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 Table of Contents
 Inoculating peanut in New...
 Peanut fertilization
 Using gramoxone in peanuts
 Tobacco blue mold
 Tobacco buyout program deadlin...
 Spiny amaranth biology
 Pesticide provisions of the Florida...
 Roation, rotation, rotation
 Intentions to plant report


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00057
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: May 2005
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00057

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Inoculating peanut in New Ground
        Page 2
    Peanut fertilization
        Page 2
    Using gramoxone in peanuts
        Page 2
    Tobacco blue mold
        Page 3
    Tobacco buyout program deadline
        Page 3
    Spiny amaranth biology
        Page 3
    Pesticide provisions of the Florida Agricultural Worker Safety Act
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Roation, rotation, rotation
        Page 6
    Intentions to plant report
        Page 6
Full Text






AGRONOMY

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA NOTES
IFAS EXTENSION

May, 2005

IN MEMORY OF
CARROL CHAMBLISS

Dr. Carrol Chambliss passed away April 23, as he was unable to survive his
battle with cancer. Carrol was a Forage Crop Extension Specialist in the
Agronomy Department and a very respected friend and colleague to many both
within and outside of IFAS. Dr. Chambliss worked with so many across the
state and beyond during his 29 years of service as a faculty member. Carrol
contributed in immeasurable ways over his career and he will surely be missed.
A memorial service was held on April 26 in Gainesville, with burial on April 30
near his Arkansas birthplace.


IN THIS ISSUE


PEANUTS
Inoculating Peanut in New Ground
Peanut Fertilization ...........
Using Gramoxone in Peanuts .....


TOBACCO
Tobacco Blue Mold ..................................
Tobacco Buyout Program Deadline ..........................

WEED CONTROL
Spiny Am aranth Biology ............... ................

MISCELLANEOUS
Pesticide Provisions of the Florida Agricultural Worker Safety Act.
Rotation, Rotation, Rotation ............................
Intentions to Plant Report ..............................


. . . 4
. . . 6
. . . 6


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension
Office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim
Dean.









Inoculating Peanut in New Ground

Peanuts may not always respond to
inoculation with rhizobium bacteria that
fixes nitrogen to aid plant growth. The main
reason for this is that there is an indigenous
population of rhizobium, cowpea
miscellany, that is common to many native
weeds and potentially able to nodulate a
crop of peanuts grown for the first time in a
field. Peanuts are only moderately efficient
in fixing and translocating atmospheric
nitrogen. With soybean, as much as 80% of
the plant nitrogen comes from the
atmosphere while about 55% of the plant
nitrogen needs of peanut are from nitrogen
fixation. Calcium is important to nodulation
and maximum peanut root growth occurs at
a pH of about 7.3 while shoot growth,
nodulation, and nitrogen fixation is best at a
pH range of 5.9 to 6.3. An application of
lime can improve the availability of calcium,
magnesium, and phosphorus and decrease
aluminum toxicity. Inoculants may be
applied to soils that have not had peanuts
grown on them for several years or at all. In
some cases nodulation may be significant
and in others little response may be noted.
However, inoculants are cheap insurance in
providing needed nitrogen for plant growth.

DLW

Peanut Fertilization

New peanut growers need to know that
peanuts do require good nutrition to obtain
high yields and quality. However,
fertilization needs of peanuts are less than
for many crops that are commonly grown in
Florida. Calcium (Ca) needs are especially
high for peanuts and the fruit develops from
nutrients absorbed directly from the soil
rather than from nutrients transported from
roots to shoots and back to the fruit which is


the case for most crops. Calcium deficiency
results in high incidences of pod rot and
unfilled pods called "pops". This results in
low yields, low grades, and poor
germination. Relatively high concentrations
of Ca are needed in soil solution and the
critical Ca absorption period begins about
20 days after the entrance of the peg into the
soil and may extend for up to 2 months.
Since peanuts are often grown on sandy
soils, which are drought prone, there is a
limited ability of these soils to replenish the
soil solution Ca. Heavier soils and irrigated
soils are better able to supply the needed Ca
for proper uptake. The Ca needs are
primarily for pod and seed development and
not for growing a healthy plant. Test soils
and apply the needed amounts of Ca for
good yields and quality.

