<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 Corn planting dates
 Time for spring fertilization...
 Calcium needs for peanut
 Early burndown for cotton
 The show is coming to town
 Soybean rust overwintering...
 Publications


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00066
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: March 2006
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00066

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Corn planting dates
        Page 2
    Time for spring fertilization approaching
        Page 2
    Calcium needs for peanut
        Page 3
    Early burndown for cotton
        Page 3
    The show is coming to town
        Page 4
    Soybean rust overwintering on kudzu
        Page 5
    Publications
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
Full Text






AGRONOMY
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA NOTES
IFAS EXTENSION


March 2006


CORN
Corn Planting Dates .................


FORAGE
Time for Spring Fertilization Approaching

PEANUTS
Calcium Needs for Peanut .............

WEED CONTROL
Early Burndown for Cotton ............

MISCELLANEOUS
The Show is Coming to Town ..........
Soybean Rust Overwintering on Kudzu ..
Publications ........................


. . . . .. . . 2


. . . . 2


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension
Office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim
Dean.


Vol. 30:3


IN THIS ISSUE









Corn Planting Dates

Early planted corn has a better chance of
avoiding fall armyworm and damaging
disease epidemics during its growth period.
Planting in early March often results in high
yield and quality. Corn is tolerant to frost
since the growing point remains under the
soil surface until corn reaches about 12" in
height. The vegetative stage of growth can
be slow from early planting, but still fares
better in most years than corn planted in late
March or April.

David Wright

Time for Spring Fertilization
Approaching -- Are You Familiar with
the New IFAS Fertilization
Recommendations?

Pasture fertilization is one of the most
expensive costs in beef cattle production.
With the escalating fertilizer costs and
concerns of over-fertilization on water
quality, there has been a need to re-evaluate
fertilizer recommendations for pasture
grasses. The most recent revision of IFAS
document on fertilizer recommendations for
agronomic crops in Florida was published in
March 2002. It is available on EDIS
Website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.
Producers are encouraged to familiarize
themselves with the most recent changes in
order to reduce cost of fertilization.

The relevant portions of the Fact Sheet SL-
129 that deal with bahiagrass pasture
fertilization for central and south Florida fall
under Crop Code 30 and Footnote 131.
Central and south Florida as used here refers
to that part of the state south of Orlando.
Producers should become aware that
although soil testing for P and K fertilization
is generally not recommended, soil testing


for maintaining optimum soil pH of 5.0 is
still essential. Phosphorus and potassium
can be eliminated since a substantial
percentage of nutrients are actually recycled
through manure back to the plant.
Additionally, most perennial grasses have
deep roots which can reach the hard pan of
soil which is naturally high in nutrients
available to plants.

Liming and nitrogen (N) fertilization remain
the only two important considerations that
influence bahiagrass yield and cattle
production in the region. The target pH for
bahiagrass pasture should be 5.0 and
nitrogen around 50 lb per A should be
applied between mid-February and March.
Since N fertilization does not require soil
testing, the only sample you may need to
send to the UF/IFAS Extension Testing
Laboratory will be for liming
recommendation. This can be done at 3-4
year intervals.

A note of caution -- new plantings of
bahiagrass should be fertilized differently
from established pastures because their root
systems are not fully developed to take
advantage of residual P and K in the soil
hardpan and there is no manure to recycle
during establishment. For new plantings,
obtain a complete soil test recommendation
for liming, P and K. Then apply 30 lb N per
A, all the recommended P and 50% of the K
as soon as seedlings emerge. Apply 70 lb N
per A and the remaining K 30 to 50 days
later. Please also note that when making
hay, 80 lb of N per A and soil test
recommendations P and K must be applied
in early spring. Apply additional 80 lb N
per A and 40 lb of K20/A after each cut
except for last harvest in the fall. Include
20 lb A of P205 in the supplemental fertilizer
if the soil tested low or medium in P.









Corn Planting Dates

Early planted corn has a better chance of
avoiding fall armyworm and damaging
disease epidemics during its growth period.
Planting in early March often results in high
yield and quality. Corn is tolerant to frost
since the growing point remains under the
soil surface until corn reaches about 12" in
height. The vegetative stage of growth can
be slow from early planting, but still fares
better in most years than corn planted in late
March or April.

David Wright

Time for Spring Fertilization
Approaching -- Are You Familiar with
the New IFAS Fertilization
Recommendations?

Pasture fertilization is one of the most
expensive costs in beef cattle production.
With the escalating fertilizer costs and
concerns of over-fertilization on water
quality, there has been a need to re-evaluate
fertilizer recommendations for pasture
grasses. The most recent revision of IFAS
document on fertilizer recommendations for
agronomic crops in Florida was published in
March 2002. It is available on EDIS
Website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.
Producers are encouraged to familiarize
themselves with the most recent changes in
order to reduce cost of fertilization.

