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 Table of Contents
 Corn problems
 Cotton growth management
 Strip till cotton
 Calcium nutrition of peanut
 Biology and control of napiergrass...
 Control of hairy indigo in...
 Who needs a license?


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00058
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: June 2005
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00058

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Corn problems
        Page 2
    Cotton growth management
        Page 2
    Strip till cotton
        Page 2
    Calcium nutrition of peanut
        Page 3
    Biology and control of napiergrass in sugarcane
        Page 3
    Control of hairy indigo in peanuts
        Page 4
    Who needs a license?
        Page 4
        Page 5
Full Text







AGRONOMY

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA NOTES
IFAS EXTENSION

June, 2005


DATES TO REMEMBER

5th Annual Perennial Peanut Field Day Moultrie, GA June 11th, 8 am 2 pm


IN THIS ISSUE


CORN
Corn Problems .............

COTTON
Cotton Growth Management ..
Strip Till Cotton .......... .

PEANUTS
Calcium Nutrition of Peanut ..


. . . . . . . . . . 2


. . . . . . . . . . 2
. . . . . . . . . . 2


. . . . . . . . . . 3


WEED CONTROL
Biology and Control of Napiergrass in Sugarcane
Control of Hairy Indigo in Peanuts .............

MISCELLANEOUS
W ho Needs a License? .....................


. . . . 3
. . . . . . 4


. . . . . . 4


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension
Office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim
Dean.









Corn Problems

There have been more reports of problems
this year in corn than any time in recent
memory. Much of this has been due to the
cool, wet conditions that have been
encountered. As of May 20, heat unit
accumulation was approximately 60% of the
normal for the corn crop. The cool weather
has delayed growth of both tops and roots.
During cloudy, cool days, corn takes up very
little water or nutrients. Many growers have
applied additional nutrients in an attempt to
stimulate corn growth since environmental
conditions were not favorable and a heavy
rain may have leached the fertilizer that was
applied. However, heat units are expected
to accumulate rapidly in early June and the
corn crop will catch up to the normal growth
stage rapidly. It is important to remember
that adequate nitrogen, sulfur, and water are
very important as the plant reaches critical
stages of growth. Just prior to silking, corn
may require as much as 40 lbs/A of N
weekly for adequate growth that needs to be
supplied either from residual soil N or
applied N.

DLW

Cotton Growth Management

Cotton often begins rapid growth in June
when moisture is not limited. This is the
period when cotton height should be
regulated and square retention is important.
There are many management factors
including N fertility, soil moisture, weed
control, plant population and insect control
that can influence vegetative growth. Good
fruit and boll retention will slow vegetative
growth. However, most of the cotton
growers in Florida use DPL 555 cotton
which tends to set fruit later in the season
and often produces excessive vegetative
growth. In general, this growth can be


managed with the use of mepiquat sold
under trade names of Pix, Mepex, Topit,
Mepichlor, Pentia, and others. These
materials will generally shorten the
internode length and reduce the leaf area
where stem and leaf expansion are
occurring. Research has shown that using
mepiquat can result in increased retention of
early fruit and slightly earlier maturity.
Yields are not necessarily increased by
using mepiquat, but plants will definitely be
shorter and may be easier to manage.

DLW

Strip Till Cotton

Strip tillage is used widely in many of the
cotton growing counties across Florida.
Research with many agronomic crops has
shown that strip tillage can be very
successful. This method of tillage will
reduce time in the field and fuel costs.
Additional advantages are that crop stands
are preserved from sand blasting due to
reduced surface disturbance and more
moisture is usually available at planting.
Most growers who have adopted this
method of planting have found that it is not
necessarily easier, but has economic and
timeliness advantages over more traditional
management systems.

