE) Brazil
Marvin Morales (PhD Biology) Venezuela
Rachel Mourio (MALAS) Brazil
Catalina Pimiento (PhD Biology) Panama
Justin Quinn (MA Anthropology) Mexico
Angela Revers (MALAS) Venezuela
Luciano Soares (PhD Biology) Brazil
Thaissa Sobreiro (PhD SNRE) Brazil
Esli Suarez (MALAS) Mexico
Erin Zavitz (PhD History) Haiti
Adrian Zeh (MALAS) Panama


2011 Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship Recipients

The following UF students received U.S. Department of Education Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies
(FLAS) Fellowships from the Center for Latin American Studies.

Sarah Benton (MALAS) Portuguese
Anna Brodrecht (Anthropology) Yucatec Maya
Crystal Felima (Anthropology) Haitian Creole
Alicia Mercado-Harvey (Spanish & Portuguese) Portuguese
Jessica Neer (LAS) Portuguese



2011 Study Abroad Scholarships

Congratulations to the following students for receiving scholarships to study abroad this summer in Brazil!

David Armas (Advertising), Hower Travel Prize, UF in Rio Language and Culture Program
Jessica Lorenzo (Business Administration), McCoy Travel Scholarship, UF in Rio Business Program
Ki Tung Zhang (International Business), McCoy Travel Scholarship, UF in Rio Business Program


SRN 20111





ISTUDENTSl


A Graduate students atthe Universidad Veracruzana participated in the field research clinic.



2011 Poster Competition W I N N E R S


Grand Prize for Best Overall Poster
Visitantes florales de Echeveria rosea Lindley
(Crassulaceae), en un bosque de pino-encino en
Veracruz, Mexico
Hector David Jimeno Sevilla

Best Poster for a Research Proposal
El Tapir Centroamericano (Tapirus bairdii) en el
Uxpanapa, Veracruz
Jesus Parroquin Perez


Best Poster for Research-in-Process
Diseho de sistemas agroforestales con base en el
manejo traditional de la milpa y el solar en el municip-
io de Jesus Carranza, Veracruz
Juana Ortiz Timoteo

Best Poster for Completed Research
Especies vegetables utilizadas para la producci6n de
papel amate en la Sierra Norte de Puebla
Adolfo de Jesus Rebolledo Morales


14 THE LATINAMERICANIST





ISTUDENTSl


A Holly Brause (MALAS 2011), winner of the grand prize in the poster competition.


2011 Poster Competition W I [N

Grand Prize
The Culture of Migration in Uruguay
Holly Brause (LAS)

2nd Prize Master's Level
Land Tenure in Yucatec Mayan Communities
Timoteo Mesh (SNRE)

2nd Prize PhD Level
Post-Earthquake Hispaniola: Migration, Families,
Children and Fosterage
Tess Kulstad (Anthropology)


ERS


3rd Prize Master's Level
Indigenous Artisans, Gender Roles, and Bargaining
Power: A Case study from the Bolivian Highlands
Alisa Woofter (LAS)

3rd Prize PhD Level
People and Fire in Tropical Forests: Cultural
Landscapes in Recurrently Burned Conservation
Areas in Calakmul, Mexico
Claudia Monz6n (Geography)


SRN 20111






I ALUMNI I


Alumni Career Profile


Sandra McGee Deutsch, Suzana Padua, and Nicolas Rubio
In this edition of the MALAS Alumni Career Profile, we highlight the careers of three alumni who participated in the annual
conference and who are employed in non-profit and public service jobs. They are Sandra McGee Deutsch (MALAS 1973 and
PhD History 1979), Suzana Padua (MALAS 1991), and Nicolds Rubio (MALAS 2006).


What is your current position?

SMD: I am a Professor of History at University of Texas at El Paso.
I specialize in 20th century Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. I teach
courses on South America, Caribbean/Central America, Latin
American women and gender, Latin American Jews, and other
post-independence topics.
SP: I am the President of IPE (Instituto de Pesquisas Ecol6gicas)
and I teach classes for short-term, non-degree programs and a
Master's program.
NR: I work for the Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) in
Washington DC as a commodity analyst covering the U.S. rice
export markets in the Western Hemisphere and North Asia. Prior
to this position, I was part of teams within FAS ensuring the
enforcement and implementation of the Dominican Republic-
Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) and the
United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement.

What do you enjoy most about your job?

SMD: I especially enjoy the contact with students and the research
opportunities.
SP: I enjoy seeing our young professionals flourish and become
involved in issues that make a difference. When they are able to
find what they like and acquire the determination to pursue quali-
ty in whatever they do, it gives us a feeling that we are on the right
track.
NR: There are two things I enjoy the most about my job: a) the
opportunities to travel to Latin America to understand the market
situation and distribution of grains in these countries and b) hav-
ing access to various resources dealing with international affairs
and business. It helps me keep up with current events!


