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 Table of Contents
 Crisis exemption
 Cutout in cotton
 Foliar area under cotton
 Tobacco crop estimates for July...
 Tobacco quota buyout proposals
 Sprayer maintenance
 Updated publications
 County estimates of field...
 NEW publications


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00049
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: August 2004
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00049

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Crisis exemption
        Page 2
    Cutout in cotton
        Page 2
    Foliar area under cotton
        Page 2
    Tobacco crop estimates for July 2004
        Page 3
    Tobacco quota buyout proposals
        Page 3
    Sprayer maintenance
        Page 3
    Updated publications
        Page 4
    County estimates of field crops
        Page 4
    NEW publications
        Page 5
Full Text






AGRONOMY

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA NOTES
IFAS EXTENSION


August, 2004


IN THIS ISSUE

COTTON


Crisis Exemption ....
Cutout In Cotton ....
Foliar Urea on Cotton


. . . . . . . . . . . . 2
. . . . . . . . . . . . 2
. . . . . . . . . . . . 2
. . . . . . 2
. . . . . . 2


TOBACCO


Tobacco Crop Estimates for July 2004
Tobacco Quota Buyout Proposals ......


MISCELLANEOUS


Sprayer Maintenance .........
County Estimates of Field Crops
Updated Publications .........
NEW Publications ..........


. . . . . .. . . 5


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension
Office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida / Larry Arrington, Interim
Dean.










Crisis Exemption

A Crisis Exemption was declared for Topsin M
fungicide for cotton on July 21, 2004. This
allows Topsin M to be used to applied to cotton
for 15 days until August 5, 2004 at which time a
Section 18 should be in place so that growers
can continue spraying cotton during the effective
bloom period. The Section 18 will then be in
place for one year. The Crisis Exemption was
granted since early planted cotton had been
flowering for about 3 weeks while other cotton
was in the initial bloom phase and is the critical
time to protect blooms against Fusarium
hardlock. Use pattern for this fungicide will be
application by ground or air at 7 to 14 day
intervals during the primary bloom period (July-
August). Do not apply within 40 days of
harvest. Rate of application of product should
be from 2 to 1 lb/A not to exceed 4 pounds of
product per acre or 2.8 pound of a.i. per acre per
season. A maximum of 4 applications per crop
may be made. Weather conditions have been
hot and humid for most of July which appears to
set up the infection causing hardlock. Weather
patterns were similar in 2002 when state average
cotton yields were at a low for recent history at
346 lbs/A. A uniform fungicide trial is being
conducted across 7 southeast states this year as
well as many other related studies to determine
how to control the damage done by hardlock and
boll rot in cotton.


Cutout In Cotton

Cutout in cotton is when there is a marked
decrease in growth, flowering, and boll
retention. It is usually not a clearly defined
event but occurs over a week to two week
period. The best way to monitor this is to
monitor nodes above the highest white flower.
When you have only 4-5 nodes above white
flower (NAWF), this stage has been reached.
This is often noticeable since you will see many
white blooms near the top of the plant driving


by the field. NAWF declines by about one node
for every week of bloom. However, this decline
is affected by the use of growth regulator,
fertility, and moisture. If the plant is stressed
before bloom, the plant may start out blooming
at 7 NAWF. However, if you get into a rainy
period, this may stay at 7 for several weeks. It
normally takes 4-5 weeks of effective bloom to
make a high yielding crop. Cotton will normally
have an effective bloom period from early to
mid July until the first week of September
depending on planting date. These late blooms
may contribute little to final yield. IfNAWF is
decreasing too rapidly, growers should attempt
to determine the cause of the stress and alleviate
it if possible. If cutout is due to a high boll load,
this is good and will lead to early maturity and
harvest. If cutout is due to water stress, or
fertility, appropriate steps should be taken to
keep the plants growing and setting fruit until an
appropriate boll load is set. On some extremely
fertile, moist soils, cutout may not occur until
weeks past the effective bloom date (about
September 7-10 since it takes at least 60 days to
mature a boll late in the fall). Defoliation should
then be determined by the larger, earlier set bolls
that will contribute most to final yield with little
thought for the status of the late bolls. Fields
near cutout in the first week of August were
either planted early or have some stress factor
that needs attention.