For years, weed control was the main
disadvantage to strip tillage cotton.
However, Roundup Ready and other genetic
technology have helped to solve this
problem and has allowed more growers to
switch to strip tillage. Another difficulty
with strip tillage is getting a smooth seedbed
for planting and a uniform seed depth, but
this can be accomplished with proper
adjustment of the strip till rig. Since many
growers are only planting 2-3 seeds every
14" of row, it is very important to have









Corn Problems

There have been more reports of problems
this year in corn than any time in recent
memory. Much of this has been due to the
cool, wet conditions that have been
encountered. As of May 20, heat unit
accumulation was approximately 60% of the
normal for the corn crop. The cool weather
has delayed growth of both tops and roots.
During cloudy, cool days, corn takes up very
little water or nutrients. Many growers have
applied additional nutrients in an attempt to
stimulate corn growth since environmental
conditions were not favorable and a heavy
rain may have leached the fertilizer that was
applied. However, heat units are expected
to accumulate rapidly in early June and the
corn crop will catch up to the normal growth
stage rapidly. It is important to remember
that adequate nitrogen, sulfur, and water are
very important as the plant reaches critical
stages of growth. Just prior to silking, corn
may require as much as 40 lbs/A of N
weekly for adequate growth that needs to be
supplied either from residual soil N or
applied N.

DLW

Cotton Growth Management

Cotton often begins rapid growth in June
when moisture is not limited. This is the
period when cotton height should be
regulated and square retention is important.
There are many management factors
including N fertility, soil moisture, weed
control, plant population and insect control
that can influence vegetative growth. Good
fruit and boll retention will slow vegetative
growth. However, most of the cotton
growers in Florida use DPL 555 cotton
which tends to set fruit later in the season
and often produces excessive vegetative
growth. In general, this growth can be


managed with the use of mepiquat sold
under trade names of Pix, Mepex, Topit,
Mepichlor, Pentia, and others. These
materials will generally shorten the
internode length and reduce the leaf area
where stem and leaf expansion are
occurring. Research has shown that using
mepiquat can result in increased retention of
early fruit and slightly earlier maturity.
Yields are not necessarily increased by
using mepiquat, but plants will definitely be
shorter and may be easier to manage.

DLW

Strip Till Cotton

Strip tillage is used widely in many of the
cotton growing counties across Florida.
Research with many agronomic crops has
shown that strip tillage can be very
successful. This method of tillage will
reduce time in the field and fuel costs.
Additional advantages are that crop stands
are preserved from sand blasting due to
reduced surface disturbance and more
moisture is usually available at planting.
Most growers who have adopted this
method of planting have found that it is not
necessarily easier, but has economic and
timeliness advantages over more traditional
management systems.

For years, weed control was the main
disadvantage to strip tillage cotton.
However, Roundup Ready and other genetic
technology have helped to solve this
problem and has allowed more growers to
switch to strip tillage. Another difficulty
with strip tillage is getting a smooth seedbed
for planting and a uniform seed depth, but
this can be accomplished with proper
adjustment of the strip till rig. Since many
growers are only planting 2-3 seeds every
14" of row, it is very important to have









Corn Problems

There have been more reports of problems
this year in corn than any time in recent
memory. Much of this has been due to the
cool, wet conditions that have been
encountered. As of May 20, heat unit
accumulation was approximately 60% of the
normal for the corn crop. The cool weather
has delayed growth of both tops and roots.
During cloudy, cool days, corn takes up very
little water or nutrients. Many growers have
applied additional nutrients in an attempt to
stimulate corn growth since environmental
conditions were not favorable and a heavy
rain may have leached the fertilizer that was
applied. However, heat units are expected
to accumulate rapidly in early June and the
corn crop will catch up to the normal growth
stage rapidly. It is important to remember
that adequate nitrogen, sulfur, and water are
very important as the plant reaches critical
stages of growth. Just prior to silking, corn
may require as much as 40 lbs/A of N
weekly for adequate growth that needs to be
supplied either from residual soil N or
applied N.

