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 Table of Contents
 Some cotton varieties are in short...
 Cover crop management for strip...
 Killing strips in cover crops is...
 Plant cotton as soon as adequate...
 Pasture establishment
 Clover pastures
 Range cattle field day
 Peanut planting
 Retrofitting tobacco barns
 Publications
 Field crop planting intentions...


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00076
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: May 2000
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00076

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Some cotton varieties are in short supply
        Page 2
    Cover crop management for strip tillage
        Page 2
    Killing strips in cover crops is not advisable
        Page 2
    Plant cotton as soon as adequate moisture is available
        Page 2
    Pasture establishment
        Page 2
    Clover pastures
        Page 2
    Range cattle field day
        Page 2
    Peanut planting
        Page 2
    Retrofitting tobacco barns
        Page 3
    Publications
        Page 3
    Field crop planting intentions for 2000
        Page 3
Full Text






AGRONOMY





P'iU U, O ,W,wQ idM May 2000


DATES TO REMEMBER

June 1 Range Cattle Field Day Ona
June 13 Florida Tobacco Tour
June 13-15 Georgia Tobacco Tour
June 27-29 Deep South Weed Tour


IN THIS ISSUE PAGE

COTTON
Some Cotton Varieties are in Short Supply ........................... .... ............................... 2
Cover Crop Management for Strip Tillage ........................... ........................................... 2
Killing Strips in Cover Crops is Not Advisable .......................... ..................................... 2
Plant Cotton as Soon as Adequate Moisture is Available ...................................................... 2

FORAGE
P asture E stablishm ent ................................................................ ..................... ............... ...... 2
C lov er P astu res ..... ......................................................... ......................... ............... ...... 2
R ange C battle Field D ay ........................................................................ ........................... 2

PEANUT
P eanut P planting ..... ......................................................... ......................... ............... ...... 2

TOBACCO
R etrofitting T tobacco B arns .................................................. .................................................. 3

MISCELLANEOUS
Publications ...... ......................................................................... 3
Field Crop Planting Intentions for 2000 .......................................... ............................... 3






The use of tradenames does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; E.B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; and D. L. Wright,
Extension Agronomist, North Florida Research and Education Center.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other
extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
/ University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director.









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),









SOME COTTON VARIETIES ARE IN SHORT
SUPPLY

Several popular varieties of RR cotton are in short supply
and should be purchased as soon as you determine what
variety you want to grow. About 65% of the cotton variet-
ies grown in Florida in 1999 were transgenic. Both Roundup
ready and Bt varieties have shown economic benefit in many
situations and are widely grown.

DLW

COVER CROP MANAGEMENT FOR STRIP
TILLAGE

Cover crops should be killed three to four weeks ahead of
planting for two important reasons:
1. Cover crops continue to take up moisture until they are
killed and can create a moisture shortage for germinating
crops if allowed to grow until planting.
2. Living crops harbor a variety of soil insects including
cutworms, wire worms and corn root worms. If the cover
crop is killed several weeks prior to planting, insects have
either died or migrated out of the area since there were no
living roots to feed on. If the cover crop is killed at the time
of planting as in the case with winter grazing, a soil insecti-
cide must be used to prevent insect attack as insects move
from the dying cover crop to the developing crop.


DLW

KILLING STRIPS IN COVER CROPS IS
ADVISABLE

Several years of research has shown that leaving living strips
of cover crops in row middles to fix nitrogen or to grow
larger can adversely affect crop yields. All of our research
has shown higher yields by killing the entire cover crop prior
to planting since the crop cannot distinguish competition of
a cover crop from a weed and has the same end result on
yield.

DLW

PLANT COTTON AS SOON AS ADEQUATE
MOISTURE IS AVAILABLE

Getting a stand is one of the most sensitive production prob-
lems for cotton in Florida. The shallow planting depth for
cotton makes it extremely sensitive to dry weather or com-
paction after a heavy rain. After cotton stands are estab-
lished, cotton can withstand dry conditions until blooming
when more moisture is required for good yields. Generally,
mid season varieties do better in non-irrigated fields than


short season varieties because of their potential to wait for
rain to set fruit. Normally, the period of setting fruit in
Florida is from about June 20 until September 10, with the
first three weeks of this period being the most important for
good rains and adequate moisture to get early fruit set.


DLW


PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT


April and May are usually too dry to plant a new pasture or
hay field, especially in peninsular Florida. By mid June the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of April/May, start preparing the land
for planting by plowing and/or discing, plus dragging to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed before land
preparation begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur during June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. One final discing
(harrowing) just before planting will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't forget to use a land roller or
cultipacker to pack or firm the seed bed after planting.


CGC


CLOVER PASTURES


Cattle should be removed from heavily grazed white clover
pastures for about two weeks to allow for reseeding. After
flowers have begun to turn brown, grazing may be resumed.
Arrowleaf cloverpastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or reduce stocking rate
to allow for adequate reseeding.