Every year some cotton fields will begin looking
yellow sooner that the grower would like. These
fields should be examined closely to determine
if this is due to a heavy fruit load or other
causes. Our research has shown that
applications of nitrogen after the third week of
bloom can actually cause a yield reduction if it
has a good fruit load. The question is often
asked how much urea can be applied without
burning cotton leaves if urea is going to be
applied. Normally 10 lbs of urea can be
dissolved in 5 gallons of water for aerial


DLW


DLW


Foliar Urea on Cotton










Crisis Exemption

A Crisis Exemption was declared for Topsin M
fungicide for cotton on July 21, 2004. This
allows Topsin M to be used to applied to cotton
for 15 days until August 5, 2004 at which time a
Section 18 should be in place so that growers
can continue spraying cotton during the effective
bloom period. The Section 18 will then be in
place for one year. The Crisis Exemption was
granted since early planted cotton had been
flowering for about 3 weeks while other cotton
was in the initial bloom phase and is the critical
time to protect blooms against Fusarium
hardlock. Use pattern for this fungicide will be
application by ground or air at 7 to 14 day
intervals during the primary bloom period (July-
August). Do not apply within 40 days of
harvest. Rate of application of product should
be from 2 to 1 lb/A not to exceed 4 pounds of
product per acre or 2.8 pound of a.i. per acre per
season. A maximum of 4 applications per crop
may be made. Weather conditions have been
hot and humid for most of July which appears to
set up the infection causing hardlock. Weather
patterns were similar in 2002 when state average
cotton yields were at a low for recent history at
346 lbs/A. A uniform fungicide trial is being
conducted across 7 southeast states this year as
well as many other related studies to determine
how to control the damage done by hardlock and
boll rot in cotton.


Cutout In Cotton

Cutout in cotton is when there is a marked
decrease in growth, flowering, and boll
retention. It is usually not a clearly defined
event but occurs over a week to two week
period. The best way to monitor this is to
monitor nodes above the highest white flower.
When you have only 4-5 nodes above white
flower (NAWF), this stage has been reached.
This is often noticeable since you will see many
white blooms near the top of the plant driving


by the field. NAWF declines by about one node
for every week of bloom. However, this decline
is affected by the use of growth regulator,
fertility, and moisture. If the plant is stressed
before bloom, the plant may start out blooming
at 7 NAWF. However, if you get into a rainy
period, this may stay at 7 for several weeks. It
normally takes 4-5 weeks of effective bloom to
make a high yielding crop. Cotton will normally
have an effective bloom period from early to
mid July until the first week of September
depending on planting date. These late blooms
may contribute little to final yield. IfNAWF is
decreasing too rapidly, growers should attempt
to determine the cause of the stress and alleviate
it if possible. If cutout is due to a high boll load,
this is good and will lead to early maturity and
harvest. If cutout is due to water stress, or
fertility, appropriate steps should be taken to
keep the plants growing and setting fruit until an
appropriate boll load is set. On some extremely
fertile, moist soils, cutout may not occur until
weeks past the effective bloom date (about
September 7-10 since it takes at least 60 days to
mature a boll late in the fall). Defoliation should
then be determined by the larger, earlier set bolls
that will contribute most to final yield with little
thought for the status of the late bolls. Fields
near cutout in the first week of August were
either planted early or have some stress factor
that needs attention.


Every year some cotton fields will begin looking
yellow sooner that the grower would like. These
fields should be examined closely to determine
if this is due to a heavy fruit load or other
causes. Our research has shown that
applications of nitrogen after the third week of
bloom can actually cause a yield reduction if it
has a good fruit load. The question is often
asked how much urea can be applied without
burning cotton leaves if urea is going to be
applied. Normally 10 lbs of urea can be
dissolved in 5 gallons of water for aerial