How did the MALAS degree help prepare you for your career?

SMD: The MALAS program was useful in getting me started on
my research path, acquainting me with prominent experts in the
field, and awakening interdisciplinary interests.
SP: The interdisciplinary approach of the MALAS program influ-
enced Claudio, my husband, and I when we founded our institu-
tion IPE. We have integrated theory with practice of the social
and the environmental spheres. We particularly used these princi-
ples when we conceptualized the courses for our Master's pro-
gram. We teach a seminar course, which is similar to what we
experienced at MALAS. In this course, we cover many aspects that
are important for conservation, but that are not typically included
in a Master's program in Ecology. For example, we discuss envi-


ronmental ethics, environmental education, community-based
ecotourism, conflict resolution, green economy, carbon offsets
estimates, and so on. After being exposed to these fields, students
are asked to come up with creative alternatives to real problems,
usually helping partners reach more sustainable solutions. This
may be a little different from the MALAS approach, but the pro-
gram at UF was innovative when we studied there in the late 80s,
and I am afraid it still is when compared with the overall Brazilian
academic world.
NR: The MALAS degree prepared me in many important ways.
For example, it gave me an excellent academic background on the
region and helped me further develop my research and communi-
cation skills. On a personal level, it gave more assurance about the
type of work I wanted to do in Latin America.


Do you have any memories or interesting stories that you would
like to share about your time at the Center or UF?

SMD: I especially remember how William Carter, Director of the
Center for Latin American Studies at the time, gave me extra
encouragement and support.
SP: I remember participating in the Amazonian Seminar that
Marianne Schmink taught. Each student in the class wrote a final
paper on a topic of their own interest and then presented it to the
class. One of the students was interested in mosses and I had no
idea if she was speaking of an animal, an ethnic group or a climate
characteristic. Only when she was finished did I understand she
was speaking of a type of plant. So, the diversity in the class was
great and helped us learn with open minds, respecting what others
had to offer.
In family terms, I was happy to have the security of counting on
Baby Gator to leave my younger child, Joana. Two days a week I
left her very early and picked her up late in the afternoon. I always
felt guilty and arrived at the school with a pain in my heart, but
she was always happy and many times even said: "Hi Mom, you
are already here to pick me up?" This gave me such a good feeling
that she was well taken care of while I was busy studying. For a
mother, this is critical for all the rest to be achieved.
NR: There are so many stories and memories! After seven years in
Gainesville, my heart is still there! The best memories at the
Center are the times I spent at the Computer Lab on the third
floor of Grinter Hall. I never knew who I was going to run into in
that room. However, I did know that I was going to discuss ran-
dom topics about politics, the Gators, projects, classes, professors,
trips, and many others.


16 THE LATINAMERICANIST






IALUMNII


- NEWS


NOTES



Rhina Bonilla (BS Journalism with LAS
Minor 1997; MALAS 2002) worked as a
Spanish interpreter for the district schools
in Greensboro, NC after graduating from
UF. Since 2007, she has worked as a free-
lance Spanish interpreter and translator.
She also does transcriptions, consulting,
proofreading and editing. Rhina lives in Mt.
Dora, FL.
Amy Turner Bushnell (PhD History 1978)
has retired to Rhode Island with her hus-
band, Jack Greene. She holds courtesy
appointments in the Department of History
at Brown University and at the John Carter
Brown Library. In spring 2009, Amy taught
a graduate course at the John F. Kennedy
Institute at the Free University in Berlin. She
was as a fellow at the National Humanities
Center in North Carolina in 2009-10. This
year, Amy has spent a month apiece at the
Rockefeller Library in Colonial
Williamsburg and at the International
Center for Jefferson Studies in
Charlottesville.


Christine (Archer) Engels (MALAS 2002)
works as an evaluation specialist on a USDA
Specialty Crops Project carried out by UF
and UC-Davis. She lives in Gainesville with
her husband and two children.
Erica Felker-Kantor (MALAS 2011) will
start a Master's program in international
public health at Johns Hopkins University
this fall.
Michael Gamble (MALAS 1992) began
teaching in Alachua County in 1994. He was
appointed Principal of Howard Bishop
Middle School in 2010.
Juanita Ibaiiez (BA Political Science with
LAS Certificate & Minor 2009) is an advisor
for gender, conflict and human development
for the city of Bucaramanga, Colombia.
Bonnie Lincoln (MA Economics 1966) has
been appointed for three years to the Project
Development Committee of the
International Federation of University
Women. The committee oversees IFUW's
grants promoting the empowerment of
women and girls undertaken by member
national associations in developing coun-
tries. Bonnie is a retired Foreign Service
Officer.
Steven Minegar (BA Political Science/
History 2008; MALAS 2010) will start a
PhD program in Political Science this fall at
Emory University in Atlanta.