The relevant portions of the Fact Sheet SL-
129 that deal with bahiagrass pasture
fertilization for central and south Florida fall
under Crop Code 30 and Footnote 131.
Central and south Florida as used here refers
to that part of the state south of Orlando.
Producers should become aware that
although soil testing for P and K fertilization
is generally not recommended, soil testing


for maintaining optimum soil pH of 5.0 is
still essential. Phosphorus and potassium
can be eliminated since a substantial
percentage of nutrients are actually recycled
through manure back to the plant.
Additionally, most perennial grasses have
deep roots which can reach the hard pan of
soil which is naturally high in nutrients
available to plants.

Liming and nitrogen (N) fertilization remain
the only two important considerations that
influence bahiagrass yield and cattle
production in the region. The target pH for
bahiagrass pasture should be 5.0 and
nitrogen around 50 lb per A should be
applied between mid-February and March.
Since N fertilization does not require soil
testing, the only sample you may need to
send to the UF/IFAS Extension Testing
Laboratory will be for liming
recommendation. This can be done at 3-4
year intervals.

A note of caution -- new plantings of
bahiagrass should be fertilized differently
from established pastures because their root
systems are not fully developed to take
advantage of residual P and K in the soil
hardpan and there is no manure to recycle
during establishment. For new plantings,
obtain a complete soil test recommendation
for liming, P and K. Then apply 30 lb N per
A, all the recommended P and 50% of the K
as soon as seedlings emerge. Apply 70 lb N
per A and the remaining K 30 to 50 days
later. Please also note that when making
hay, 80 lb of N per A and soil test
recommendations P and K must be applied
in early spring. Apply additional 80 lb N
per A and 40 lb of K20/A after each cut
except for last harvest in the fall. Include
20 lb A of P205 in the supplemental fertilizer
if the soil tested low or medium in P.









Although studies conducted to date in south
Florida show no economic advantage from
the addition of P and K or micronutrients to
bahiagrass pastures, there is still the
question as to how long bahiagrass can go
without them. The UF/IFAS is currently
considering recommending that it may be
necessary to apply small levels (25 lb/A) of
P205 and K20 per acre periodically as an
insurance policy against deficiencies until
such a time that we have enough data to be
more specific on time intervals.

In summary, soil testing is required at 3-4
year intervals for the purpose of determining
only liming requirement for grazed
bahiagrass pastures in central-south Florida.
A complete soil testing for liming, P and K
is required if pasture is to be re-established
or used for hay production. In our next
issue of Agronomy Notes we will consider
fertilization recommendations for stargrass
and limpograss.

Martin Adj ei

Calcium Needs for Peanut

Peanut responds very little to direct
fertilization of most nutrients. However,
calcium (Ca) is needed in high levels by
peanut for developing a viable seed, but not
necessary to grow a healthy plant. The
amount of Ca taken up by the plant is
dependent on the concentration in soil
solution and on the amount of water moving
into the plant. The critical period for Ca
absorption begins about 20 days after pegs
start entering into the soil and may extend
for an additional 60 days. However, some
researchers have reported that 69% of total
Ca uptake occurred between 20 and 30 days
after pegging. It is then necessary that
proper amounts of Ca are supplied for the
first 30 days after pegging begins.


The problem occurs when limited soil
moisture coincides with the high Ca need
period and there is no moisture for Ca
uptake. Sandy soils in the peanut region
have low moisture retention capacity which
leads to moisture-induced Ca deficiency.
Much of the irrigation installed in the SE
was due to peanut in rotation. High levels
of potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) in
the soil can result in reduced Ca uptake.
Peanuts are often not fertilized and "high
cal" lime is used instead of dolomite which
is higher in Mg to avoid these problems.
Soil test levels of about 450 lbs/A of Ca
result in maximum yields of runner type
peanuts while levels almost double this are
necessary for maximum yield of Virginia
type peanut. The larger peanuts have a
smaller surface to weight ratio and requires
a higher concentration of soil solution Ca in
order to provide adequate Ca to the pod.

David Wright

Early Burndown for Cotton

Although planting season is still several
weeks away, it is time to start planning the
spring burdown program. Wild radish and
cutleaf eveningprimrose are two species that
commonly escape control from glyphosate
applications. If not controlled, these weeds
will compete with the crop well into the
summer and result in greater than expected
yield loss.