CGC

RANGE CATTLE FIELD DAY

A field day will be held at the Range Cattle Research and
Education Center (Ona, FL) on Thursday June 1. The cattle
and forage field day will highlight water quality issues fac-
ing cow/calf producers.

CGC

PEANUT PLANTING

Generally peanuts should be planted by mid to late May for
best yields. However, dry weather may not allow satisfac-
tory planting of non-irrigated peanuts by this deadline. Pea-
nuts planted in June may perform satisfactorily (if rain oc-
curs until maturity and if cool weather does not come early),








but are subject to greater disease pressure than early-planted
peanuts. Some insect problems are also greater with late-
planted peanuts.

EBW

RETROFITTING TOBACCO BARNS

The proposal to financially assist tobacco farmers in chang-
ing the direct-fire burners to indirect-fire types has not yet
been approved. The purpose of this conversion would be to
reduce the formation of nitrosamines by the combustion gases
reacting with compounds in the tobacco leaves. The indi-
rect-fire burners use heat exchangers to provide the needed
curing temperatures, while preventing the combustion gases
from entering the curing barn. Due to the approaching har-
vest, Florida growers have little time to convert their barns
this season even if the agreement is finalized today. The pro-
posed agreement does provide funding, but at a reduced level,
if barns are converted after the 2000 crop, but before the
2001 crop is cured.

EBW

PUBLICATIONS

The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. A PDF file for each publi-
cation is also available.


SSAGR25
SSAGR36
SSAGR44


Tifton-9 Pensacola Bahiagrass
Bahiagrass
Peanut Varieties 2000


SSAGR47
SSAGR48
SSAGR49
SSAGR51
SSAGR54
SSAGR57
SSAGR59
SSAGR60
SSAGR64
SSAGR65
SSAGR67

SSAGR70
SSAGR76
SSAGR77
SSAGR112


Alyceclover Summer Annual Legume
Summer Forage Legume Guide
Winter Forage Legume Guide
Digitgrasses
White Clover
Tifton 85 Bermudagrass
'Callide' Rhodesgrass
Bermudagrass Production in Florida
Grass Tetany in Cattle
Pasture and Forage Crops for Horses
Floralta Limpograss (Hemarthria
altissima)
Hay Production in Florida
Florida's 1999 Rice Variety Census
An Overview of the Rice Industry
Poison Control Centers


The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.


SSAGR11

SSAGR75


Weed Management in Transgenic, Herbi-
cide-Resistant Soybeans
Management of Late-maturing Peanut
Varieties


You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, you find the box that says EDIS Detective. There
you can type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or you can type in a Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click
on the appropriate button below (Find Keywords or Find
PublicationNo.). You will get a listing of publications. Please
be sure to check the date in the footnote on the first page to
be sure it is the most up-to-date publication for that topic.


FIELD CROP PLANTING INTENTIONS FOR 2000

According to reports of the Florida Agricultural Statistics Service and the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Florida acre-
ages of cotton, hay, and wheat will increase in 2000, while peanut and tobacco acreages will decrease. Florida and United States
estimates are as follows: EBW

Florida Acreage United States Acreage

Crop 2000 (x1000) 2000 as % of 1999 2000 (x1000) 2000 as % of 1999

Corn, all 90 100 77,881 101

Cotton, upland 120 112 15,341 105

Hay, all 270 104 63,052 100

Peanuts, all 98 96 1,474 96

Soybeans, all 20 100 74,871 101

Tobacco, all 4.9 82 500.7 78

Winter wheat 20 125 43,245 100








but are subject to greater disease pressure than early-planted
peanuts. Some insect problems are also greater with late-
planted peanuts.

EBW

RETROFITTING TOBACCO BARNS

The proposal to financially assist tobacco farmers in chang-
ing the direct-fire burners to indirect-fire types has not yet
been approved. The purpose of this conversion would be to
reduce the formation of nitrosamines by the combustion gases
reacting with compounds in the tobacco leaves. The indi-
rect-fire burners use heat exchangers to provide the needed
curing temperatures, while preventing the combustion gases
from entering the curing barn. Due to the approaching har-
vest, Florida growers have little time to convert their barns
this season even if the agreement is finalized today. The pro-
posed agreement does provide funding, but at a reduced level,
if barns are converted after the 2000 crop, but before the
2001 crop is cured.

EBW

PUBLICATIONS

The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. A PDF file for each publi-
cation is also available.


