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 Table of Contents
 Corn grain and silage yield
 Cotton simulation
 Defoliating cotton
 Timely cotton harvest
 Florida 99 Alfalfa
 Small grain planting for dove...
 Forage weed update
 Peanut inspection report
 New and updated
 Tobacco quota outlook for 2001
 Tobacco barn retrofits
 County tobacco quota transfer
 Tobacco market report
 October crop estimates


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00079
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: September 2000
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00079

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Corn grain and silage yield
        Page 2
    Cotton simulation
        Page 2
    Defoliating cotton
        Page 2
    Timely cotton harvest
        Page 2
    Florida 99 Alfalfa
        Page 2
    Small grain planting for dove hunting
        Page 2
    Forage weed update
        Page 2
    Peanut inspection report
        Page 3
    New and updated
        Page 3
    Tobacco quota outlook for 2001
        Page 3
    Tobacco barn retrofits
        Page 3
    County tobacco quota transfer
        Page 3
    Tobacco market report
        Page 4
    October crop estimates
        Page 4
Full Text






AGRONOMY

L!T. UNVER TTY OF
OFLORIDA
EXTENSION
[r...... F.-. -.j A.. ,r..s ...5 Sep tember-October



DATES TO REMEMBER

November 5-9 American Society of Agronomy Meetings Minneapolis, MN


IN THIS ISSUE PAGE

CORN
C orn G rain and Silage Y field ........................................................................ ......................... 2

COTTON
C o tto n S itu atio n ............................................................................................................................ 2
D efoliatin g C otto n ........................................................................................................................ 2
T im ely C otton H arv est ................................................................................................................. 2

FORAGE
F lo rid a 9 9 A lfalfa ........................................................................................ ......................... 2
Sm all G rain Planting for D ove H hunting ....................................................................................... 2
F orag e W eed U p date ................................................................................... ......................... 2

PEANUT
P eanut In section R report .............................................................................................................. 3

PUBLICATIONS
N ew an d U p dated ........................................................................................ ......................... 3

TOBACCO
T tobacco Q uota O outlook for 2001 ................................................................................................. 3
T ob acco B arn R etrofits ................................................................................ ......................... 3
C county T tobacco Q uota T transfer ................................................................................................... 3
T ob acco M ark et R ep ort ............................................................................... ......................... 4

GENERAL
O ctob er C rop E stim ates ............................................................................... ......................... 4


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other
extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
/ University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director.








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








Corn Grain and Silage Yield


Corn grain and silage variety trials in Florida were conducted in
conjunction with the University of Georgia, and yield data will
be posted on their web site (http://www.griffin.peachnet.edu/caes/
grain/).

DLW

Cotton Situation

The 2000 cotton crop got off to a late start with emergence in
late June in many fields. Much of this cotton started blooming
early and was under severe heat/drought stress in late July and
August causing many fields to move rapidly to cutout. Yields
will be low in most dry land fields while some irrigated fields
will have good yields. Insect infestation has been relatively
low through most of the season but picked up significantly in
early to mid September on the late planted and late emerging
cotton. Cotton harvest is behind due to tropical storms and
wet conditions through the middle part of September.

DLW

Defoliating Cotton

Defoliation of cotton is always a challenge. Recent rains have
caused cotton that was cut out to begin new growth in the tops.
Cotton with mature leaves can easily be defoliated with Harvade,
which does a good job under cooler conditions and in fields with
morning-glory. It will not remove immature leaves of either cot-
ton or weeds. Cotton Quik is usually applied with Dropp or simi-
lar materials to enhance defoliation and provide regrowth suppres-
sion. Finish has been used alone with good results, but DEF/Folex
at 4 to 8 oz/A may improve leaf drop. Dropp Ultra is a formulation
of Dropp and diuron that was formulated for cooler conditions
than for Dropp alone. Ginstar is an emulsifiable concentrate for-
mulation of the same materials often used in the Southeast.

DLW


Timely Cotton Harvest


Late cotton takes longer to pick than early maturing cotton be-
cause days are shorter and there are less hours in the day when it
is suitable to pick. There are about 42 hours of good picking
conditions in the first week of October and about 26 hours the
last week, which is due to higher humidity earlier in the eve-
nings and the potential for rain as we get nearer November.
Therefore, early harvests are critical to crop harvest and quality.

DLW

Florida 99 Alfalfa

This new variety is available for fall planting this year. The
July/August issue of Agronomy Notes incorrectly stated that
no recommended varieties were available.