DLW


DLW


Foliar Urea on Cotton










Crisis Exemption

A Crisis Exemption was declared for Topsin M
fungicide for cotton on July 21, 2004. This
allows Topsin M to be used to applied to cotton
for 15 days until August 5, 2004 at which time a
Section 18 should be in place so that growers
can continue spraying cotton during the effective
bloom period. The Section 18 will then be in
place for one year. The Crisis Exemption was
granted since early planted cotton had been
flowering for about 3 weeks while other cotton
was in the initial bloom phase and is the critical
time to protect blooms against Fusarium
hardlock. Use pattern for this fungicide will be
application by ground or air at 7 to 14 day
intervals during the primary bloom period (July-
August). Do not apply within 40 days of
harvest. Rate of application of product should
be from 2 to 1 lb/A not to exceed 4 pounds of
product per acre or 2.8 pound of a.i. per acre per
season. A maximum of 4 applications per crop
may be made. Weather conditions have been
hot and humid for most of July which appears to
set up the infection causing hardlock. Weather
patterns were similar in 2002 when state average
cotton yields were at a low for recent history at
346 lbs/A. A uniform fungicide trial is being
conducted across 7 southeast states this year as
well as many other related studies to determine
how to control the damage done by hardlock and
boll rot in cotton.


Cutout In Cotton

Cutout in cotton is when there is a marked
decrease in growth, flowering, and boll
retention. It is usually not a clearly defined
event but occurs over a week to two week
period. The best way to monitor this is to
monitor nodes above the highest white flower.
When you have only 4-5 nodes above white
flower (NAWF), this stage has been reached.
This is often noticeable since you will see many
white blooms near the top of the plant driving


by the field. NAWF declines by about one node
for every week of bloom. However, this decline
is affected by the use of growth regulator,
fertility, and moisture. If the plant is stressed
before bloom, the plant may start out blooming
at 7 NAWF. However, if you get into a rainy
period, this may stay at 7 for several weeks. It
normally takes 4-5 weeks of effective bloom to
make a high yielding crop. Cotton will normally
have an effective bloom period from early to
mid July until the first week of September
depending on planting date. These late blooms
may contribute little to final yield. IfNAWF is
decreasing too rapidly, growers should attempt
to determine the cause of the stress and alleviate
it if possible. If cutout is due to a high boll load,
this is good and will lead to early maturity and
harvest. If cutout is due to water stress, or
fertility, appropriate steps should be taken to
keep the plants growing and setting fruit until an
appropriate boll load is set. On some extremely
fertile, moist soils, cutout may not occur until
weeks past the effective bloom date (about
September 7-10 since it takes at least 60 days to
mature a boll late in the fall). Defoliation should
then be determined by the larger, earlier set bolls
that will contribute most to final yield with little
thought for the status of the late bolls. Fields
near cutout in the first week of August were
either planted early or have some stress factor
that needs attention.


Every year some cotton fields will begin looking
yellow sooner that the grower would like. These
fields should be examined closely to determine
if this is due to a heavy fruit load or other
causes. Our research has shown that
applications of nitrogen after the third week of
bloom can actually cause a yield reduction if it
has a good fruit load. The question is often
asked how much urea can be applied without
burning cotton leaves if urea is going to be
applied. Normally 10 lbs of urea can be
dissolved in 5 gallons of water for aerial


DLW


DLW


Foliar Urea on Cotton










application. If cotton is to be sprayed with
ground equipment apply 1 lb of urea for each
gallon of water i.e., add 15 lbs urea to 15 gallons
of water if spray volume is 15 gallons per acre,
or 20 lbs in 20 gallons for a spray volume of 20
gallons per acre. These higher rates can be
safely applied without bum if the cotton has had
plenty of water or is irrigated and is not under
water stress. Liquid urea (23% N) can be used
and diluted with water safely. A similar rate to
46% urea would be 2.1 gallons in 5 gallons of
water for aerial application or 3.1 gallons in 15
gallons of water for ground application which is
equivalent to 6.9 lbs N /A. Liquid urea should
not be used without dilution since it is too
concentrated for direct application and leaf bum
will occur as with 32% N. If adequate N has
been applied by ground applications during
squaring or by the first week or two of bloom,
foliar N should not be applied even if petioles
show low N levels as these levels will decrease
normally as the season progresses. Applications
of N during August may keep the plant
blooming and growing past the effective bloom
date and interfere with defoliation and make
harvest decisions more difficult.