DLW

Cotton Growth Management

Cotton often begins rapid growth in June
when moisture is not limited. This is the
period when cotton height should be
regulated and square retention is important.
There are many management factors
including N fertility, soil moisture, weed
control, plant population and insect control
that can influence vegetative growth. Good
fruit and boll retention will slow vegetative
growth. However, most of the cotton
growers in Florida use DPL 555 cotton
which tends to set fruit later in the season
and often produces excessive vegetative
growth. In general, this growth can be


managed with the use of mepiquat sold
under trade names of Pix, Mepex, Topit,
Mepichlor, Pentia, and others. These
materials will generally shorten the
internode length and reduce the leaf area
where stem and leaf expansion are
occurring. Research has shown that using
mepiquat can result in increased retention of
early fruit and slightly earlier maturity.
Yields are not necessarily increased by
using mepiquat, but plants will definitely be
shorter and may be easier to manage.

DLW

Strip Till Cotton

Strip tillage is used widely in many of the
cotton growing counties across Florida.
Research with many agronomic crops has
shown that strip tillage can be very
successful. This method of tillage will
reduce time in the field and fuel costs.
Additional advantages are that crop stands
are preserved from sand blasting due to
reduced surface disturbance and more
moisture is usually available at planting.
Most growers who have adopted this
method of planting have found that it is not
necessarily easier, but has economic and
timeliness advantages over more traditional
management systems.

For years, weed control was the main
disadvantage to strip tillage cotton.
However, Roundup Ready and other genetic
technology have helped to solve this
problem and has allowed more growers to
switch to strip tillage. Another difficulty
with strip tillage is getting a smooth seedbed
for planting and a uniform seed depth, but
this can be accomplished with proper
adjustment of the strip till rig. Since many
growers are only planting 2-3 seeds every
14" of row, it is very important to have









every seed germinate and produce a plant.
Therefore, cotton seed depth should range
from 12 to no more than 1 1 inch deep
depending on soil moisture and uniformity
of the seed bed.

DLW

Calcium Nutrition of Peanut

Calcium (Ca) is the element most commonly
deficient for peanut. Calcium deficiency
results in high incidence of pod rot, unfilled
pods (otherwise known as "pops"), and
much lower germination if saved for seed.
Georgia research has shown that Ca applied
as lime should not be turned under or yields
will be comparable to areas where no lime
was applied. Even though peanut has a
lower overall Ca requirement than soybean
or cowpea, peanut has a critical Ca need for
seed maturation and quality. Lime should
be applied to fields well in advance of
planting and may be applied to strip tilled
fields as a surface application. Calcium is
routinely applied as gypsum at pegging time
on sandy soils for rapid replenishment of
soil solution Ca. Gypsum is often not as
necessary on heavier soils that have higher
diffusion gradients toward the pods.

DLW

Biology and Control of Napiergrass in
Sugarcane

If you are driving through southern Florida
and see an enormous cane like grass
growing along the roadside it is most likely
napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum
Schumacher). Napiergrass, also known as
elephant grass, has been documented in
almost 30 counties throughout Florida. It is
of African origin, but has been introduced to
all tropical areas of the world because of its
ability to quickly produce large amounts of


biomass. Although napiergrass was
introduced to South Florida and Texas for
use as a forage crop, it is no longer widely
used for forage purposes and has become a
major weed problem. Napiergrass is listed
as invasive by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant
Council and is considered to be one of the
world's worst weeds. It is still widely
grown in Central America, South America,
and Africa as a forage crop. Napiergrass is
now established throughout southern
Florida, especially along canal and ditch
banks and in disturbed or cultivated areas.
Although it can be found in central and
northern Florida, it is less common due to
cooler temperatures.

Napiergrass is a large perennial with erect
cane-like stems that may reach up to 15 feet
in height. Leaf blades are typically 3/ to 1/4
inch wide and 12 to 29 inches long. Leaf
surfaces are flat and sandpapery with long
stiff hairs on the upper surface and can be
either smooth or sandpapery on the bottom
side. Leaf sheaths are extremely hairy near
the bottom of the stem and smooth towards
the top of the stem. Propagation is by seed
and the bristly bottle-brush shaped
seedheads can be 4 to 13 inches long.