"Florida 99Alfalfa is an excellent high yielding, persistent
alfalfa variety bred by the Agronomy Department, Univer-
sity of Florida. This cultivar is adapted to the entire state of
Florida and all other areas where dormancy #9 alfalfa is
grown." Florida 99 is called a nondormant type alfalfa. This
means that it will continue to grow during short days and
cool nights, whereas more northerly adapted varieties will
not. Florida 99 is an improvement on the older variety known
as Florida 77. Yields at Jay, Florida and at Gainesville were
significantly higher than other nondormant varieties, averag-
ing 5 to 6 tons of dry matter per acre per year over a 2 to 3
year period.

CGC

Small Grain Planting for Dove Hunting

The question about surface seeding of small grains keeps sur-
facing. The following is adapted from the Small Grain Pro-
duction Guide, SS-AGR-45.

Small grain seeding must be done as a normal agri-
cultural practice which could include planting into a
prepared seedbed, drilled, harrowed or dragged after
seeding, or planting with a no-till drill. The only time
that it is recommended that small grain be surface
seeded is prior to leaf drop of soybean or before defo-
liating cotton. The normal seeding rates per acre are
listed [in SS-AGR-45] for grain and for grazing. Sur-
face sowing at high rates of seed without incorporat-
ing is not a normal agricultural practice and would be
considered baiting if done in this manner. The nor-
mal seeding rates of small grain do not usually attract
large numbers of birds. Therefore, it would be advis-
able to plant other crops such as corn or millet in the

summer that could be mowed down prior to the open-
ing of [dove] hunting season to have adequate feed to
attract birds.

CGC


Forage Weed Update


Good news in pasture and hay field weed control. The price of
Remedy has been decreased to $62/gal from $80/gal. This will
decrease the cost/acre significantly so that more producers can
benefit from triclopyr, the active ingredient. In addition, DOW
AgroSciences recommends that higher volumes be used when
applying their products for pasture and rangeland. These prod-
ucts include Redeem R+P, Remedy and Crossbow.

Redeem R+P is the newest product for pasture and rangeland
weed control. It is a pre-mix of triclopyr (23.7%) + clopyralid
(7.9%). Redeem provides control of annual and perennial broa-
dleaf weeds in rangeland and permanent grass pastures, non-
crop areas such as fence rows, non-irrigation ditchbanks, road-
sides, and around farm buildings, and CRP areas. The clopyralid








provides residual soil activity to prevent weeds from germi-
nating after application.
JAT

Peanut Inspection Report

Through October 25, 72,607 tons of peanuts have been inspected
at Florida buying points according to USDA reports. This is
almost 80 percent of the estimated production for 2000. Only
136 tons have been graded into the Segregation III category,
which are those that contain aflatoxin. There have been 1802
tons of spanish, 70,615 tons of runners, and 190 tons of virginia
market types included in the total. Most of the additional pea-
nuts that were placed in the loan were bought back and placed
in domestic markets. Very few quota peanuts have been placed
in loan. About 43 percent of the inspections have been on ad-
ditional peanuts and 57 percent on quotas.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


New
SSAGR13

SSAGR81

SSAGR80
SSAGR82
SSAGR83
SSAGR84
SSAGR85
SSAGR86

SSAGR87


Updated


Weed Management in Transgenic Herbi-
cide Resistant Cotton
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal
Plain Region
Skunkvine (Paederia foetida)
Seed Certification
Production of Ultra Narrow Row Cotton
Fall Forage Update 2000
Cool Season Forage Variety Trials
The Story Behind IFAS Assessment of
Non-native Plants
Water Use Considerations for Florida
Grown Rice


SSAGR09 Weed Management in Sugarcane 2001
SSAGR10 Weed Management in Rice 2001
SSAGR46 Liming for Production of Forage Crops in
Florida
SSAGR78 Milling and Marketing of Florida Rice
SSAGR106 Names and Addresses of Some Herbicide
Manufacturers and Formulators


