• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 Front Matter
 The Christmas gift that came to...
 Rupert’s Christmas gift
 Rupert ill, and the doctor visiting...
 The little drummer
 Rupert’s vision and death
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Dame Wonder's series
Title: The little drummer, or, The Christmas gift that came to Rupert
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066427/00001
 Material Information
Title: The little drummer, or, The Christmas gift that came to Rupert
Series Title: Dame Wonder's series
Alternate Title: Christmas gift that came to Rupert
Physical Description: 63, 8 p. : col. ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Strangeways, John ( Printer )
Banks, Henry H ( Illustrator )
Hotten, John Camden, 1832-1873 ( Publisher )
Banks & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: John Camden Hotten
Banks & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Edinburgh
Manufacturer: John Stangeways
Publication Date: [1873?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Drum -- War use -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
War -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sick -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Physicians -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
History -- Juvenile fiction -- United States -- Civil War, 1861-1865   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Bret Harte ; with illustrations by Henry H. Banks.
General Note: Date from publisher's catalogue following text.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Added t.p. and other illustrations printed in sepia.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066427
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002219468
notis - ALF9652
oclc - 71439467

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    List of Illustrations
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Front Matter
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The Christmas gift that came to Rupert
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Rupert’s Christmas gift
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Rupert ill, and the doctor visiting him
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The little drummer
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Rupert’s vision and death
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Advertising
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text






















THE LITTLE DRUMMER.



CG*


1 _



















StVJ .













SRET )AFkTE

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY HENRY H. BANKS

LO N .) 1N
JOHN ( .AMDEN HOTT N. 7-&T-7. PIC( ADIL-LY.








THE LITTLE DRUMMER

S GT THE


CHRISTMAS GIFT THAT CAME TO RUPERT.


,,A TO Y


FOFq CHILDREN


BRET HARTE.










WITH ILLUSTRA TIONS IN SEPIA
BY
HENRY H. BANKS.





LONDON:
JOHN CAMDEN HOTTEN, 74 AND 75 PICCADILLY, W.



























































































LONDON:
PRIN lrI BV JOHN STRANGEWAYS,
Castle St. Leicester Sq.























L" ___






Iist of 3lIustrations.


THE DOCTOR'S STORY ... ......


Fronttispicce.


RUPERT'S CHRISTMAS GIFT .. ... ... ... ... p.25

RUPERT ILL, AND THE DOCTOR VISITING HIM ... 35


THE LITTLE DRUMMER


... 5


RUPERT'S VISION AND DEATH ...



-".


----


























EELING hearts, touch them but lightly, pour
A thousand melodies unheard before.


HERE are moments when petty slights are harder to bear
than even a serious injury.


THE heart that is soonest awake to the flowers
Is always the first to be touched by the thorns.





&~t~~I~~(t

















THE

CHRISTMAS GIFT THAT

CAME TO RUPERT.




T was the Christmas

season in California a

season of falling rain

and springing grasses.

There were intervals when.


i


I









The Christmas Gft


through driving clouds and flying

scud, the sun visited the haggard

hills with a miracle, and death

and resurrection were as one, and

out of the very throes of decay

a joyous life struggled outward
and upward. Even the storms

that swept down the dead leaves

nurtured the tender buds that took

their places.
There were no episodes of

snowy silence ; over the quicken-










that came to Rupert.


ing fields the farmer's ploughshare

hard followed the furrows left by

the latest rains.

Perhaps it was for this rea-

son that the Christmas evergreens,

which decorated the drawing- room,

took upon themselves a foreign

aspect, and offered a weird contrast

to the roses, seen dimly through

the windows, as the south- west

wind beat their soft faces against

the panes.









12 The Christmas Gift


'Now;' said the Doctor, draw-
ing his chair closer to the fire,

and looking mildly but firmly at
the semicircle of flaxen heads around

him, 'I want it distinctly understood
before I begin my story, that I
am not to be interrupted by any
ridiculous questions. At the first

one I shall stop. At the second,
I shall feel it my duty to administer
a dose of castor-oil, all round. The
boy that moves his legs or arms










that came to Rupert.


will be understood to invite ampu-

tation. I have brought my instru-

ments with me, and never allow

pleasure to interfere with my busi-

ness. Do you promise?'