DLW

Using Gramoxone in Peanuts

Gramoxone is a virtually non-selective
herbicide that has been used to control
weeds in peanuts for many years. Although
generally considered a burndown herbicide,
peanuts possess a great amount of tolerance
to Gramoxone applied directly to the crop.
The peanut crop will show foliar burning
after treatment, but full recovery will occur
within 1 or 2 weeks after application.

New herbicides have been labeled in
peanuts in recent years that provide high
levels of weed control without causing foliar
burn on the peanuts. The lack of peanut
injury from these herbicides has led many
producers to stop using Gramoxone all
together. However, it is my opinion that
Gramoxone is still an excellent herbicide
that possesses many advantages.









Inoculating Peanut in New Ground

Peanuts may not always respond to
inoculation with rhizobium bacteria that
fixes nitrogen to aid plant growth. The main
reason for this is that there is an indigenous
population of rhizobium, cowpea
miscellany, that is common to many native
weeds and potentially able to nodulate a
crop of peanuts grown for the first time in a
field. Peanuts are only moderately efficient
in fixing and translocating atmospheric
nitrogen. With soybean, as much as 80% of
the plant nitrogen comes from the
atmosphere while about 55% of the plant
nitrogen needs of peanut are from nitrogen
fixation. Calcium is important to nodulation
and maximum peanut root growth occurs at
a pH of about 7.3 while shoot growth,
nodulation, and nitrogen fixation is best at a
pH range of 5.9 to 6.3. An application of
lime can improve the availability of calcium,
magnesium, and phosphorus and decrease
aluminum toxicity. Inoculants may be
applied to soils that have not had peanuts
grown on them for several years or at all. In
some cases nodulation may be significant
and in others little response may be noted.
However, inoculants are cheap insurance in
providing needed nitrogen for plant growth.

DLW

Peanut Fertilization

New peanut growers need to know that
peanuts do require good nutrition to obtain
high yields and quality. However,
fertilization needs of peanuts are less than
for many crops that are commonly grown in
Florida. Calcium (Ca) needs are especially
high for peanuts and the fruit develops from
nutrients absorbed directly from the soil
rather than from nutrients transported from
roots to shoots and back to the fruit which is


the case for most crops. Calcium deficiency
results in high incidences of pod rot and
unfilled pods called "pops". This results in
low yields, low grades, and poor
germination. Relatively high concentrations
of Ca are needed in soil solution and the
critical Ca absorption period begins about
20 days after the entrance of the peg into the
soil and may extend for up to 2 months.
Since peanuts are often grown on sandy
soils, which are drought prone, there is a
limited ability of these soils to replenish the
soil solution Ca. Heavier soils and irrigated
soils are better able to supply the needed Ca
for proper uptake. The Ca needs are
primarily for pod and seed development and
not for growing a healthy plant. Test soils
and apply the needed amounts of Ca for
good yields and quality.

DLW

Using Gramoxone in Peanuts

Gramoxone is a virtually non-selective
herbicide that has been used to control
weeds in peanuts for many years. Although
generally considered a burndown herbicide,
peanuts possess a great amount of tolerance
to Gramoxone applied directly to the crop.
The peanut crop will show foliar burning
after treatment, but full recovery will occur
within 1 or 2 weeks after application.

New herbicides have been labeled in
peanuts in recent years that provide high
levels of weed control without causing foliar
burn on the peanuts. The lack of peanut
injury from these herbicides has led many
producers to stop using Gramoxone all
together. However, it is my opinion that
Gramoxone is still an excellent herbicide
that possesses many advantages.









