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 Table of Contents
 Cotton traits in the U.S.
 Changing trends in U.S. agricu...
 Control spring weeds in hay...
 Fertilizing pastures in hay...
 Overseeding warm season legume...
 Warm season annual grasses and...
 Assigning the peanut base
 Peanut varieties
 Clipping schedule and use of Actigard...
 Tobacco plant bed management
 Transplanting tobacco
 Asian rust soy fungus
 Atrazine IRED outlines monitoring...
 Biotech crop plantings
 EUP for bensulfuron methyl
 Residue tolerance for mesotrio...
 Florida crop values for 2002
 Publications


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00032
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: March 2003
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00032

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Cotton traits in the U.S.
        Page 2
    Changing trends in U.S. agriculture
        Page 2
    Control spring weeds in hay fields
        Page 2
    Fertilizing pastures in hay fields
        Page 2
    Overseeding warm season legume on warm season perennial grass pastures
        Page 3
    Warm season annual grasses and pasture renovation
        Page 3
    Assigning the peanut base
        Page 3
    Peanut varieties
        Page 4
    Clipping schedule and use of Actigard on tobacco plants
        Page 4
    Tobacco plant bed management
        Page 4
    Transplanting tobacco
        Page 5
    Asian rust soy fungus
        Page 5
    Atrazine IRED outlines monitoring program
        Page 5
    Biotech crop plantings
        Page 6
    EUP for bensulfuron methyl
        Page 6
    Residue tolerance for mesotrione
        Page 6
    Florida crop values for 2002
        Page 7
    Publications
        Page 7
Full Text







AGRONOMY
UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDAOTES

IFAS EXTENSION

March 2003
DATES TO REMEMBER
May 8 Forage Field Day, Jay Research Farm
July 8 Agronomy Weed Science Field Day (Deep South Weed Tour), Jay
Research Farm
September 5 Row Crop Field Day, Jay Research Farm

IN THIS ISSUE

COTTON
Cotton Traits in the U.S. ...................................... .......... 2
Changing Trends in U.S. Agriculture ....................................... 2

FORAGE
Control Spring W eeds in Hay Fields ....................................... 2
Fertilizing Pastures and Hay Fields ............. ..................... 2
Overseeding Warm Season Legumes on Warm Season Perennial Grass Pastures ...... 3
Warm Season Annual Grasses and Pasture Renovation ......................... 3

PEANUT
Assigning the Peanut Base ............................................... 3
Peanut V varieties .................................................... 4

TOBACCO
Clipping Schedule and Use of Actigard on Tobacco Plants ....................... 4
Tobacco Plant Bed M management .......................................... 4
Transplanting Tobacco ................................................. 5

MISCELLANEOUS
Asian Rust Soy Fungus ................................................. 5
Atrazine IRED Outlines Monitoring Program ................................ 5
Biotech Crop Plantings ................................................. 6
EUP for Bensulfuron M ethyl ............................................. 6
Residue Tolerance for M esotrione ......................................... 6
Florida Crop Values for 2002 .......................................... 7
Publications .......................................... ........... 7

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide
research, educational information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age,
handicap or national origin. For information on obtaining other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Office. Florida
Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences / University ofFlorida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director.










Fertilizing Pastures and Hay Fields


Almost three quarters of the cotton grown in the
U.S. is transgenic. Of this cotton, about 1/2 is
Roundup Ready (resistant to Roundup) and the other
1/2 is the combined traits of Bt and Roundup Ready.
Less than 5% that is sold is just the Bt trait for
insect resistance.

DLW

Changing Trends in U.S. Agriculture

In 1900 there were 5,739,657 farms with an average
of 147 acres. By the end of the century the number
of farms had dropped to 1,911,859 farms with an
average of 487 acres. This and many other
agricultural statistics can be obtained on line at
Http://www.usda.gov/nass/.

DLW

Control Spring Weeds in Hay Fields

Broadleaf weeds in the first hay crop can sometimes
be a problem. Burning at or just before green up
will control many of the spring weed seedlings. If it
is not possible to burn then a timely application of
herbicide can be used. Banvel, 2,4-D, or the
combination of the two are available for use on grass
hay fields. Banvel (dicamba) at 0.25 lbs plus 2,4-D
at 0.75 lbs per acre usually gives better control than
either herbicide used alone. Annual weeds should be
treated soon after emergence. Perennial weeds (such
as dogfennel) should be allowed to obtain a leaf
surface large enough to allow sufficient spray
coverages (about 12"-18" tall). Individuals using
these herbicides should read the label carefully and
observe all safety precautions. These herbicides can
drift and may cause damage to nearby vegetable
crops. Avoid drift. If there is a vegetable crop
growing adjacent to the hay field, it may be wise to
simply forgo application of the herbicide. See the
publication SS-AGR-08, Weeds in the Sunshine, "
Weed Management in Pastures and Rangeland -
2002", for additional information.


The six soil-supplied nutrients required by plants in
the largest quantities are nitrogen (N), phosphorus
(P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg),
and sulfur (S). Micronutrents, iron, copper, zinc,
manganese, boron, molybdenum, and chlorine, are
also essential but are used by the plant in very small
amounts. The soil can supply the plant with most, if
not all of these nutrients, but often the supply of one
or more of the nutrients is insufficient for optimum
growth.

Nitrogen is the most important fertilizer nutrient
used on grass pastures and hay fields. It is the
nutrient that is most likely to be deficient and
therefore the one that most often results in increased
forage production. Phosphorus may be deficient in
some areas, but some Florida soils are high in native
P. Also, some pasture grasses (such as bahiagrass)
may extract sufficient P from the subsoil, even when
the P level in the surface soil is low. Potassium may
need to be added to some pastures, but in South Fl.,
bahiagrass pastures on flatwoods that receive 50
pounds of nitrogen or less per year have shown little
if any response to potassium fertilization. Under
intensive hay or silage production, where nutrients
are removed from the land, annual applications of P
and K are needed. Where nutrients are being
removed in harvested forage (hay) potassium may
reach critically low levels, where not only plant
growth is reduced, but plants may die. This is
usually indicated by a thinning stand in
bermudagrass hay fields. Potassium can very
qu ickl become deficient; also calcium, magnesium,
sulfur, and some micronutrients may eventually
become deficient after several years of cropping.
Calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and the micronutrients
are seldom a problem in pastures where considerable
recycling of nutrients occurs. (Source: Fl. Forage
Handbook-modified).

CGC


CGC


Cotton Traits in the U.S.










Fertilizing Pastures and Hay Fields


Almost three quarters of the cotton grown in the
U.S. is transgenic. Of this cotton, about 1/2 is
Roundup Ready (resistant to Roundup) and the other
1/2 is the combined traits of Bt and Roundup Ready.
Less than 5% that is sold is just the Bt trait for
insect resistance.

DLW

Changing Trends in U.S. Agriculture

In 1900 there were 5,739,657 farms with an average
of 147 acres. By the end of the century the number
of farms had dropped to 1,911,859 farms with an
average of 487 acres. This and many other
agricultural statistics can be obtained on line at
Http://www.usda.gov/nass/.