Susan Poats (MALAS 1975; PhD
Anthropology 1979) is Acting Executive
Director of the Corporaci6n Grupo Randi
Randi in Quito, Ecuador.
Nicole Sarrine (BA Political Science with
LAS Certificate & Minor 2010) is the Special
Assistant for Congressional and State
Relations for the National Commission on
the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and
Offshore Drilling.
Ellie (Lewis) Sintjago (MALAS 2010) is a
Principal Operations Specialist for the
MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of
Atherosclerosis) Sleep Study at the
University of Minnesota School of Public
Health. She plans to enroll in Law School
or a PhD program in the fall.
Howard Wiarda (PhD Political Science
1965) has been appointed Professor of
National Security Policy and the Associate
Director for Research and Publications at
the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies
at the National Defense University.
Sunni Witmer (MALAS 2009) is finishing a
PhD in Musicology/Ethnomusicology at UE
This spring she taught World Music at
Rollins College and Latin American
Humanities at Valencia College as an
adjunct professor.


New Steering Committee

of the LAS Alumni Board


UF's LAS Alumni Board recently elected a new
Steering Committee:

President: Jose Sariego (BS 1977)
Vice-President: Steven Keats (BA & LAS Certificate 1977)
Secretary: Meredith Fensom (JD/MALAS 2004)

The mission of the UF Latin American Studies Alumni
Board is to cultivate stronger relationships between
Latinamericanist alumni and the Center for Latin American
Studies, enhance the quantity and quality of the Center's
program offerings, build the prestige of the Center both
nationally and internationally, and assist in acquiring the
resources needed to accomplish those goals.


A Stephen Walroth-Sadurni (left), outgoing President of the LAS Alumni
Board, Philip Williams, Center Director (center), and Jos6 Sariego (right),
incoming President of the LAS Alumni Board, enjoy the Gala Reception atthe
60th Annual Conference.


SRN 20111










Fifty UF LAS alumni were panelists at the 60th Annual Conference. They were joined on the panels by current and former UFfaculty.
Listed below are the conference panels, names, year of graduation, and places of employment of the alumni participants.


Latin American History at UF
Sandra McGee Deutsch (PhD 1979, MALAS 1973),
University of Texas at El Paso
Paul Hoffman (PhD 1969), Louisiana State University
Sherry Johnson (PhD 1995), Florida International University
Allan Keuthe (PhD 1967), Texas Tech
Jane Landers (PhD 1988), Vanderbilt University
Marixa Lasso (PhD 2002), Case Western Reserve University
Murdo MacLeod (PhD 1962), University of Florida
Kym Morrison (PhD 2003), University of Massachusetts,
Amherst
David Sowell (PhD 1986), Juniata College
Blair Turner (PhD 1985), Virginia Military Institute

Latin American Business Symposium
Alan Behmoiras (BS 1989), 18 Industries, Inc.
Steven Keats (BS 1977), Kestrel Liner Agencies
Oscar Luzuriaga (BS 1991), Latin American Agribusiness
Development Corporation
Jorge Piii6n (BA 1975), international energy consultant
Jose Sariego (BS 1977), HBO Latin America Group
Stephen Walroth-Sadurni (BS 1980), Walroth-Sadurni &
Mendoza-Tirado

Latin American Career Workshop
Omaira Bolafios (PhD 2008, MALAS 2003), Rights and
Resources Institute
Nadine Brown (JD 1997, MALAS 1998), Law Office of
Nadine A. Brown
Rebecca Caballero (JD 2005, MALAS 2002), Law Office of
Rebecca Caballero
Louise Canuto (BS 2009), TransMedia Group
Kirsten Clanton (JD/MALAS 2005), Southern Legal Counsel
Meredith Fensom (JD/MALAS 2004), Allen F. Johnson &
Associates
Evan George (JD 2003, MALAS 2004), Law Office of Evan D.
George
Kathy Newman (BSBA 1976), Cheery, Bekaert & Holland
Levy Parajon (MS 2004, MALAS 2006), Cross Keys Captial
Nicolas Rubio (MALAS 2006), Foreign Agricultural Service,
USDA

The Legacy of Charles Wagley
Emilio Moran (PhD 1975), Indiana University
Richard Pace (PhD 1987), Middle Tennessee State
University
William Vickers (PhD 1976), Florida International University


