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 Table of Contents
 Nitrogen on cotton
 Protecting cotton squares...
 Yellowing of peanuts
 Asian soybean rust
 Common pokeweed biology and...
 Controling large pigweeds...
 Late planting dates for soybean,...
 Licensing of pesticide dealers...
 Operation Cleansweep for pesti...


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00059
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: July 2005
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00059

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Nitrogen on cotton
        Page 2
    Protecting cotton squares and blooms
        Page 2
    Yellowing of peanuts
        Page 2
    Asian soybean rust
        Page 2
    Common pokeweed biology and control
        Page 3
    Controling large pigweeds in peanuts
        Page 3
    Late planting dates for soybean, peanuts, and corn
        Page 4
    Licensing of pesticide dealers in Florida
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Operation Cleansweep for pesticides
        Page 6
Full Text






AGRONOMY

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA NOTES
IFAS EXTENSION


July 2005


IN THIS ISSUE

COTTON
Nitrogen on Cotton .................
Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms ..

PEANUTS
Yellowing of Peanuts ................

SOYBEAN
Asian Soybean Rust .................

WEED CONTROL
Common Pokeweed Biology and Control
Controlling Large Pigweeds in Peanuts ..


MISCELLANEOUS
Late Planting Dates for Soybean, Peanuts and Corn
Licensing of Pesticide Dealers in Florida ........
Operation Cleansweep for Pesticides ..........


. . . . . . . . 2
. . . . . . . . 2


. . . . . . . . 2


............................... 2


. . . .. 4


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension
Office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim
Dean.









Nitrogen on Cotton

Now is the time to apply N on cotton.
Cotton does not require as much N as many
crops, but approximately 50-60 lbs/A is
required to produce a bale of cotton. There
may be as much as 20-50 lbs/A of soil
residual nitrate N available to the plant over
the season, so applications of 60-90 lbs/A
may be adequate for 2-3 bale yields. Sandy
soils do require greater N management than
heavier soils, but it should not be applied
later than the 3rd week of bloom. Late foliar
applications ofN can cause excessive
vegetative growth and is not recommended
unless boll set is poor.

DLW

Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms

Much of the cotton that was planted in late
April and early May should be blooming by
early July and will continue to bloom
through August. It is important to protect
these early squares from insects and
irrigation should be maintained to keep
squares from shedding. Early boll set is
very desirable since it helps slow vegetative
growth and cuts the amount of growth
regulators needed to control plant height.
Plant bugs and stinkbugs need to be
controlled in the July-August period since
they may be leaving small grains or corn
that was harvested for grain or silage and are
looking for succulent plants to feed on. Bt
cotton may not need to be sprayed for
larvae, but it will be important to spray for
stinkbugs in early July followed by
additional applications every two weeks as
determined by scouting. Recent research in
Georgia reported a 50-500 lb/A yield
increase by controlling stinkbugs in Bt
cotton in July and August. Brown stinkbugs
are already arriving this year so make sure


the material used will control both brown
and green stinkbugs.

DLW

Yellowing of Peanuts

Peanuts may have a yellow cast to them at
times during the growing season. There
could be several causes for this including
poor nodulation, micronutrient deficiencies,
water logged soils, or herbicide damage.
Water logging will result in poor nodulation
and reduced nitrogen fixation, as well as
limited iron and micronutrient availability.
However, these situations are usually
corrected as soils dry out and nodulation
resumes.

Manganese deficiencies will also lead to leaf
yellowing and may occur on soils that have
been excessively limed to a pH above 6.3.
Applications of manganese will be essential
to recover from this deficiency. It is
possible to correct manganese deficiency by
lowering soil pH through acid forming
fertilizers, but micronutrient applications
may be more cost effective and the crop will
respond faster than if changing the pH.