DLW

Control Spring Weeds in Hay Fields

Broadleaf weeds in the first hay crop can sometimes
be a problem. Burning at or just before green up
will control many of the spring weed seedlings. If it
is not possible to burn then a timely application of
herbicide can be used. Banvel, 2,4-D, or the
combination of the two are available for use on grass
hay fields. Banvel (dicamba) at 0.25 lbs plus 2,4-D
at 0.75 lbs per acre usually gives better control than
either herbicide used alone. Annual weeds should be
treated soon after emergence. Perennial weeds (such
as dogfennel) should be allowed to obtain a leaf
surface large enough to allow sufficient spray
coverages (about 12"-18" tall). Individuals using
these herbicides should read the label carefully and
observe all safety precautions. These herbicides can
drift and may cause damage to nearby vegetable
crops. Avoid drift. If there is a vegetable crop
growing adjacent to the hay field, it may be wise to
simply forgo application of the herbicide. See the
publication SS-AGR-08, Weeds in the Sunshine, "
Weed Management in Pastures and Rangeland -
2002", for additional information.


The six soil-supplied nutrients required by plants in
the largest quantities are nitrogen (N), phosphorus
(P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg),
and sulfur (S). Micronutrents, iron, copper, zinc,
manganese, boron, molybdenum, and chlorine, are
also essential but are used by the plant in very small
amounts. The soil can supply the plant with most, if
not all of these nutrients, but often the supply of one
or more of the nutrients is insufficient for optimum
growth.

Nitrogen is the most important fertilizer nutrient
used on grass pastures and hay fields. It is the
nutrient that is most likely to be deficient and
therefore the one that most often results in increased
forage production. Phosphorus may be deficient in
some areas, but some Florida soils are high in native
P. Also, some pasture grasses (such as bahiagrass)
may extract sufficient P from the subsoil, even when
the P level in the surface soil is low. Potassium may
need to be added to some pastures, but in South Fl.,
bahiagrass pastures on flatwoods that receive 50
pounds of nitrogen or less per year have shown little
if any response to potassium fertilization. Under
intensive hay or silage production, where nutrients
are removed from the land, annual applications of P
and K are needed. Where nutrients are being
removed in harvested forage (hay) potassium may
reach critically low levels, where not only plant
growth is reduced, but plants may die. This is
usually indicated by a thinning stand in
bermudagrass hay fields. Potassium can very
qu ickl become deficient; also calcium, magnesium,
sulfur, and some micronutrients may eventually
become deficient after several years of cropping.
Calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and the micronutrients
are seldom a problem in pastures where considerable
recycling of nutrients occurs. (Source: Fl. Forage
Handbook-modified).

CGC


CGC


Cotton Traits in the U.S.










Fertilizing Pastures and Hay Fields


Almost three quarters of the cotton grown in the
U.S. is transgenic. Of this cotton, about 1/2 is
Roundup Ready (resistant to Roundup) and the other
1/2 is the combined traits of Bt and Roundup Ready.
Less than 5% that is sold is just the Bt trait for
insect resistance.

DLW

Changing Trends in U.S. Agriculture

In 1900 there were 5,739,657 farms with an average
of 147 acres. By the end of the century the number
of farms had dropped to 1,911,859 farms with an
average of 487 acres. This and many other
agricultural statistics can be obtained on line at
Http://www.usda.gov/nass/.

DLW

Control Spring Weeds in Hay Fields

Broadleaf weeds in the first hay crop can sometimes
be a problem. Burning at or just before green up
will control many of the spring weed seedlings. If it
is not possible to burn then a timely application of
herbicide can be used. Banvel, 2,4-D, or the
combination of the two are available for use on grass
hay fields. Banvel (dicamba) at 0.25 lbs plus 2,4-D
at 0.75 lbs per acre usually gives better control than
either herbicide used alone. Annual weeds should be
treated soon after emergence. Perennial weeds (such
as dogfennel) should be allowed to obtain a leaf
surface large enough to allow sufficient spray
coverages (about 12"-18" tall). Individuals using
these herbicides should read the label carefully and
observe all safety precautions. These herbicides can
drift and may cause damage to nearby vegetable
crops. Avoid drift. If there is a vegetable crop
growing adjacent to the hay field, it may be wise to
simply forgo application of the herbicide. See the
publication SS-AGR-08, Weeds in the Sunshine, "
Weed Management in Pastures and Rangeland -
2002", for additional information.


The six soil-supplied nutrients required by plants in
the largest quantities are nitrogen (N), phosphorus
(P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg),
and sulfur (S). Micronutrents, iron, copper, zinc,
manganese, boron, molybdenum, and chlorine, are
also essential but are used by the plant in very small
amounts. The soil can supply the plant with most, if
not all of these nutrients, but often the supply of one
or more of the nutrients is insufficient for optimum
growth.

Nitrogen is the most important fertilizer nutrient
used on grass pastures and hay fields. It is the
nutrient that is most likely to be deficient and
therefore the one that most often results in increased
forage production. Phosphorus may be deficient in
some areas, but some Florida soils are high in native
P. Also, some pasture grasses (such as bahiagrass)
may extract sufficient P from the subsoil, even when
the P level in the surface soil is low. Potassium may
need to be added to some pastures, but in South Fl.,
bahiagrass pastures on flatwoods that receive 50
pounds of nitrogen or less per year have shown little
if any response to potassium fertilization. Under
intensive hay or silage production, where nutrients
are removed from the land, annual applications of P
and K are needed. Where nutrients are being
removed in harvested forage (hay) potassium may
reach critically low levels, where not only plant
growth is reduced, but plants may die. This is
usually indicated by a thinning stand in
bermudagrass hay fields. Potassium can very
qu ickl become deficient; also calcium, magnesium,
sulfur, and some micronutrients may eventually
become deficient after several years of cropping.
Calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and the micronutrients
are seldom a problem in pastures where considerable
recycling of nutrients occurs. (Source: Fl. Forage
Handbook-modified).

CGC


CGC


Cotton Traits in the U.S.










Fertilizing Pastures and Hay Fields


Almost three quarters of the cotton grown in the
U.S. is transgenic. Of this cotton, about 1/2 is
Roundup Ready (resistant to Roundup) and the other
1/2 is the combined traits of Bt and Roundup Ready.
Less than 5% that is sold is just the Bt trait for
insect resistance.

DLW

Changing Trends in U.S. Agriculture

In 1900 there were 5,739,657 farms with an average
of 147 acres. By the end of the century the number
of farms had dropped to 1,911,859 farms with an
average of 487 acres. This and many other
agricultural statistics can be obtained on line at
Http://www.usda.gov/nass/.

