• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 Half Title
 Robinson Crusoe
 Crusoe makes an umbrella
 Crusoe finds a footprint in the...
 Robinson Crusoe and Friday
 How Crusoe and Friday made...
 Crusoe, Friday, and the savage...
 How cock sparrow kept his...
 Queer characters
 Aesop's fables
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Robinson Crusoe.
Title: The Robinson Crusoe picture book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066411/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Robinson Crusoe picture book containing, Robinson Crusoe; How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas; Queer characters; Æsop's fables
Uniform Title: Robinson Crusoe
Æsop's fables
Alternate Title: How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas
Queer characters
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Defoe, Daniel, 1661?-1731
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [187-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations, printed in colours by Kronheim.
General Note: Date of publication based on binding indicating publication in the 1870's.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066411
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002219895
notis - ALG0084
oclc - 71439464

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page
    List of Illustrations
        List of Illustrations
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Robinson Crusoe
        Page 1
        Plate
    Crusoe makes an umbrella
        Page 2
        Plate
    Crusoe finds a footprint in the sand
        Page 3
        Plate
    Robinson Crusoe and Friday
        Page 4
        Plate
    How Crusoe and Friday made a boat
        Page 5
        Plate
    Crusoe, Friday, and the savages
        Page 6
    How cock sparrow kept his Christmas
        Page 1
        Page 1a
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Page 6
    Queer characters
        Page 1
        Dobbin the blacksmith
            Page 1a
            Plate
        Tabby, the piper
            Page 2
            Plate
        Doctor Donkey's academy
            Page 3
            Plate
        The artful fox
            Plate
            Page 4
        Towser's trial
            Plate
            Page 5
        Mischievous monkeys
            Plate
            Page 6
    Aesop's fables
        Page 1
        The man and his two sweethearts
            Page 1a
            Plate
        The man and the lion
            Page 2
        The goose & the golden eggs
            Page 2
        The lion in love
            Page 2
        The brother and sister
            Page 2
            Plate
        The man and the image
            Page 3
        Mercury and the woodman
            Page 3
        The bundle of sticks
            Page 3
        The ass and the lap-dog
            Page 3
            Plate
        The mountain in labour
            Plate
        The trees and the axe
            Plate
        The ass in the lion's skin
            Plate
        The town & country
            Plate
            Page 4
        The fox and the ape
            Plate
        The Hercules & the waggoner
            Plate
        The owl & the grasshopper
            Plate
        The woman & the wine-cask
            Plate
            Page 5
        The blackamoor
            Plate
        Trumpeter taken prisoner
            Plate
        The herdsman & lost bull
            Plate
        The dog invited to supper
            Plate
            Page 6
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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THE


ROBINSON CRUSOE PICTURE BOOK

CONTAINING


ROBINSON CRUSOE.


HOW COCK SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS.

QUEER CHARACTERS.

ESOP'S FABLES.

WITH

TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS,


PRINTED IN COLOURS BY KRONHEIM.


LONDON


GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND


SONS


THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE


NEW YORK: 416 BROOME STREET


~_I~~














LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.




ROBINSON CRUSOE:-
CRUSOE AND FRIDAY AT HOME. (Frontispiece.)
CRUSOE TAMES A LITTLE KID.
CRUSOE MAKES AN UMBRELLA.
CRUSOE SEES A FOOTPRINT IN THE SAND.
CRUSOE AND FRIDAY LAUNCHING A BOAT.
CRUSOE AND FRIDAY WATCHING THE SAVAGES.

HOW COCK SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS:-
ISAAC HARLEY'S COTTAGE.
MR. AND MRS. SPARROW WITH THEIR YOUNG ONES.
KITTY FINDS THE POOR LITTLE SPARROW.
KITTY AND HER PARENTS WATCHING THE SPARROWS.
LITTLE SPARROW BRINGS A MESSAGE TO KITTY's MOTHER.
KITTY SAVED BY HER FATHER.

QUEER CHARACTERS:-
DOBBIN, THE BLACKSMITH.
TABBY, THE PIPER.
DOCTOR DONKEY.
THE ARTFUL FOX.
TOWSER'S TRIAL.
THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEYS.

JESOP'S FABLES:-
THE MAN AND HIS TWO SWEETHEARTS.
THE MAN AND THE LION-THE GOOSE AND THE GOLDEN EGGS-THE LION IN LOVE-
THE BROTHER AND SISTER.
THE MAN AND THE IMAGE-MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN-THE BUNDLE OF STICKS-
THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.
THE MOUNTAIN-THE TREES AND THE AXE-THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN-THE TOWN
MOUSE AND THE COUNTRY MOUSE.
THE FOX AND THE APE-HERCULES AND THE WAGGONER-THE OWL AND THE GRASS-
HOPPER-THE WOMAN AND THE WINE CASK.
THE BLACKAMOOR-THE TRUMPETER-THE HERDSMAN AND THE LOST BULL-THE DOG
INVITED TO SUPPER.





















ROBINSON CRUSOE.









ROBINSON CRUSOE.


SOBINSON CRUSOE was born at York, in the year
S1632. He had a great wish to go to sea; and as his
father and mother would not give him leave, he ran away and
became a sailor. This was very wrong, and he had great cause
afterwards to be sorry that he had disobeyed his parents. After
several strange adventures, he went on a voyage to Guinea, but
the ship struck on a sand-bank and was wrecked. All hands were
lost but Crusoe, who was cast ashore. His first thought was
to thank God that his life had been spared. When he looked
about him the next day, he found that he was on an uninhabited
island.
After he had been some time on this island, living as best
he could, he began to get used to his lot. He had saved a chest
of tools and many other useful things from the wreck, among
them some powder and shot. He also found a Bible in the
cabin, which proved a great comfort to him.
He built himself a house, and made tables and chairs, and
pots of earthenware. He grew corn and other grain, and found
plenty of grapes and lemons growing on the island.
Robinson Crusoe had several pets; he had a parrot that
talked, a faithful dog, and three or four cats.
One day, when he was out on a journey, his dog caught a
young kid, and Crusoe, running up quickly, saved it alive from
the dog. He then made a collar of hemp, and led it home by a
string. This little kid became so tame that it followed its master
about like a dog, and would never leave him. After this he suc-
ceeded in taming several goats, so that he soon had a large number
of them, and always had plenty of goats' flesh for food.








CRUSOE MAKES AN UMBRELLA.