Tobacco Quota Outlook for 2001

Due to heavy reductions in quota over the past three years,
many growers are concerned about the prospects for the 2001
quota. Farmers need to have some idea about quota because of
decisions on how many barns to retrofit, and to make other
plans that would be affected by the quota. The quota will not
be announced until December 15, but there are four major com-
ponents of the formula for determining quota. The first com-


ponent is the purchase intentions by domestic cigarette manu-
facturers. This report is due on December 1. Last year the
purchase intentions were 286 million pounds, which was a sharp
decline from the preceding year. Purchase intentions are de-
termined entirely by the manufacturers and are reflections of
their anticipated needs. These 2000 buying patterns may be
of little value in predicting the 2001 purchase intentions, but
about 95 percent of the tobacco was bought, which indicates
good demand. The second component of the formula is av-
erage exports, that have declined and will probably be less
than the 334 million pounds that was the 3-year average used
last year. Reserve stocks are the third component and basi-
cally are the holdings in Stabilization. If the stocks exceed
15 percent of the previous year's basic quota, there will be a
negative figure in the formula. At the present time, there are
almost 200 million pounds in the Stabilization, that includes
about 25 million pounds added in 2000. Fifteen percent of
the 2000 basic quota is about 80 million pounds, which at
this time indicates a strong negative figure for the formula.
Last year the negative figure was 93 million pounds. Sales
of Stabilization stocks to China or other customers are an-
ticipated and would lessen the negative impact of the level of
storage stocks. The final component of the formula is a dis-
cretionary plus or minus 3 percent, that is decided by the
USDA. Any outlook for the 2001 quota will have to take
these components into consideration, but some prognostica-
tors think that there could be a small increase in quota for
2001.

EBW

Tobacco Barn Retrofits

Tobacco farmers should plan to retrofit curing barns with
indirect fire curing systems before July 1, 2001. It is ex-
pected that price supports will not be available if barns are
not retrofitted. The formation of tobacco specific nitrosamines
(TSNA) by a reaction between the combustion gases and the
tobacco is prevented with the indirect fire units. Lower TSNA
levels in tobacco are believed to lessen the dangers of smok-
ing. One new cigarette brand in test markets is composed of
low TSNA tobacco.

EBW

County Tobacco Quota Transfer

At the present time, federal rules do not allow tobacco quota
to be transferred (sold or leased) and moved across county
lines except under certain conditions. It is expected that a
referendum will be held in January to change this for Florida
if there is enough support for such a vote. Those in favor of
such a change point out that in small counties there may be
few or no potential buyers or lessors. Thus, the value of the
quota is limited. Also being able to move the quota across
county lines would make the value of the quota more uni-








provides residual soil activity to prevent weeds from germi-
nating after application.
JAT

Peanut Inspection Report

Through October 25, 72,607 tons of peanuts have been inspected
at Florida buying points according to USDA reports. This is
almost 80 percent of the estimated production for 2000. Only
136 tons have been graded into the Segregation III category,
which are those that contain aflatoxin. There have been 1802
tons of spanish, 70,615 tons of runners, and 190 tons of virginia
market types included in the total. Most of the additional pea-
nuts that were placed in the loan were bought back and placed
in domestic markets. Very few quota peanuts have been placed
in loan. About 43 percent of the inspections have been on ad-
ditional peanuts and 57 percent on quotas.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


New
SSAGR13

SSAGR81

SSAGR80
SSAGR82
SSAGR83
SSAGR84
SSAGR85
SSAGR86

SSAGR87


Updated


Weed Management in Transgenic Herbi-
cide Resistant Cotton
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal
Plain Region
Skunkvine (Paederia foetida)
Seed Certification
Production of Ultra Narrow Row Cotton
Fall Forage Update 2000
Cool Season Forage Variety Trials
The Story Behind IFAS Assessment of
Non-native Plants
Water Use Considerations for Florida
Grown Rice


SSAGR09 Weed Management in Sugarcane 2001
SSAGR10 Weed Management in Rice 2001
SSAGR46 Liming for Production of Forage Crops in
Florida
SSAGR78 Milling and Marketing of Florida Rice
SSAGR106 Names and Addresses of Some Herbicide
Manufacturers and Formulators