DLW

Control Spring Weeds in Hay Fields

Broadleaf weeds in the first hay crop can sometimes
be a problem. Burning at or just before green up
will control many of the spring weed seedlings. If it
is not possible to burn then a timely application of
herbicide can be used. Banvel, 2,4-D, or the
combination of the two are available for use on grass
hay fields. Banvel (dicamba) at 0.25 lbs plus 2,4-D
at 0.75 lbs per acre usually gives better control than
either herbicide used alone. Annual weeds should be
treated soon after emergence. Perennial weeds (such
as dogfennel) should be allowed to obtain a leaf
surface large enough to allow sufficient spray
coverages (about 12"-18" tall). Individuals using
these herbicides should read the label carefully and
observe all safety precautions. These herbicides can
drift and may cause damage to nearby vegetable
crops. Avoid drift. If there is a vegetable crop
growing adjacent to the hay field, it may be wise to
simply forgo application of the herbicide. See the
publication SS-AGR-08, Weeds in the Sunshine, "
Weed Management in Pastures and Rangeland -
2002", for additional information.


The six soil-supplied nutrients required by plants in
the largest quantities are nitrogen (N), phosphorus
(P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg),
and sulfur (S). Micronutrents, iron, copper, zinc,
manganese, boron, molybdenum, and chlorine, are
also essential but are used by the plant in very small
amounts. The soil can supply the plant with most, if
not all of these nutrients, but often the supply of one
or more of the nutrients is insufficient for optimum
growth.

Nitrogen is the most important fertilizer nutrient
used on grass pastures and hay fields. It is the
nutrient that is most likely to be deficient and
therefore the one that most often results in increased
forage production. Phosphorus may be deficient in
some areas, but some Florida soils are high in native
P. Also, some pasture grasses (such as bahiagrass)
may extract sufficient P from the subsoil, even when
the P level in the surface soil is low. Potassium may
need to be added to some pastures, but in South Fl.,
bahiagrass pastures on flatwoods that receive 50
pounds of nitrogen or less per year have shown little
if any response to potassium fertilization. Under
intensive hay or silage production, where nutrients
are removed from the land, annual applications of P
and K are needed. Where nutrients are being
removed in harvested forage (hay) potassium may
reach critically low levels, where not only plant
growth is reduced, but plants may die. This is
usually indicated by a thinning stand in
bermudagrass hay fields. Potassium can very
qu ickl become deficient; also calcium, magnesium,
sulfur, and some micronutrients may eventually
become deficient after several years of cropping.
Calcium, magnesium, sulfur, and the micronutrients
are seldom a problem in pastures where considerable
recycling of nutrients occurs. (Source: Fl. Forage
Handbook-modified).

CGC


CGC


Cotton Traits in the U.S.










Overseeding Warm Season Legumes on Warm
Season Perennial Grass Pastures

Planing ahead, producers may want to think about
overseeding Aeschynomene americanna (joint vetch
or deer vetch) onto their pastures this spring or early
summer. This may be a good aeschynomene year.
What is a good aeschynomene year? That is a year
when we have above average winter and spring
rainfall. This allows the aeschynomene to start early
from natural reseeding, or decreases the chances of
losing the young seedlings to drought when planted.
In most years seed that germinate during the spring
are lost due to drought and therefore producers delay
planting until the summer rains start. This in turn
delays the date when the annual legume will be ready
to graze, thereby producing a shorter grazing season.
Aeschynomene should only be planted on moist
flatwoods. Savanna stylo, alyceclover, and hairy
indigo can be planted on flatwoods with good
drainage or on upland sands.

CGC

Warm Season Annual Grasses and Pasture
Renovation

The two most popular warm season annual grasses
are pearl millet and sorghum x sudangrass. Both
should be planted on sites that have good drainage,
but sorghum x sudangrass will tolerate wet,
saturated soil conditions better than pearl millet.
Therefore, it may be the better choice on some
flatwoods sites. These grasses should not be planted
until the soil is warm. The earliest planting date is
usually mid March to mid April.

When or where should these crops be used? These
crops can be useful in a pasture renovation program.
For instance, if you desire to convert an old rundown
bahiagrass pasture to an improved more productive
grass such as Tifton-9 bahiagrass, it might be
desirable to till and plant the land to a summer
annual grass or some other crop for one or more
seasons before planting the Tifton-9. The summer
annual grass can be followed in the fall with a cool
season annual such as ryegrass or a small grain.
The Tifton-9 would then be planted in June


following the ryegrass. This process would involve
soil tillage and seedbed preparation before each crop
is planted. The multiple tillage operations should
eliminate most of the old pasture grass and grass
seed. This process involves considerable expense;
therefore, the producer must make good use of the
forage produced from the annuals.

The summer annuals will grow rapidly during hot
weather and may be ready to graze in 35 to 40 days
after planting. They are very productive if fertilized
properly and can provide high quality grazing. The
most efficient use of these pastures can be had by
grazing young animals such as developing heifers or
stockers that require a higher quality forage than
that required by mature animals. Also, be prepared
to graze rotationally. Remember, do not graze
sorghum x sudangrass until it is 24 inches tall or
taller. This is due to the prussic acid (HCN)
poisoning problem that can occur in very young
plants. Prussic acid is not a problem in pearl millet.

One complaint about summer annuals is that they
can produce too much growth and will "get away
from you." They do require a high stocking rate.
When excess growth occurs, move young animals to
a fresh pasture and let the mature cow herd clean up
behind them. Stems may need to be mowed after
grazing.

CGC

Assigning the Peanut Base

March 31 is the deadline for farmers to go to their
local Farm Service Agency office and assign their
peanut base acres to a particular farm. The base
does not have to go to the farm on which it was
generated, but must remain on the assigned farm
through 2007, the life of the current farm bill. The
total of all crop bases (cotton, grains, and peanuts)
cannot exceed the acres of crop land on the farm.
Certain payments to growers are determined by the
base acreage. Peanut growers should contact their
local FSA office for details.

EBW










Overseeding Warm Season Legumes on Warm
Season Perennial Grass Pastures

Planing ahead, producers may want to think about
overseeding Aeschynomene americanna (joint vetch
or deer vetch) onto their pastures this spring or early
summer. This may be a good aeschynomene year.
What is a good aeschynomene year? That is a year
when we have above average winter and spring
rainfall. This allows the aeschynomene to start early
from natural reseeding, or decreases the chances of
losing the young seedlings to drought when planted.
In most years seed that germinate during the spring
are lost due to drought and therefore producers delay
planting until the summer rains start. This in turn
delays the date when the annual legume will be ready
to graze, thereby producing a shorter grazing season.
Aeschynomene should only be planted on moist
flatwoods. Savanna stylo, alyceclover, and hairy
indigo can be planted on flatwoods with good
drainage or on upland sands.

CGC

Warm Season Annual Grasses and Pasture
Renovation

The two most popular warm season annual grasses
are pearl millet and sorghum x sudangrass. Both
should be planted on sites that have good drainage,
but sorghum x sudangrass will tolerate wet,
saturated soil conditions better than pearl millet.
Therefore, it may be the better choice on some
flatwoods sites. These grasses should not be planted
until the soil is warm. The earliest planting date is
usually mid March to mid April.