Control of napiergrass in the Everglades
Agricultural Area tends to be a difficult and
time consuming process. Currently, there
are no labeled herbicides for selective
control of napiergrass in sugarcane.
Because seedling napiergrass plants can
quickly outgrow and overwhelm an
emerging sugarcane crop, it is critical to
establish control quickly. Once napiergrass
populations become established in the
sugarcane fields, spot treatment with
glyphosate is the most effective control
option. Napiergrass tends to be more
common in successively planted sugarcane
fields, thus fallow periods or rotational crops
may offer the best opportunity for control.









every seed germinate and produce a plant.
Therefore, cotton seed depth should range
from 12 to no more than 1 1 inch deep
depending on soil moisture and uniformity
of the seed bed.

DLW

Calcium Nutrition of Peanut

Calcium (Ca) is the element most commonly
deficient for peanut. Calcium deficiency
results in high incidence of pod rot, unfilled
pods (otherwise known as "pops"), and
much lower germination if saved for seed.
Georgia research has shown that Ca applied
as lime should not be turned under or yields
will be comparable to areas where no lime
was applied. Even though peanut has a
lower overall Ca requirement than soybean
or cowpea, peanut has a critical Ca need for
seed maturation and quality. Lime should
be applied to fields well in advance of
planting and may be applied to strip tilled
fields as a surface application. Calcium is
routinely applied as gypsum at pegging time
on sandy soils for rapid replenishment of
soil solution Ca. Gypsum is often not as
necessary on heavier soils that have higher
diffusion gradients toward the pods.

DLW

Biology and Control of Napiergrass in
Sugarcane

If you are driving through southern Florida
and see an enormous cane like grass
growing along the roadside it is most likely
napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum
Schumacher). Napiergrass, also known as
elephant grass, has been documented in
almost 30 counties throughout Florida. It is
of African origin, but has been introduced to
all tropical areas of the world because of its
ability to quickly produce large amounts of


biomass. Although napiergrass was
introduced to South Florida and Texas for
use as a forage crop, it is no longer widely
used for forage purposes and has become a
major weed problem. Napiergrass is listed
as invasive by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant
Council and is considered to be one of the
world's worst weeds. It is still widely
grown in Central America, South America,
and Africa as a forage crop. Napiergrass is
now established throughout southern
Florida, especially along canal and ditch
banks and in disturbed or cultivated areas.
Although it can be found in central and
northern Florida, it is less common due to
cooler temperatures.

Napiergrass is a large perennial with erect
cane-like stems that may reach up to 15 feet
in height. Leaf blades are typically 3/ to 1/4
inch wide and 12 to 29 inches long. Leaf
surfaces are flat and sandpapery with long
stiff hairs on the upper surface and can be
either smooth or sandpapery on the bottom
side. Leaf sheaths are extremely hairy near
the bottom of the stem and smooth towards
the top of the stem. Propagation is by seed
and the bristly bottle-brush shaped
seedheads can be 4 to 13 inches long.

Control of napiergrass in the Everglades
Agricultural Area tends to be a difficult and
time consuming process. Currently, there
are no labeled herbicides for selective
control of napiergrass in sugarcane.
Because seedling napiergrass plants can
quickly outgrow and overwhelm an
emerging sugarcane crop, it is critical to
establish control quickly. Once napiergrass
populations become established in the
sugarcane fields, spot treatment with
glyphosate is the most effective control
option. Napiergrass tends to be more
common in successively planted sugarcane
fields, thus fallow periods or rotational crops
may offer the best opportunity for control.









In addition to controlling napiergrass in the
field, it is critical that it be controlled along
field borders, canals, and irrigation ditches
to prevent the introduction of new seed to
the field.