Tobacco Quota Outlook for 2001

Due to heavy reductions in quota over the past three years,
many growers are concerned about the prospects for the 2001
quota. Farmers need to have some idea about quota because of
decisions on how many barns to retrofit, and to make other
plans that would be affected by the quota. The quota will not
be announced until December 15, but there are four major com-
ponents of the formula for determining quota. The first com-


ponent is the purchase intentions by domestic cigarette manu-
facturers. This report is due on December 1. Last year the
purchase intentions were 286 million pounds, which was a sharp
decline from the preceding year. Purchase intentions are de-
termined entirely by the manufacturers and are reflections of
their anticipated needs. These 2000 buying patterns may be
of little value in predicting the 2001 purchase intentions, but
about 95 percent of the tobacco was bought, which indicates
good demand. The second component of the formula is av-
erage exports, that have declined and will probably be less
than the 334 million pounds that was the 3-year average used
last year. Reserve stocks are the third component and basi-
cally are the holdings in Stabilization. If the stocks exceed
15 percent of the previous year's basic quota, there will be a
negative figure in the formula. At the present time, there are
almost 200 million pounds in the Stabilization, that includes
about 25 million pounds added in 2000. Fifteen percent of
the 2000 basic quota is about 80 million pounds, which at
this time indicates a strong negative figure for the formula.
Last year the negative figure was 93 million pounds. Sales
of Stabilization stocks to China or other customers are an-
ticipated and would lessen the negative impact of the level of
storage stocks. The final component of the formula is a dis-
cretionary plus or minus 3 percent, that is decided by the
USDA. Any outlook for the 2001 quota will have to take
these components into consideration, but some prognostica-
tors think that there could be a small increase in quota for
2001.

EBW

Tobacco Barn Retrofits

Tobacco farmers should plan to retrofit curing barns with
indirect fire curing systems before July 1, 2001. It is ex-
pected that price supports will not be available if barns are
not retrofitted. The formation of tobacco specific nitrosamines
(TSNA) by a reaction between the combustion gases and the
tobacco is prevented with the indirect fire units. Lower TSNA
levels in tobacco are believed to lessen the dangers of smok-
ing. One new cigarette brand in test markets is composed of
low TSNA tobacco.

EBW

County Tobacco Quota Transfer

At the present time, federal rules do not allow tobacco quota
to be transferred (sold or leased) and moved across county
lines except under certain conditions. It is expected that a
referendum will be held in January to change this for Florida
if there is enough support for such a vote. Those in favor of
such a change point out that in small counties there may be
few or no potential buyers or lessors. Thus, the value of the
quota is limited. Also being able to move the quota across
county lines would make the value of the quota more uni-








provides residual soil activity to prevent weeds from germi-
nating after application.
JAT

Peanut Inspection Report

Through October 25, 72,607 tons of peanuts have been inspected
at Florida buying points according to USDA reports. This is
almost 80 percent of the estimated production for 2000. Only
136 tons have been graded into the Segregation III category,
which are those that contain aflatoxin. There have been 1802
tons of spanish, 70,615 tons of runners, and 190 tons of virginia
market types included in the total. Most of the additional pea-
nuts that were placed in the loan were bought back and placed
in domestic markets. Very few quota peanuts have been placed
in loan. About 43 percent of the inspections have been on ad-
ditional peanuts and 57 percent on quotas.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


New
SSAGR13

SSAGR81

SSAGR80
SSAGR82
SSAGR83
SSAGR84
SSAGR85
SSAGR86

SSAGR87


Updated


Weed Management in Transgenic Herbi-
cide Resistant Cotton
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal
Plain Region
Skunkvine (Paederia foetida)
Seed Certification
Production of Ultra Narrow Row Cotton
Fall Forage Update 2000
Cool Season Forage Variety Trials
The Story Behind IFAS Assessment of
Non-native Plants
Water Use Considerations for Florida
Grown Rice


SSAGR09 Weed Management in Sugarcane 2001
SSAGR10 Weed Management in Rice 2001
SSAGR46 Liming for Production of Forage Crops in
Florida
SSAGR78 Milling and Marketing of Florida Rice
SSAGR106 Names and Addresses of Some Herbicide
Manufacturers and Formulators


Tobacco Quota Outlook for 2001

Due to heavy reductions in quota over the past three years,
many growers are concerned about the prospects for the 2001
quota. Farmers need to have some idea about quota because of
decisions on how many barns to retrofit, and to make other
plans that would be affected by the quota. The quota will not
be announced until December 15, but there are four major com-
ponents of the formula for determining quota. The first com-