'Yes, sir,' said six small voices,

simultaneously.

The volley was, however, fol-

lowed by half a dozen dropping

questions.

'Silence! Bob, put your feet

down, and stop rattling that sword.









14 The Christmas Gift


Flora shall sit by my side, like a

little lady, and be an example to

the rest. Fung Tang shall stay,

too, if he likes. Now, turn down

the gas a little ; there, that wil)

do -just enough to make the fire

look brighter, and to show off the

Christmas candles. Silence, every-

body! The boy who cracks an

almond, or breathes too loud over

his raisins, will be put out of the

room.










taat came to Ruperl.


There was a profound

Bob laid his sword

aside, and nursed his leg

fully.


silence.

tenderly

thought-


Flora, after coquettishly adjusting

the pockets of her little apron, put

her arm upon the Doctor's shoulder,

and permitted herself to be drawn

beside him.

Fung Tang, the little heathen

page, who was permitted, on this
rare occasion, to share the Christian









16 The Christmas GXft


revels in the drawing room, sur-

veyed the group with a smile that
was at once sweet and philosophical.
The light ticking of a French
clock on the mantel, supported

by a young shepherdess of bronze
complexion and great symmetry of
limb, was the only sound that dis-
turbed the Christmas- like peace of
the apartment -a peace which held

the odours of evergreens, new toys,
cedar- boxes, glue, and varnish in a










that came to RzMiert. 17


harmonious combination that passed

all understanding.


'About four years ago at this

time,' began the Doctor, 'I attended

a cours of lectures in a certain

city. One of the professors, who

was a sociable, kindly man though

somewhat practical and hard-headed

-invited me to his house on Christ-

mas night.

'I was very glad to go, as I
c









18 The Christmas Git


was anxious to see one of his sons,

who, though only twelve years old,

was said to be very clever.

'I dare not tell you how many

Latin verses this little fellow could

recite, or how many English ones

he had composed. In the first

place, you'd want me to repeat

them; secondly, I'm not a judge of

poetry Latin or English.

'But there were judges who

said they were wonderful for a boy,










tkat came lo Riyicrl.


and everybody predicted a splendid

future for him. Everybody but his

father. He shook his head doubt-

ingly, whenever it was mentioned,

for, as I have told you, he was

a practical, matter- of- fact man.

'There was a pleasant party at

the Professor's that night. All the

children of the neighbourhood were

there, and among them the Pro-

fessor's clever son Rupert, as they

called him a thin little chap, about









The Christmas Gft


as tall as Bobby there, and fair
and delicate as Flora by my side.
His health was feeble, his father

said; he seldom ran about and
played with other boys preferring
to stay at home and brood over
his books, and compose what he
called his verses.

'Well, we had a Christmas-tree
just like this, and we had been
laughing and talking, calling off
the names of the children who










ltha came to Rupert. 2 1


had presents on the tree, and

everybody was very happy and

joyous, when one of the children
suddenly uttered a cry of mingled

surprise and hilarity, and said

'" Here's something for Rupert

- and what do you think it is ?"

'We all guessed.

"A desk."

"A copy of Milton."

S"A gold pen."

S"A rhyming dictionary."










The Christmas Gift


'"No! what then?"

'" A drum !"


'"A what ?"


asked everybody.


A drum! with Rupert's

on it."


'Sure enough


good- sized,

drum, with


bright,

a slip


there it


was.


new, brass- bound


paper


on it,


with the inscription


" FOR RUPERT."


'Of course we all


laughed,


and


it a good joke.


name


thought
















RUPERT'S CHRISTMAS GIFT.



w^g5











Miat came to Rupert.


'" You see you're to make a


in the world, Rupert !"


said


parchment


for the


said another.


'" Rupert's


/ast work in


"said


a third.


us a classical


tune,


Rupert," said

on.

