<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 Planting cotton and peanut in dry...
 Section 18 applied for fungicide...
 Clover pastures
 The legume - aeschynomene...
 Soybean varieties
 Kill cover crops early
 Prowl H20: familiar product, new...
 Intentions to plant report...


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00046
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: May 2004
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00046

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Planting cotton and peanut in dry soil
        Page 2
    Section 18 applied for fungicide to reduce fusarium hardlock in cotton
        Page 2
    Clover pastures
        Page 2
    The legume - aeschynomene americana
        Page 2
    Soybean varieties
        Page 3
    Kill cover crops early
        Page 3
    Prowl H20: familiar product, new formulation
        Page 3
    Intentions to plant report 2004
        Page 4
        Page 5
Full Text






AGRONOMY
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA NOTES
IFAS EXTENSION


May, 2004


DATES TO REMEMBER
May 22 4th Annual Perennial Peanut Field Day, Moultrie, GA
May 27 Corn Silage Field Day, Citra (http://www.animal.ufl.edu)


IN THIS ISSUE

COTTON
Planting Cotton and Peanut in Dry Soil ..........
Section 18 Applied for Fungicide to Reduce
Fusarium Hardlock in Cotton ...............

FORAGE
Clover Pastures ..........................
The Legume Aeschynomene americana ........

SOYBEAN
Soybean V varieties ........................

MISCELLANEOUS
Kill Cover Crops Early .....................
Prowl H20: Familiar Product, New Formulation ...
Intentions to Plant Report for 2004 ............
Updated Publications ......................
NEW Publications ........................


. . . . . . 4


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to
provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color,
sex, age, handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension
Office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University of Florida /, Larry Arrington,
Interim Dean.









Planting Cotton and Peanut in Dry Soil

Record dry weather has been recorded in
March and April of this year for much of the
row crop region. May is often a very dry
month meaning that any subsoil moisture
will be taken up by weeds, cover crops or
the soil will dry out if tillage is done.
Cotton normally does well if planted by the
middle of June if there is adequate moisture
at that time to start the crop. Cotton planted
in July or that emerges in July never matures
even though it fruits up well and looks good
through the season. "Don't plant cotton in
July and expect to make any yield". Peanut
may be planted 2-3 inches deep if needed to
plant into moisture. Cotton should never be
planted over 1 inch deep as it will not
emerge from deeper depths. It is best for
either to wait until soil moisture is adequate
to plant either of these crops. Soils can heat
up and reduce germination of either crop if
they are allowed to lay in the soil for a very
long period or they can be injured by soil
insects. Cotton has often been dusted in
with no surface or subsoil moisture and
planted at a depth of 1/2 to 34 inch and a small
shower can result in germination and then it
will die after a few days due to having no
subsoil moisture.


DLW


Section 18 Applied for Fungicide to
Reduce Fusarium Hardlock in Cotton

Questions have been asked about the
availability of Topsin M for bloom time
applications to cotton to control hardlock. A
section 18 has been applied for and it
appears that it is on schedule to get approval
by June 1 of this year. Cotton does not
normally start blooming until around late
June to mid July depending on the planting
date. This product will be labeled for 4
applications during the bloom period with a
total of 4 lbs. of product per acre. The label


will allow 12 to 1 lb applications in each of
the applications. The purpose of these
applications is to protect the blooms from
infection which will lead to hardlocked bolls
at boll opening time. Applications may be
made weekly or every other week for the
bloom period which viable blooms are
usually set until around the 10th of
September. The first 4-6 weeks of bloom
usually account for much of the yield of
cotton.

DLW

Clover Pastures

There has been above average clover growth
this spring. Now is the time to manage for
seed production on white clover and
arrowleaf clover. Cattle should be removed
from heavily grazed white clover pastures
for about two weeks to allow for reseeding.
After flowers have begun to turn brown,
grazing may be resumed. Arrowleaf clover
pastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or
reduce stocking rate to allow for adequate
reseeding.