ponent is the purchase intentions by domestic cigarette manu-
facturers. This report is due on December 1. Last year the
purchase intentions were 286 million pounds, which was a sharp
decline from the preceding year. Purchase intentions are de-
termined entirely by the manufacturers and are reflections of
their anticipated needs. These 2000 buying patterns may be
of little value in predicting the 2001 purchase intentions, but
about 95 percent of the tobacco was bought, which indicates
good demand. The second component of the formula is av-
erage exports, that have declined and will probably be less
than the 334 million pounds that was the 3-year average used
last year. Reserve stocks are the third component and basi-
cally are the holdings in Stabilization. If the stocks exceed
15 percent of the previous year's basic quota, there will be a
negative figure in the formula. At the present time, there are
almost 200 million pounds in the Stabilization, that includes
about 25 million pounds added in 2000. Fifteen percent of
the 2000 basic quota is about 80 million pounds, which at
this time indicates a strong negative figure for the formula.
Last year the negative figure was 93 million pounds. Sales
of Stabilization stocks to China or other customers are an-
ticipated and would lessen the negative impact of the level of
storage stocks. The final component of the formula is a dis-
cretionary plus or minus 3 percent, that is decided by the
USDA. Any outlook for the 2001 quota will have to take
these components into consideration, but some prognostica-
tors think that there could be a small increase in quota for
2001.

EBW

Tobacco Barn Retrofits

Tobacco farmers should plan to retrofit curing barns with
indirect fire curing systems before July 1, 2001. It is ex-
pected that price supports will not be available if barns are
not retrofitted. The formation of tobacco specific nitrosamines
(TSNA) by a reaction between the combustion gases and the
tobacco is prevented with the indirect fire units. Lower TSNA
levels in tobacco are believed to lessen the dangers of smok-
ing. One new cigarette brand in test markets is composed of
low TSNA tobacco.

EBW

County Tobacco Quota Transfer

At the present time, federal rules do not allow tobacco quota
to be transferred (sold or leased) and moved across county
lines except under certain conditions. It is expected that a
referendum will be held in January to change this for Florida
if there is enough support for such a vote. Those in favor of
such a change point out that in small counties there may be
few or no potential buyers or lessors. Thus, the value of the
quota is limited. Also being able to move the quota across
county lines would make the value of the quota more uni-








provides residual soil activity to prevent weeds from germi-
nating after application.
JAT

Peanut Inspection Report

Through October 25, 72,607 tons of peanuts have been inspected
at Florida buying points according to USDA reports. This is
almost 80 percent of the estimated production for 2000. Only
136 tons have been graded into the Segregation III category,
which are those that contain aflatoxin. There have been 1802
tons of spanish, 70,615 tons of runners, and 190 tons of virginia
market types included in the total. Most of the additional pea-
nuts that were placed in the loan were bought back and placed
in domestic markets. Very few quota peanuts have been placed
in loan. About 43 percent of the inspections have been on ad-
ditional peanuts and 57 percent on quotas.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


New
SSAGR13

SSAGR81

SSAGR80
SSAGR82
SSAGR83
SSAGR84
SSAGR85
SSAGR86

SSAGR87


Updated


Weed Management in Transgenic Herbi-
cide Resistant Cotton
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal
Plain Region
Skunkvine (Paederia foetida)
Seed Certification
Production of Ultra Narrow Row Cotton
Fall Forage Update 2000
Cool Season Forage Variety Trials
The Story Behind IFAS Assessment of
Non-native Plants
Water Use Considerations for Florida
Grown Rice


SSAGR09 Weed Management in Sugarcane 2001
SSAGR10 Weed Management in Rice 2001
SSAGR46 Liming for Production of Forage Crops in
Florida
SSAGR78 Milling and Marketing of Florida Rice
SSAGR106 Names and Addresses of Some Herbicide
Manufacturers and Formulators


Tobacco Quota Outlook for 2001

Due to heavy reductions in quota over the past three years,
many growers are concerned about the prospects for the 2001
quota. Farmers need to have some idea about quota because of
decisions on how many barns to retrofit, and to make other
plans that would be affected by the quota. The quota will not
be announced until December 15, but there are four major com-
ponents of the formula for determining quota. The first com-