WH EN Robinson Crusoe's clothes began to wear out, he
set to work to make new ones. He had two or three
dozen shirts, which he had saved from the wreck, and several
sailors' watch-coats, which were too thick and heavy to wear. He
found his work rather difficult, and was very clumsy at it at first,
but soon managed to piece together two or three waistcoats. He
always saved the skins of the animals he killed, and stretched them
out in the sun to dry. Crusoe first made of these a great fur cap
for his head, with the hair outside, to shoot off the rain, which fell
very heavily in certain seasons; and then made himself a suit of
clothes entirely of skins. They were not very neatly made, to be
sure; but they were very strong, and served to protect him from
the sun and rain.
After this he spent a great deal of time and pains to make an
umbrella. He was in much need of one, and had seen them made
in the Brazils, where it is very hot. He was a long time before
he could make anything to hold together, and spoiled two or three
before he could satisfy himself; but at last he made one that an-
swered very well. The hardest part was to get it to let down.
He could make one to spread, but if it did not let down too, and
draw in, so that he could easily carry it about, it would not do.
But at last he made one to answer, and covered it with skins, the
hair upwards, so that it cast off the rain like a penthouse, and kept
off the sun so well that he could walk out in the hottest weather
with greater comfort than he could before in the coolest, and when
he had no need of it he could close it up, and carry it under his
arm. If anyone from England could have met Robinson Crusoe
when he was fully equipped for a journey, he would have been
either very much frightened or very much amused at the sight of
so strange a figure.
It &!








CRUSOE FINDS A FOOTPRINT
IN THE SAND.


R OBINSON CRUSOE had another dwelling in the
island, with a plantation where he grew grapes and barley
and rice; he had also made enclosures here for his breed of tame
goats, which gave him milk and butter. He called this his country
house, and would often go from one place to the other for a change.
He had a small boat, which he kept laid up on the beach; and
one day, going towards this boat, he was greatly surprised to find
the print of a man's naked foot upon the sand. He stood as
though he had been thunderstruck. He listened and looked round,
but could see nobody; he went up a hill to look farther; he walked
up and down the shore; but it was all the same; he could see no
other footprints but that one! In great fear he went back to a
part of his dwelling which he had made strong in case of an attack
from savages. When he came to this castle, as he called it, he
ran into it as though he were pursued. He had no sleep that
night, but lay awake, thinking of all sorts of dreadful things. At
last he concluded that it must be some of the savages from the
mainland opposite the island, who had perhaps wandered out to
sea in their canoes, and had been driven ashore, but had got off to
sea again.
For some time after this Crusoe spent all his time in making
defences against the savages, in case they should come again. He
planted two thick rows of trees around his dwelling, and took every
precaution he could think of. He then began to feel safe again,
but he always now used more caution and kept his eyes more
about him than he used to do.
Crusoe had now been on the island twenty-three years, and
could he but have been sure that no savages would come to disturb
him, he would have been quite content to end his days there.








ROBINSON CRUSOE AND FRIDAY.


WHEN Robinson Crusoe had been about twenty-five years
on the island, he was surprised one morning to see five
canoes on the shore, but the savages who had landed from them
were all out of sight. He got his guns, and prepared to defend
himself, if they should attack him. The savages were about thirty
in number, and, by the help of his glass, Crusoe now saw them
drag from the boats two poor savages whom they meant to kill.
But one of the victims jumped up and ran away as fast as he could
towards the place where Crusoe was watching. He was followed
by three of the other savages, till he came to a little creek, which
he swam across, and two of his pursuers swam after him. When
they came close, Crusoe, pitying the poor fellow who was flying for
his life, ran out and knocked down one of the savages and shot
the other. But the savage whom he had saved was so frightened
at the gun that he was at first afraid to come near; however, upon
Robinson Crusoe making signs to him that he would not hurt
him, he knelt down, and kissed the ground, and taking Crusoe's
foot in his hand, placed it on his head in token of submission.
He was a fine, handsome young man, about twenty-six years old.
Crusoe took him home and named him Friday, because he had
saved him on that day. He afterwards taught him to speak Eng-
lish. He made him clothes like his own, and set him to work to
thresh corn and do many other useful things. Friday worked not
only very willingly and very hard, but he did it cheerfully. This
was the pleasantest year of all the life Crusoe had led in the is-
land; for he had now a companion to whom he could speak, and
who became a most faithful and willing servant to him. Crusoe
would often read the Bible to Friday, and instruct him in the
truths of the Christian religion, for the poor savage had never been
taught these things.








HOW CRUSOE & FRIDAY MADE A BOAT.


F RI DAY had a great desire to go over to that part of the
mainland where the people of his own nation dwelt, and
as Robinson Crusoe wished to get away from the island if he could,
he got Friday to help him to make a large boat, in which they
might be able to put to sea. They first cut down a great tree,
and then hollowed out the trunk. When they had done this, they
took their axes and hewed the outside into the shape of a boat.
When this was done, it took them some time to get her into the
water, as they had to move her almost inch by inch, by the help of
great rollers. But when she was at last launched, she would
have carried twenty men with ease.
Robinson Crusoe was astonished to see how swiftly and skil-
fully Friday could manage her, turning her about and paddling
along. So he asked him if he was willing to venture in her to
the mainland, where he had come from. Friday said yes, he
was. Crusoe then cut down a straight young cedar tree for a
mast, and set Friday to hew it smooth, while he made a large
three-cornered sail by stitching together some old sail-cloth that
he had saved from the wreck. It took him about two months
to rig the boat properly, but when it was finished it answered
very well indeed. Crusoe also made and fitted a rudder to the
stern to steer with. After all this was done, he had to teach
Friday how to sail it; for although he knew very well how to
paddle a canoe, he knew nothing about sails or rudder, and when
he saw Crusoe work the boat to and fro by the rudder and tack
about with the sails, he stood still with wonder. But with a little
practice he got quite used to these things and became a very
expert sailor. They were now quite ready to start; but as the
rainy season just then set in, they had to put off their journey
and lay the boat up till it had passed away.







CRUSOE, FRIDAY, AND THE SAVAGES.


ONE morning Robinson Crusoe sent Friday to the shore to
see if he could find a turtle. Friday had not been long
gone when he came running back, saying, O, master! 0, master!
O, sorrow! 0, bad! "What's the matter, Friday," said Crusoe.
" O, yonder there cried Friday, one, two, three canoes-one,
two, three! Poor Friday was terribly frightened, as he thought
that his old enemies had come back to kill him, but Crusoe cheered
him up as well as he could, and asked him whether he would help
him to fight the savages. Friday answered, Me die, when you
bid me die, master." So Crusoe got all the firearms he could
muster and hung his great sword at his side. He divided the fire-
arms with Friday, and they cautiously crept together through the
wood to watch the savages. Now, Crusoe had made up his mind
that he would not kill any of these poor wretches, unless he was
obliged to do so in self-defence, as they had never been taught
that it was wicked to kill and eat their fellow-creatures; but when
he drew near he saw that they were about to kill a white man,
whom they had brought with them. This greatly enraged him,
and he resolved to save the white man if he could. He had no
time to lose, so at once told Friday to be ready to fire at the same
moment as he should. They killed two or three of the savages,
upon which all the rest took to their boats, leaving the Spaniard,
for such the white man proved to be, and a poor old savage whom
they also meant to kill. Crusoe sent Friday to unbind and com-
fort this poor captive, but as soon as he heard his voice and saw
his face he found that it was his own father whom they had saved!
Friday's joy was so great that he could hardly speak.
Soon after this event, an English ship came that way, and
Robinson Crusoe left the island, taking Friday with him, and re-
turned safely to England.





















HOW COCK


SPARROW


CHRISTMAS.