Since these weeds are not controlled by
glyphosate alone, other herbicides should be
added to the weed management program.
The most effective way to control these
weeds is to spray 2,4-D (16 or 24 fl oz/A) or
Banvel (8 fl oz/A) in early March, then
follow up with a glyphosate or Gramoxone
application near planting. This will allow
plenty of time for these herbicides to









Although studies conducted to date in south
Florida show no economic advantage from
the addition of P and K or micronutrients to
bahiagrass pastures, there is still the
question as to how long bahiagrass can go
without them. The UF/IFAS is currently
considering recommending that it may be
necessary to apply small levels (25 lb/A) of
P205 and K20 per acre periodically as an
insurance policy against deficiencies until
such a time that we have enough data to be
more specific on time intervals.

In summary, soil testing is required at 3-4
year intervals for the purpose of determining
only liming requirement for grazed
bahiagrass pastures in central-south Florida.
A complete soil testing for liming, P and K
is required if pasture is to be re-established
or used for hay production. In our next
issue of Agronomy Notes we will consider
fertilization recommendations for stargrass
and limpograss.

Martin Adj ei

Calcium Needs for Peanut

Peanut responds very little to direct
fertilization of most nutrients. However,
calcium (Ca) is needed in high levels by
peanut for developing a viable seed, but not
necessary to grow a healthy plant. The
amount of Ca taken up by the plant is
dependent on the concentration in soil
solution and on the amount of water moving
into the plant. The critical period for Ca
absorption begins about 20 days after pegs
start entering into the soil and may extend
for an additional 60 days. However, some
researchers have reported that 69% of total
Ca uptake occurred between 20 and 30 days
after pegging. It is then necessary that
proper amounts of Ca are supplied for the
first 30 days after pegging begins.


The problem occurs when limited soil
moisture coincides with the high Ca need
period and there is no moisture for Ca
uptake. Sandy soils in the peanut region
have low moisture retention capacity which
leads to moisture-induced Ca deficiency.
Much of the irrigation installed in the SE
was due to peanut in rotation. High levels
of potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) in
the soil can result in reduced Ca uptake.
Peanuts are often not fertilized and "high
cal" lime is used instead of dolomite which
is higher in Mg to avoid these problems.
Soil test levels of about 450 lbs/A of Ca
result in maximum yields of runner type
peanuts while levels almost double this are
necessary for maximum yield of Virginia
type peanut. The larger peanuts have a
smaller surface to weight ratio and requires
a higher concentration of soil solution Ca in
order to provide adequate Ca to the pod.

David Wright

Early Burndown for Cotton

Although planting season is still several
weeks away, it is time to start planning the
spring burdown program. Wild radish and
cutleaf eveningprimrose are two species that
commonly escape control from glyphosate
applications. If not controlled, these weeds
will compete with the crop well into the
summer and result in greater than expected
yield loss.

Since these weeds are not controlled by
glyphosate alone, other herbicides should be
added to the weed management program.
The most effective way to control these
weeds is to spray 2,4-D (16 or 24 fl oz/A) or
Banvel (8 fl oz/A) in early March, then
follow up with a glyphosate or Gramoxone
application near planting. This will allow
plenty of time for these herbicides to









dissipate from the soil before cotton is
planted. However, these herbicides can be
tank-mixed with glyphosate or Gramoxone.
Table 1 details the effectiveness of different
herbicide combinations on control of radish
and primrose. These data show that both
weed species are highly sensitive to 2,4-D
and Banvel, regardless if they are mixed
with glyphosate or Gramoxone Max. The
addition of Valor was less effective on both
species. Regardless of which herbicide is


used, planning a few weeks ahead will
dramatically improve early-season weed
control for only a few extra dollars per acre.

It must be noted that cotton planting should
be delayed for approximately 30 days after
2,4-D application, and 21 days for Banvel.
The planting restriction for Valor is 14 to 30
days, depending on herbicide rate and tillage
type.


Table 1 Control of wild radish and cutleaf evening primrose with hurdown applications
Wild Radish Cutleaf eveningprimrose
Herbicide % control at 4 WATb
Roundup Wmax 22 oz 80 60
2,4-D 16 oz +
97 97
Roundup Wmax 22oz
Banvel 8 oz +
94 94
Roundup Wmax 22oz
2,4-D 16 oz +
96 97
Gramoxone Max 32 oz
Banvel 8 oz +
96 83
Gramoxone Max 32 oz
Valor 2 oz +
85 83
Roundup Wmax 22 oz
Valor 2 oz +
76 70
Gramoxone Max 32 oz
a Adopted from: Culpepper, et. al. Journal of Cotton Science 9:223-228 (2005)
b Weeks after treatment.