CRR

Control of Hairy Indigo in Peanuts

Hairy indigo is an aggressive weed that is
common throughout the peanut producing
regions of Florida. Hairy indigo is in the
same plant family as peanut and
consequently grows extremely well on lands
prepared for peanut production.

Hairy indigo germinates relatively early and
continues to grow throughout the season,
sometimes reaching over 3 feet in height.
The leaves on this plant are extremely hairy
and become more dense as the plant
matures. These dense hairs can decrease the
amount of herbicide that reaches the leaf
surface. Therefore, delaying herbicide
applications can significantly reduce that
amount of control that can be achieved with
a herbicide. This means that timing of the
herbicide application is critical to
controlling hairy indigo.

Hairy indigo can be controlled by
preemergence applications of Strongarm or
Valor. However, most producers rely on
postemergence herbicides such as Cadre,
Classic, Cobra or Ultra Blazer. Cobra or
Ultra Blazer can be highly effective on hairy
indigo, but applications made to larger
plants will result in stunting, followed by
resprout and continued growth.

Cadre is the most commonly used
postemergence herbicide in peanut
production and the least effective on hairy
indigo. However, before buying new
herbicides for the express purpose of hairy


indigo control, there are ways to
dramatically increase the efficacy of Cadre.
The most important factor is to spray when
the hairy indigo plants are approximately 3
inches in height. As hairy indigo advances
past this 3 inch stage, the leaf hairs become
so abundant that contact of the herbicide
droplet with the leaf surface is almost
impossible. Spraying earlier in the season
can avert this problem. Increasing the
surfactant rate can also be greatly beneficial.
Most recommendations call for non-ionic
surfactants at a rate of 1 quart per 100
gallons of water (or 0.25% by volume).
Although this is sufficient for most
applications, hairy indigo may require more.
It has been observed that increasing the
surfactant rate to 2 quarts per 100 gallons
(or 0.5% by volume) can improve
penetration of the herbicide droplet through
the leaf hairs. Consequently, the more
herbicide that reaches the leaf the greater
weed control will occur. It has also been
observed that adding 2,4-DB at a rate of 8-
12 oz per acre can be greatly beneficial.
However, increasing the 2,4-DB rate to 16
oz per acre will often show marginal or no
improvement over 12 oz.

Hairy indigo can be a serious weed problem.
However, timely application of any
herbicide is absolutely critical for control of
this weed. By monitoring and spraying
early, hairy indigo is a pest that can be
effectively controlled.

JAF

Who Needs a License?

Those who apply restricted use pesticides
need to be licensed to meet Florida's legal
requirement. In the agronomic sector, most
who will need to have a license will fall into
at least one of the following categories:
private applicator or commercial applicators









In addition to controlling napiergrass in the
field, it is critical that it be controlled along
field borders, canals, and irrigation ditches
to prevent the introduction of new seed to
the field.

CRR

Control of Hairy Indigo in Peanuts

Hairy indigo is an aggressive weed that is
common throughout the peanut producing
regions of Florida. Hairy indigo is in the
same plant family as peanut and
consequently grows extremely well on lands
prepared for peanut production.

Hairy indigo germinates relatively early and
continues to grow throughout the season,
sometimes reaching over 3 feet in height.
The leaves on this plant are extremely hairy
and become more dense as the plant
matures. These dense hairs can decrease the
amount of herbicide that reaches the leaf
surface. Therefore, delaying herbicide
applications can significantly reduce that
amount of control that can be achieved with
a herbicide. This means that timing of the
herbicide application is critical to
controlling hairy indigo.

Hairy indigo can be controlled by
preemergence applications of Strongarm or
Valor. However, most producers rely on
postemergence herbicides such as Cadre,
Classic, Cobra or Ultra Blazer. Cobra or
Ultra Blazer can be highly effective on hairy
indigo, but applications made to larger
plants will result in stunting, followed by
resprout and continued growth.