DLW

Tobacco Crop Estimates for July 2004

The National Agricultural Statistics Service
estimated on July 1 that 4,000 acres of flue-
cured tobacco would in Florida in 2004 and the
average yield would be 2650 pounds per acre.
For the United States, the estimated acreage was
231,000 with a projected yield of 2240 pounds
per acre.

EBW

Tobacco Quota Buyout Proposals

The US Senate passed a bill in July that would
provide for a tobacco quota buyout of $8 per
pound for quota owners and $4 per pound for
growers. Payments would be over a 10-year


period and the Food and Drug Administration
would have authority to regulate tobacco.
Earlier the US House of Representatives passed
a quota buyout of $7 per pound for quota owners
and $3 per pound for growers, and payments
would be over a 5-year period. There was no
provision for FDA regulation in the House bill.
A conference committee will propose a
compromise bill for consideration after the
current recess.

EBW

Sprayer Maintenance

By this time in the season, it is likely that your
sprayer has covered several hundred acres and
sprayed thousands of gallons of solution.
Although sprayer technology has greatly
evolved over the years, parts do wear out and
need to be periodically replaced. Of particular
interest is wearing of the spray tips.

We have all observed how running water can
carve canyons out of solid rock. The same
processes occur as water moves through a spray
nozzle. As a spray tip begins to wear, the output
pattern becomes distorted, nozzle output
increases, droplet size increases, and spray
coverage is compromised. Although this may
not be of great concern for some soil
incorporated herbicides, it can be a major issue
for foliar herbicides and fungicides where
precise leaf coverage is essential.

When modem nozzle tips were first introduced,
brass was the metal of choice. This was because
brass is soft and made the delicate machining
processes much easier. However, soft metals
will wear and show significant spray pattern
distortion after only 5 hours of use. Regardless,
brass stray tips remain attractive because they
can be purchased at relatively low cost.
Stainless steel and ceramic tips are more
expensive than brass, but will often last much
longer. For example, ceramic tips will last up to
200 times longer than brass. The extended










application. If cotton is to be sprayed with
ground equipment apply 1 lb of urea for each
gallon of water i.e., add 15 lbs urea to 15 gallons
of water if spray volume is 15 gallons per acre,
or 20 lbs in 20 gallons for a spray volume of 20
gallons per acre. These higher rates can be
safely applied without bum if the cotton has had
plenty of water or is irrigated and is not under
water stress. Liquid urea (23% N) can be used
and diluted with water safely. A similar rate to
46% urea would be 2.1 gallons in 5 gallons of
water for aerial application or 3.1 gallons in 15
gallons of water for ground application which is
equivalent to 6.9 lbs N /A. Liquid urea should
not be used without dilution since it is too
concentrated for direct application and leaf bum
will occur as with 32% N. If adequate N has
been applied by ground applications during
squaring or by the first week or two of bloom,
foliar N should not be applied even if petioles
show low N levels as these levels will decrease
normally as the season progresses. Applications
of N during August may keep the plant
blooming and growing past the effective bloom
date and interfere with defoliation and make
harvest decisions more difficult.

DLW

Tobacco Crop Estimates for July 2004

The National Agricultural Statistics Service
estimated on July 1 that 4,000 acres of flue-
cured tobacco would in Florida in 2004 and the
average yield would be 2650 pounds per acre.
For the United States, the estimated acreage was
231,000 with a projected yield of 2240 pounds
per acre.

EBW

Tobacco Quota Buyout Proposals

The US Senate passed a bill in July that would
provide for a tobacco quota buyout of $8 per
pound for quota owners and $4 per pound for
growers. Payments would be over a 10-year


period and the Food and Drug Administration
would have authority to regulate tobacco.
Earlier the US House of Representatives passed
a quota buyout of $7 per pound for quota owners
and $3 per pound for growers, and payments
would be over a 5-year period. There was no
provision for FDA regulation in the House bill.
A conference committee will propose a
compromise bill for consideration after the
current recess.