'But Rupert

tified to speak;


a fourth, and so



seemed too mor -

he changed colour,


noise


one.


S" Here's


poet,"


skin


covers,


sheep -


'"Give


I I










28 The Clirlistizas Gift


bit his lips, and finally burst into

a passionate fit of crying, and left

the room.

'Then those who had joked

him felt ashamed, and everybody

began to ask who had put the

drum there. But no one knew,

or if they did, the unexpected

sympathy awakened for the sensi-

tive boy kept them silent.

'Even the servants were called

up and questioned, but no one










M/al came /0 6z5 cr1k.


could give any idea where it came

from. And, what was still more

singular, everybody declared that up

to the moment it was produced,

no one had seen it hanging on

the tree.

'What do I think? Well, I

have my own opinion. But no

questions! Enough for you to

know that Rupert did not come

downstairs again that night, and

the party soon after broke up.









30 The Christmas Gi


'I had almost forgotten those

things, for the War of the Rebel -

lion broke out the next spring,

and I was appointed surgeon in

one of the new regiments, and

was on my way to the seat of

war. But I had to pass through

the city where the Professor lived,
and there I met him.

'My first question was about

Rupert. The Professor shook his


head sadly










that came to Rupert.


"He's not so well," he said;

" he has been declining since last

Christmas, when you saw him.

A very strange case," he added,

giving it a long Latin name, "a

very singular case. But go and

see him yourself," he urged ; it

may distract his mind and do him

good."

'I went accordingly to the Pro-

fessor's house, and found Rupert

lying on a sofa, propped up with









The C/zhz1rn'as Gzfl


pillows. Around him were scat -

tered his books, and, what seemed

in singular contrast, that drum I

told you about was hanging on a

nail, just above his head.

'His face was thin and wasted;

there was a red spot on either

cheek, and his eyes were very

bright and widely opened.

'He was glad to see me, and

when I told him where I was

going, he asked a thousand ques-
























RUPERT ILL, AND THE DOCTOR

VISITING HIM.










that came to Rzpcert.


tions about the war. I thought I

had thoroughly diverted his' mind

from its sick and languid fancies,

when he suddenly grasped my hand

and drew me towards him.
'" Doctor," said he, in a low

whisper, "you won't laugh at me

if I tell you something ?"

"No, certainly not," I said.

'" You remember that drum ?"

he said, pointing to the glittering

toy that hung against the wall.
E










38 The Christmas Gift

"You know, too, how it came to
me. A few weeks after Christmas,
I was lying half asleep here, and
the drum was hanging on the wall,
when suddenly I heard it beaten:
at first low and slowly, then faster
and louder, until its rolling filled
the house. In the middle of the
night, I heard it again. I did
not dare to tell any body about
it, but I have heard it every
night, ever since."










Miat came to Rzherl.


' He paused f
i 1*


or some min-


utes, and looked anxiously into

my face.

Sometimes," he continued, it

is played softly, sometimes loudly,

but always quickening to a long-

roll, so loud and alarming, that I

have looked to see people coming

into my room to ask what was the

matter. But I think, Doctor I

think," he repeated slowly, looking

up with painful interest into my









40 The Chrisztmas GIt


face, "that no one hears it but

myself."

'I thought so, too, but I asked

him if he had heard it at any
other time.

'"Once or twice in the day-

time," he replied, when I have

been reading or writing; then very

loudly, as though it were angry,

and tried in that way to attract

my attention away from my books."

'I looked into his face, and










that came to R~perlt.


placed my hand upon his pulse.

His eyes were very bright, and

his pulse a little flurried and

quick. I then tried to explain to

him that he was very weak, and

that his senses were very acute,
as most weak people's are ; and

how that, when he read, or grew

interested and excited, or when he

was tired at night, the throbbing
of a big artery made the beating
sound he heard.










42 The Christmas Gift


'He listened to me with a

sad smile of unbelief, but thanked

me, and in a little while I went

away. But as I was going down-

stairs, I met the Professor. I

gave him my opinion of the case
-well, no matter what it was.