Inoculating Peanut in New Ground

Peanuts may not always respond to
inoculation with rhizobium bacteria that
fixes nitrogen to aid plant growth. The main
reason for this is that there is an indigenous
population of rhizobium, cowpea
miscellany, that is common to many native
weeds and potentially able to nodulate a
crop of peanuts grown for the first time in a
field. Peanuts are only moderately efficient
in fixing and translocating atmospheric
nitrogen. With soybean, as much as 80% of
the plant nitrogen comes from the
atmosphere while about 55% of the plant
nitrogen needs of peanut are from nitrogen
fixation. Calcium is important to nodulation
and maximum peanut root growth occurs at
a pH of about 7.3 while shoot growth,
nodulation, and nitrogen fixation is best at a
pH range of 5.9 to 6.3. An application of
lime can improve the availability of calcium,
magnesium, and phosphorus and decrease
aluminum toxicity. Inoculants may be
applied to soils that have not had peanuts
grown on them for several years or at all. In
some cases nodulation may be significant
and in others little response may be noted.
However, inoculants are cheap insurance in
providing needed nitrogen for plant growth.

DLW

Peanut Fertilization

New peanut growers need to know that
peanuts do require good nutrition to obtain
high yields and quality. However,
fertilization needs of peanuts are less than
for many crops that are commonly grown in
Florida. Calcium (Ca) needs are especially
high for peanuts and the fruit develops from
nutrients absorbed directly from the soil
rather than from nutrients transported from
roots to shoots and back to the fruit which is


the case for most crops. Calcium deficiency
results in high incidences of pod rot and
unfilled pods called "pops". This results in
low yields, low grades, and poor
germination. Relatively high concentrations
of Ca are needed in soil solution and the
critical Ca absorption period begins about
20 days after the entrance of the peg into the
soil and may extend for up to 2 months.
Since peanuts are often grown on sandy
soils, which are drought prone, there is a
limited ability of these soils to replenish the
soil solution Ca. Heavier soils and irrigated
soils are better able to supply the needed Ca
for proper uptake. The Ca needs are
primarily for pod and seed development and
not for growing a healthy plant. Test soils
and apply the needed amounts of Ca for
good yields and quality.

DLW

Using Gramoxone in Peanuts

Gramoxone is a virtually non-selective
herbicide that has been used to control
weeds in peanuts for many years. Although
generally considered a burndown herbicide,
peanuts possess a great amount of tolerance
to Gramoxone applied directly to the crop.
The peanut crop will show foliar burning
after treatment, but full recovery will occur
within 1 or 2 weeks after application.

New herbicides have been labeled in
peanuts in recent years that provide high
levels of weed control without causing foliar
burn on the peanuts. The lack of peanut
injury from these herbicides has led many
producers to stop using Gramoxone all
together. However, it is my opinion that
Gramoxone is still an excellent herbicide
that possesses many advantages.









By eliminating Gramoxone from the weed
control program, Cadre applications are
made much earlier in the growing season.
Although Cadre possesses a great amount of
soil residual activity, we commonly see
weed escapes by the end of the season. This
is why I believe Gramoxone still fits into a
weed control program. By using
Gramoxone within 28 days after peanut
emergence, you often control all weeds
present. This allows the Cadre to be applied
6 to 8 weeks after planting, rather then 3 to 4
weeks after planting if Gramoxone is not
used. Delaying the Cadre application will
allow more residual control later in the
growing season and may prevent some late
season weed escapes.

Another advantage of Gramoxone is the cost
of application. Gramoxone applied at 5
oz/A will cost approximately $1.35 per acre.
This is extremely cost effective for the
amount of weed control provided. Some
have routinely added Basagran when
applying Gramoxone to lessen peanut
injury. However, Basagran will reduce the
level weed control on many species while
dramatically increasing herbicide cost.
Research has shown that the reduced peanut
injury obtained from the addition of
Basagran will not improve peanut yield.
This means that in the long-run, there is
rarely an advantage to using Basagran with
Gramoxone.

Gramoxone can be a useful herbicide for
early season weed control. The amount of
weed control obtained and the low cost of
Gramoxone make it one of the most cost
effective herbicides on currently on the
market.