EBW

Sprayer Maintenance

By this time in the season, it is likely that your
sprayer has covered several hundred acres and
sprayed thousands of gallons of solution.
Although sprayer technology has greatly
evolved over the years, parts do wear out and
need to be periodically replaced. Of particular
interest is wearing of the spray tips.

We have all observed how running water can
carve canyons out of solid rock. The same
processes occur as water moves through a spray
nozzle. As a spray tip begins to wear, the output
pattern becomes distorted, nozzle output
increases, droplet size increases, and spray
coverage is compromised. Although this may
not be of great concern for some soil
incorporated herbicides, it can be a major issue
for foliar herbicides and fungicides where
precise leaf coverage is essential.

When modem nozzle tips were first introduced,
brass was the metal of choice. This was because
brass is soft and made the delicate machining
processes much easier. However, soft metals
will wear and show significant spray pattern
distortion after only 5 hours of use. Regardless,
brass stray tips remain attractive because they
can be purchased at relatively low cost.
Stainless steel and ceramic tips are more
expensive than brass, but will often last much
longer. For example, ceramic tips will last up to
200 times longer than brass. The extended










application. If cotton is to be sprayed with
ground equipment apply 1 lb of urea for each
gallon of water i.e., add 15 lbs urea to 15 gallons
of water if spray volume is 15 gallons per acre,
or 20 lbs in 20 gallons for a spray volume of 20
gallons per acre. These higher rates can be
safely applied without bum if the cotton has had
plenty of water or is irrigated and is not under
water stress. Liquid urea (23% N) can be used
and diluted with water safely. A similar rate to
46% urea would be 2.1 gallons in 5 gallons of
water for aerial application or 3.1 gallons in 15
gallons of water for ground application which is
equivalent to 6.9 lbs N /A. Liquid urea should
not be used without dilution since it is too
concentrated for direct application and leaf bum
will occur as with 32% N. If adequate N has
been applied by ground applications during
squaring or by the first week or two of bloom,
foliar N should not be applied even if petioles
show low N levels as these levels will decrease
normally as the season progresses. Applications
of N during August may keep the plant
blooming and growing past the effective bloom
date and interfere with defoliation and make
harvest decisions more difficult.

DLW

Tobacco Crop Estimates for July 2004

The National Agricultural Statistics Service
estimated on July 1 that 4,000 acres of flue-
cured tobacco would in Florida in 2004 and the
average yield would be 2650 pounds per acre.
For the United States, the estimated acreage was
231,000 with a projected yield of 2240 pounds
per acre.

EBW

Tobacco Quota Buyout Proposals

The US Senate passed a bill in July that would
provide for a tobacco quota buyout of $8 per
pound for quota owners and $4 per pound for
growers. Payments would be over a 10-year


period and the Food and Drug Administration
would have authority to regulate tobacco.
Earlier the US House of Representatives passed
a quota buyout of $7 per pound for quota owners
and $3 per pound for growers, and payments
would be over a 5-year period. There was no
provision for FDA regulation in the House bill.
A conference committee will propose a
compromise bill for consideration after the
current recess.

EBW

Sprayer Maintenance

By this time in the season, it is likely that your
sprayer has covered several hundred acres and
sprayed thousands of gallons of solution.
Although sprayer technology has greatly
evolved over the years, parts do wear out and
need to be periodically replaced. Of particular
interest is wearing of the spray tips.

We have all observed how running water can
carve canyons out of solid rock. The same
processes occur as water moves through a spray
nozzle. As a spray tip begins to wear, the output
pattern becomes distorted, nozzle output
increases, droplet size increases, and spray
coverage is compromised. Although this may
not be of great concern for some soil
incorporated herbicides, it can be a major issue
for foliar herbicides and fungicides where
precise leaf coverage is essential.

When modem nozzle tips were first introduced,
brass was the metal of choice. This was because
brass is soft and made the delicate machining
processes much easier. However, soft metals
will wear and show significant spray pattern
distortion after only 5 hours of use. Regardless,
brass stray tips remain attractive because they
can be purchased at relatively low cost.
Stainless steel and ceramic tips are more
expensive than brass, but will often last much
longer. For example, ceramic tips will last up to
200 times longer than brass. The extended









spray life of stainless steel and ceramic spray
tips will more than offset the difference in
purchase price with brass.