KEPT


HIS











HOW COCK SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS,


ISAAC HARLEY was a shepherd. He lived in a pretty little cottage on
his master's farm, and he had a wife and one little daughter, named
Kitty, and a large dog named Bob. Isaac's house was not a very large one,
but, if it wasn't very big, it was very comfortable; and outside, it was so
covered with green ivy, and sweet-smelling woodbine and roses, that it looked
in the summer-time more like a bower than a house, for the ivy trailed right
up the great chimney, and so on to the roof of the house, where it spread
itself in all directions, so that little Kitty, when she looked out of her bed-
room window, had a garland of ivy all around her pretty little face.
Mrs. Harley was a good, kind woman, and very clever. She could wash,
and brew, and bake, all in a superior manner, and she could make such lovely
cheese-cakes that they were talked about five miles off and more. Many a
farmer's wife sent for Mrs. Harley, if she was going to have a feast, and the
fame of Mrs. Harley's pastry grew greater and greater every day. But she
could do more things than these; she could spin, and she could sew, and she
could make lace. This last accomplishment was the triumph of triumphs in
Mrs. Harley's eyes. All other things that she could do she thought of as
mere nothings by the side of this great power. Her husband boasted of her
cheese-cakes; Mrs. Harley only boasted of her lace.
If you had ever seen Isaac, you might be sure you would have loved him.
He was such a good fellow. He had lived a country-life all his days, and he
knew all the secrets the country hides from those who don't wholly belong to
it. He knew where the owl's nest was, and whereabouts in the wood you
might find a squirrel. He knew the fish parishes in the river, and could point
out all the big holes where the pirate pikes lay in waiting for their prey. He
knew all about the weather-not as to whether it had or had not been raining,
which you and I know well enough, but whether it was likely to rain, or to be
fine, to be hot or cold, or betwixt and between. He could run and ride, jump
and swim; in fact, all that it became a man to do in the country, that he could
do, and could do it famously.
And little Kitty ? Well, there is no use in attempting to deny it, little
Kitty was a duck. No other word can at all describe her. She had blue
eyes, and golden hair, and rosy cheeks,and such a tiny little neck that her head
looked like a bud set on a slender stalk. Of course, Mr. and Mrs. Harley







2 How Cock Sparrow ke/pt kis Christmas.
loved Kitty very much, and Kitty loved them too, and so they all loved one
another, which was as it should be, and very delightful. Now, I must tell you
that their house had a garden. One part of it, nearest the house, was full of
flowers; crocuses and snowdrops in the spring-time, then tulips and pansies,
roses when the days were at their longest, lilies as the autumn drew near, and
Michaelmas daisies, in their half-mourning clothes, when the nights were getting
long, and dark, and cold again. In the other part of the garden were herbs
and, vegetables, and in the farthest corner of all was a sumptuous mansion.
This sumptuous mansion was four feet high, and was built of wood and
thatch. In front of it was a commodious yard, at least six feet square. In one
corner of the yard was a lovely trough, and in these highly desirable premises
lived Madam Pig and her graceful family. -Now you know all about the
Harleys, who they were and how they lived; I must tell you something about
Cock Sparrow.
Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow had built themselves a sweet little nest in a snug
corner of the ivy-covered thatch of Isaac Harley's house. In the nest there
were five little eggs, and Mrs. Sparrow sat warming them day by day. Very
early one morning Mrs. Sparrow said to her husband, Dick," said she, "I
do believe our darling little chicks are breaking their shells." And so, indeed,
they were; and presently, instead of five little eggs, there was one little egg
and four funny little sparrows, with squabby little bodies all naked, and soft,
yellow little beaks and shrill little tongues, and very fierce appetites. "Peet,
peet," said all the sparrows at once, anj away flew the father to fetch them a
meal ; then, when he came with it, away flew the mother to fetch them another,
until they left off saying peet, peet," and nestled themselves down warmly
under their mother's wings. Another day came, and still there were four little
sparrows and one little egg. And another day and another, and still this egg
did not get hatched ; so that the poor dear mother began to grow sorrowful
about it, and the poor dear father began to hint that it was perhaps just as
well as it was, and that four were easier to feed than five would be. But while
they were in all this doubt and perplexity, the egg settled the matter itself, by
cracking right in two one afternoon, and letting out little sparrow number five.
" Peet, peet," he cried, and away flew his parents to get him his dinner. Now,
just because he had given by far the most trouble, his mother was far fonder
of him than his little brothers and sisters; not that she did not love them all
very much indeed, but then she loved this last little one the most.
So the days went on, and, as the sweet summer came, they seemed all to be
strong enough to fly. You had best wait," said the mother. You had best
wait a bit, my dears, until your wing-feathers are a little more grown; I am








3 How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas.
so afraid you should tumble." And the father said, Nonsense about wait-
ing; they don't know what they can do until they try, and I am quite sure
they are big enough to get their living." But the mother said, "My
dear, I would rather they should wait:" and so for three days longer they
waited. On the fourth day, however, they all ventured out on the thatch, and
their father and mother showed them how to flutter their wings and spread out
their tails; and so, one after the other, they all got safely into the great apple-
tree, which, you must know, stood by the side of the cottage. Then they all
hopped along its branches until they got down to the lowest, which was not
very far from the ground. And now," said Mr. Sparrow, let us fly to the
garden palings," and away he went; but no, the little ones were quite too
frightened, and not one of them stirred. So then the mother flew across, to
show them how, and then both coming back, flew across again, together, and
sat on the palings calling to their little ones. So at last the biggest of the
five flapped out his wings, and away he went, and got to the palings safely
enough, and so away the other four started after him. Three of them were, as you
know, large and strong, and they flew away famously; but the other, the poor
little fellow who was hatched last, felt his wings trembling beneath him, and
though he tried his best, he was not strong enough to fly so far, and down he
came, fluttering and tumbling, right upon the garden-walk. Oh, dear; oh,
dear," his mother cried; he is killed; and away she flew to see, and away
flew the father also, and all the other four little brothers and sisters fell back-
wards off the top rail of the palings, overcome with emotion. But they were
quite too strong for such a little fall to hurt them. But not so their little brother.
When Mr. and Mrs. Sparrow got to him they found him fluttering on the
ground, and though he was not dead; yet he was very much hurt, and his wing
seemed broken. What to do they didn't know; they couldn't carry him, nor
get him back to the nest; and his poor little wing hung down to the ground,
and they were all very sorrowful. Just at that moment the door opened, and
out came little Kitty and Bob the dog. The two old sparrows flew round the
little one; and the mother opened her wings, and spread them out along the
path, and chattered and twittered, all in the hope of frightening away the
fierce monster of a dog, and protecting. her darling. But Bob cared nothing
for Mrs. Sparrow, and walked slowly towards her, whereupon she and her
husband flew up into a bush, and chattered and twittered so amazingly that
Kitty came along the path to see what was the matter.
Soon she saw the little fellow on the ground, and lifting him up, she ran
to her mother, calling, Look, mother! look, mother! I've caught a little
sparrow." Now, Isaac was sitting in his cottage, and he got up to see