CGC

The Legume Aeschynomene americana

Is this the year to overseed Aeschynomene
americana (joint vetch or deer vetch) onto
your pastures? Aeschynomene americana
can put extra pounds on calves this summer.
With high calf prices, the chances of paying
for the cost of overseeding plus make a
profit are increased.

Research at the Agronomy Forage Field Lab
(Beef Research Unit) has consistently shown
increased weight gain on yearling cattle in
July and August when aeschynomene is
available. This year we have had a dry
April and it looks like we will have a dry









Planting Cotton and Peanut in Dry Soil

Record dry weather has been recorded in
March and April of this year for much of the
row crop region. May is often a very dry
month meaning that any subsoil moisture
will be taken up by weeds, cover crops or
the soil will dry out if tillage is done.
Cotton normally does well if planted by the
middle of June if there is adequate moisture
at that time to start the crop. Cotton planted
in July or that emerges in July never matures
even though it fruits up well and looks good
through the season. "Don't plant cotton in
July and expect to make any yield". Peanut
may be planted 2-3 inches deep if needed to
plant into moisture. Cotton should never be
planted over 1 inch deep as it will not
emerge from deeper depths. It is best for
either to wait until soil moisture is adequate
to plant either of these crops. Soils can heat
up and reduce germination of either crop if
they are allowed to lay in the soil for a very
long period or they can be injured by soil
insects. Cotton has often been dusted in
with no surface or subsoil moisture and
planted at a depth of 1/2 to 34 inch and a small
shower can result in germination and then it
will die after a few days due to having no
subsoil moisture.


DLW


Section 18 Applied for Fungicide to
Reduce Fusarium Hardlock in Cotton

Questions have been asked about the
availability of Topsin M for bloom time
applications to cotton to control hardlock. A
section 18 has been applied for and it
appears that it is on schedule to get approval
by June 1 of this year. Cotton does not
normally start blooming until around late
June to mid July depending on the planting
date. This product will be labeled for 4
applications during the bloom period with a
total of 4 lbs. of product per acre. The label


will allow 12 to 1 lb applications in each of
the applications. The purpose of these
applications is to protect the blooms from
infection which will lead to hardlocked bolls
at boll opening time. Applications may be
made weekly or every other week for the
bloom period which viable blooms are
usually set until around the 10th of
September. The first 4-6 weeks of bloom
usually account for much of the yield of
cotton.

DLW

Clover Pastures

There has been above average clover growth
this spring. Now is the time to manage for
seed production on white clover and
arrowleaf clover. Cattle should be removed
from heavily grazed white clover pastures
for about two weeks to allow for reseeding.
After flowers have begun to turn brown,
grazing may be resumed. Arrowleaf clover
pastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or
reduce stocking rate to allow for adequate
reseeding.

CGC

The Legume Aeschynomene americana

Is this the year to overseed Aeschynomene
americana (joint vetch or deer vetch) onto
your pastures? Aeschynomene americana
can put extra pounds on calves this summer.
With high calf prices, the chances of paying
for the cost of overseeding plus make a
profit are increased.

Research at the Agronomy Forage Field Lab
(Beef Research Unit) has consistently shown
increased weight gain on yearling cattle in
July and August when aeschynomene is
available. This year we have had a dry
April and it looks like we will have a dry









Planting Cotton and Peanut in Dry Soil

Record dry weather has been recorded in
March and April of this year for much of the
row crop region. May is often a very dry
month meaning that any subsoil moisture
will be taken up by weeds, cover crops or
the soil will dry out if tillage is done.
Cotton normally does well if planted by the
middle of June if there is adequate moisture
at that time to start the crop. Cotton planted
in July or that emerges in July never matures
even though it fruits up well and looks good
through the season. "Don't plant cotton in
July and expect to make any yield". Peanut
may be planted 2-3 inches deep if needed to
plant into moisture. Cotton should never be
planted over 1 inch deep as it will not
emerge from deeper depths. It is best for
either to wait until soil moisture is adequate
to plant either of these crops. Soils can heat
up and reduce germination of either crop if
they are allowed to lay in the soil for a very
long period or they can be injured by soil
insects. Cotton has often been dusted in
with no surface or subsoil moisture and
planted at a depth of 1/2 to 34 inch and a small
shower can result in germination and then it
will die after a few days due to having no
subsoil moisture.