When or where should these crops be used? These
crops can be useful in a pasture renovation program.
For instance, if you desire to convert an old rundown
bahiagrass pasture to an improved more productive
grass such as Tifton-9 bahiagrass, it might be
desirable to till and plant the land to a summer
annual grass or some other crop for one or more
seasons before planting the Tifton-9. The summer
annual grass can be followed in the fall with a cool
season annual such as ryegrass or a small grain.
The Tifton-9 would then be planted in June


following the ryegrass. This process would involve
soil tillage and seedbed preparation before each crop
is planted. The multiple tillage operations should
eliminate most of the old pasture grass and grass
seed. This process involves considerable expense;
therefore, the producer must make good use of the
forage produced from the annuals.

The summer annuals will grow rapidly during hot
weather and may be ready to graze in 35 to 40 days
after planting. They are very productive if fertilized
properly and can provide high quality grazing. The
most efficient use of these pastures can be had by
grazing young animals such as developing heifers or
stockers that require a higher quality forage than
that required by mature animals. Also, be prepared
to graze rotationally. Remember, do not graze
sorghum x sudangrass until it is 24 inches tall or
taller. This is due to the prussic acid (HCN)
poisoning problem that can occur in very young
plants. Prussic acid is not a problem in pearl millet.

One complaint about summer annuals is that they
can produce too much growth and will "get away
from you." They do require a high stocking rate.
When excess growth occurs, move young animals to
a fresh pasture and let the mature cow herd clean up
behind them. Stems may need to be mowed after
grazing.

CGC

Assigning the Peanut Base

March 31 is the deadline for farmers to go to their
local Farm Service Agency office and assign their
peanut base acres to a particular farm. The base
does not have to go to the farm on which it was
generated, but must remain on the assigned farm
through 2007, the life of the current farm bill. The
total of all crop bases (cotton, grains, and peanuts)
cannot exceed the acres of crop land on the farm.
Certain payments to growers are determined by the
base acreage. Peanut growers should contact their
local FSA office for details.

EBW










Overseeding Warm Season Legumes on Warm
Season Perennial Grass Pastures

Planing ahead, producers may want to think about
overseeding Aeschynomene americanna (joint vetch
or deer vetch) onto their pastures this spring or early
summer. This may be a good aeschynomene year.
What is a good aeschynomene year? That is a year
when we have above average winter and spring
rainfall. This allows the aeschynomene to start early
from natural reseeding, or decreases the chances of
losing the young seedlings to drought when planted.
In most years seed that germinate during the spring
are lost due to drought and therefore producers delay
planting until the summer rains start. This in turn
delays the date when the annual legume will be ready
to graze, thereby producing a shorter grazing season.
Aeschynomene should only be planted on moist
flatwoods. Savanna stylo, alyceclover, and hairy
indigo can be planted on flatwoods with good
drainage or on upland sands.

CGC

Warm Season Annual Grasses and Pasture
Renovation

The two most popular warm season annual grasses
are pearl millet and sorghum x sudangrass. Both
should be planted on sites that have good drainage,
but sorghum x sudangrass will tolerate wet,
saturated soil conditions better than pearl millet.
Therefore, it may be the better choice on some
flatwoods sites. These grasses should not be planted
until the soil is warm. The earliest planting date is
usually mid March to mid April.

When or where should these crops be used? These
crops can be useful in a pasture renovation program.
For instance, if you desire to convert an old rundown
bahiagrass pasture to an improved more productive
grass such as Tifton-9 bahiagrass, it might be
desirable to till and plant the land to a summer
annual grass or some other crop for one or more
seasons before planting the Tifton-9. The summer
annual grass can be followed in the fall with a cool
season annual such as ryegrass or a small grain.
The Tifton-9 would then be planted in June


following the ryegrass. This process would involve
soil tillage and seedbed preparation before each crop
is planted. The multiple tillage operations should
eliminate most of the old pasture grass and grass
seed. This process involves considerable expense;
therefore, the producer must make good use of the
forage produced from the annuals.

The summer annuals will grow rapidly during hot
weather and may be ready to graze in 35 to 40 days
after planting. They are very productive if fertilized
properly and can provide high quality grazing. The
most efficient use of these pastures can be had by
grazing young animals such as developing heifers or
stockers that require a higher quality forage than
that required by mature animals. Also, be prepared
to graze rotationally. Remember, do not graze
sorghum x sudangrass until it is 24 inches tall or
taller. This is due to the prussic acid (HCN)
poisoning problem that can occur in very young
plants. Prussic acid is not a problem in pearl millet.

One complaint about summer annuals is that they
can produce too much growth and will "get away
from you." They do require a high stocking rate.
When excess growth occurs, move young animals to
a fresh pasture and let the mature cow herd clean up
behind them. Stems may need to be mowed after
grazing.

CGC

Assigning the Peanut Base

March 31 is the deadline for farmers to go to their
local Farm Service Agency office and assign their
peanut base acres to a particular farm. The base
does not have to go to the farm on which it was
generated, but must remain on the assigned farm
through 2007, the life of the current farm bill. The
total of all crop bases (cotton, grains, and peanuts)
cannot exceed the acres of crop land on the farm.
Certain payments to growers are determined by the
base acreage. Peanut growers should contact their
local FSA office for details.

EBW










Peanut Varieties

Several new peanut varieties are available for
planting in 2003, but seed supplies may be limited.
Six new varieties were released in 2002 by the
University of Florida: Andru II, DP-1, GP-1,
Carver, Hull, and Norden. The University of
Georgia has released Georgia-01R and Georgia-
02C. Increased disease resistance is a major feature
of most of the newer varieties, and improved oil
quality is also available in some of them. Seed
supplies of older varieties, such as C-99R and
Georgia Green, should be adequate to meet demand.
In tests at Marianna, where tomato spotted wilt virus
(TSWV) is severe, C-99R, DP-1, Hull, Andru II and
Norden have produced good yields. In the
Gainesville area (Green/Pine Acres) where TSWV
has not been a major problem, varieties with less
resistance have performed well. Variety test results
are available in Marianna NFREC Research Report
03-1.

EBW

Clipping Schedule and Use of Actigard on
Tobacco Plants

Florida has received a special local need or state
label for the sale and use of Actigard in greenhouse
or plant bed production of tobacco plants. Use of
Actigard at this stage of growth has been shown to
reduce the incidence of tomato spotted wilt virus
(TSWV) throughout the season. Actigard has been
and is still labeled for later applications to control
blue mold. To use Actigard for TSWV control, the
grower should get a Waiver of Liability and
Indemnification Agreement from the Flue-Cured
Tobacco Stabilization Corporation Cooperative at:
http://www.ustobaccofarmer. com and then return the
signed and notarized application to get a copy of the
label.