ponent is the purchase intentions by domestic cigarette manu-
facturers. This report is due on December 1. Last year the
purchase intentions were 286 million pounds, which was a sharp
decline from the preceding year. Purchase intentions are de-
termined entirely by the manufacturers and are reflections of
their anticipated needs. These 2000 buying patterns may be
of little value in predicting the 2001 purchase intentions, but
about 95 percent of the tobacco was bought, which indicates
good demand. The second component of the formula is av-
erage exports, that have declined and will probably be less
than the 334 million pounds that was the 3-year average used
last year. Reserve stocks are the third component and basi-
cally are the holdings in Stabilization. If the stocks exceed
15 percent of the previous year's basic quota, there will be a
negative figure in the formula. At the present time, there are
almost 200 million pounds in the Stabilization, that includes
about 25 million pounds added in 2000. Fifteen percent of
the 2000 basic quota is about 80 million pounds, which at
this time indicates a strong negative figure for the formula.
Last year the negative figure was 93 million pounds. Sales
of Stabilization stocks to China or other customers are an-
ticipated and would lessen the negative impact of the level of
storage stocks. The final component of the formula is a dis-
cretionary plus or minus 3 percent, that is decided by the
USDA. Any outlook for the 2001 quota will have to take
these components into consideration, but some prognostica-
tors think that there could be a small increase in quota for
2001.

EBW

Tobacco Barn Retrofits

Tobacco farmers should plan to retrofit curing barns with
indirect fire curing systems before July 1, 2001. It is ex-
pected that price supports will not be available if barns are
not retrofitted. The formation of tobacco specific nitrosamines
(TSNA) by a reaction between the combustion gases and the
tobacco is prevented with the indirect fire units. Lower TSNA
levels in tobacco are believed to lessen the dangers of smok-
ing. One new cigarette brand in test markets is composed of
low TSNA tobacco.

EBW

County Tobacco Quota Transfer

At the present time, federal rules do not allow tobacco quota
to be transferred (sold or leased) and moved across county
lines except under certain conditions. It is expected that a
referendum will be held in January to change this for Florida
if there is enough support for such a vote. Those in favor of
such a change point out that in small counties there may be
few or no potential buyers or lessors. Thus, the value of the
quota is limited. Also being able to move the quota across
county lines would make the value of the quota more uni-








provides residual soil activity to prevent weeds from germi-
nating after application.
JAT

Peanut Inspection Report

Through October 25, 72,607 tons of peanuts have been inspected
at Florida buying points according to USDA reports. This is
almost 80 percent of the estimated production for 2000. Only
136 tons have been graded into the Segregation III category,
which are those that contain aflatoxin. There have been 1802
tons of spanish, 70,615 tons of runners, and 190 tons of virginia
market types included in the total. Most of the additional pea-
nuts that were placed in the loan were bought back and placed
in domestic markets. Very few quota peanuts have been placed
in loan. About 43 percent of the inspections have been on ad-
ditional peanuts and 57 percent on quotas.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


New
SSAGR13

SSAGR81

SSAGR80
SSAGR82
SSAGR83
SSAGR84
SSAGR85
SSAGR86

SSAGR87


Updated


Weed Management in Transgenic Herbi-
cide Resistant Cotton
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal
Plain Region
Skunkvine (Paederia foetida)
Seed Certification
Production of Ultra Narrow Row Cotton
Fall Forage Update 2000
Cool Season Forage Variety Trials
The Story Behind IFAS Assessment of
Non-native Plants
Water Use Considerations for Florida
Grown Rice


SSAGR09 Weed Management in Sugarcane 2001
SSAGR10 Weed Management in Rice 2001
SSAGR46 Liming for Production of Forage Crops in
Florida
SSAGR78 Milling and Marketing of Florida Rice
SSAGR106 Names and Addresses of Some Herbicide
Manufacturers and Formulators


Tobacco Quota Outlook for 2001

Due to heavy reductions in quota over the past three years,
many growers are concerned about the prospects for the 2001
quota. Farmers need to have some idea about quota because of
decisions on how many barns to retrofit, and to make other
plans that would be affected by the quota. The quota will not
be announced until December 15, but there are four major com-
ponents of the formula for determining quota. The first com-


ponent is the purchase intentions by domestic cigarette manu-
facturers. This report is due on December 1. Last year the
purchase intentions were 286 million pounds, which was a sharp
decline from the preceding year. Purchase intentions are de-
termined entirely by the manufacturers and are reflections of
their anticipated needs. These 2000 buying patterns may be
of little value in predicting the 2001 purchase intentions, but
about 95 percent of the tobacco was bought, which indicates
good demand. The second component of the formula is av-
erage exports, that have declined and will probably be less
than the 334 million pounds that was the 3-year average used
last year. Reserve stocks are the third component and basi-
cally are the holdings in Stabilization. If the stocks exceed
15 percent of the previous year's basic quota, there will be a
negative figure in the formula. At the present time, there are
almost 200 million pounds in the Stabilization, that includes
about 25 million pounds added in 2000. Fifteen percent of
the 2000 basic quota is about 80 million pounds, which at
this time indicates a strong negative figure for the formula.
Last year the negative figure was 93 million pounds. Sales
of Stabilization stocks to China or other customers are an-
ticipated and would lessen the negative impact of the level of
storage stocks. The final component of the formula is a dis-
cretionary plus or minus 3 percent, that is decided by the
USDA. Any outlook for the 2001 quota will have to take
these components into consideration, but some prognostica-
tors think that there could be a small increase in quota for
2001.