DLW


Section 18 Applied for Fungicide to
Reduce Fusarium Hardlock in Cotton

Questions have been asked about the
availability of Topsin M for bloom time
applications to cotton to control hardlock. A
section 18 has been applied for and it
appears that it is on schedule to get approval
by June 1 of this year. Cotton does not
normally start blooming until around late
June to mid July depending on the planting
date. This product will be labeled for 4
applications during the bloom period with a
total of 4 lbs. of product per acre. The label


will allow 12 to 1 lb applications in each of
the applications. The purpose of these
applications is to protect the blooms from
infection which will lead to hardlocked bolls
at boll opening time. Applications may be
made weekly or every other week for the
bloom period which viable blooms are
usually set until around the 10th of
September. The first 4-6 weeks of bloom
usually account for much of the yield of
cotton.

DLW

Clover Pastures

There has been above average clover growth
this spring. Now is the time to manage for
seed production on white clover and
arrowleaf clover. Cattle should be removed
from heavily grazed white clover pastures
for about two weeks to allow for reseeding.
After flowers have begun to turn brown,
grazing may be resumed. Arrowleaf clover
pastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or
reduce stocking rate to allow for adequate
reseeding.

CGC

The Legume Aeschynomene americana

Is this the year to overseed Aeschynomene
americana (joint vetch or deer vetch) onto
your pastures? Aeschynomene americana
can put extra pounds on calves this summer.
With high calf prices, the chances of paying
for the cost of overseeding plus make a
profit are increased.

Research at the Agronomy Forage Field Lab
(Beef Research Unit) has consistently shown
increased weight gain on yearling cattle in
July and August when aeschynomene is
available. This year we have had a dry
April and it looks like we will have a dry









Planting Cotton and Peanut in Dry Soil

Record dry weather has been recorded in
March and April of this year for much of the
row crop region. May is often a very dry
month meaning that any subsoil moisture
will be taken up by weeds, cover crops or
the soil will dry out if tillage is done.
Cotton normally does well if planted by the
middle of June if there is adequate moisture
at that time to start the crop. Cotton planted
in July or that emerges in July never matures
even though it fruits up well and looks good
through the season. "Don't plant cotton in
July and expect to make any yield". Peanut
may be planted 2-3 inches deep if needed to
plant into moisture. Cotton should never be
planted over 1 inch deep as it will not
emerge from deeper depths. It is best for
either to wait until soil moisture is adequate
to plant either of these crops. Soils can heat
up and reduce germination of either crop if
they are allowed to lay in the soil for a very
long period or they can be injured by soil
insects. Cotton has often been dusted in
with no surface or subsoil moisture and
planted at a depth of 1/2 to 34 inch and a small
shower can result in germination and then it
will die after a few days due to having no
subsoil moisture.


DLW


Section 18 Applied for Fungicide to
Reduce Fusarium Hardlock in Cotton

Questions have been asked about the
availability of Topsin M for bloom time
applications to cotton to control hardlock. A
section 18 has been applied for and it
appears that it is on schedule to get approval
by June 1 of this year. Cotton does not
normally start blooming until around late
June to mid July depending on the planting
date. This product will be labeled for 4
applications during the bloom period with a
total of 4 lbs. of product per acre. The label


will allow 12 to 1 lb applications in each of
the applications. The purpose of these
applications is to protect the blooms from
infection which will lead to hardlocked bolls
at boll opening time. Applications may be
made weekly or every other week for the
bloom period which viable blooms are
usually set until around the 10th of
September. The first 4-6 weeks of bloom
usually account for much of the yield of
cotton.

DLW

Clover Pastures

There has been above average clover growth
this spring. Now is the time to manage for
seed production on white clover and
arrowleaf clover. Cattle should be removed
from heavily grazed white clover pastures
for about two weeks to allow for reseeding.
After flowers have begun to turn brown,
grazing may be resumed. Arrowleaf clover
pastures should be treated similarly. When
flowering starts either remove cattle or
reduce stocking rate to allow for adequate
reseeding.