Growers that plan to use Actigard in the greenhouse
or plant bed should apply the material 5-7 days
before transplanting. Plants should be about
transplanting size when they are sprayed with
Actigard because growth will be slower after
treatment. Therefore the plants should receive the


final clipping a few days before the Actigard is
applied in order for them to be about transplanting
size at treatment. Also be sure to transplant on the
same day the plants are pulled as there have been
some reports of poor stands when plants are held for
a period of time between pulling and transplanting.
Treated plants may not resume growth as fast after
transplanting as untreated plants and stress
conditions, such as dry weather, may add to this
slower growth. Plan on a "once over" pulling, as the
plants that are too small for transplanting at the time
of Actigard application will probably be unusable.

EBW

Tobacco Plant Bed Management

It is important to protect plants from diseases,
insects, and nutrient problems as the transplanting
period is near and healthy plants are needed to get
the crop off to a good start. Diseases that often
develop include damping-off and blue mold.
Dithane is labeled for use in plant beds and
applications according to the label prior to infection
can prevent or greatly reduce losses to blue mold
and damping-off. Preventive applications in the
plant bed are much more economical and effective
than having to rely on applications to transplanted
tobacco. The same would be true for insect control,
as preventive applications of Orthene or other
insecticides can insure that aphids and perhaps
budworms are not carried to the field on the
transplants. Vegetable weevils and cutworms in the
plant bed would also be controlled and result in
healthier transplants. If the plants are nitrogen
deficient, 3 to 5 pounds of nitrate of soda or
comparable product per 100 square yards should be
beneficial. If magnesium or sulfur are deficient, 3 to
5 pounds of magnesium sulfate or Epsom salts
should restore the green color and good growth.
Irrigate as needed, but do not use excessive
irrigation as blue mold is favored by excess
moisture. Clip the plants as needed to prevent
excessive growth and to get uniform plants. Clipped
plants are easier to pull and reduces labor
requirements.

EBW










Peanut Varieties

Several new peanut varieties are available for
planting in 2003, but seed supplies may be limited.
Six new varieties were released in 2002 by the
University of Florida: Andru II, DP-1, GP-1,
Carver, Hull, and Norden. The University of
Georgia has released Georgia-01R and Georgia-
02C. Increased disease resistance is a major feature
of most of the newer varieties, and improved oil
quality is also available in some of them. Seed
supplies of older varieties, such as C-99R and
Georgia Green, should be adequate to meet demand.
In tests at Marianna, where tomato spotted wilt virus
(TSWV) is severe, C-99R, DP-1, Hull, Andru II and
Norden have produced good yields. In the
Gainesville area (Green/Pine Acres) where TSWV
has not been a major problem, varieties with less
resistance have performed well. Variety test results
are available in Marianna NFREC Research Report
03-1.

EBW

Clipping Schedule and Use of Actigard on
Tobacco Plants

Florida has received a special local need or state
label for the sale and use of Actigard in greenhouse
or plant bed production of tobacco plants. Use of
Actigard at this stage of growth has been shown to
reduce the incidence of tomato spotted wilt virus
(TSWV) throughout the season. Actigard has been
and is still labeled for later applications to control
blue mold. To use Actigard for TSWV control, the
grower should get a Waiver of Liability and
Indemnification Agreement from the Flue-Cured
Tobacco Stabilization Corporation Cooperative at:
http://www.ustobaccofarmer. com and then return the
signed and notarized application to get a copy of the
label.

Growers that plan to use Actigard in the greenhouse
or plant bed should apply the material 5-7 days
before transplanting. Plants should be about
transplanting size when they are sprayed with
Actigard because growth will be slower after
treatment. Therefore the plants should receive the


final clipping a few days before the Actigard is
applied in order for them to be about transplanting
size at treatment. Also be sure to transplant on the
same day the plants are pulled as there have been
some reports of poor stands when plants are held for
a period of time between pulling and transplanting.
Treated plants may not resume growth as fast after
transplanting as untreated plants and stress
conditions, such as dry weather, may add to this
slower growth. Plan on a "once over" pulling, as the
plants that are too small for transplanting at the time
of Actigard application will probably be unusable.

EBW

Tobacco Plant Bed Management

It is important to protect plants from diseases,
insects, and nutrient problems as the transplanting
period is near and healthy plants are needed to get
the crop off to a good start. Diseases that often
develop include damping-off and blue mold.
Dithane is labeled for use in plant beds and
applications according to the label prior to infection
can prevent or greatly reduce losses to blue mold
and damping-off. Preventive applications in the
plant bed are much more economical and effective
than having to rely on applications to transplanted
tobacco. The same would be true for insect control,
as preventive applications of Orthene or other
insecticides can insure that aphids and perhaps
budworms are not carried to the field on the
transplants. Vegetable weevils and cutworms in the
plant bed would also be controlled and result in
healthier transplants. If the plants are nitrogen
deficient, 3 to 5 pounds of nitrate of soda or
comparable product per 100 square yards should be
beneficial. If magnesium or sulfur are deficient, 3 to
5 pounds of magnesium sulfate or Epsom salts
should restore the green color and good growth.
Irrigate as needed, but do not use excessive
irrigation as blue mold is favored by excess
moisture. Clip the plants as needed to prevent
excessive growth and to get uniform plants. Clipped
plants are easier to pull and reduces labor
requirements.

EBW










Peanut Varieties

Several new peanut varieties are available for
planting in 2003, but seed supplies may be limited.
Six new varieties were released in 2002 by the
University of Florida: Andru II, DP-1, GP-1,
Carver, Hull, and Norden. The University of
Georgia has released Georgia-01R and Georgia-
02C. Increased disease resistance is a major feature
of most of the newer varieties, and improved oil
quality is also available in some of them. Seed
supplies of older varieties, such as C-99R and
Georgia Green, should be adequate to meet demand.
In tests at Marianna, where tomato spotted wilt virus
(TSWV) is severe, C-99R, DP-1, Hull, Andru II and
Norden have produced good yields. In the
Gainesville area (Green/Pine Acres) where TSWV
has not been a major problem, varieties with less
resistance have performed well. Variety test results
are available in Marianna NFREC Research Report
03-1.

EBW

Clipping Schedule and Use of Actigard on
Tobacco Plants

Florida has received a special local need or state
label for the sale and use of Actigard in greenhouse
or plant bed production of tobacco plants. Use of
Actigard at this stage of growth has been shown to
reduce the incidence of tomato spotted wilt virus
(TSWV) throughout the season. Actigard has been
and is still labeled for later applications to control
blue mold. To use Actigard for TSWV control, the
grower should get a Waiver of Liability and
Indemnification Agreement from the Flue-Cured
Tobacco Stabilization Corporation Cooperative at:
http://www.ustobaccofarmer. com and then return the
signed and notarized application to get a copy of the
label.

Growers that plan to use Actigard in the greenhouse
or plant bed should apply the material 5-7 days
before transplanting. Plants should be about
transplanting size when they are sprayed with
Actigard because growth will be slower after
treatment. Therefore the plants should receive the


final clipping a few days before the Actigard is
applied in order for them to be about transplanting
size at treatment. Also be sure to transplant on the
same day the plants are pulled as there have been
some reports of poor stands when plants are held for
a period of time between pulling and transplanting.
Treated plants may not resume growth as fast after
transplanting as untreated plants and stress
conditions, such as dry weather, may add to this
slower growth. Plan on a "once over" pulling, as the
plants that are too small for transplanting at the time
of Actigard application will probably be unusable.