How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas. 4
"Why, poor thing," he said, "it's but just fledged, and I think it's broke its
wing trying to fly." So he took it in his great, big hand, and the poor little
sparrow was very much frightened at first, but Isaac handled it so gently and
tenderly that it soon began to think he did not mean to hurt it.
So they thought it was best to get a little basket, too deep for the
little fellow easily to get out of; and they put a little bit of hay in it to make
it warm and soft, and a tiny little saucer full of bread soaked in milk ; and
then they put the basket, with little Cock Sparrow in it, on the window-sill.
Presently the two old birds left off twittering and chattering in the tree, and came
near to the house, in the hope of seeing what had become of their poor little
fellow. So they came nearer and nearer, and at last they ventured on to a rose-
tree overhanging the window, and by degrees they dared to perch on the out-
side sill of the window within which the basket was. Now Isaac, and Mrs.
Harley, and Kitty, were standing in the room watching them, and Isaac said,
when he saw the old birds on the window-sill, that he thought if they hung the
little basket on the tree outside, the old ones would perhaps come and feed the
little one, and take care of him. So they hung it up on a low branch of the
tree, and sure enough, as soon as the little sparrow began to chirp and cry, its
mother flew up into the tree, and perched on the basket-side, and fluttered her
wings in delight, and called to the father, who came too, and so they flew off,
and soon came back with the little sparrow's dinner; and, considering all
things, were very happy indeed. Then they found their four other darlings,
and took them back to their nest, and then they flew back again to the little
one in the basket. So, as night come on, they didn't know what to do. They
could hear the little ones in the nest calling to them, and yet how could they
go to them, and leave the poor little fellow in the basket? But while they
were thinking what to do, out of the house came Isaac and Kitty, and reaching
down the basket, carried it into the house. At this the two old birds felt very
unhappy, as they couldn't know what Isaac would do with him, and they flew
back to their ne:t, and cried themselves to sleep.
But they need not have been so very sorrowful, for the very first thing in
the morning Isaac brought out the basket again, and hung it up as before;
and again the old birds came and fed their little one. So when on this night
Kitty carried the basket in once more, the old b irdswerenot at allfrightened,
and flew away to their nest quite merrily. Thus they went on for several
days, and each day little Cock Sparrow grew stronger and stronger, and at
last he was quite well and brave, and he could perch on the edge of the bas-
ket; and at last, one day, he followed his mother's example, and flew after her
towards the old nest. But though he flew away, he had grown quite tame,







How Cock Sparrow kept kis Christmas. 5
and so fond of little Kitty that he would take food out of her hand, and sit
upon her shoulder; and he had grown quite fond of Bob also, and Bob
had grown fond of him; and Kitty had coaxed them both, until little
Sparrow had learned to sit upon Bob's head, and was as tame with Bob as
he was with Kitty.
As for his four little brothers and sisters, they had grown so strong and
big that they had all gone out into the wide world to make their fortunes,
and only this little Cock Sparrow stayed with his father and mother at home.
Well, the summer was ended, and the dark nights kept growing longer and
the days kept getting shorter and colder, until at last, a little before Christmas,
there- came a great frost and a deep snow. It was so cold that all the poor
birds didn't know what to do, and the snow was so thick on the ground that
they didn't know where to find anything to eat; but every morning Kitty
used to bring out plentiful crumbs of bread for her Sparrow, and little Sparrow
used to fly down to eat them, and carry back some of them to his father and
mother; and so, though the frost was so bitter and so keen, they were all very
comfortable in the nest in the ivy, and, indeed, grew quite fat on Kitty's crumbs.
Now, Kitty had a grandmother, who lived in a very tiny little cottage, two
or three fields off her father's house, and there was a path leading from the one
cottage to the other, and Kitty used always to be running backwards and for-
wards to see how grandmother was, as the old lady was rather feeble, and a
little short in her breath. And it had been settled that on Christmas-Day
Kitty should go to her grandmother's to dinner, and that her father and
mother should come to fetch her in the evening; so Christmas-Day having
come, little Kitty set off on her walk, wrapped up warmly in her pretty red
cloak, with a basket in her hand, full of mince-pies, for the poor dear old
grandmother. Away she went: she would soon be there, they thought, she
was so used to the road, and although the snow was deep, she was well used
to that also. Although it was Christmas-Day, Isaac had to go to look after
his sheep, and had, of course, taken Bob with him; so Mrs. Harley set to work
to boil the pudding and roast the meat for their Christmas dinner, and to
bake a large and lovely cake for Kitty's tea. She was so very busy that
though she heard a tapping at the window she took no notice of it for some
time; but at last she looked up, and there was little Sparrow, sitting on the
window-sill, flapping his wings, and tapping at the window with his beak.
"Poor little bird!" thought Mrs. Harley; Kitty's forgotten to give him
his crumbs," and out she went to see; but no, he had not been forgotten,
the crumbs had been put on the ground as usual, and, strange to say, many of
them remained uneaten. Perhaps he is cold," thought Mrs. Harley, and she









How Cock Sparrow kept his Christmas. 6
left the door open to see if he would come into the kitchen; but no, he
stayed outside, and kept first tapping at the window, and then, when Mrs.
Harleywent towards it, off he flew down towards the garden-gate, and then
presently came back again. But she could make nothing of it; so directly
her husband came home, she told him what the bird had been doing, and
while she was talking, back little Sparrow came again, and began to tap at
the window as before. So Isaac went out, and again the bird flew towards
the garden-gate, and when Isaac stopped the bird stopped too, and fluttered
his little wings, and flew a little way, and stopped again fluttering, until at
last Isaac said, Something must be the matter, I'll go and see," and he
whistled to Bob, and away they went. Little Sparrow saw them coming, and
flew this time right down to the garden-gate, and perched at the top, and as
they came near it flew a little way into the field, and so by degrees tempted
them along, always flying before them till he got to the second style, where, as
Isaac knew, there was a very deep ditch. All of a sudden a thought struck
Isaac; he called to the dog, Hie, Bob! good dog! hie on! and away went
Bob, at full speed, up to the second style. He looked down into the ditch,
and then, with a loud bark, tore back again to Isaac; and he, well guessing
what was the matter, ran as fast as he could to the style. There, peeping out
from a great drift of snow, was little Kitty's red cloak, and deep down in the
snow was poor Kitty herself. Isaac jumped down into the ditch, and lifted
out his poor little girl, all blue and cold, and ran back with her to the cot-
tage. There they put her to bed, and chafed her little limbs with their hands,
until the warmth came back to her body, and presently she opened her clear
blue eyes. Now how glad they were, I leave you to guess. So she told them
by-and-by, how she had slipped of the plank, and had fallen into the snow, and
how she had hurt her ankle so in falling that she could not get up again, but
that at each trial she made the snow had slipped more over her: and so, how
she had called on them all till she could call no more; and the last thing she
could remember was that the little Sparrow had come and perched upon her
as she lay in the snow, and had then flown away again. Then she grew colder
and colder, and remembered no more until she awoke in her own little bed.
So poor little Kitty was saved, and they were so happy together that I
couldn't tell you one-half of their happiness, if I tried all day; and you may
be sure little Sparrow was happy too, and that he thought, as he tucked his
little head under his wing, how glad he was that he had heard poor Kitty
calling as she lay in the drifted snow. And this is the tale of


How COCK SPARROW KEPT HIS CHRISTMAS.





