CGC

The Legume Aeschynomene americana

Is this the year to overseed Aeschynomene
americana (joint vetch or deer vetch) onto
your pastures? Aeschynomene americana
can put extra pounds on calves this summer.
With high calf prices, the chances of paying
for the cost of overseeding plus make a
profit are increased.

Research at the Agronomy Forage Field Lab
(Beef Research Unit) has consistently shown
increased weight gain on yearling cattle in
July and August when aeschynomene is
available. This year we have had a dry
April and it looks like we will have a dry









May. Very early planting and early
development of the crop will not be
possible. Aeschynomene should be planted
as soon as the summer rains begin which is
usually in the first half of June. If planting
is delayed past the middle of June, the
amount of grazing time is reduced due to the
delayed development of the aeschynomene.
For additional information on seeding
method and seeding rate, see the fact sheet
at the web site:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AA189.
Aeschynomene is a summer annual legume
that is adapted to moist flatwoods soils. Do
not plant on drought upland sands.

CGC

Soybean Varieties

We have been asked about soybean varieties
by producers all over the state since prices
of soybeans are around $10 per bushel.
Florida no longer does variety testing with
soybeans but information can be found on
the Georgia web site at
www.griffin.peachnet.edu/swvt
.
There are a lot of good varieties out there
that are Roundup Ready that can be
produced for less than $100 per acre cash
costs. However, make sure there are grain
elevators in the area or at some convenient
location that will accept the soybeans when
they are ready to harvest. Soybeans do not
weather well in the field after maturity and
must be harvested timely.

DLW

Kill Cover Crops Early

Cover crops for strip tilling crops in should
be killed early enough that they do not
deplete subsoil moisture needed for the


summer crop. As cover crops get larger,
they will utilize more soil moisture. Also,
most herbicides take longer to work when
water stressed allowing more soil moisture
to be used. Never plant crops into living
cover crops since they harbor soil insects
and will make the likelihood of having
grasshopper, and cutworm problems more
severe. Data from many of our trials show
reduced yields when planting into living
cover crops since they will compete as
severely as weeds with the crop.

DLW

Prowl H20: Familiar Product, New
Formulation

Prowl 3.3EC is a familiar "yellow dye"
herbicide that has been used to control
annual grasses and small-seeded broadleaf
weeds for many years. Although this
product is relatively inexpensive and very
effective, there are some disadvantages to its
use. The most notable is the yellow staining
of spray tanks, truck beds, clothing, etc.

Prowl H20 is a microencapsulated
formulation of pendimethalin (the active
ingredient of Prowl 3.3EC). The
microencapsulation process forms a thin
polymer layer around the herbicide
molecules. These polymers will then
quickly degrade in soil leaving the active
herbicide molecules available for uptake by
weeds. The polymers also shield the
herbicide molecule from staining spray
tanks, or other surfaces, while in solution.
As an added benefit, microencapsulation
will also greatly reduce pesticide odor.

Prowl H20 is a 3.8 lb/gallon and is currently
labeled for use in Florida at a rate of 2 to 3
pt/A. University research has shown that
Prowl H20 and Prowl 3.3EC provide equal









May. Very early planting and early
development of the crop will not be
possible. Aeschynomene should be planted
as soon as the summer rains begin which is
usually in the first half of June. If planting
is delayed past the middle of June, the
amount of grazing time is reduced due to the
delayed development of the aeschynomene.
For additional information on seeding
method and seeding rate, see the fact sheet
at the web site:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AA189.
Aeschynomene is a summer annual legume
that is adapted to moist flatwoods soils. Do
not plant on drought upland sands.

CGC

Soybean Varieties

We have been asked about soybean varieties
by producers all over the state since prices
of soybeans are around $10 per bushel.
Florida no longer does variety testing with
soybeans but information can be found on
the Georgia web site at
www.griffin.peachnet.edu/swvt
.
There are a lot of good varieties out there
that are Roundup Ready that can be
produced for less than $100 per acre cash
costs. However, make sure there are grain
elevators in the area or at some convenient
location that will accept the soybeans when
they are ready to harvest. Soybeans do not
weather well in the field after maturity and
must be harvested timely.