'"He wants fresh air and ex-

ercise," said the Professor, and

some practical experience of life,


sir.


'The Professor was not a bad









that came to Rupert.


man, but he was a little worried

and impatient, and thought as
clever people are apt to think -

that things which he didn't under-
stand were either silly or im -

proper.
'I left the city that very day,

and in the excitement of battle -

fields and hospitals I forgot all
about little Rupert; nor did I

hear of him again, until one day,
meeting an old class- mate in the









The Christmas Gift


army, who had known the Pro-
fessor, he told me that Rupert

had become quite insane, and that

in one of his paroxysms he had

escaped from the house; and as
he had never been found, it was

feared by his friends that he
had fallen into the river and was

drowned.

'I was terribly shocked for
the moment, as you may imagine;

but, dear me, I was living just










that came to Rupert.


then among scenes as terrible and

shocking, and I had little time

to spare to mourn over poor

Rupert.

'It was not long after receiv-

ing this intelligence that we had

a terrible battle, in which a por -

tion of our army was slaughtered.

I was detached from my brigade

to ride over to the battle field

and assist the surgeons of the

beaten division, who had more










The Crisztmas Gift


on their hands than they could

attend to.

'When I reached the barn

that served for a temporary hos -

pital, I went at once to work.

'Ah, Bob,' said the Doctor,

thoughtfully taking the bright sword

from the hands of the half- fright -

ened Bob, and holding it gravely

before him, 'these pretty playthings

are symbols of cruel, ugly re -

alities.









tIat came to Rupert. 47


'I turned to a tall, stout Ver -

monter,' he continued, very slowly,

tracing a pattern on the rug with

the point of the scabbard, 'who

was badly wounded in both thighs,

but he held up his hands and

begged me to help others first

who needed it more than he.

'I did not at first heed his

request, for this kind unselfishness

was very common in the army;

but he went on:










Thc C/zris'inzas GzjI


'"For God's sake, Doctor, leave

me here; there is a drummer- boy

of our regiment -a mere child -

dying, if he isn't dead now. Go,

and see him first. He lies over

there. He saved more than one

life. He was at his post in the

panic of this morning, and saved

the honour of the regiment."

'I was so much more im-

pressed by the man's manner than

by the substance of his speech,


















THE LITTLE


DRUMMER.


6-4! ,


%;Qxl 3










that came to Rupert. 53


which was, however, corroborated

by the other poor' fellows stretched
around me, that I passed over to

where the drummer lay, with his

drum beside him.

'I gave one glance at his face

- and yes, Bob yes, my child-

ren -it was Rupert!

Well well it needed not

the chalked cross which my brother-

surgeons had left upon the rough

board whereon he lay to show










The Chrizstas Gft


how urgent was the relief he

sought ; it needed not the pro-

phetic words of the Vermonter,

nor the damp that mingled with

the brown curls that clung to his

pale forehead, to show how hope -

less it was now.

'I called him by name. He

opened his eyes--larger, I thought,

in the new vision that was begin-

ning to dawn upon him and

recognized me.










I/iaI came to RuqlerI.


'He whispered: "I'm glad you

are come, but I don't think you

can do me any good."

'I could not tell him a lie.

I could not say anything. I only

pressed his hand in mine, as he

went on.

'"But you will see father, and

ask him to forgive me. Nobody

is to blame but myself. It was

a long time before I understood

why the drum came to me that
I_ _










The C/ristmas Gift


Christmas night, and why it kept

calling to me every night, and

what it said. I know it now.

The work is done, and I am

content. Tell father, it is better

as it is. I should have lived

only to worry and perplex him,

and something in me tells me this

is right."

'He lay still for a mo-

ment, and then grasping my hand,

said:










t/at came to Rupert. 57


Hark !"

'I listened, but heard nothing

but the suppressed moans of the

wounded men around me.

'" The drum," he said faintly;

"don't you hear it ? the drum is

calling me."