QUEER


CHARACTERS.







DOBBIN THE BLACKSMITH.


T HE village forge old Dobbin kept,
And earned his bread from day to day;
For up he rose when others slept,
And worked while others were at play.

The gossips of the town would pay
A morning visit to his shop;
And while old Dobbin worked away,
They talked as if they'd never stop.

Thus Farmer Dogberry, you see,
Lays down the law to Beadle Dio;
While Ploughman Ox appears to be
The wisest of the idle trio.

But Dobbin only blinks his eyes,
For he has honest work to do,
And thinks that talk; however wise,
Will never mend a horse's shoe.

Like Dobbin, let us learn to keep
A watchful eye and silent tongue;
And never let our conscience sleep
When idle gossips we're among.







TABBY, THE PIPER.


AS Tabby lay basking one day in the sun,
A-longing for something to eat,
He thought to himself wouldd be capital fun
To play on a pipe for his meat.

So Tabby, who was an ingenious cat,
Ran off to his home in the mews,
Where he put on his coat and a wide-awake hat,
And breeches and stockings and shoes.

And then in the road, with his pipe in his mouth,
He played such a comical air,
That he startled the folk in the north and the south,
And the east and the west of the square.

From Piggy, the porter, he got but a laugh,
From Ducky, the housemaid, a quack,
And Carlo, the groom, gave him nothing but chaff,
So Tabby went dinnerless back.

So people who sometimes, led on by conceit,
Attempt what they cannot well do,
A warning should take from poor Tabby's defeat,
Or they may get ridiculed too.
2







DOCTOR DONKEY'S ACADEMY.


DOCTOR DONKEY kept a school
For all the brute creation;
But many thought him more a fool,
Than beast of education.

'Tis true he never much professed
Of learning taught at College;
But then the patience he possessed
Went further than his knowledge.

The worthy doctor here you see,
His scholars catechising;
That they should all so quiet be
Is really most surprising.

There's pert Miss Poll, and Pussy Cat,
Fox, Elephant, and Monkey,
And Piggy, with a dunce's hat,
All listening to a donkey.

If thus a brute the beasts can tame,
By patience exercising;
There's scarce a virtue we can name
More worthy our advising.
3






THE ARTFUL FOX.



H ERE'S a sly, old, cunning Fox,
Trying to appear devout;
Do you think those well-fed Cocks
Know what Reynard is about?

"Let us shut our eyes," quoth he,
"Say our grace before our meat;
Surely we should thankful be
That we've barley here to eat."

But barley's not the food he seeks,
Nor any other kind of grain;
For Reynard to the farm-yard sneaks
A better supper to obtain.

"No, no," replies the eldest bird,
"You look as if you'd like to sup;
And I remember to have heard
That Cocks are sometimes eaten up."

Thus wickedness too often tries,
To make itself a friend appear;
So mind you never shut your eyes
When danger may be lurking near.
4







TOWSER'S TRIAL.



T HERE are some dogs that much prefer
Their neighbour's dinner to their own;
So Towser, like a selfish cur,
Robbed honest Toby of his bone.

Old Toby raised a hue and cry,
And all the village dogs gave chase;
Till Watchman Trusty's practised eye,
Discovered Towser's hiding-place.

Then to the barn, where Caesar sat,
Arrayed in solemn wig and gown,
They took the wicked Towser, that
Before had braved the judge's frown.

Then the cunning counsel, Carlo, tried
To plead a melancholy tale;
But Guilty" all the jury cried,
And so the thief was sent to jail.

As Towser lost his liberty,
Some silly persons lose their name;
And those who have not honesty
Will taste his pain and share his shame.
5







THE MISCHIEVOUS MONKEYS.



OLD Jacky, the carpenter's, very well known
To all in the village around;
He lives in a neat little house of his own,
Where mischievous monkeys abound.

Each day after dinner he sits in his chair,
The youngsters all being away;
And tries to get forty winks quietly there,
While they in the fields are at play.

But sometimes it happens that, ere he awakes,
These mischievous monkeys come back;
And each some impertinent liberty takes
With the tools of old Carpenter Jack.

They play with his whiskers and tickle his chin,
While Jacky sleeps sound as a church;
But if they awake him he'll surely begin
To give them a taste of the birch.

The young should remember to honour the old,
And never be rude in their play;
Forthey will wish children to do what they're told,
When they become aged and grey.
6






















IE SioP' S


FABLES.








OP'S


FABLE


THE MAN AND HIS TWO SWEETHEARTS.


-z-Ez>^B4


A MIDDLE-AGED Man, whose hair had begun to


grey, courted two women at the same time.


them was young; and the


years.


One of


other well advanced


in


The elder woman, ashamed to be courted by


a man younger than herself, made a point, whenever


her admirer visited her, to pull out some portion


his black hairs.


The younger, on the contrary,


wishing


to become the wife


of


not


an old man, was


equally zealous in removing every grey hair she could
find. Thus it came to pass, that between the two
he very soon found that he had not a hair left on his
head.


Those


who seek to please


everybody


please


nobody.


S


S.


turn


of








THE MAN AND THE LION.

A MAN and a Lion travelled together
through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented a Lion
strangled by a Man. The traveller pointed
to it and said: See there! How strong we
are, and how we prevail over even the king
of beasts." The lion replied: "This statue
was made by one of you men. If we
Lions knew how to erect statues, you would
see the Man placed under the paw of the
Lion."


THE LION IN LOVE.

A LION demanded the daughter of a wood-
cutter in marriage. The father, unwilling
to grant, and yet afraid to refuse his re-
quest, hit upon this expedient to rid him-
self of him. He expressed his willingness
to accept him as the suitor of his daughter
on one condition; that he should allow
him to pull out his teeth, and cut off his
claws, as his daughter was fearfully afraid
of both. The Lion cheerfully agreed to
this; but when he next asked for the
daughter, the woodman, no longer afraid,
set upon him with his club, and drove him
away into the forest.


THE GOOSE &THE GOLDEN EGGS

A COTTAGER and his wife had a Goose,
which laid every day a Golden Egg. They
supposed that it must contain a great lump
of gold in its inside, and, not contented with
their daily good fortune, foolishly made up
their minds to cut it open, so as to obtain
the treasure all at once. But when these
greedy folks had killed the poor goose so
that they might get it, they found, to their
surprise, that it was just the same as other
geese. The silly pair, thus hoping to be-
come rich all at once, deprived themselves
of the gain of which they were day by day
assured.


THE BROTHER AND SISTER.

A MAN had a son and a daughter; the son
was good-looking but the daughter was
not. While they were playing one day they
happened to look together into a mirror.
The boy boasted of his good looks, upon
which the girl grew angry, and ran off to
her father, complaining of her brother's
vanity in using the mirror, a thing which
was only proper for girls; but their father
said: "I wish you both to look into the
mirror: you, my son, that you may not
spoil your beauty by evil conduct; and you,
my daughter, that you may make up for
your wvant of beauty by your virtues."