DLW

Kill Cover Crops Early

Cover crops for strip tilling crops in should
be killed early enough that they do not
deplete subsoil moisture needed for the


summer crop. As cover crops get larger,
they will utilize more soil moisture. Also,
most herbicides take longer to work when
water stressed allowing more soil moisture
to be used. Never plant crops into living
cover crops since they harbor soil insects
and will make the likelihood of having
grasshopper, and cutworm problems more
severe. Data from many of our trials show
reduced yields when planting into living
cover crops since they will compete as
severely as weeds with the crop.

DLW

Prowl H20: Familiar Product, New
Formulation

Prowl 3.3EC is a familiar "yellow dye"
herbicide that has been used to control
annual grasses and small-seeded broadleaf
weeds for many years. Although this
product is relatively inexpensive and very
effective, there are some disadvantages to its
use. The most notable is the yellow staining
of spray tanks, truck beds, clothing, etc.

Prowl H20 is a microencapsulated
formulation of pendimethalin (the active
ingredient of Prowl 3.3EC). The
microencapsulation process forms a thin
polymer layer around the herbicide
molecules. These polymers will then
quickly degrade in soil leaving the active
herbicide molecules available for uptake by
weeds. The polymers also shield the
herbicide molecule from staining spray
tanks, or other surfaces, while in solution.
As an added benefit, microencapsulation
will also greatly reduce pesticide odor.

Prowl H20 is a 3.8 lb/gallon and is currently
labeled for use in Florida at a rate of 2 to 3
pt/A. University research has shown that
Prowl H20 and Prowl 3.3EC provide equal









May. Very early planting and early
development of the crop will not be
possible. Aeschynomene should be planted
as soon as the summer rains begin which is
usually in the first half of June. If planting
is delayed past the middle of June, the
amount of grazing time is reduced due to the
delayed development of the aeschynomene.
For additional information on seeding
method and seeding rate, see the fact sheet
at the web site:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AA189.
Aeschynomene is a summer annual legume
that is adapted to moist flatwoods soils. Do
not plant on drought upland sands.

CGC

Soybean Varieties

We have been asked about soybean varieties
by producers all over the state since prices
of soybeans are around $10 per bushel.
Florida no longer does variety testing with
soybeans but information can be found on
the Georgia web site at
www.griffin.peachnet.edu/swvt
.
There are a lot of good varieties out there
that are Roundup Ready that can be
produced for less than $100 per acre cash
costs. However, make sure there are grain
elevators in the area or at some convenient
location that will accept the soybeans when
they are ready to harvest. Soybeans do not
weather well in the field after maturity and
must be harvested timely.

DLW

Kill Cover Crops Early

Cover crops for strip tilling crops in should
be killed early enough that they do not
deplete subsoil moisture needed for the


summer crop. As cover crops get larger,
they will utilize more soil moisture. Also,
most herbicides take longer to work when
water stressed allowing more soil moisture
to be used. Never plant crops into living
cover crops since they harbor soil insects
and will make the likelihood of having
grasshopper, and cutworm problems more
severe. Data from many of our trials show
reduced yields when planting into living
cover crops since they will compete as
severely as weeds with the crop.

DLW

Prowl H20: Familiar Product, New
Formulation

Prowl 3.3EC is a familiar "yellow dye"
herbicide that has been used to control
annual grasses and small-seeded broadleaf
weeds for many years. Although this
product is relatively inexpensive and very
effective, there are some disadvantages to its
use. The most notable is the yellow staining
of spray tanks, truck beds, clothing, etc.

Prowl H20 is a microencapsulated
formulation of pendimethalin (the active
ingredient of Prowl 3.3EC). The
microencapsulation process forms a thin
polymer layer around the herbicide
molecules. These polymers will then
quickly degrade in soil leaving the active
herbicide molecules available for uptake by
weeds. The polymers also shield the
herbicide molecule from staining spray
tanks, or other surfaces, while in solution.
As an added benefit, microencapsulation
will also greatly reduce pesticide odor.