SHe reached out his arm to

where it lay, as though he would

embrace it:

'" Listen he went on it's

the reveille. There are the ranks










58 The Christmas Gift


drawn up in review. Don't you

see the sunlight flash down the

long line of bayonets? Their faces

are shining they present arms -

there comes the General but his

face I cannot look at, for the

glory round his head. He sees

me ; he smiles, it is and

with a name upon his lips that

he had learned long ago, he

stretched himself wearily upon the

planks, and lay quite still.


i ~_~~~g~

























RUPERT'S VISION AND DEATH.









tat came to Rufert. 63


That's all.

'No questions now.

'Never mind what became of

the drum.

'Who's that snivelling ?

'Bless my soul!

'Where's my pill-box?'
















































LONDON:
PIINTfI) B JOHN STRANGEWAYS,
Castle St. Leicester Sq
























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bound in a volume, morocco, gilt edges, 2 5s.

ALBERT DURER'S "LITTLE PASSION," as Engraved
by the distinguished Artist in 50o9-1o; consisting of 37 inimitable
Designs upon Wood. With a Survey of Durer's Works by W. C.
PRIME. Royal 4to. The Illustrations in exquisite facsimile, emble-
matic binding, 25s.
*'* Only too copies of this beautiful book were printed.

BRUNET'S MANUEL DU LIBRAIRE, 5 vols. royal 8vo,
half morocco, top edge gilt, 25s. only.

JOHN CAMDEN HOTTEN, 74 AND 75, PICCADILLY, LONDON.



















Very Important New Books.

CURIOSITIES OF LONDON. Exhibiting the most Rare
and Remarkable Objects of Interest in the Metropolis; with nearly
Sixty Years' Personal Recollections. By JOHN TimBS, F.S.A.
New Edition, Corrected and Enlarged, 2Is.
** "A most valuable and interesting work, and a mine of information to all who
deire past ad present. It contains nearly 1,ooo closely
printed '


Bow CHURCH AND CHEAPSIDE, 1750.


LONDON CHARACTERS: The Humour, Pathos, and
Peculiarities of London Life. By HENIRY MAYHEW (Author of
London Labour and the London Poor ") and other Writers. With
upwards of 70 Characteristic Illustrations of London Life. Crown
8vo, 480 pages, 7s. 6d.

KNIGHT'S (Charles) PICTORIAL HISTORY OF LONDON,
Ancient and Modern. With nearly 700 Engravings of Buildings,
Antiquities, Costumes, Remarkable Characters. Curiosities, &c., &c.
6 vols., imp. 8vo, bound in 3, cloth neat, 35s.
** The most delightful book ever written about Old and Modern London. It
is a perfect mine of information, and should be in oery English Library. If lookedat
from the point of cheapness alone, the work is a perfect marvel, containing as it does
more than 2,500 large and handsomely printed pages, crowded with pictures.

JOHN CAMDEN HOTTEN, 74 AND 75, PICCADILLY, LONDON.


