I








THE MAN AND THE LION.

A MAN and a Lion travelled together
through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented a Lion
strangled by a Man. The traveller pointed
to it and said: See there! How strong we
are, and how we prevail over even the king
of beasts." The lion replied: "This statue
was made by one of you men. If we
Lions knew how to erect statues, you would
see the Man placed under the paw of the
Lion."


THE LION IN LOVE.

A LION demanded the daughter of a wood-
cutter in marriage. The father, unwilling
to grant, and yet afraid to refuse his re-
quest, hit upon this expedient to rid him-
self of him. He expressed his willingness
to accept him as the suitor of his daughter
on one condition; that he should allow
him to pull out his teeth, and cut off his
claws, as his daughter was fearfully afraid
of both. The Lion cheerfully agreed to
this; but when he next asked for the
daughter, the woodman, no longer afraid,
set upon him with his club, and drove him
away into the forest.


THE GOOSE &THE GOLDEN EGGS

A COTTAGER and his wife had a Goose,
which laid every day a Golden Egg. They
supposed that it must contain a great lump
of gold in its inside, and, not contented with
their daily good fortune, foolishly made up
their minds to cut it open, so as to obtain
the treasure all at once. But when these
greedy folks had killed the poor goose so
that they might get it, they found, to their
surprise, that it was just the same as other
geese. The silly pair, thus hoping to be-
come rich all at once, deprived themselves
of the gain of which they were day by day
assured.


THE BROTHER AND SISTER.

A MAN had a son and a daughter; the son
was good-looking but the daughter was
not. While they were playing one day they
happened to look together into a mirror.
The boy boasted of his good looks, upon
which the girl grew angry, and ran off to
her father, complaining of her brother's
vanity in using the mirror, a thing which
was only proper for girls; but their father
said: "I wish you both to look into the
mirror: you, my son, that you may not
spoil your beauty by evil conduct; and you,
my daughter, that you may make up for
your wvant of beauty by your virtues."


I








THE MAN AND THE LION.

A MAN and a Lion travelled together
through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented a Lion
strangled by a Man. The traveller pointed
to it and said: See there! How strong we
are, and how we prevail over even the king
of beasts." The lion replied: "This statue
was made by one of you men. If we
Lions knew how to erect statues, you would
see the Man placed under the paw of the
Lion."


THE LION IN LOVE.

A LION demanded the daughter of a wood-
cutter in marriage. The father, unwilling
to grant, and yet afraid to refuse his re-
quest, hit upon this expedient to rid him-
self of him. He expressed his willingness
to accept him as the suitor of his daughter
on one condition; that he should allow
him to pull out his teeth, and cut off his
claws, as his daughter was fearfully afraid
of both. The Lion cheerfully agreed to
this; but when he next asked for the
daughter, the woodman, no longer afraid,
set upon him with his club, and drove him
away into the forest.


THE GOOSE &THE GOLDEN EGGS

A COTTAGER and his wife had a Goose,
which laid every day a Golden Egg. They
supposed that it must contain a great lump
of gold in its inside, and, not contented with
their daily good fortune, foolishly made up
their minds to cut it open, so as to obtain
the treasure all at once. But when these
greedy folks had killed the poor goose so
that they might get it, they found, to their
surprise, that it was just the same as other
geese. The silly pair, thus hoping to be-
come rich all at once, deprived themselves
of the gain of which they were day by day
assured.


THE BROTHER AND SISTER.

A MAN had a son and a daughter; the son
was good-looking but the daughter was
not. While they were playing one day they
happened to look together into a mirror.
The boy boasted of his good looks, upon
which the girl grew angry, and ran off to
her father, complaining of her brother's
vanity in using the mirror, a thing which
was only proper for girls; but their father
said: "I wish you both to look into the
mirror: you, my son, that you may not
spoil your beauty by evil conduct; and you,
my daughter, that you may make up for
your wvant of beauty by your virtues."


I








THE MAN AND THE LION.

A MAN and a Lion travelled together
through the forest. They soon began to
boast of their respective superiority to each
other in strength and prowess. As they
were disputing, they passed a statue,
carved in stone, which represented a Lion
strangled by a Man. The traveller pointed
to it and said: See there! How strong we
are, and how we prevail over even the king
of beasts." The lion replied: "This statue
was made by one of you men. If we
Lions knew how to erect statues, you would
see the Man placed under the paw of the
Lion."


THE LION IN LOVE.

A LION demanded the daughter of a wood-
cutter in marriage. The father, unwilling
to grant, and yet afraid to refuse his re-
quest, hit upon this expedient to rid him-
self of him. He expressed his willingness
to accept him as the suitor of his daughter
on one condition; that he should allow
him to pull out his teeth, and cut off his
claws, as his daughter was fearfully afraid
of both. The Lion cheerfully agreed to
this; but when he next asked for the
daughter, the woodman, no longer afraid,
set upon him with his club, and drove him
away into the forest.


THE GOOSE &THE GOLDEN EGGS

A COTTAGER and his wife had a Goose,
which laid every day a Golden Egg. They
supposed that it must contain a great lump
of gold in its inside, and, not contented with
their daily good fortune, foolishly made up
their minds to cut it open, so as to obtain
the treasure all at once. But when these
greedy folks had killed the poor goose so
that they might get it, they found, to their
surprise, that it was just the same as other
geese. The silly pair, thus hoping to be-
come rich all at once, deprived themselves
of the gain of which they were day by day
assured.


THE BROTHER AND SISTER.

A MAN had a son and a daughter; the son
was good-looking but the daughter was
not. While they were playing one day they
happened to look together into a mirror.
The boy boasted of his good looks, upon
which the girl grew angry, and ran off to
her father, complaining of her brother's
vanity in using the mirror, a thing which
was only proper for girls; but their father
said: "I wish you both to look into the
mirror: you, my son, that you may not
spoil your beauty by evil conduct; and you,
my daughter, that you may make up for
your wvant of beauty by your virtues."


I








THE MAN AND THE IMAGE,

A POOR man had a wooden Image of Mer-
cury, before which he made offerings day
by day, and begged the idol to make him
rich: but, in spite of his entreaties, he only
became poorer and poorer. At last he took
the Image down from its pedestal, and
dashed it against the wall: when, its head
being knocked off, out came a stream of
gold, which the man quickly picked up,.
and said: "Well, I think thou art alto-
gether contradictory and unreasonable; for
when I paid thee honour, I reaped no bene-
fits; but now that I maltreat thee I am
loaded with an abundance of riches."


THE BUNDLE OF STICKS.

A FATHER had a family who were always
quarrelling. One day he told them to bring
him a bundle of sticks; he then gave each
the faggot in turn, and ordered them to
break it. Each one tried with all his
strength, but neither could do it. He next
unbound the faggot, and gave them the
sticks one by one, which they broke easily.
He then said: "My sons, if you are of
one mind and unite to assist each other,
you will be as this faggot, uninjured by all
the attempts of your enemies; but if you
are divided among yourselves, you will be
broken as easily as these sticks."


MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN.

A WOODMAN dropped his axe into a deep
pool. Seeing his distress Mercury appeared,
plunged in, and brought up a golden axe.
The man said that this was not the axe he
had lost. Upon this Mercury brought him
a silver one, which the man also refused.
Mercury then brought up the axe that had
been lost, which the man joyfully claimed;
when Mercury, pleased at his honesty, gave
him the gold and silver axes too. A fellow
workman, hearing of this, purposely lost
his axe in the same way, thinking to get
the golden one instead; but he did not get
back even his own.


THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.

A MAN had an Ass and a Lap-dog. The
Ass was left in the stable, but the Lap-dog
knew many tricks, and was a great favourite
with his master, who often fondled him.
The Ass was jealous of this, and one day
broke his cords and halter, and galloped
into his master's house, kicking up his
heels and frisking and fawning as well as
he could. He then tried to jump about
his master, as he had seen the Lap-dog do,
but he broke the table, and smashed all
the dishes. The servants hearing the
strange hubbub, quickly drove him to his
stable, with kicks and blows.


I








THE MAN AND THE IMAGE,

A POOR man had a wooden Image of Mer-
cury, before which he made offerings day
by day, and begged the idol to make him
rich: but, in spite of his entreaties, he only
became poorer and poorer. At last he took
the Image down from its pedestal, and
dashed it against the wall: when, its head
being knocked off, out came a stream of
gold, which the man quickly picked up,.
and said: "Well, I think thou art alto-
gether contradictory and unreasonable; for
when I paid thee honour, I reaped no bene-
fits; but now that I maltreat thee I am
loaded with an abundance of riches."


THE BUNDLE OF STICKS.

A FATHER had a family who were always
quarrelling. One day he told them to bring
him a bundle of sticks; he then gave each
the faggot in turn, and ordered them to
break it. Each one tried with all his
strength, but neither could do it. He next
unbound the faggot, and gave them the
sticks one by one, which they broke easily.
He then said: "My sons, if you are of
one mind and unite to assist each other,
you will be as this faggot, uninjured by all
the attempts of your enemies; but if you
are divided among yourselves, you will be
broken as easily as these sticks."


MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN.

A WOODMAN dropped his axe into a deep
pool. Seeing his distress Mercury appeared,
plunged in, and brought up a golden axe.
The man said that this was not the axe he
had lost. Upon this Mercury brought him
a silver one, which the man also refused.
Mercury then brought up the axe that had
been lost, which the man joyfully claimed;
when Mercury, pleased at his honesty, gave
him the gold and silver axes too. A fellow
workman, hearing of this, purposely lost
his axe in the same way, thinking to get
the golden one instead; but he did not get
back even his own.


THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.

A MAN had an Ass and a Lap-dog. The
Ass was left in the stable, but the Lap-dog
knew many tricks, and was a great favourite
with his master, who often fondled him.
The Ass was jealous of this, and one day
broke his cords and halter, and galloped
into his master's house, kicking up his
heels and frisking and fawning as well as
he could. He then tried to jump about
his master, as he had seen the Lap-dog do,
but he broke the table, and smashed all
the dishes. The servants hearing the
strange hubbub, quickly drove him to his
stable, with kicks and blows.


I








THE MAN AND THE IMAGE,

A POOR man had a wooden Image of Mer-
cury, before which he made offerings day
by day, and begged the idol to make him
rich: but, in spite of his entreaties, he only
became poorer and poorer. At last he took
the Image down from its pedestal, and
dashed it against the wall: when, its head
being knocked off, out came a stream of
gold, which the man quickly picked up,.
and said: "Well, I think thou art alto-
gether contradictory and unreasonable; for
when I paid thee honour, I reaped no bene-
fits; but now that I maltreat thee I am
loaded with an abundance of riches."


THE BUNDLE OF STICKS.

A FATHER had a family who were always
quarrelling. One day he told them to bring
him a bundle of sticks; he then gave each
the faggot in turn, and ordered them to
break it. Each one tried with all his
strength, but neither could do it. He next
unbound the faggot, and gave them the
sticks one by one, which they broke easily.
He then said: "My sons, if you are of
one mind and unite to assist each other,
you will be as this faggot, uninjured by all
the attempts of your enemies; but if you
are divided among yourselves, you will be
broken as easily as these sticks."


MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN.

A WOODMAN dropped his axe into a deep
pool. Seeing his distress Mercury appeared,
plunged in, and brought up a golden axe.
The man said that this was not the axe he
had lost. Upon this Mercury brought him
a silver one, which the man also refused.
Mercury then brought up the axe that had
been lost, which the man joyfully claimed;
when Mercury, pleased at his honesty, gave
him the gold and silver axes too. A fellow
workman, hearing of this, purposely lost
his axe in the same way, thinking to get
the golden one instead; but he did not get
back even his own.


THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.

A MAN had an Ass and a Lap-dog. The
Ass was left in the stable, but the Lap-dog
knew many tricks, and was a great favourite
with his master, who often fondled him.
The Ass was jealous of this, and one day
broke his cords and halter, and galloped
into his master's house, kicking up his
heels and frisking and fawning as well as
he could. He then tried to jump about
his master, as he had seen the Lap-dog do,
but he broke the table, and smashed all
the dishes. The servants hearing the
strange hubbub, quickly drove him to his
stable, with kicks and blows.


I








THE MAN AND THE IMAGE,

A POOR man had a wooden Image of Mer-
cury, before which he made offerings day
by day, and begged the idol to make him
rich: but, in spite of his entreaties, he only
became poorer and poorer. At last he took
the Image down from its pedestal, and
dashed it against the wall: when, its head
being knocked off, out came a stream of
gold, which the man quickly picked up,.
and said: "Well, I think thou art alto-
gether contradictory and unreasonable; for
when I paid thee honour, I reaped no bene-
fits; but now that I maltreat thee I am
loaded with an abundance of riches."


THE BUNDLE OF STICKS.

A FATHER had a family who were always
quarrelling. One day he told them to bring
him a bundle of sticks; he then gave each
the faggot in turn, and ordered them to
break it. Each one tried with all his
strength, but neither could do it. He next
unbound the faggot, and gave them the
sticks one by one, which they broke easily.
He then said: "My sons, if you are of
one mind and unite to assist each other,
you will be as this faggot, uninjured by all
the attempts of your enemies; but if you
are divided among yourselves, you will be
broken as easily as these sticks."


MERCURY AND THE WOODMAN.

A WOODMAN dropped his axe into a deep
pool. Seeing his distress Mercury appeared,
plunged in, and brought up a golden axe.
The man said that this was not the axe he
had lost. Upon this Mercury brought him
a silver one, which the man also refused.
Mercury then brought up the axe that had
been lost, which the man joyfully claimed;
when Mercury, pleased at his honesty, gave
him the gold and silver axes too. A fellow
workman, hearing of this, purposely lost
his axe in the same way, thinking to get
the golden one instead; but he did not get
back even his own.


THE ASS AND THE LAP-DOG.