Prowl H20 is a 3.8 lb/gallon and is currently
labeled for use in Florida at a rate of 2 to 3
pt/A. University research has shown that
Prowl H20 and Prowl 3.3EC provide equal









levels of weed control. Additionally, Prowl
H20 has been shown to be less injurious
than Prowl 3.3EC when applied broadcast to
2-leaf cotton.


There will likely be a price differential
between Prowl H20 and Prowl 3.3EC.
However, calls made to chemical dealers in
Northwest Florida in March found no Prowl
H20 in stock. Therefore, availability for the
2004 growing season will likely be limited.


JAF


Intentions to Plant Report for 2004


According to surveys by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, farmers expect to
plant the following acreage of agronomic crops in 2004:


Florida United States

Crop Acres (x1000) 2004/2003 Acres (x1000) 2004/2003

Corn 65 87 79,004 100

Wheat, all 20 100 59,462 96

Hay, all 250 98 63,731 101

Soybeans 15 115 75,411 103

Peanuts 140 112 1,366 102

Cotton, all 105 112 14,401.6 107

Tobacco, all 4.2 95 414.5 100

In addition to the above survey, farmers in certain states were asked the percentage of their
acreage that will be planted to transgenic varieties. For corn, the acreage in transgenic varieties
will be 46% in 2004, compared to 40% in 2003. The respective figures for cotton and soybeans
are 76% vs. 73% and 86% vs. 81%.

EBW

Updated Publications


SS-AGR-01
SS-AGR-02
SS-AGR-03
SS-AGR-04
SS-AGR-05
SS-AGR-06
SS-AGR-07
SS-AGR-08


Weed Management in Tobacco 2004
Weed Management in Corn 2004
Weed Management in Peanuts 2004
Weed Management in Cotton 2004
Weed Management in Soybeans 2004
Weed Management in Sorghum 2004
Weed Management in Small Grains Harvested for Grain 2004
Weed Management in Pastures and Rangeland 2004









SS-AGR-10
SS-AGR-11
SS-AGR-12
SS-AGR-13
SS-AGR-14
SS-AGR-15
SS-AGR-27
SS-AGR-100
SS-AGR-103

SS-AGR-104
SS-AGR-106
SS-AGR-108
SS-AGR-109
SS-AGR-110
SS-AGR-111
SS-AGR-112
SS-AGR-239


Weed Management in Rice 2004
Weed Management in Transgenic, Herbicide-Resistant Soybeans
Florida's Organo-Auxin Herbicide Rule 2004
Weed Management in Transgenic, Herbicide-Resistant Cotton
Herbicide Prepackage Mixtures 2004
Diagnosing Herbicide Injury 2004
Conversion Factors
Principles of Weed Management
Recrop Intervals for Herbicides Used in Cotton, Corn and Peanut in
Florida
Trade Name, Common Name and Registrant of Some Herbicides
Names and Addresses of Some Herbicide Manufacturers and Formulators
Using Herbicides Safely and Herbicide Toxicity
Adjuvants
Weed Management in Grazed Fence Rows and Non-Cropped Areas
Weed Management in Fence Rows and Non-Cropped Areas
Poison Control Centers
Florida Sugarcane Handbook: Table of Contents


NEW Publications


SS-AGR-212
SS-AGR-213
SS-AGR-214
SS-AGR-216
SS-AGR-217
SS-AGR-218
SS-AGR-219
SS-AGR-220
SS-AGR-221


Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 70-1133
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 72-2086
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 78-1628
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 80-1743
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 80-1827
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 84-1198
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 88-1762
Sucrose Accumulation Maturity Curves for CP 89-2143
Maturity Curves and Harvest Schedule Recommendations for CP
Sugarcane Varieties


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; J.A. Ferrell, Extension Agronomist, M. B. Adjei, Forage
Agronomist, E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist, D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.