Jason A. Ferrell


The Show is Coming to Town

Notice of Violation -this is a notification of
the requirements of the Florida Pesticide
Law andRules, Chapter 487, Florida
Statutes."

This is a statement no one wants to see in
any Worker Protection Standard (WPS)


related correspondence. But, without a
doubt, WPS conformity problems are being
documented. The Pesticide Information
Office (PIO) receives questions from the
regulated community relative to WPS and
changes within the Standard. As a result of
these changes, the documented violation
problems, and the greater overall attention
given to the WPS by the state legislature and









the news media, the PIO will be
participating in a series of regional meetings
throughout the state. The meetings will
focus on the real "how to" on better
compliance with WPS. All citrus, vegetable,
and other related agricultural commodity
producers, farm managers, crew leaders and
other related groups/individuals are
encouraged to attend. Each meeting is
scheduled to last 2 hours. Although the WPS
is not new, problems do still exist and the
meetings are intended to provide each
participant with the ability to assess their
specific production situation to the WPS.
The itinerary for each meeting includes:

-Welcome, overview, and objectives
Mike Aerts, Florida Fruit and
Vegetable Association
Recordkeeping Essentials: Chemical
and Worker Dale Dubberly,
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
-Field and Central Posting Fred
Fishel, University of Florida/IFAS
-Revisions to the WPS How-to-
Comply Manual Dale Dubberly,
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services
-Worker Training Gloria Lopez,
Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services

A total of 2 restricted use pesticide CEUs
(aerial, ag row, ag tree, or private) are
available for certified applicators, and 2
CEUs are also available for Certified Crop
Advisors. The dates, locations, and times of
the meetings are as follows:

-March 6, Homestead, John D.
Campbell Ag Center (5:30 pm)
-March 7, Belle Glade, Everglades
REC Auditorium (11:30 am)


March 7, Palm Beach, Richard's
Steakhouse (5:30 pm)
-March 8, Immokalee, Immokalee
Community Park Auditorium (noon)
March 8, Palmetto, Kendrick
Auditorium in the Manatee County
CES (5:30 pm)
-March 9, Bartow, Bob Crawford Ag
Center in the FDACS Building
(11:00 am)March 9, St. Augustine,
St. Johns County CES Auditorium
(5:30 pm)

All who wish to attend are asked to
preregister (no cost) with the local extension
office in those areas.

Fred Fishel

Soybean Rust Overwintering on Kudzu

The soybean rust pathogen attacks several
legumes in North America. We recently
(December, 2005) observed it for the first
time in North America at the NFREC on
common beans, including lima and kidney
beans. Another known host is kudzu, that
was once spread throughout the southeast as
a plant to control erosion and feed livestock.
We are presently monitoring kudzu
throughout Florida and have several sites
under observation that are still producing
rust spores (although maybe not as many
after the recent February freezes). We are
looking at the sites for lesions on the kudzu
as well as monitoring the air in the vicinity
with spore traps to try and detect if spores
are actually being released during the winter
months. Spore loads in rust can be huge.
Research this fall at the NFREC, conducted
in cooperation with Ray Schneider at LSU,
indicated that an acre of infected soybeans
can produce 80,000,000,000 spores per acre
per day!









Below is a picture of kudzu growing through
a driveway culvert in Quincy. The infected
leaves were found in front of the culvert
producing viable spores on Jan. 17, 2006


them such as at what temperature does the
kudzu die back sufficiently so that the
spores do not survive, or under what
conditions are spores actually released from
kudzu in the winter. This will help us
develop models to predict the spore load in
future years. There are many thousands of
kudzu sites in Florida that could never be
found or monitored so control state wide
would be nearly impossible. However, an
attempt at eradication would be interesting.

David Wright and James Marois

Publications


New Publications


So, the question is if kudzu is producing the
spores during the winter months, should we
be trying to control it? This brings in a lot
of other questions such as personal property
rights, difficulty of detection when kudzu is
so wide spread, (thousands of sites) and of
course, how does one spray kudzu when it is
40 ft up a tree hanging over a 60 ft deep
ravine. A lot of our Midwestern colleagues
working on the problem ask why we do not
just control the kudzu something our
southern friends don't ask. However, there
are fungicides available that would work.
The idea has some merit. If the southeast is
supplying the spores for the rest of the
county, why not control the spores when
there are so few of them in the winter.
Some have even proposed that we launch an
eradication program for the entire United
States.