A MAN had an Ass and a Lap-dog. The
Ass was left in the stable, but the Lap-dog
knew many tricks, and was a great favourite
with his master, who often fondled him.
The Ass was jealous of this, and one day
broke his cords and halter, and galloped
into his master's house, kicking up his
heels and frisking and fawning as well as
he could. He then tried to jump about
his master, as he had seen the Lap-dog do,
but he broke the table, and smashed all
the dishes. The servants hearing the
strange hubbub, quickly drove him to his
stable, with kicks and blows.


I








THE MOUNTAIN IN LABOUR.

A MOUNTAIN was once greatly agitated.
The news spread all over the country.;
loud groans and noises were heard; and
crowds of people came from all parts to see
what was the matter. Great curiosity pre-
vailed; it was thought that at least some
hideous dragon or other frightful monster
would appear. They watched for many
days and nights in great anxiety, wonder-
ing what the Mountain would bring forth.
But at last, when all assembled were every
moment expecting some terrible calamity,
out came a ridiculous Mouse.
Don't make much ado about nothing.


THE ASS IN THE LION'S SKIN.

AN Ass, having put on the Lion's skin,
roamed about in the forest, and amused
himself by frightening all the foolish ani-
mals he met with in his wanderings. His
brother asses, dogs, and sheep fled in terror
before him. At last, meeting a Man, he
tried to frighten him also, but the Man no
sooner heard his voice, than he exclaimed:
" I might possibly have been frightened
myself, if I had not heard your bray."
Saying which, he seized a heavy cudgel,
and belaboured the poor ass unmercifully.
"Alas!" cried he, "this comes of trying to
appear other than what I am!"


THE TREES AND THE AXE.

A MAN came into a forest, and begged the
Trees to provide him a handle for his Axe.
The Trees consented to his request, and
gave him a young ash-tree. No sooner had
the man fitted from it a new handle to his
Axe, than he began to use it, and quickly
felled with his strokes the noblest giants of
the forest. An old oak, lamenting, when
too late, the destruction of his companions,
said to a neighboring cedar: "The first
step has lost us all. If we had not given
up the rights of the ash, we might yet have
retained our own privileges, and have stood
for ages."


THE TOWN & COUNTRY MOUSE.

A COUNTRY Mouse invited a Town Mouse
to visit him. The Town Mouse, dissatis-
fied with the frugal fare, asked the Country
Mouse to come to town, and share the
dainties which he enjoyed. The Country
Mouse agreed. But while the two friends
were regaling themselves on creams and
custards, a great noise was heard, and a
dog came barking into the room. The two
mice, in great fear, ran away and hid them-
selves, barely escaping with their lives.
"This life wouldn't suit me," said the
Country Mouse; I prefer my simple fare
at home so long as I can enjoy it in peace."


t _~








THE FOX AND THE APE.

AN Ape once danced in an assembly of the
beasts, and so pleased them all by his per-
formance that they elected him their king.
A Fox, envying him the honour, discovered
a piece of meat lying in a trap, and leading
the Ape to the place where it was, said
that he had found a store, but had kept
it for him as treasure-trove of his kingdom.
The Ape approached carelessly, and was
caught in the trap; and on his accusing the
Fox of purposely leading him into the
snare, he replied: "What! are you then,
with such a mind as yours, going to be
king over the beasts ?"


THE OWL & THE GRASSHOPPER.

AN Owl, accustomed to feed at night and
to sleep during the day, was greatly dis-
turbed by the noise of a Grasshopper, and
earnestly besought her to leave off chirping.
The Grasshopper refused to desist, and
chirped louder and louder the more the
Owl entreated. When the Owl saw this
she resorted to stratagem. "Since I cannot
sleep," she said, "on account of your sweet
song, I shall indulge myself with some
nectar. Pray come and share it with me."
The Grasshopper, who was at once thirsty
and pleased with this flattery, eagerly flew
up, when the Owl swallowed her.


HERCULES & THE WAGGONER.

A CARTER was driving a waggon along
a country lane. The roads were heavy
with rain, and the wheels sank down deep
into a rut. The driver, stupefied and
aghast, stood looking at the waggon, and
did nothing but utter loud cries to Her-
cules to come and help him. Hercules,
it is said, appeared, and thus addressed
him: Put your shoulders to the wheel,
my man; goad on your bullocks, and never
more pray to me for help until you have
done your best to help yourself, or, depend
upon it, you will henceforth pray in vain."
Self-help is the best help.


THE WOMAN & THE WINE-CASK.

A POOR old Woman, anxiously looking
about for something to eat and drink, found
an empty Cask, which had lately been
full of prime old wine, and still retained
the fragrant smell of its former contents.
She eagerly seized it, and although it was
quite empty, she was loth to leave it. She
placed her nose to the bung-hole again and
again, and eagerly sniffing at it, exclaimed:
"0, most delicious! How nice must the
wine itself have been, when it leaves be-
hind in the very cask which contained it
so sweet a perfume I"
The memory of a good deed lives.


I










THE BLACKAMOOR.

A FOOLISH Man, who had bought a black
servant, was persuaded by some of his
friends that the colour of his Negro's skin
arose from dirt contracted through the ne-
glect of his former masters. So when he
got the unfortunate man home he had him
placed in a tub, and tried every means of
scrubbing and cleaning he could think of,
hoping to make him white. Through these
incessant scrubbings, the poor Blackamoor
at last caught a severe cold, but never
changed his colour or complexion.
What's bred in the bone will stick to the
flesh.


THE HERDSMAN & LOST BULL.

A HERDSMAN lost a Bull-calf from the
fold. After a long search, he made a vow
that, if he could only discover the thief
who had stolen the Calf, he would offer a
lamb to the Guardian Deities of the forest.
Not long afterwards he saw a Lion feed-
ing on the Calf. Terrified at the sight,
he said: "Just now I vowed to offer a
lamb to the Deities of the forest if I could
only find out who had robbed me; but now
that I have found the thief I would wil-
lingly add a full-grown Bull to the Calf I
have lost to secure my own escape from
him."


TRUMPETER TAKEN PRISONER.

ONCE, in a great battle, a Trumpeter, bravely
leading on the soldiers, was captured by
the enemy. He cried- out to his captors:
"Pray spare me, and do not take my life
without cause or without inquiry. I have
not slain a single man of your troop. I
have no arms, and carry nothing but this
one brass trumpet." "That is the very
reason for which you should be put to
death," they said; "for, while you do not
fight yourself, your trumpet stirs up all the
others to battle; so that you are, in fact,
the wicked cause of all this dreadful
slaughter."


THE DOG INVITED TO SUPPER.

A RICH man gave a great feast, to which he
invited many friends and acquaintances.
His Dog availed himself of the occasion
to invite a stranger Dog. The Dog, thus
invited, went at the hour appointed, and,
seeing the preparations for so grand an en-
tertainment, said, in the joy of his heart:
"How glad I am that I came! I do not
often get such a chance as this." Just then
the Cook saw him, and, seizing him by his
fore and hind paws, bundled him out of the
window. He fell with force upon the
ground, and limped away.
Uninvited guests are seldom welcome.







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