DLW

Asian Soybean Rust

There has been a lot of interest in Florida
with regard to the spread of Asian Soybean
Rust (ASR). There is a web site devoted to
the disease and its spread
(http://www.usda.gov/soybeanrust/). The
disease has not spread as rapidly as
predicted from early models and the kudzu
sites that were found to contain ASR have
not had a high incidence of infection.
Currently, only Georgia has identified ASR
on soybean and it was found in volunteer









Nitrogen on Cotton

Now is the time to apply N on cotton.
Cotton does not require as much N as many
crops, but approximately 50-60 lbs/A is
required to produce a bale of cotton. There
may be as much as 20-50 lbs/A of soil
residual nitrate N available to the plant over
the season, so applications of 60-90 lbs/A
may be adequate for 2-3 bale yields. Sandy
soils do require greater N management than
heavier soils, but it should not be applied
later than the 3rd week of bloom. Late foliar
applications ofN can cause excessive
vegetative growth and is not recommended
unless boll set is poor.

DLW

Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms

Much of the cotton that was planted in late
April and early May should be blooming by
early July and will continue to bloom
through August. It is important to protect
these early squares from insects and
irrigation should be maintained to keep
squares from shedding. Early boll set is
very desirable since it helps slow vegetative
growth and cuts the amount of growth
regulators needed to control plant height.
Plant bugs and stinkbugs need to be
controlled in the July-August period since
they may be leaving small grains or corn
that was harvested for grain or silage and are
looking for succulent plants to feed on. Bt
cotton may not need to be sprayed for
larvae, but it will be important to spray for
stinkbugs in early July followed by
additional applications every two weeks as
determined by scouting. Recent research in
Georgia reported a 50-500 lb/A yield
increase by controlling stinkbugs in Bt
cotton in July and August. Brown stinkbugs
are already arriving this year so make sure


the material used will control both brown
and green stinkbugs.

DLW

Yellowing of Peanuts

Peanuts may have a yellow cast to them at
times during the growing season. There
could be several causes for this including
poor nodulation, micronutrient deficiencies,
water logged soils, or herbicide damage.
Water logging will result in poor nodulation
and reduced nitrogen fixation, as well as
limited iron and micronutrient availability.
However, these situations are usually
corrected as soils dry out and nodulation
resumes.

Manganese deficiencies will also lead to leaf
yellowing and may occur on soils that have
been excessively limed to a pH above 6.3.
Applications of manganese will be essential
to recover from this deficiency. It is
possible to correct manganese deficiency by
lowering soil pH through acid forming
fertilizers, but micronutrient applications
may be more cost effective and the crop will
respond faster than if changing the pH.

DLW

Asian Soybean Rust

There has been a lot of interest in Florida
with regard to the spread of Asian Soybean
Rust (ASR). There is a web site devoted to
the disease and its spread
(http://www.usda.gov/soybeanrust/). The
disease has not spread as rapidly as
predicted from early models and the kudzu
sites that were found to contain ASR have
not had a high incidence of infection.
Currently, only Georgia has identified ASR
on soybean and it was found in volunteer









Nitrogen on Cotton

Now is the time to apply N on cotton.
Cotton does not require as much N as many
crops, but approximately 50-60 lbs/A is
required to produce a bale of cotton. There
may be as much as 20-50 lbs/A of soil
residual nitrate N available to the plant over
the season, so applications of 60-90 lbs/A
may be adequate for 2-3 bale yields. Sandy
soils do require greater N management than
heavier soils, but it should not be applied
later than the 3rd week of bloom. Late foliar
applications ofN can cause excessive
vegetative growth and is not recommended
unless boll set is poor.