Another perspective is that we could never
adequately sample and spray all of the
kudzu, so lets keep the few sites that we
know about (less than 15 in Florida
currently) and learn as much as we can from


SS-AGR-11



SS-AGR-13

SS-AGR-104



SS-AGR-108

SS-AGR-112
SS-AGR-243
SS-AGR-244


SS-AGR-260


SS-AGR-259


Making the Transition from
Conventional to Organic
Farming Using Conservation
Tillage in Florida
Peanut Variety Performance
in Florida 2002-2005
Safe Use of Glyphosate-
containing Products in
Aquatic and Upland Natural
Areas
Single-nozzle Backpack or
ATV Sprayer Calibration
Florida Carpon Desmodium
Herbicide Resistant Weeds
Managing Against the
Development of Herbicide
Resistant Weeds: Sugarcane
Herbicide Application
Techniques for Woody Plant
Control
Sugarcane Leaf Tissue
Sample Preparation for
Diagnostic Analysis









Updated Publications


SS-AGR-15

SS-AGR-16

SS-AGR-17
SS-AGR-26
SS-AGR-36
SS-AGR-37


S S-AGR-38


SS-AGR-45


SS-AGR-47

SS-AGR-51
SS-AGR-52



SS-AGR-60

SS-AGR-61
SS-AGR-62
SS-AGR-67

SS-AGR-84
SS-AGR-89

SS-AGR-92

SS-AGR-94


SS-AGR-110

SS-AGR-111


Diagnosing Herbicide Injury
-2006
Approximate Herbicide
Pricing 2006
Brazilian Pepper-tree Control
Pasture Weed Management
Bahiagrass
Peanut Stunt Virus Reported
on Perennial Peanut in North
Florida and Southern Georgia
Dollar Spot (Sclerotinia
homoeocarpa) on Bahiagrass
Pastures in North Florida
NATURAL AREA WEEDS:
Chinese Tallow (Sapium
sebiferum L.)
Alyceclover Summer
Annual Legume
Digitgrasses
Cogongrass (Imperata
cylindrica (L.) Beauv.)
Biology, Ecology and
Management in Florida
Bermudagrass Production in
Florida
Aeschynomene
Stargrass
Floralta Limpograss
(Hemarthria altissima)
Fall Forage Update 2006
Producing Millets and
Sorghums
Grazing Management
Concepts and Systems
General Guidelines for
Managing Pastures for Dairy
Cows
Weed Management in Fence
Rows 2006
Weed Management in
Rights-of-way and Non-
Cropped Areas 2006


SS-AGR-204 Pokkah Boeng Disease of
Sugarcane
SS-AGR-205 Pineapple Disease of
Sugarcane
SS-AGR-206 Sugarcane Red Rot Disease
SS-AGR-207 Sugarcane Rust Disease

Weeds in Florida SP37


FW003

FW005


FW006

FW020

FW022

FW023

FW024


FW027


FW028

FW029



FW031

FW032

FW033

FW035

FW036


Rosary Pea (Precatory Bean),
A brus precatorius L.
Common Beggar's-tick
(Hairy Beggar's-tick), Bidens
alba (L.)
Partridge Pea, Cassia
fasciculata Michx.
Scarlet Morningglory,
Ipomoea hederifolia L.
Cypressvine Morningglory,
Ipomoea quamoclit L.
Sharppod Morningglory,
Ipomoea trichocarpa Ell.
Smallflower Morningglory,
Jacquemontia tamnifolia (L.)
Griseb.
Catclaw Mimosa (Giant
Sensitive Plant), Mimosa
pigra L.
Balsam-apple, Momordica
charantia L.
Creeping Wood Sorrel,
Oxalis corniculata L.
Southern Yellow Wood
Sorrel, Oxalisflorida Salisb.
Cutleaf Ground-cherry,
Physalis angulata L.
Wild Radish, Raphanus
raphanistrum L.
Brazil Pusley, Richardia
brasiliensis (Moq.)
Curly Dock, Rumex crispus
L.
Heartwing Sorrel, Rumex
hastatulus Baldwin ex Ell.











FW037 Brazilian Pepper-tree,
Schinus terebinthifolius
FW038 Bagpod (Bladderpod),
Sesbania vesicaria (Jacq.)
Ell.


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J.M. Bennett, Chairman; M.B. Adjei, Forage Agronomist (mbadjei@ifas.ufl.edu); J.A. Ferrell, Extension Agronomist
(jaferrell@ifas.ufl.edu); F.M. Fishel, Pesticide Coordinator (weeddr@ifas.ufl.edu); C.R. Rainbolt, Extension Agronomist
(crrainbolt@ifas.ufl.edu); B.A. Sellers, Extension Agronomist (sellersb@ifas.ufl.edu); E.B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist
(ebw@ifas.ufl.edu); D.L. Wright, Extension Agronomist (dlw@ifas.ufl.edu).