EBW

Tobacco Barn Retrofits

Tobacco farmers should plan to retrofit curing barns with
indirect fire curing systems before July 1, 2001. It is ex-
pected that price supports will not be available if barns are
not retrofitted. The formation of tobacco specific nitrosamines
(TSNA) by a reaction between the combustion gases and the
tobacco is prevented with the indirect fire units. Lower TSNA
levels in tobacco are believed to lessen the dangers of smok-
ing. One new cigarette brand in test markets is composed of
low TSNA tobacco.

EBW

County Tobacco Quota Transfer

At the present time, federal rules do not allow tobacco quota
to be transferred (sold or leased) and moved across county
lines except under certain conditions. It is expected that a
referendum will be held in January to change this for Florida
if there is enough support for such a vote. Those in favor of
such a change point out that in small counties there may be
few or no potential buyers or lessors. Thus, the value of the
quota is limited. Also being able to move the quota across
county lines would make the value of the quota more uni-








form among counties. A disadvantage of such a transfer is
that some counties could lose this source of farm income.

EBW


Tobacco Market Report


During the 2000 season, the three Florida tobacco markets
sold 11,459,955 pounds. This total includes Georgia-pro-
duced tobacco sold in Florida, but excludes Florida-produced
tobacco sold in Georgia. Of the tobacco sold in Florida, there
were 9,498 bales that accounted for 7,095,516 pounds, or 62
percent of the total Florida sales. Nationwide, 77 percent of
the flue-cured tobacco has been sold in bales. Nonauction
sales of Florida tobacco has amounted to 228,287 pounds.

EBW


OCTOBER CROP ESTIMATES


The National Agricultural Statistics Service made the following crop acreage and yield
estimates as of August 1:

Florida United States


Acreage for Yield Acreage for Yield
rop Harvest (x1000) Per Acre Harvest (x1000) Per Acre

Cotton 92 420 lb 13,544 650 lb

Peanuts 80 2,400 lb 1,395.5 2,486 lb

Sugarcane 454 35.2 ton 1,026 34.7 ton

Tobacco 4.9 2,450 lb 492.3 2,284 lb

Corn, hay, soybeans, and wheat are no longer estimated for Florida. Cotton is carried over
from a previous forecast.


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist, J. A. Tredaway, Extension
gronomist; G. M. Prine, Agronomist; D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist, North Florida Research and Education Center.








form among counties. A disadvantage of such a transfer is
that some counties could lose this source of farm income.

EBW


Tobacco Market Report


During the 2000 season, the three Florida tobacco markets
sold 11,459,955 pounds. This total includes Georgia-pro-
duced tobacco sold in Florida, but excludes Florida-produced
tobacco sold in Georgia. Of the tobacco sold in Florida, there
were 9,498 bales that accounted for 7,095,516 pounds, or 62
percent of the total Florida sales. Nationwide, 77 percent of
the flue-cured tobacco has been sold in bales. Nonauction
sales of Florida tobacco has amounted to 228,287 pounds.

EBW


OCTOBER CROP ESTIMATES


The National Agricultural Statistics Service made the following crop acreage and yield
estimates as of August 1:

Florida United States


Acreage for Yield Acreage for Yield
rop Harvest (x1000) Per Acre Harvest (x1000) Per Acre

Cotton 92 420 lb 13,544 650 lb

Peanuts 80 2,400 lb 1,395.5 2,486 lb

Sugarcane 454 35.2 ton 1,026 34.7 ton

Tobacco 4.9 2,450 lb 492.3 2,284 lb

Corn, hay, soybeans, and wheat are no longer estimated for Florida. Cotton is carried over
from a previous forecast.


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist, J. A. Tredaway, Extension
gronomist; G. M. Prine, Agronomist; D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist, North Florida Research and Education Center.