DLW

Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms

Much of the cotton that was planted in late
April and early May should be blooming by
early July and will continue to bloom
through August. It is important to protect
these early squares from insects and
irrigation should be maintained to keep
squares from shedding. Early boll set is
very desirable since it helps slow vegetative
growth and cuts the amount of growth
regulators needed to control plant height.
Plant bugs and stinkbugs need to be
controlled in the July-August period since
they may be leaving small grains or corn
that was harvested for grain or silage and are
looking for succulent plants to feed on. Bt
cotton may not need to be sprayed for
larvae, but it will be important to spray for
stinkbugs in early July followed by
additional applications every two weeks as
determined by scouting. Recent research in
Georgia reported a 50-500 lb/A yield
increase by controlling stinkbugs in Bt
cotton in July and August. Brown stinkbugs
are already arriving this year so make sure


the material used will control both brown
and green stinkbugs.

DLW

Yellowing of Peanuts

Peanuts may have a yellow cast to them at
times during the growing season. There
could be several causes for this including
poor nodulation, micronutrient deficiencies,
water logged soils, or herbicide damage.
Water logging will result in poor nodulation
and reduced nitrogen fixation, as well as
limited iron and micronutrient availability.
However, these situations are usually
corrected as soils dry out and nodulation
resumes.

Manganese deficiencies will also lead to leaf
yellowing and may occur on soils that have
been excessively limed to a pH above 6.3.
Applications of manganese will be essential
to recover from this deficiency. It is
possible to correct manganese deficiency by
lowering soil pH through acid forming
fertilizers, but micronutrient applications
may be more cost effective and the crop will
respond faster than if changing the pH.

DLW

Asian Soybean Rust

There has been a lot of interest in Florida
with regard to the spread of Asian Soybean
Rust (ASR). There is a web site devoted to
the disease and its spread
(http://www.usda.gov/soybeanrust/). The
disease has not spread as rapidly as
predicted from early models and the kudzu
sites that were found to contain ASR have
not had a high incidence of infection.
Currently, only Georgia has identified ASR
on soybean and it was found in volunteer









Nitrogen on Cotton

Now is the time to apply N on cotton.
Cotton does not require as much N as many
crops, but approximately 50-60 lbs/A is
required to produce a bale of cotton. There
may be as much as 20-50 lbs/A of soil
residual nitrate N available to the plant over
the season, so applications of 60-90 lbs/A
may be adequate for 2-3 bale yields. Sandy
soils do require greater N management than
heavier soils, but it should not be applied
later than the 3rd week of bloom. Late foliar
applications ofN can cause excessive
vegetative growth and is not recommended
unless boll set is poor.

DLW

Protecting Cotton Squares and Blooms

Much of the cotton that was planted in late
April and early May should be blooming by
early July and will continue to bloom
through August. It is important to protect
these early squares from insects and
irrigation should be maintained to keep
squares from shedding. Early boll set is
very desirable since it helps slow vegetative
growth and cuts the amount of growth
regulators needed to control plant height.
Plant bugs and stinkbugs need to be
controlled in the July-August period since
they may be leaving small grains or corn
that was harvested for grain or silage and are
looking for succulent plants to feed on. Bt
cotton may not need to be sprayed for
larvae, but it will be important to spray for
stinkbugs in early July followed by
additional applications every two weeks as
determined by scouting. Recent research in
Georgia reported a 50-500 lb/A yield
increase by controlling stinkbugs in Bt
cotton in July and August. Brown stinkbugs
are already arriving this year so make sure


the material used will control both brown
and green stinkbugs.

DLW

Yellowing of Peanuts

Peanuts may have a yellow cast to them at
times during the growing season. There
could be several causes for this including
poor nodulation, micronutrient deficiencies,
water logged soils, or herbicide damage.
Water logging will result in poor nodulation
and reduced nitrogen fixation, as well as
limited iron and micronutrient availability.
However, these situations are usually
corrected as soils dry out and nodulation
resumes.

Manganese deficiencies will also lead to leaf
yellowing and may occur on soils that have
been excessively limed to a pH above 6.3.
Applications of manganese will be essential
to recover from this deficiency. It is
possible to correct manganese deficiency by
lowering soil pH through acid forming
fertilizers, but micronutrient applications
may be more cost effective and the crop will
respond faster than if changing the pH.