At this time in the season it may be good to
closely examine the entire sprayer. Starting with
spray tips, then checking hose quality,


cleaning strainers and inspecting connectors for
leaks are all activities that can be accomplished
while the sprayer is idle. By performing these
tasks now, a costly and time consuming repair
during the next spraying season may be avoided.

JAF


County Estimates of Field Crops


According to estimates of the Florida Agricultural Statistics Service, counties that led in 2003 production
of cotton, peanuts, and tobacco are as follows:

Crop Acreage Harvested (acres) Yield per Acre (lbs)

Cotton Jackson (34,300) Santa Rosa (659)
Santa Rosa (22,800) Walton (632)
Escambia (10,700) Escambia (628)
Calhoun (8,100) Jackson (602)
Walton (4,900) Okaloosa (600)
State Total (92,000) State Average (610)

Peanuts Jackson (30,600) Madison (3840)
Santa Rosa (16,100) Escambia (3690)
Levy (15,700) Okaloosa (3595)
Marion (7,600) Santa Rosa (3595)
Escambia (6,900) Washington (3195)
State Total (115,000) State Average (3000)

Tobacco Suwannee (1070) Lafayette (2850)
Hamilton (730) Columbia (2720)
Alachua (620) Alachua (2685)
Madison (500) Suwannee (2640)
Columbia (440) Hamilton (2460)
State Total (4400) State Average (2500)


EBW


Updated Publications


SS-AGR-09
SS-AGR-44
SS-AGR-81
SS-AGR-225


Weed Management in Sugarcane 2004
Peanut Varieties for 2004
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal Plain Region
IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas









spray life of stainless steel and ceramic spray
tips will more than offset the difference in
purchase price with brass.

At this time in the season it may be good to
closely examine the entire sprayer. Starting with
spray tips, then checking hose quality,


cleaning strainers and inspecting connectors for
leaks are all activities that can be accomplished
while the sprayer is idle. By performing these
tasks now, a costly and time consuming repair
during the next spraying season may be avoided.

JAF


County Estimates of Field Crops


According to estimates of the Florida Agricultural Statistics Service, counties that led in 2003 production
of cotton, peanuts, and tobacco are as follows:

Crop Acreage Harvested (acres) Yield per Acre (lbs)

Cotton Jackson (34,300) Santa Rosa (659)
Santa Rosa (22,800) Walton (632)
Escambia (10,700) Escambia (628)
Calhoun (8,100) Jackson (602)
Walton (4,900) Okaloosa (600)
State Total (92,000) State Average (610)

Peanuts Jackson (30,600) Madison (3840)
Santa Rosa (16,100) Escambia (3690)
Levy (15,700) Okaloosa (3595)
Marion (7,600) Santa Rosa (3595)
Escambia (6,900) Washington (3195)
State Total (115,000) State Average (3000)

Tobacco Suwannee (1070) Lafayette (2850)
Hamilton (730) Columbia (2720)
Alachua (620) Alachua (2685)
Madison (500) Suwannee (2640)
Columbia (440) Hamilton (2460)
State Total (4400) State Average (2500)


EBW


Updated Publications


SS-AGR-09
SS-AGR-44
SS-AGR-81
SS-AGR-225


Weed Management in Sugarcane 2004
Peanut Varieties for 2004
Forage Production in the Southern Coastal Plain Region
IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas











NEW Publications


SS-AGR-222

SS-AGR-223
SS-AGR-224


Results of 2003 Early, Mid Plus Full Season, and Roundup Ready Cotton Variety
Tests in Florida
Tropical Spiderwort (Commelina benghalensis L.), Identification and Control
Dogfennel (Eupatorium capillifolium): Biology and Control


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; J.A. Ferrell, Extension Agronomist, G. E. MacDonald, Weed
Researcher, M. B. Adjei, Forage Agronomist, E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist, D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.