Very Important New Books,

WORKS BY BRET HARTE.
WIDELY KNOWN FOR TIEIR EXQUISITE PATKOS AND DELIGHTFUL HUMOTE.
44A BrLACwoon's MAGAzINE goes into raptures over this Author, and gives page
after page to prove that he is a literary star of undoubted brilliancy.
1. LUCK OF ROARING CAMP, and other Stories. By
BRET HARTE. Crown 8vo, toned paper, 3s. 6d.; a paper edition, Is.
*,* The "Saturday Review devoted three e r v' se marvel-
lous stories. Chambers's Journal gives sever ... .... ; "A .New
Transatlantic Genius." The "Spectator" is '. ,' i ,, .. .. thor; and
readers are everywhere asking for his books.
2. THAT HEA THEN CHINEE, and other Humorous Poems.
By BRET HARTE. Cloth, very neat, 2s. 6d.; paper, is. 6d.
*** An entirely new style of humour. Since the publication of these poems in this
country, extractsfrom them have been copied and re-copied into every newspaper through-
out the country, giving the public an infinity of delight.
3. SENSATION NOV ELS. Condensed by BRET HARTE.
Price 2s. 6d., cloth, neat; or, in paper, is. 6d.
*** A most enjoyable book. Here are the titles of some of the Sensation Novels : "
SELIIA SEDILIA: by Miss M. E. B-dd-n and Mrs. H-n-y W-d. FANTIN :
after the French of Victor Hugo. TERENCE DEUVILLE: by Ch-l-s L-v-r. TBn
DWELLER ON THE THRESHOlD : by Sir Ed-d L-tt-n B-lw-r. THE NINETY-NINI
GUARnDMES : by Al-x-a-d-r D-m-s. MR. MInsHIPMxA BREEZY, A Naval Officer:
by Captain M-rry-t, R.N. Guy HEAVYsTONE; or, "ENTIRu:" A Muscular
Novel: by the Author of "Sword and Gun." THE HAUNTED MAN: A Christ.
mas Story: by Ch-r-s D-c-k-ns. MARY McGILLUP: A Southern Novel: after
Belle Boyd. MIss Mix: by Ch-l-tte Br-nti. No TITLE: by W-lk-e C-11-ns.
4. LOTHAW: or, The Adventures of a Young Gentleman
in Search of a Religion. By Mr. BENJAMINS (Bret Harte). Price
6d. Curiously Illustrated.
S". -" -, littlevolume. 7 P ,i 7 I ,,' ,.?-. ,' /
t .. r *. It is so droll, s ,. ,,.
5. Illustrated Edition of THAT HEATHEN CHINEE, and
Poems. By BEET HARTE. With "That Heathen Chinee set to
Music by STEPHEN TUCKER, Author of Beautiful Isle of the Sea."
Cloth, very neat, 3s. 6d.
*** These are the Illustrations which have so tickled our American cousins. There's
a sort of "kick-up-your-heels" delight about them. In a word, they're immense I
6. EAST AND WEST. The New Volume of Verse. By
BRET HARTE, Author of "That Heathen Chinee." Cloth, very
neat, 2s. 6d.; or in paper, Is. 6d.
*,* Readers who found pleasure in reading this Author's first books will not be
disappointed with this new work.
COMPANION TO BRET HARTE'S HEATHEN CHINEE."
LITTLE BREECHES, and other Pieces, Descriptive and
Pathetic. By Col. JOHN HAY. Cloth, neat, 2s. 6d.; in paper, Is. 6d.
*,* The dramatiefire and vigour of these PIXE COUNTY BALLADS will startle
T i. r The lase' 'i, '. terrfie,-something entirely
.,,' hat any F r j uch less put on paper.
JOHN CAMDEN HOTTEN, 74 AND 75, PICCADILLY, LONDON.



















Very Important New Books.

THE STANDARD EDITION.
ROBINSON CRUSOE. Profusely Illustrated by ERNEST
GRISET. Edited, with a New Account of the Origin of Robinson
Crusoe, by WILTIAM LEE, Esq. Crown 8vo, 5s.
*** This edition deserves special attention from the fact that it is the only correct
one that has been printed since the time of Defoe. By the kindness of Mr. Lee a copy
of the rare and in three vols., was deposited . ... f
the progress of .. .' those alterations and blunder '. '. ...
covered in every recent edition are in this case avoided. There is no living artist better
adapted to the task of illustrating Crusoe than Ernest Griset.

LEGENDS OF SA VAGE LIFE. By JAMES GREENWOOD, the
famous Author of A Night in a Workhouse." With 36 inimitably
droll Illustrations, drawn and coloured by ERNEST GRISET, the
English Gustave DorE. 4to, coloured, 7s. 6d.; plain, 5s.
**, The pictures are among the most surprising which have comefrom this artist'spencil.
A Munchausen sort of book. The drawings by M. Griset are very power-
ful and eccentric."-Saturday Review.
Walk up! Walk up! and see the
FOOL'S PARADISE; with the Many Wonderful Adven-
tures there, as seen in the strange, surprising
PEEP-SHOW OF PROFESSOR WOLLEY COBBLE
earee Showman these Five-and-Twenty Years.
N.B.-Money Returned if the Performance not Approved of. Private Parties
attended on the Shortest Notice.
Crown 4to, with nearly 200 immensely funny Pictures, all beautifully Coloured.