DLW

Asian Soybean Rust

There has been a lot of interest in Florida
with regard to the spread of Asian Soybean
Rust (ASR). There is a web site devoted to
the disease and its spread
(http://www.usda.gov/soybeanrust/). The
disease has not spread as rapidly as
predicted from early models and the kudzu
sites that were found to contain ASR have
not had a high incidence of infection.
Currently, only Georgia has identified ASR
on soybean and it was found in volunteer









stands where it may have over wintered on
nearby foliage. A system is currently in
place to notify counties as the disease
appears and will allow the information to be
passed on to growers.

Fungicides are not being recommended at
this time and will not be until we know that
the disease will be a problem. It is still early
in the season, but if ASR spread becomes
severe a fungicide will be recommended for
control. If fungicides are required,
applications will be made at bloom which
generally occurs in July and August
depending on planting date and maturity
group.

DLW

Common Pokeweed Biology and Control

Common pokeweed (Phytolacca americana)
is a perennial weed often found in pastures
as well as fence-rows, rights-of-ways, and
wooded areas. Pokeweed usually has a red
trunk-like stem, which becomes hollow as
the plant matures. Leaves tend to be quite
large, alternate, ovate-shaped, dark green,
and attached to the stem by a reddish fleshy
petiole. When mature, the fruits are dark
purple which contain dark, red-staining, sap.
After fruiting, the whole plant dies back to
the soil surface and a new shoot will
regenerate from the crown of the perennial,
producing a fleshy taproot at the start of the
new growing season. Other names for
common pokeweed include: poke berry,
pigeon berry, inkberry coakun, pocan bush,
scoke, poke salad, and American
nightshade.

While pokeweed is rarely considered a
noxious weed, it can cause harm in certain
situations. All parts of the plant contain
saponins, oxalates, and phytolacine (an


alkaloid). However, the roots and the seeds
contain the highest concentrations of these
toxins. Depending on the quantity of plant
consumed, livestock may exhibit mild to
severe colic and diarrhea. Hogs are most
commonly affected by eating the root.
Additionally, sheep, cattle, horses, and
poultry are susceptible to pokeweed
poisoning, but the affect is often low as the
plant is not very palatable. Birds can eat the
fruits without much harm and are usually the
means for seed dispersal along fence rows
and wooded areas.

Control of common pokeweed is typically
not easy because of the large fleshy crown
and associated taproot. Additionally,
pokeweed rarely infests large areas and is
usually found in isolated instances.
Removal of individual plants is
accomplished by wholly removing the
crown and a major portion of the associated
taproot. Alternatively, spot applications of
glyphosate (3% volume/volume) or products
containing 2,4-D or dicamba can severely
injure or kill the plant.

BAS

Controlling Large Pigweeds in Peanuts

Pigweeds redroott, smooth, or Palmer
amaranth) can be controlled by many
herbicides with preemergence or
postemergence applications. However,
these weeds produce millions of seeds per
acre and grow extremely fast during warm
weather. Regardless of which herbicides
were used, these factors often conspire to
make pigweeds a common and serious weed
problem.

Preemergence herbicides (Prowl, Dual,
Sonalan, Strongarm, and Valor) will often
provide effective control early, but full-









stands where it may have over wintered on
nearby foliage. A system is currently in
place to notify counties as the disease
appears and will allow the information to be
passed on to growers.

Fungicides are not being recommended at
this time and will not be until we know that
the disease will be a problem. It is still early
in the season, but if ASR spread becomes
severe a fungicide will be recommended for
control. If fungicides are required,
applications will be made at bloom which
generally occurs in July and August
depending on planting date and maturity
group.