JAF


Tobacco Blue Mold

This disease of tobacco has not been
reported so far in 2005, but growers should
inspect their crop frequently for infections.
Cool, wet weather favors the development
of this disease which can spread rapidly and
cause considerable loss when conditions are
favorable. Early detection allows warnings
to be issued so that growers can apply
preventive fungicides as needed.

EBW

Tobacco Buyout Program Deadline

Tobacco quota owners and producers that
are eligible to participate in the Tobacco
Transition Payment Program (TTPP), also
known as the tobacco buyout, should sign
contracts by June 17 at their Farm Service
Agency office if they are to receive the 2005
payments. Information is available at the
FSA offices or the web site
www.fsa.gov/tobacco. Other web sites that
contain useful information about the buyout
include www.tobaccobuyoutinfo.com/ and
www.tobaccobuyout.cals.ncsu.edu.

EBW

Spiny Amaranth Biology

A member of the pigweed or Amaranthus
family, spiny amaranth can be found
throughout Florida. Identification of
individual pigweed species is quite difficult,
especially when plants are in the seedling
stage. Spiny amaranth, however, is quite
easy to identify. This plant has spines
around each branch and inflorescence. Grab
this plant, and you will know that it is spiny
amaranth, the only weedy pigweed species
to have spines throughout the plant.









By eliminating Gramoxone from the weed
control program, Cadre applications are
made much earlier in the growing season.
Although Cadre possesses a great amount of
soil residual activity, we commonly see
weed escapes by the end of the season. This
is why I believe Gramoxone still fits into a
weed control program. By using
Gramoxone within 28 days after peanut
emergence, you often control all weeds
present. This allows the Cadre to be applied
6 to 8 weeks after planting, rather then 3 to 4
weeks after planting if Gramoxone is not
used. Delaying the Cadre application will
allow more residual control later in the
growing season and may prevent some late
season weed escapes.

Another advantage of Gramoxone is the cost
of application. Gramoxone applied at 5
oz/A will cost approximately $1.35 per acre.
This is extremely cost effective for the
amount of weed control provided. Some
have routinely added Basagran when
applying Gramoxone to lessen peanut
injury. However, Basagran will reduce the
level weed control on many species while
dramatically increasing herbicide cost.
Research has shown that the reduced peanut
injury obtained from the addition of
Basagran will not improve peanut yield.
This means that in the long-run, there is
rarely an advantage to using Basagran with
Gramoxone.

Gramoxone can be a useful herbicide for
early season weed control. The amount of
weed control obtained and the low cost of
Gramoxone make it one of the most cost
effective herbicides on currently on the
market.

JAF


Tobacco Blue Mold

This disease of tobacco has not been
reported so far in 2005, but growers should
inspect their crop frequently for infections.
Cool, wet weather favors the development
of this disease which can spread rapidly and
cause considerable loss when conditions are
favorable. Early detection allows warnings
to be issued so that growers can apply
preventive fungicides as needed.

EBW

Tobacco Buyout Program Deadline

Tobacco quota owners and producers that
are eligible to participate in the Tobacco
Transition Payment Program (TTPP), also
known as the tobacco buyout, should sign
contracts by June 17 at their Farm Service
Agency office if they are to receive the 2005
payments. Information is available at the
FSA offices or the web site
www.fsa.gov/tobacco. Other web sites that
contain useful information about the buyout
include www.tobaccobuyoutinfo.com/ and
www.tobaccobuyout.cals.ncsu.edu.

EBW

Spiny Amaranth Biology

A member of the pigweed or Amaranthus
family, spiny amaranth can be found
throughout Florida. Identification of
individual pigweed species is quite difficult,
especially when plants are in the seedling
stage. Spiny amaranth, however, is quite
easy to identify. This plant has spines
around each branch and inflorescence. Grab
this plant, and you will know that it is spiny
amaranth, the only weedy pigweed species
to have spines throughout the plant.