*r i ," -


THE PROFESSOR'S LEETLE MUSIC LESSON.
*** One of the drollest, most comical books ever published.

THE HATCHET-THROWERS. With Thirty-six Illustra-
tions, coloured after the inimitably grotesque Drawings of ERNEST
GRISET. 4to, cloth gilt, 78. 6d.; plates uncoloured, 5s.
*,* Comprises the astonishing adventures of Three Ancient Mariners, the Brothers
Brass of Bristol, Mr. Corker, and Mungo Midge.
JOHN CAMDEN HOTTEN, 74 AND 75, PICCADILLY, LONDON.


















Very Important New Books.

MAGICIAN'S OWN BOOK. Containing Ample Instructions
for PERFORMANCE in LEGERDEMAIN, CUPS and BALLS, Eaos,
HATS, HANDKERCHIEFS, &c. By the Author of The Secret Out."
All from Actual Experience, and Edited by W. H. CREMER, Jun.,
of Regent Street. With 200 Illustrations, 4s. 6d.

THE SECRET OUT; or, One Thousand Tricks with Cards,
and other Recreations; with Entertaining Experiments in Drawing-
Room or White Magic." By the Author of the Magician's Own
Book." Edited by W. H. CREMER, Jun., of Regent Street. With
300 Engravings. Crown 8vo, cloth, 4s. 6d.













*T* These Books are complete Cyelopadias of Legerdemain. Under the title of
"Le Magicien des Salons" the first has long -.- '' --'-r? -- o--' Bool with all
French and German Professors of the Art. F I .. r *.
with engraoings to illustrate them, that anybody can easily learn how .. "
ENTIRELY NEW GAMES.
THE MERRY CIRCLE. A Book of NEW, GRACEFUL, and
INTELLECTUAL GAMES and AMUSEMENTS. Edited by Mrs. CLARA
BELLEW. Crown 8vo, numerous Illustrations, 4s. 6d.
A new and capital book of Household Amusements. These are in every way
Intellectual Games,and will please both old and young. It is an excellent book to
consult before going to an evening party.
THE ART OF AMUSING, A Collection of Graceful Arts,
Games, Tricks, Puzzles, and Charades, intended to amuse every-
body, and enable all to amuse everybody else. By FRANK BELLEW
With nearly 300 Illustrations. Crown 8vo, 4s. 6d.
-** One of the most entertaining handbooks for amusement ever published.
NOTICE.-Of the four books offered above, the first is the most Advanced
in the Mysteries of White Magic. The second is a capital Beginners'
Book on the Wonderful Art of Conjuring. The third work, "The Merry
Circle," is a book of an Advanced Character in Family Amusements,
and requires considerable judgment on the part of the players. The
last work is a capital introductory book to the Art of Amusing
generally.
JOKN CAMDEN GOTTEN, 74 AND 75, PICCADILLY, LONDON.


















Very Important New Books.

RUSKIN AND CRUIKSHANK. "German Popular Stories."
Collected by the Brothers GRIMM. Translated by EDGAR TAYLOR.
Edited by JOHN RUSKIN. With Twenty-two Illustrations after the
inimitable designs of GEORGE CRUIKSHANK. BOTH SERIES COM-
PLETE. Cloth, 8vo, 6s. 6d.; gilt leaves, 7s. 6d.
*** The, .' .. Mr. RIuskin has praised so highly, placing them far
above all ( .' of a similar character. So rare had the original
book (published in 1823-1826) become, that 25 to 6 per copy was an ordinary price.
V'FAMILY FAIRY TALES;" or, Glimpses of Elfland at
Heatherston Hall. Edited by CHOLMONDELEY PENNELL, Author
of "Puck on Pegasus," &c. Adorned with beautiful Pictures of My
Lord Lion," King Uggermugger," and other Great Folks. Hand-
somely printed on toned paper, in cloth, green and gold, price 4s. 6d.
plain, 5s. 6d. coloured.
** This charming volume has been universally praised by the critical press.
SCHOOL LIFE AT WINCHESTER COLLEGE; or, The
Reminiscences of a Winchester Junior. By the Author of The
Log of the Water Lily," and The Water Lily on the Danube.'
Second Edition, Revised, COLOURED PLATES, 75. 6d.