DLW

Common Pokeweed Biology and Control

Common pokeweed (Phytolacca americana)
is a perennial weed often found in pastures
as well as fence-rows, rights-of-ways, and
wooded areas. Pokeweed usually has a red
trunk-like stem, which becomes hollow as
the plant matures. Leaves tend to be quite
large, alternate, ovate-shaped, dark green,
and attached to the stem by a reddish fleshy
petiole. When mature, the fruits are dark
purple which contain dark, red-staining, sap.
After fruiting, the whole plant dies back to
the soil surface and a new shoot will
regenerate from the crown of the perennial,
producing a fleshy taproot at the start of the
new growing season. Other names for
common pokeweed include: poke berry,
pigeon berry, inkberry coakun, pocan bush,
scoke, poke salad, and American
nightshade.

While pokeweed is rarely considered a
noxious weed, it can cause harm in certain
situations. All parts of the plant contain
saponins, oxalates, and phytolacine (an


alkaloid). However, the roots and the seeds
contain the highest concentrations of these
toxins. Depending on the quantity of plant
consumed, livestock may exhibit mild to
severe colic and diarrhea. Hogs are most
commonly affected by eating the root.
Additionally, sheep, cattle, horses, and
poultry are susceptible to pokeweed
poisoning, but the affect is often low as the
plant is not very palatable. Birds can eat the
fruits without much harm and are usually the
means for seed dispersal along fence rows
and wooded areas.

Control of common pokeweed is typically
not easy because of the large fleshy crown
and associated taproot. Additionally,
pokeweed rarely infests large areas and is
usually found in isolated instances.
Removal of individual plants is
accomplished by wholly removing the
crown and a major portion of the associated
taproot. Alternatively, spot applications of
glyphosate (3% volume/volume) or products
containing 2,4-D or dicamba can severely
injure or kill the plant.

BAS

Controlling Large Pigweeds in Peanuts

Pigweeds redroott, smooth, or Palmer
amaranth) can be controlled by many
herbicides with preemergence or
postemergence applications. However,
these weeds produce millions of seeds per
acre and grow extremely fast during warm
weather. Regardless of which herbicides
were used, these factors often conspire to
make pigweeds a common and serious weed
problem.

Preemergence herbicides (Prowl, Dual,
Sonalan, Strongarm, and Valor) will often
provide effective control early, but full-









season control is rarely observed. This
means that postemergence herbicides are
frequently needed to control escapes when
preemergence herbicides begin to fail.
Cadre, Cobra, Pursuit, and Ultra Blazer all
provide excellent control of pigweeds.
However, timing is everything particularly
with Cobra and Ultra Blazer. Although
Cobra and Ultra Blazer are often viewed as
"rescue" herbicides, they were not designed
to control 12" tall pigweeds. For example,
Ultra Blazer and Cobra will control 99% of
pigweeds that are 3 to 4 inches in height, but
control decreases to 50% as pigweeds reach
7 to 9 inches. On large pigweeds, Cobra and
Ultra Blazer will often kill the terminal bud
and allow the pigweed to "sucker out" and
resume growth within one week of
application. Cadre and Pursuit are a bit
more forgiving, but after pigweeds reach 6
inches, control will be inconsistent and
failure is more common.

So what do you do with a field containing
12 inch pigweeds? One solution is to do
nothing. After a pigweed reaches this size,
it has already caused serious yield losses
and control with herbicides may or may not
occur. Another solution is to cultivate or
attempt hand removal to improve harvest
efficiency. However, if you feel that the
field must be sprayed, the only possible
option is to use Cadre (at the full labeled
rate), plus 1 pint of 2,4-DB, plus crop oil.
Yes, this combination will be injurious to
the peanut crop, but it is the only herbicide
combination that will potentially control
large pigweeds.

It must be noted that Palmer amaranth is
more difficult to control than other
pigweeds. However, all pigweed species
can be controlled with timely herbicide
applications. In areas where pigweeds have
been problematic in the past, it is essential


to use one or more preemergence herbicides
to reduce the weed population and ensure a
timely postemergence application.