Florida Immigration Studies at UF
Maria Miralles (PhD 1992), PHI/USAID
Bryan Page (PhD 1976), University of Miami

Legacy of UF Scholars
Lisandro Perez (PhD 1974), John Jay College, CUNY
Brent Richards Weisman (PhD 1987), University of South
Florida
Howard Wiarda (PhD 1965), University of Georgia

Caribbean Studies at UF
Kathleen Deagan (PhD 1974), University of Florida
Anthony Maingot (PhD 1967), Florida International
University

Andean Studies at UF
Mercedes Prieto (PhD 2003), FLACSO-Ecuador

Latin American Art and Culture at UF
Juliana Azoubel (MALAS 2007), Universidade Federal de
Parana

U.S. Policy toward Latin America
Frank Almaguer (BA 1967), former US Ambassador to
Honduras
PK. (Ken) Keen (MALAS 1986), U.S. Southern Command
Frank McNeil (BA 1954), former US Ambassador to Costa
Rica

Implementing the TCD Approach
Omaira Bolafios (PhD 2008, MALAS 2003), Rights and
Resources Institute
Claudio Padua (PhD 1993, MALAS 1987), Escola Superior de
Conservacao Ambiental e Sustentabilidade
Suzana Padua (MALAS 1991), Instituto de Pesquisas
Ecol6gicas
Susan Poats (PhD 1979, MALAS 1975), Grupo Randi Randi,
Ecuador

The Study of Indigenous Languages at UF
Howard Beck (PhD 1990), University of Florida
Sue Legg (PhD 1978), University of Florida

History of the Center for Latin American Studies
Paul Losch (MALAS 2002), University of Florida
Richard Phillips (MALAS 1981), University of Florida


18 THE LATINAMERICANIST










The Center for Latin American Studies would like to express its gratitude for the generosity of those who have responded to
our mailings and to the University of Florida Foundation's annual appeal. Gracias to the .'-lli. 'ii people!


Latin American Studies Fund
Christopher Baker & Karen Schwartz
Ellen Barclay
Carmen Diana Deere
Donald & Geraldine Fraser
Mark & Deborah Kisker
Richard &Wanda Oberdorfer
Paul Perez
Jose & Ann Starr Sariego
Chaitram Singh
Eduardo Silva
Eytan Starkman
Eugene Taggart


Carol French Doughty Memorial Fund
Philip Williams & Victoria Condor-Williams

Ford Foundation Endowment for Tropical Conservation and Development
TCD Student Group

Panama Canal Museum Research Fund
Panama Canal Museum

Schmink Fund for Innovation in Tropical Conservation and Development
Amy Duchelle
Raissa Guerra
Philip Williams & Victoria Condor-Williams


Vivian G. Nolan Graduate Fellowship
Wanda & Charles Denny

New Milenio Americas Society Member
Carmen Diana Deere


I UF A c gon r


Center for International Business Education & Research
Florida Museum of Natural History
Food and Resource Economics
Latin American Business Environment Program
Latin American Studies
MA in Latin American Studies
School of Forest Resources & Conservation
School of Natural Resources & Environment
Spanish and Portuguese Studies
Tropical Conservation & Development Program
Wildlife Ecology & Conservation


The Center for
Latin American Studies


would love to hear from its

ALUMNI

If you have not already done so, please complete
our electronic Alumni Update Form online at:

http://www.latam.ufl.edu/Alumn i/update.stm

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UNIVERSITY of
UF IFLORIDA
Center for Latin American Studies
319 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 115530
Gainesville, FL 32611-5530


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Giving o *e *e American tudies


We rely on contributions from our friends and alumni to support certain special activities such as student travel to conferences
and seed support for larger fund-raising efforts. If you would like to make a donation to the Center, please fill out the form below.

My gift is to benefit: Method of payment:
0 Boonstra Family Research Fellowship (014091) 0 Check (Make check payable to: UF Foundation, Inc.)
O Carol French Doughty Memorial Fund (016269) Please send your check with this form to:
0 Colonel Farris Scholarship (005067) UF Foundation
0 LAS Alumni Graduate Student Travel Fund (012521) Gift Processing Department
0 Latin American Studies Fund (011147) P.O. Box 14425
0 McCoy Travel Scholarship Fund (014527) Gainesville, FL 32604-2425
O Nolan Graduate Fellowship in LAS (016143)
O Safa Graduate Student Travel (013515) 0 Credit Card
SSchmink Fund for Innovation in TCD (016259) Call the UF Foundation's Gift Processing toll-free number with yc
credit card information:
0 Wagley and Carter Fellowships (004763) 1 Q77-351-2377


ur


Gift Amount:
0$500 O$250 O$100 O$50 0$.

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