-;



*,* This book soes for Winchester what "Tom Brown's School Days" did for Rugby.
PRINCE UBBELY BUBBLE'S NEW STORY BOOK. The
Dragon all Covered with Spikes; The Long-tailed Nag ; The Three
One-legged Men; The Old Fly and the Young Fly; Tom and the
Ogre; and many other Tales. By J. TEMPLETON LUCAS. With
numerous Illustrations by MATT MORGAN, BARNES, GORDON
THOMrsON, BRUNTON, and other Artists. In small 4to, green
and gold, 4s. 6d.; gilt leaves, 58. 6d.
*** The Times devoted a special column in praise of this New Story Book.
MADGE AND THE FAIRY CONTENT. A charming Child's
.Story. By BLANCHARD JERROLD. Intended to inculcate a spirit
of Contentment. With nearly Ioo Pictures of the Industry requisite
to produce the Christmas Pudding. 4s. 6d
LITTLE CHARLIE'S LIFE OF HIMSELF. Edited by the
Rev. W. R. CLARK, M.A., Vicar of Taunton. 4to, cloth, full of
curious Illustrations, 3s. 6d.
*** A most amusing Present for a child. It is an exact facsimile of the autobiography
of a boy between six and seven years of age, as written by himself in his copy-book.
JOHN CAMDEN GOTTEN, 74 AND 75, PICCADILLY, LONDON.
















Very Important New Books.

Hotten's "Golden Library"
OF THE BEST AUTHORS.
** A charming collection of Standard and Favourite Works, elegantly printed in
Handy Volumes, uniform with the Tauchnitz Series, and published at exceedingly low
prices. The New Volumes are-
ROCHEFOUCAULD.-Reflections and Moral Maxims. Is.;
cloth, is. 6d. Essay by SAINTE-BEUVE.
SHELLEY. ---- Poetical Works. From the Author's
Original editions. First Series, QUEEN MAB
and EARLY POEMS. IS. 8d.; in cloth, 2s. 2d.
HOLMES. -Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.
Is.; cloth, Is. 6d.
THE CLERGY. -- The Book of Clerical Anecdotes and
Pulpit Eccentricities. is. 4d.; cloth, is. iod.
CHARLES LAMB.-- The Essays of Elia. Complete.
Both Series. Is.; cloth, Is. 6d.
DICKENS. Life. By the Author of the "Life of
Thackeray." 2s.
DICKENS. Speeches upon Literary and Social
Topics. 2s.
"His Speeches are as good as any of his printed writings."--The Times.
ARTEMUS WARD.-In London; with the "PUNCH"
Letters. Is. 6d.; cloth, 2s. 6d.
TENNYSON. Old Prose Stories of Idylls of the
King. Is.; cloth, is. 6d.
DISRAELI'S, GLADSTONE'S, AND BRIGHT'S SPEECHES
in separate vols., at is. 4d.; cloth, is. Tod.
Comprise all the Important Speeches of these Statesmen during the past 25 years.
CARLYLE. -- On the Choice of Books. is.; cl. is.6d.
Should be read and re-read by every young man in the three kingdoms.
HOLMES. --Professor at the Breakfast Table.
is.; cloth, is. 6d.
LEIGH HUNT. Tale for a Chimney Corner, and
other Essays. is. 4d.; cloth, is. rod.
HOOD, -Whims and Oddities. 8o Illustra-
tions. 2 Series, Complete. is.; cloth, Is. 6d.
LELAND. -- Hans Breitmann's Ballads, Com-
plete. is.; cloth, Is. 6d.
JOHN CGAMDEN HOTTEN, 74 ANI 75, PICUAULLIy, hL bwu.







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