JAF

Late Planting Dates for Soybean, Peanuts
and Corn

Soybeans may be planted in July if drilled
and irrigated. Yields can be satisfactory if
maturity group VI-VIII can be used. The
latest planting date for soybean may be as
late as the first week of August if irrigated.
Peanuts will probably not yield sufficiently
to make July planting dates profitable. A
major issue with this practice is damage
from late frosts when dug in November.
Therefore, late planting for peanuts it is not
recommended. Corn may be planted as a
second crop for grain or silage if a tropical
variety is used that has good disease
resistance and insect resistance from Bt.
July 15-20 is the latest planting date for corn
to achieve satisfactory yields.

DLW

Licensing of Pesticide Dealers in Florida

All persons (including individuals,
businesses and other entities) who sell, hold
for sale, or offer for sale restricted use
pesticides in the state of Florida must have a
pesticide dealer license issued by the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FDACS). A license is required
regardless to whom restricted use pesticides
are sold. Additionally, if a company has
more than one business location, each
location must have a separate license and
licenses are not transferable from one
company to another. However, transport of
pesticides from one location to another
without change in ownership of the products









season control is rarely observed. This
means that postemergence herbicides are
frequently needed to control escapes when
preemergence herbicides begin to fail.
Cadre, Cobra, Pursuit, and Ultra Blazer all
provide excellent control of pigweeds.
However, timing is everything particularly
with Cobra and Ultra Blazer. Although
Cobra and Ultra Blazer are often viewed as
"rescue" herbicides, they were not designed
to control 12" tall pigweeds. For example,
Ultra Blazer and Cobra will control 99% of
pigweeds that are 3 to 4 inches in height, but
control decreases to 50% as pigweeds reach
7 to 9 inches. On large pigweeds, Cobra and
Ultra Blazer will often kill the terminal bud
and allow the pigweed to "sucker out" and
resume growth within one week of
application. Cadre and Pursuit are a bit
more forgiving, but after pigweeds reach 6
inches, control will be inconsistent and
failure is more common.

So what do you do with a field containing
12 inch pigweeds? One solution is to do
nothing. After a pigweed reaches this size,
it has already caused serious yield losses
and control with herbicides may or may not
occur. Another solution is to cultivate or
attempt hand removal to improve harvest
efficiency. However, if you feel that the
field must be sprayed, the only possible
option is to use Cadre (at the full labeled
rate), plus 1 pint of 2,4-DB, plus crop oil.
Yes, this combination will be injurious to
the peanut crop, but it is the only herbicide
combination that will potentially control
large pigweeds.

It must be noted that Palmer amaranth is
more difficult to control than other
pigweeds. However, all pigweed species
can be controlled with timely herbicide
applications. In areas where pigweeds have
been problematic in the past, it is essential


to use one or more preemergence herbicides
to reduce the weed population and ensure a
timely postemergence application.

JAF

Late Planting Dates for Soybean, Peanuts
and Corn

Soybeans may be planted in July if drilled
and irrigated. Yields can be satisfactory if
maturity group VI-VIII can be used. The
latest planting date for soybean may be as
late as the first week of August if irrigated.
Peanuts will probably not yield sufficiently
to make July planting dates profitable. A
major issue with this practice is damage
from late frosts when dug in November.
Therefore, late planting for peanuts it is not
recommended. Corn may be planted as a
second crop for grain or silage if a tropical
variety is used that has good disease
resistance and insect resistance from Bt.
July 15-20 is the latest planting date for corn
to achieve satisfactory yields.

DLW

Licensing of Pesticide Dealers in Florida

All persons (including individuals,
businesses and other entities) who sell, hold
for sale, or offer for sale restricted use
pesticides in the state of Florida must have a
pesticide dealer license issued by the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FDACS). A license is required
regardless to whom restricted use pesticides
are sold. Additionally, if a company has
more than one business location, each
location must have a separate license and
licenses are not transferable from one
company to another. However, transport of
pesticides from one location to another
without change in ownership of the products









is not considered distribution and does not
require a license. For the sale or distribution
of general use or unclassified pesticides, no
pesticide dealer license is required in
Florida.