By eliminating Gramoxone from the weed
control program, Cadre applications are
made much earlier in the growing season.
Although Cadre possesses a great amount of
soil residual activity, we commonly see
weed escapes by the end of the season. This
is why I believe Gramoxone still fits into a
weed control program. By using
Gramoxone within 28 days after peanut
emergence, you often control all weeds
present. This allows the Cadre to be applied
6 to 8 weeks after planting, rather then 3 to 4
weeks after planting if Gramoxone is not
used. Delaying the Cadre application will
allow more residual control later in the
growing season and may prevent some late
season weed escapes.

Another advantage of Gramoxone is the cost
of application. Gramoxone applied at 5
oz/A will cost approximately $1.35 per acre.
This is extremely cost effective for the
amount of weed control provided. Some
have routinely added Basagran when
applying Gramoxone to lessen peanut
injury. However, Basagran will reduce the
level weed control on many species while
dramatically increasing herbicide cost.
Research has shown that the reduced peanut
injury obtained from the addition of
Basagran will not improve peanut yield.
This means that in the long-run, there is
rarely an advantage to using Basagran with
Gramoxone.

Gramoxone can be a useful herbicide for
early season weed control. The amount of
weed control obtained and the low cost of
Gramoxone make it one of the most cost
effective herbicides on currently on the
market.

JAF


Tobacco Blue Mold

This disease of tobacco has not been
reported so far in 2005, but growers should
inspect their crop frequently for infections.
Cool, wet weather favors the development
of this disease which can spread rapidly and
cause considerable loss when conditions are
favorable. Early detection allows warnings
to be issued so that growers can apply
preventive fungicides as needed.

EBW

Tobacco Buyout Program Deadline

Tobacco quota owners and producers that
are eligible to participate in the Tobacco
Transition Payment Program (TTPP), also
known as the tobacco buyout, should sign
contracts by June 17 at their Farm Service
Agency office if they are to receive the 2005
payments. Information is available at the
FSA offices or the web site
www.fsa.gov/tobacco. Other web sites that
contain useful information about the buyout
include www.tobaccobuyoutinfo.com/ and
www.tobaccobuyout.cals.ncsu.edu.

EBW

Spiny Amaranth Biology

A member of the pigweed or Amaranthus
family, spiny amaranth can be found
throughout Florida. Identification of
individual pigweed species is quite difficult,
especially when plants are in the seedling
stage. Spiny amaranth, however, is quite
easy to identify. This plant has spines
around each branch and inflorescence. Grab
this plant, and you will know that it is spiny
amaranth, the only weedy pigweed species
to have spines throughout the plant.









Pigweed species are characterized by ovate-
lanceolate to lanceolate (wide at the base of
the leaf and tapers to a point) leaf shapes
with or without hair on the leaves. Stems
can be smooth or hairy, and depends upon
the species. Spiny amaranth most often
lacks hairs on the leaves and stems. Like
most pigweed species, spiny amaranth is
monoecious, having both female and male
flowers on the same plant. In most cases,
male flowers are at the top, and female
flowers are located at the base of the leaves
near the stem.

Pigweed species are capable of producing
hundreds of thousands of seeds per plant.
Research in the Midwest revealed that a
single spiny amaranth is capable of
producing approximately 114,000 seeds.
This is substantially lower than other
pigweed species like smooth pigweed,
which is capable of producing upwards of
300,000 seeds per plant. Even though spiny
amaranth appears to be on the lower end of
seed production compared to other pigweed
species, it is a prolific seed producer when
left uncontrolled. On average, spiny
amaranth produces 157 seeds per gram of
dry plant matter.

Germination of pigweed species generally
occurs under conditions of high temperature,
soil moisture, and light quality. You will
likely see spiny amaranth germination and
establishment occur in disturbed areas where
light reaches the soil surface. In fact,
germination of pigweed species is
dramatically reduced when light is
intercepted by a particular crop. For
example, 100% shade reduced common
waterhemp germination by 82%. Although
some seedlings do emerge under such
conditions, many more seeds would
germinate without shading the soil surface.