SSAGR25
SSAGR36
SSAGR44


Tifton-9 Pensacola Bahiagrass
Bahiagrass
Peanut Varieties 2000


SSAGR47
SSAGR48
SSAGR49
SSAGR51
SSAGR54
SSAGR57
SSAGR59
SSAGR60
SSAGR64
SSAGR65
SSAGR67

SSAGR70
SSAGR76
SSAGR77
SSAGR112


Alyceclover Summer Annual Legume
Summer Forage Legume Guide
Winter Forage Legume Guide
Digitgrasses
White Clover
Tifton 85 Bermudagrass
'Callide' Rhodesgrass
Bermudagrass Production in Florida
Grass Tetany in Cattle
Pasture and Forage Crops for Horses
Floralta Limpograss (Hemarthria
altissima)
Hay Production in Florida
Florida's 1999 Rice Variety Census
An Overview of the Rice Industry
Poison Control Centers


The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.


SSAGR11

SSAGR75


Weed Management in Transgenic, Herbi-
cide-Resistant Soybeans
Management of Late-maturing Peanut
Varieties


You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, you find the box that says EDIS Detective. There
you can type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or you can type in a Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click
on the appropriate button below (Find Keywords or Find
PublicationNo.). You will get a listing of publications. Please
be sure to check the date in the footnote on the first page to
be sure it is the most up-to-date publication for that topic.


FIELD CROP PLANTING INTENTIONS FOR 2000

According to reports of the Florida Agricultural Statistics Service and the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Florida acre-
ages of cotton, hay, and wheat will increase in 2000, while peanut and tobacco acreages will decrease. Florida and United States
estimates are as follows: EBW

Florida Acreage United States Acreage

Crop 2000 (x1000) 2000 as % of 1999 2000 (x1000) 2000 as % of 1999

Corn, all 90 100 77,881 101

Cotton, upland 120 112 15,341 105

Hay, all 270 104 63,052 100

Peanuts, all 98 96 1,474 96

Soybeans, all 20 100 74,871 101

Tobacco, all 4.9 82 500.7 78

Winter wheat 20 125 43,245 100








but are subject to greater disease pressure than early-planted
peanuts. Some insect problems are also greater with late-
planted peanuts.

EBW

RETROFITTING TOBACCO BARNS

The proposal to financially assist tobacco farmers in chang-
ing the direct-fire burners to indirect-fire types has not yet
been approved. The purpose of this conversion would be to
reduce the formation of nitrosamines by the combustion gases
reacting with compounds in the tobacco leaves. The indi-
rect-fire burners use heat exchangers to provide the needed
curing temperatures, while preventing the combustion gases
from entering the curing barn. Due to the approaching har-
vest, Florida growers have little time to convert their barns
this season even if the agreement is finalized today. The pro-
posed agreement does provide funding, but at a reduced level,
if barns are converted after the 2000 crop, but before the
2001 crop is cured.

EBW

PUBLICATIONS

The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. A PDF file for each publi-
cation is also available.


SSAGR25
SSAGR36
SSAGR44


Tifton-9 Pensacola Bahiagrass
Bahiagrass
Peanut Varieties 2000


SSAGR47
SSAGR48
SSAGR49
SSAGR51
SSAGR54
SSAGR57
SSAGR59
SSAGR60
SSAGR64
SSAGR65
SSAGR67

SSAGR70
SSAGR76
SSAGR77
SSAGR112


Alyceclover Summer Annual Legume
Summer Forage Legume Guide
Winter Forage Legume Guide
Digitgrasses
White Clover
Tifton 85 Bermudagrass
'Callide' Rhodesgrass
Bermudagrass Production in Florida
Grass Tetany in Cattle
Pasture and Forage Crops for Horses
Floralta Limpograss (Hemarthria
altissima)
Hay Production in Florida
Florida's 1999 Rice Variety Census
An Overview of the Rice Industry
Poison Control Centers


The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.


SSAGR11

SSAGR75


Weed Management in Transgenic, Herbi-
cide-Resistant Soybeans
Management of Late-maturing Peanut
Varieties


You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, you find the box that says EDIS Detective. There
you can type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or you can type in a Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click
on the appropriate button below (Find Keywords or Find
PublicationNo.). You will get a listing of publications. Please
be sure to check the date in the footnote on the first page to
be sure it is the most up-to-date publication for that topic.


FIELD CROP PLANTING INTENTIONS FOR 2000

According to reports of the Florida Agricultural Statistics Service and the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Florida acre-
ages of cotton, hay, and wheat will increase in 2000, while peanut and tobacco acreages will decrease. Florida and United States
estimates are as follows: EBW

Florida Acreage United States Acreage

Crop 2000 (x1000) 2000 as % of 1999 2000 (x1000) 2000 as % of 1999

Corn, all 90 100 77,881 101

Cotton, upland 120 112 15,341 105

Hay, all 270 104 63,052 100

Peanuts, all 98 96 1,474 96

Soybeans, all 20 100 74,871 101

Tobacco, all 4.9 82 500.7 78

Winter wheat 20 125 43,245 100