Cadre is the most commonly used
postemergence herbicide in peanut
production and the least effective on hairy
indigo. However, before buying new
herbicides for the express purpose of hairy


indigo control, there are ways to
dramatically increase the efficacy of Cadre.
The most important factor is to spray when
the hairy indigo plants are approximately 3
inches in height. As hairy indigo advances
past this 3 inch stage, the leaf hairs become
so abundant that contact of the herbicide
droplet with the leaf surface is almost
impossible. Spraying earlier in the season
can avert this problem. Increasing the
surfactant rate can also be greatly beneficial.
Most recommendations call for non-ionic
surfactants at a rate of 1 quart per 100
gallons of water (or 0.25% by volume).
Although this is sufficient for most
applications, hairy indigo may require more.
It has been observed that increasing the
surfactant rate to 2 quarts per 100 gallons
(or 0.5% by volume) can improve
penetration of the herbicide droplet through
the leaf hairs. Consequently, the more
herbicide that reaches the leaf the greater
weed control will occur. It has also been
observed that adding 2,4-DB at a rate of 8-
12 oz per acre can be greatly beneficial.
However, increasing the 2,4-DB rate to 16
oz per acre will often show marginal or no
improvement over 12 oz.

Hairy indigo can be a serious weed problem.
However, timely application of any
herbicide is absolutely critical for control of
this weed. By monitoring and spraying
early, hairy indigo is a pest that can be
effectively controlled.

JAF

Who Needs a License?

Those who apply restricted use pesticides
need to be licensed to meet Florida's legal
requirement. In the agronomic sector, most
who will need to have a license will fall into
at least one of the following categories:
private applicator or commercial applicators









who are hired to apply restricted use
pesticides to agricultural row crops or
agricultural tree crops. There are differences
among these types of applicators as one
category does not necessarily fit all.

Private applicators are those who are
licensed to use restricted use pesticides for
the purpose of producing an agricultural
commodity on property owned or rented by
the applicator or the applicator's employer.
This license is for owners and employees of
farms, ranches, groves, nurseries, gardens,
and other establishments that produce
agricultural commodities. To obtain this
license, one must pass the general standards
and private applicator exams. These exams
are based on material addressed in the
publications Applying Pesticides Correctly
and Private Applicator Agricultural Pest
Control manuals, respectively. The cost of
the license is $60 and is valid for four years.

Commercial applicators are those who apply
restricted use pesticides in situations such as
contract applications for someone else (i.e.
someone other than the owner or an
employee of the firm makes the application).
In Florida's agronomic environment, this
will generally be to row crops or tree crops.
These are separate categories and have
different exams. If treating row crops, an
applicator needs to take and pass the general
standards and agricultural row crop exams.
The study manuals for this category are the
Applying Pesticides Correctly and
Agricultural Row Crops Pest Control
manuals, respectively. One who will be


making commercial applications of
restricted use pesticides to agricultural tree
crops will need to take and pass the general
standards and agricultural tree crop exams.
Study material for these exams is based
upon the information contained in the
Applying Pesticides Correctly and
Agricultural Tree Crop Pest Control
manuals, respectively. The cost of a
commercial license is $160 and is valid for
four years.

All types of licenses are maintained by
continuing education units (CEU' s) earned
at various programs throughout the state. If
maintaining CEU's is not convenient,
licenses will be extended if applicators
choose to retake and pass the initial exams.

Study manuals for these exams may be
obtained from the IFAS Extension
Bookstore by calling 1-800-226-1764 or
going on-line at http://IFASbooks.ufl.edu.

Exams are administered by most county
extension offices throughout the state.
Contact the local office in your area to
check with exam scheduling. In some cases,
local offices also provide programs or
tutorials to assist in exam preparation. (Fred
Fishel, 352-392-4721)

FMF


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; M. B. Adjei, Forage Agronomist, C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; J.A. Ferrell, Extension
Agronomist, G. E. MacDonald, Weed Researcher, B.A. Sellers, Extension Agronomist, E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist, D. L. Wright,
Extension Agronomist.