EBW

Tobacco Plant Bed Management

It is important to protect plants from diseases,
insects, and nutrient problems as the transplanting
period is near and healthy plants are needed to get
the crop off to a good start. Diseases that often
develop include damping-off and blue mold.
Dithane is labeled for use in plant beds and
applications according to the label prior to infection
can prevent or greatly reduce losses to blue mold
and damping-off. Preventive applications in the
plant bed are much more economical and effective
than having to rely on applications to transplanted
tobacco. The same would be true for insect control,
as preventive applications of Orthene or other
insecticides can insure that aphids and perhaps
budworms are not carried to the field on the
transplants. Vegetable weevils and cutworms in the
plant bed would also be controlled and result in
healthier transplants. If the plants are nitrogen
deficient, 3 to 5 pounds of nitrate of soda or
comparable product per 100 square yards should be
beneficial. If magnesium or sulfur are deficient, 3 to
5 pounds of magnesium sulfate or Epsom salts
should restore the green color and good growth.
Irrigate as needed, but do not use excessive
irrigation as blue mold is favored by excess
moisture. Clip the plants as needed to prevent
excessive growth and to get uniform plants. Clipped
plants are easier to pull and reduces labor
requirements.

EBW










Transplanting Tobacco


Most of Florida's tobacco is transplanted in March
or early April. Establishing a good stand of uniform
plants will pay dividends in that cultivation,
spraying, and harvesting will be easier and more
efficient than is the case with non-uniform stands.
Field preparation, to include fumigation and
incorporation of herbicides, insecticides, and
fungicides, should have resulted in uniform mixtures
of the chemicals with the soil. Non-uniform
application of pesticides could result in stunting or
death of plants due to excessive rates, or a lack of
pest control if the chemical rate is below
recommendations. The transplanter should be
adjusted so that plants are planted uniformly in the
row. Use adequate water to insure good contact of
the soil and roots of the transplants. Including an
insecticide in the transplant water will provide
control of cutworms, mole crickets, wire worms,
and other insect pests that could reduce stands.
Depending on the selected insecticide, early season
control of tomato spotted wilt virus, aphids,
budworms, and other pests may also be obtained.

EBW

Asian Rust Soy Fungus

On January 22, Brazilian sources were cited as
reporting that Asian rust soy fungus, which damaged
400,000 hectares (988,000 acres) of Brazil's soy
area in 2001/02, was found in the new crop in Sao
Paulo state, adding, "It was found in a field in
Itapeva which was immediately sprayed with
fungicide. Yields won't be affected." However, the
presence of the outbreak means that spores of the
phakospora fungus are in the atmosphere and could
be spread by wind to other soy areas, sapping the
potential of plants to produce soybeans, Brazil's top
farm export earner. Although Sao Paulo is a minor
soybean producing state, it is next to Parana, the
country's No. 2 soy state. (Reuters, 1/22/03 via
AgNet).

MAM


Atrazine IRED Outlines Monitoring Program

On January 31, the EPA released the atrazine
Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decision (IRED)
and announced an innovative and aggressive
program to protect vulnerable community drinking
water systems from contamination by atrazine. The
announcement by the Agency involves intensive,
targeted monitoring of raw water entering certain
community water systems in areas of atrazine use.
"After the most extensive analysis ever conducted on
atrazine, EPA has designed a protective, early alert
system to implement rigorous monitoring and fine-
tuned safeguards to protect drinking water in the
communities where atrazine is used," said Stephen
L. Johnson, EPA's Assistant Administrator for the
Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic
Substances. "For the most vulnerable watersheds, if
the testing shows higher levels of atrazine than we
consider acceptable, use of the product will be
prohibited in that area."

Under this approach the main registrant of atrazine,
Syngenta, is required to conduct a specialized testing
program in vulnerable watersheds on a weekly basis
to monitor "raw" drinking water during high-use
periods for this pesticide. If the Agency's regulatory
safety standards are exceeded in raw drinking water,
atrazine use is canceled in that geographic area.
This more stringent approach requiring weekly
monitoring of "raw" drinking water during certain
times of the year augments monitoring conducted
under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of
"finished" drinking water. For all other areas where
atrazine might be used, monitoring of finished
drinking water for atrazine is routinely required
under the SDWA. For these systems, detections
approaching the Maximum Contaminant Level for
atrazine will trigger additional monitoring and
regulatory oversight.

In the IRED, the Agency has concluded that atrazine
may continue to be used, provided all the
precautions and the new specific measures are
implemented to reduce risks to drinking water.
These new measures will help ensure the continued
protection of drinking water. The Agency has
concluded that risks associated with exposures from










Transplanting Tobacco


Most of Florida's tobacco is transplanted in March
or early April. Establishing a good stand of uniform
plants will pay dividends in that cultivation,
spraying, and harvesting will be easier and more
efficient than is the case with non-uniform stands.
Field preparation, to include fumigation and
incorporation of herbicides, insecticides, and
fungicides, should have resulted in uniform mixtures
of the chemicals with the soil. Non-uniform
application of pesticides could result in stunting or
death of plants due to excessive rates, or a lack of
pest control if the chemical rate is below
recommendations. The transplanter should be
adjusted so that plants are planted uniformly in the
row. Use adequate water to insure good contact of
the soil and roots of the transplants. Including an
insecticide in the transplant water will provide
control of cutworms, mole crickets, wire worms,
and other insect pests that could reduce stands.
Depending on the selected insecticide, early season
control of tomato spotted wilt virus, aphids,
budworms, and other pests may also be obtained.

EBW

Asian Rust Soy Fungus

On January 22, Brazilian sources were cited as
reporting that Asian rust soy fungus, which damaged
400,000 hectares (988,000 acres) of Brazil's soy
area in 2001/02, was found in the new crop in Sao
Paulo state, adding, "It was found in a field in
Itapeva which was immediately sprayed with
fungicide. Yields won't be affected." However, the
presence of the outbreak means that spores of the
phakospora fungus are in the atmosphere and could
be spread by wind to other soy areas, sapping the
potential of plants to produce soybeans, Brazil's top
farm export earner. Although Sao Paulo is a minor
soybean producing state, it is next to Parana, the
country's No. 2 soy state. (Reuters, 1/22/03 via
AgNet).

MAM


Atrazine IRED Outlines Monitoring Program

On January 31, the EPA released the atrazine
Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decision (IRED)
and announced an innovative and aggressive
program to protect vulnerable community drinking
water systems from contamination by atrazine. The
announcement by the Agency involves intensive,
targeted monitoring of raw water entering certain
community water systems in areas of atrazine use.
"After the most extensive analysis ever conducted on
atrazine, EPA has designed a protective, early alert
system to implement rigorous monitoring and fine-
tuned safeguards to protect drinking water in the
communities where atrazine is used," said Stephen
L. Johnson, EPA's Assistant Administrator for the
Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic
Substances. "For the most vulnerable watersheds, if
the testing shows higher levels of atrazine than we
consider acceptable, use of the product will be
prohibited in that area."