Control of spiny amaranth can be a sticky
situation. As pigweeds get larger, control
becomes more difficult. Therefore, more
herbicide may be required for adequate
control. Herbicides that have activity on
spiny amaranth include Weedmaster,
Pasturegard, Outlaw, Cimarron, Cimmaron
Max, and Banvel. Be sure to read the label
for specific rates and adjuvant selection. It
is best to apply these herbicides when plants
are small and actively growing. Except
when applied after flowering, any of these
herbicides should reduce the number of
seeds produced by the plant.

BAS

Pesticide Provisions of the Florida
Agricultural Worker Safety Act

The purpose of this guide is to provide a
summary of the pesticide provisions of the
recently enacted Florida Agricultural
Worker Safety Act (FAWSA) and the
definitions that are used in its language.

The pesticide provisions of FAWSA, which
became effective on July 1, 2004, are
designed to ensure that information is made
available to farm workers about specific
hazards associated with the use of
agricultural pesticides. The law was
implemented and will be enforced by the
Florida Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services (FDACS), also known
as "the Department."
The provisions of FAWSA that concern
pesticides and modify Chapter 487, F.S., are
as follows:

* Pesticide dealers, distributors,
manufacturers, and importers selling
agricultural pesticides must provide
a Material Safety Data Sheet
(MSDS)









in printed or written format to the
purchaser upon initial purchase of
each agricultural product and upon
first purchase after an MSDS has
been updated. Providing purchasers
with a CD, floppy disk, website
address, or email that contains an
MSDS does not meet the legal
requirement for a printed or written
format. Subsequent purchases of the
same product from the same dealer
do not require an MSDS to be
provided to the purchaser unless the
MSDS has been updated.

* Agricultural employers must make
available to farm workers upon
request either an MSDS or fact sheet
approved by the state or federal
government in written format which
provides information about the
impacts of the use of the agricultural
pesticide. The required pesticide
safety information must be made
available to any worker who:

enters an agricultural area
where an agricultural
pesticide has been applied or
a restricted entry interval
(REI) has been in effect
within the past 30 days, or

may be exposed to an
agricultural pesticide during
normal conditions of use or
in a foreseeable emergency.

The language in the FAWSA regarding the
time period of the REI is not clear;
therefore, the language in the federal
Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for
Agricultural Workers ("within the last 30
days") has been adopted. The MSDS or fact
sheet must be made available to the worker
within 2


working days of request by a worker or
designated representative. In the case of a
pesticide-related medical emergency, the
MSDS or fact sheet must be provided in
written format promptly upon request by a
worker, a designated representative, or
medical personnel treating a worker. If no
MSDS was provided at the time an
agricultural product was purchased, or if for
any reason the agricultural employer does
not have the appropriate fact sheet, the
agricultural employer must take timely steps
to obtain an MSDS or fact sheet. Most
agricultural pesticide MSDS's are available
from the website http://www.cdms.net.
Other possible sources are pesticide
manufacturers, FDACS's Pesticide
Registration Section (850-487-2130), EPA,
and pesticide distributors and dealers.

* FDACS must make available to
trainers a one page general
agricultural safety sheet. The safety
sheet must be in a language
understood by the worker and must
include illustrated instructions on
preventing pesticide exposure and
toll free telephone numbers to the
Florida Poison Control Centers. The
safety sheet is available from
FDACS in English, Spanish and
Creole/Haitian and is provided to
trainers upon request to distribute to
workers during training pursuant to
the WPS.

* FAWSA prohibits the agricultural
employer from taking any retaliatory
action against employees who
attempt to exercise their rights under
this bill. Agricultural workers who
have been subject to retaliatory
action may file a complaint with
FDACS. In any action brought forth
that involves retaliatory action, if the








retaliatory action is predicated on the
disclosure by a worker of an illegal
action, policy, or practice, the
worker may not be required to show
that the disclosure was under oath or
in writing or that the worker notified
the employer in writing of the illegal
action, policy, or practice. FDACS is
required to monitor all complaints of
retaliation received and report its
findings to the Legislature on or
before October 1, 2008. The report
will include descriptions and
summaries of the circumstances
surrounding the complaints and
subsequent actions taken.