Unlike applicator licenses, there is no
certification or exam requirement for a
Florida pesticide dealer license. The only
requirement for the license is to submit a
license application form and pay a license
fee of $175/year to FDACS. License
applications may be downloaded from:
http://www.doacs.state.fl.us/onestop/forms/1
3337.pdf or by calling FDACS at (850) 488-
3314.

The pesticide dealer license is valid for 12
months and generally expires at the end of
the month one year from issue date. License
renewal notices are generally mailed 60
days prior to the expiration date. If
pesticide dealer licenses are not renewed
before they expire, a new license must be
obtained to continue sale and distribution of
restricted use pesticides in Florida.

Licensed pesticide dealers maintain the
following records relating to the sale or
exchange of restricted use pesticides:

a. Date of sale.

b. Name and license number of
licensed applicator making or
authorizing the purchase.

c. Name of authorized agent
purchasing the pesticide product, if
applicable.

d. Brand name and EPA registration
number of each product sold or
exchanged.


e. Size and number of containers of
each product sold or exchanged.

f. Date and location where delivery
was made if the pesticide dealer
delivered the product.

The information listed in items "a" through
"e" shall be recorded immediately at the
time of sale or exchange and may be
incorporated into billing invoices or other
business transaction records. The
information required in item "f' shall be
recorded immediately after product delivery,
when applicable, and may be incorporated
into billing invoices or other business
transaction records.

Pesticide dealers are required to retain all of
the recorded information for a period of 2
years from the date of the sale or exchange
in a manner that is accessible by authorized
FDACS representatives. Upon written
request by an authorized FDACS
representative, a licensed dealer shall make
available the records required to be
maintained under this rule and shall permit
the authorized representative to copy or
photograph any of the records. The original
records shall be maintained by the licensed
dealer.

Additional information concerning licensing
may be obtained from the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services at (850) 488-3314 or
http://www.flaes.org. A listing of restricted
use pesticides is available in UF/IFAS EDIS
Document PI-36 at
httD://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PI073.


FMF









Operation Cleansweep for Pesticides

Operation Cleansweep is a mobile collection
program that provides agricultural producers
a safe and economical method of disposing
of cancelled, suspended and unusable
pesticides. Proper disposal can be expensive
and place a regulatory burden on small
agricultural producers and dealers.
Operation Cleansweep offers an opportunity
to avoid these barriers and to promote safe
and environmentally sound pesticide use,
handling and disposal. Operation
Cleansweep was initiated in 1995 with the
major objective of collecting lead arsenate, a
widely used pesticide in Florida citrus
production, but banned for use by the EPA
in 1978. During 1995, Operation
Cleansweep collected more than 70,000
pounds of lead arsenate.

Statewide surveys have identified
substantial quantities of cancelled,
suspended and unusable pesticides stored
throughout Florida. Some of these materials
have been


in confinement for many years and are in
containers unsuitable for proper storage.
Some, such as chlordane and DDT, are no
longer allowed to be used.

Operation Cleansweep provides for a
contractor to come directly to a farm or
business for pickup and disposal of
pesticides when there is a sufficient quantity
in a defined area. There is no cost charged
to those who participate in the program. For
more information, contact Kim Hainge
(haingek@doacs. state.fl.us) or Keith Myhre
(myhrek@doacs.state.fl.us) at the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer
Services by calling toll-free 877-851-5285.

Cleansweep Website:
www.dep.state.fl.us/waste/categories/cleans
weep-pesticides/

FMF


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; M. B. Adjei, Forage Agronomist, J.A. Ferrell, Extension Agronomist, G. E. MacDonald, Weed
Scientist, B.A. Sellers, Extension Agronomist, E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist, D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.