Under this approach the main registrant of atrazine,
Syngenta, is required to conduct a specialized testing
program in vulnerable watersheds on a weekly basis
to monitor "raw" drinking water during high-use
periods for this pesticide. If the Agency's regulatory
safety standards are exceeded in raw drinking water,
atrazine use is canceled in that geographic area.
This more stringent approach requiring weekly
monitoring of "raw" drinking water during certain
times of the year augments monitoring conducted
under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of
"finished" drinking water. For all other areas where
atrazine might be used, monitoring of finished
drinking water for atrazine is routinely required
under the SDWA. For these systems, detections
approaching the Maximum Contaminant Level for
atrazine will trigger additional monitoring and
regulatory oversight.

In the IRED, the Agency has concluded that atrazine
may continue to be used, provided all the
precautions and the new specific measures are
implemented to reduce risks to drinking water.
These new measures will help ensure the continued
protection of drinking water. The Agency has
concluded that risks associated with exposures from










Transplanting Tobacco


Most of Florida's tobacco is transplanted in March
or early April. Establishing a good stand of uniform
plants will pay dividends in that cultivation,
spraying, and harvesting will be easier and more
efficient than is the case with non-uniform stands.
Field preparation, to include fumigation and
incorporation of herbicides, insecticides, and
fungicides, should have resulted in uniform mixtures
of the chemicals with the soil. Non-uniform
application of pesticides could result in stunting or
death of plants due to excessive rates, or a lack of
pest control if the chemical rate is below
recommendations. The transplanter should be
adjusted so that plants are planted uniformly in the
row. Use adequate water to insure good contact of
the soil and roots of the transplants. Including an
insecticide in the transplant water will provide
control of cutworms, mole crickets, wire worms,
and other insect pests that could reduce stands.
Depending on the selected insecticide, early season
control of tomato spotted wilt virus, aphids,
budworms, and other pests may also be obtained.

EBW

Asian Rust Soy Fungus

On January 22, Brazilian sources were cited as
reporting that Asian rust soy fungus, which damaged
400,000 hectares (988,000 acres) of Brazil's soy
area in 2001/02, was found in the new crop in Sao
Paulo state, adding, "It was found in a field in
Itapeva which was immediately sprayed with
fungicide. Yields won't be affected." However, the
presence of the outbreak means that spores of the
phakospora fungus are in the atmosphere and could
be spread by wind to other soy areas, sapping the
potential of plants to produce soybeans, Brazil's top
farm export earner. Although Sao Paulo is a minor
soybean producing state, it is next to Parana, the
country's No. 2 soy state. (Reuters, 1/22/03 via
AgNet).

MAM


Atrazine IRED Outlines Monitoring Program

On January 31, the EPA released the atrazine
Interim Reregistration Eligibility Decision (IRED)
and announced an innovative and aggressive
program to protect vulnerable community drinking
water systems from contamination by atrazine. The
announcement by the Agency involves intensive,
targeted monitoring of raw water entering certain
community water systems in areas of atrazine use.
"After the most extensive analysis ever conducted on
atrazine, EPA has designed a protective, early alert
system to implement rigorous monitoring and fine-
tuned safeguards to protect drinking water in the
communities where atrazine is used," said Stephen
L. Johnson, EPA's Assistant Administrator for the
Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic
Substances. "For the most vulnerable watersheds, if
the testing shows higher levels of atrazine than we
consider acceptable, use of the product will be
prohibited in that area."

Under this approach the main registrant of atrazine,
Syngenta, is required to conduct a specialized testing
program in vulnerable watersheds on a weekly basis
to monitor "raw" drinking water during high-use
periods for this pesticide. If the Agency's regulatory
safety standards are exceeded in raw drinking water,
atrazine use is canceled in that geographic area.
This more stringent approach requiring weekly
monitoring of "raw" drinking water during certain
times of the year augments monitoring conducted
under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of
"finished" drinking water. For all other areas where
atrazine might be used, monitoring of finished
drinking water for atrazine is routinely required
under the SDWA. For these systems, detections
approaching the Maximum Contaminant Level for
atrazine will trigger additional monitoring and
regulatory oversight.

In the IRED, the Agency has concluded that atrazine
may continue to be used, provided all the
precautions and the new specific measures are
implemented to reduce risks to drinking water.
These new measures will help ensure the continued
protection of drinking water. The Agency has
concluded that risks associated with exposures from










food are not of concern. Exposure from residential
uses and exposure to workers are low and have been
addressed by changes in product use conditions.
The Agency is continuing to evaluate the potential
effects of atrazine on amphibians, which continue to
be the subject of additional research and analysis.
EPA intends to submit the issue of atrazine effects
on amphibians for independent scientific peer review
by the FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel in June, and
the Agency anticipates completion of an amended
IRED, including consideration of effects on
amphibians, by October 31, 2003. (EPA Pesticide
Program Update, 2/3/03).

MAM

Biotech Crop Plantings

A survey released on January 22 was cited as
finding that American farmers are poised to boost
plantings of biotech corn by nearly 10 percent this
year amid growing U.S. pressure on the European
Union to lift a ban on imports of genetically
modified crops. The story says that the straw poll of
340 growers, conducted at the American Farm
Bureau Federation's annual meeting, estimated that
U.S. 2003 plantings for Roundup Ready corn will
jump by 9.9 percent and Roundup Ready soybeans
by 8.4 percent. B.t. corn plantings posted the only
decline among the five major biotech crops included
on the survey, falling 3.8 percent. Gene-altered
cotton plantings will also rise in 2003, according to
the survey. Roundup Ready cotton plantings will
be up 4.0 percent, while B.t. cotton will rise by 5.2
percent. The story cites U.S. Agriculture
Department data as saying that 34 percent of corn in


2002 was grown with biotech seeds, up from 26
percent a year earlier. Biotech soybeans rose to 75
percent of the total U.S. soybean crop in 2002, up
from 68 percent in the previous year. Biotech cotton
accounted for 71 percent of the crop in 2002, up 2
percent from 2001. Nearly half of U.S. farmers
polled in the same survey said they were undecided
or opposed to growing biotech crops engineered to
produce drugs for ailments like diabetes, with 13
percent opposed to planting pharmaceutical crops
and half saying they would consider planting the new
kinds of crops, which are expected to command
premium prices. Another 35 percent of growers said
they needed more information about health and
safety issues before deciding whether to grow them.
(Reuters, 1/22/03 via AgNet).

MAM

EUP for Bensulfuron Methyl

FDACS has issued an experimental use permit for
bensulfuron methyl (Londax) herbicide (EPA Reg.
# 352-506) and assigned it the number FL03-EUP-
1, which is authorized though January 30, 2004.
The product is used for control of weeds in rice.
(FDACS letter of 1/30/03).