FMF


Rotation, Rotation, Rotation

Good rotations are one of the keys to high
yields, low pest pressure, reduced risks, and
farm profitability. Rotations usually
become limited due to high prices for a
commodity or ease of growing crops such as
with Roundup Ready technology. We have
learned over the years that crop yields for
legume crops like soybean and peanut
decline rapidly if planted for more than one
year without rotation. Cotton and corn
yields decline also without proper rotation
but maybe a slower pace than for the
legumes. Good rotations have always been
a key to good production practices and will
reduce pests (diseases, insects, and
nematodes) if proper crops are used in the
right sequence as well as legumes supplying
nitrogen for grass crops.


DLW


Intentions to Plant Report


The USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service released the 2005 report of prospective
planting of agronomic crops http://usda.mannilib.cornell.edu/reports/nassr/field/pcp-bbp/:

Florida United States

Crop 2005 acres (xl000) 2005/2004 2005 acres (xl000) 2005/2004
Corn 65 93 81,413 101
Wheat, all 20 111 58,592 98
Hay, all 265 102 62,940 102
Soybeans 11 58 73,910 98
Peanuts 155 107 1,597 112
Cotton, all 85 96 13,815 101
Tobacco, flue-cured 2.8 70 189.3 83

EBW

The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; J.A. Ferrell, Extension Agronomist (jaferrell@ifas.ufl.edu), F.M. Fishel, Pesticide Coordinator
(weeddr@ifas.ufl.edu), B.A. Sellers, Extension Agronomist (sellersb@ifas.ufl.edu), E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist (ebw@ifas.ufl.edu),
D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist (dlw@ifas.ufl.edu).








retaliatory action is predicated on the
disclosure by a worker of an illegal
action, policy, or practice, the
worker may not be required to show
that the disclosure was under oath or
in writing or that the worker notified
the employer in writing of the illegal
action, policy, or practice. FDACS is
required to monitor all complaints of
retaliation received and report its
findings to the Legislature on or
before October 1, 2008. The report
will include descriptions and
summaries of the circumstances
surrounding the complaints and
subsequent actions taken.


FMF


Rotation, Rotation, Rotation

Good rotations are one of the keys to high
yields, low pest pressure, reduced risks, and
farm profitability. Rotations usually
become limited due to high prices for a
commodity or ease of growing crops such as
with Roundup Ready technology. We have
learned over the years that crop yields for
legume crops like soybean and peanut
decline rapidly if planted for more than one
year without rotation. Cotton and corn
yields decline also without proper rotation
but maybe a slower pace than for the
legumes. Good rotations have always been
a key to good production practices and will
reduce pests (diseases, insects, and
nematodes) if proper crops are used in the
right sequence as well as legumes supplying
nitrogen for grass crops.


DLW


Intentions to Plant Report


The USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service released the 2005 report of prospective
planting of agronomic crops http://usda.mannilib.cornell.edu/reports/nassr/field/pcp-bbp/:

Florida United States

Crop 2005 acres (xl000) 2005/2004 2005 acres (xl000) 2005/2004
Corn 65 93 81,413 101
Wheat, all 20 111 58,592 98
Hay, all 265 102 62,940 102
Soybeans 11 58 73,910 98
Peanuts 155 107 1,597 112
Cotton, all 85 96 13,815 101
Tobacco, flue-cured 2.8 70 189.3 83

EBW

The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; J.A. Ferrell, Extension Agronomist (jaferrell@ifas.ufl.edu), F.M. Fishel, Pesticide Coordinator
(weeddr@ifas.ufl.edu), B.A. Sellers, Extension Agronomist (sellersb@ifas.ufl.edu), E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist (ebw@ifas.ufl.edu),
D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist (dlw@ifas.ufl.edu).