MAM

Residue Tolerance for Mesotrione

Based on work by IR-4, tolerances were received for
residues of the herbicide mesotrione in or on pop
corn grain/stover (0.01 ppm). (Federal Register,
1/3/03).


MAM










food are not of concern. Exposure from residential
uses and exposure to workers are low and have been
addressed by changes in product use conditions.
The Agency is continuing to evaluate the potential
effects of atrazine on amphibians, which continue to
be the subject of additional research and analysis.
EPA intends to submit the issue of atrazine effects
on amphibians for independent scientific peer review
by the FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel in June, and
the Agency anticipates completion of an amended
IRED, including consideration of effects on
amphibians, by October 31, 2003. (EPA Pesticide
Program Update, 2/3/03).

MAM

Biotech Crop Plantings

A survey released on January 22 was cited as
finding that American farmers are poised to boost
plantings of biotech corn by nearly 10 percent this
year amid growing U.S. pressure on the European
Union to lift a ban on imports of genetically
modified crops. The story says that the straw poll of
340 growers, conducted at the American Farm
Bureau Federation's annual meeting, estimated that
U.S. 2003 plantings for Roundup Ready corn will
jump by 9.9 percent and Roundup Ready soybeans
by 8.4 percent. B.t. corn plantings posted the only
decline among the five major biotech crops included
on the survey, falling 3.8 percent. Gene-altered
cotton plantings will also rise in 2003, according to
the survey. Roundup Ready cotton plantings will
be up 4.0 percent, while B.t. cotton will rise by 5.2
percent. The story cites U.S. Agriculture
Department data as saying that 34 percent of corn in


2002 was grown with biotech seeds, up from 26
percent a year earlier. Biotech soybeans rose to 75
percent of the total U.S. soybean crop in 2002, up
from 68 percent in the previous year. Biotech cotton
accounted for 71 percent of the crop in 2002, up 2
percent from 2001. Nearly half of U.S. farmers
polled in the same survey said they were undecided
or opposed to growing biotech crops engineered to
produce drugs for ailments like diabetes, with 13
percent opposed to planting pharmaceutical crops
and half saying they would consider planting the new
kinds of crops, which are expected to command
premium prices. Another 35 percent of growers said
they needed more information about health and
safety issues before deciding whether to grow them.
(Reuters, 1/22/03 via AgNet).

MAM

EUP for Bensulfuron Methyl

FDACS has issued an experimental use permit for
bensulfuron methyl (Londax) herbicide (EPA Reg.
# 352-506) and assigned it the number FL03-EUP-
1, which is authorized though January 30, 2004.
The product is used for control of weeds in rice.
(FDACS letter of 1/30/03).

MAM

Residue Tolerance for Mesotrione

Based on work by IR-4, tolerances were received for
residues of the herbicide mesotrione in or on pop
corn grain/stover (0.01 ppm). (Federal Register,
1/3/03).


MAM










food are not of concern. Exposure from residential
uses and exposure to workers are low and have been
addressed by changes in product use conditions.
The Agency is continuing to evaluate the potential
effects of atrazine on amphibians, which continue to
be the subject of additional research and analysis.
EPA intends to submit the issue of atrazine effects
on amphibians for independent scientific peer review
by the FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel in June, and
the Agency anticipates completion of an amended
IRED, including consideration of effects on
amphibians, by October 31, 2003. (EPA Pesticide
Program Update, 2/3/03).

MAM

Biotech Crop Plantings

A survey released on January 22 was cited as
finding that American farmers are poised to boost
plantings of biotech corn by nearly 10 percent this
year amid growing U.S. pressure on the European
Union to lift a ban on imports of genetically
modified crops. The story says that the straw poll of
340 growers, conducted at the American Farm
Bureau Federation's annual meeting, estimated that
U.S. 2003 plantings for Roundup Ready corn will
jump by 9.9 percent and Roundup Ready soybeans
by 8.4 percent. B.t. corn plantings posted the only
decline among the five major biotech crops included
on the survey, falling 3.8 percent. Gene-altered
cotton plantings will also rise in 2003, according to
the survey. Roundup Ready cotton plantings will
be up 4.0 percent, while B.t. cotton will rise by 5.2
percent. The story cites U.S. Agriculture
Department data as saying that 34 percent of corn in


2002 was grown with biotech seeds, up from 26
percent a year earlier. Biotech soybeans rose to 75
percent of the total U.S. soybean crop in 2002, up
from 68 percent in the previous year. Biotech cotton
accounted for 71 percent of the crop in 2002, up 2
percent from 2001. Nearly half of U.S. farmers
polled in the same survey said they were undecided
or opposed to growing biotech crops engineered to
produce drugs for ailments like diabetes, with 13
percent opposed to planting pharmaceutical crops
and half saying they would consider planting the new
kinds of crops, which are expected to command
premium prices. Another 35 percent of growers said
they needed more information about health and
safety issues before deciding whether to grow them.
(Reuters, 1/22/03 via AgNet).

MAM

EUP for Bensulfuron Methyl

FDACS has issued an experimental use permit for
bensulfuron methyl (Londax) herbicide (EPA Reg.
# 352-506) and assigned it the number FL03-EUP-
1, which is authorized though January 30, 2004.
The product is used for control of weeds in rice.
(FDACS letter of 1/30/03).

MAM

Residue Tolerance for Mesotrione

Based on work by IR-4, tolerances were received for
residues of the herbicide mesotrione in or on pop
corn grain/stover (0.01 ppm). (Federal Register,
1/3/03).


MAM









Florida Crop Values for 2002


The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service has released the following estimates of the season average price and
value of production for agronomic crops in 2002, with 2000 and 2001 estimates also included:


Season Average Price ($) Value of Production (1000 $)

Crop 2000 2001 2002 Unit 2000 2001 2002

Corn for grain 2.24 2.25 2.60 bu 4,200 5,090 8,486

Cotton 0.565 0.295 0.380 lb 28,747 22,373 15,139

Cottonseed 100.00 71.50 81.50 ton 3,800 3,790 2,445

Hay, all 82.00 96.00 97.00 ton 55,350 72,575 76,048

Peanuts for nuts 0.300 0.215 0.177 lb 64,113 53,772 35,011

Sugarcane 28.60 31.70 --- ton 487,373 517,915 ---

Tobacco 1.730 1.871 1.879 lb 19,852 21,891 22,473

Wheat 2.25 2.25 2.40 bu 992 830 722


The above figures do not include certain federal payments to growers.
in the February 2003 issue of Agronomy Notes.


Yield and acreage of the crops were given


EBW

Publications


The following publications have been recently UPDATED and are available though EDIS. PDF files for these
publications are also available:


SS-AGR-29

SS-AGR-162

SS-AGR-163


Tobacco Varieties for 2003

Florida 2001 and 2002 Short, Mid, and Full-Season Corn Variety Tests for Silage and Grain

Results of 2002 Early, Mid, and Full Season and Roundup Ready Cotton Variety Tests


The following NEW publications are available through EDIS. A PDF file for each publication is also available.


SS-AGR-180
SS-AGR-188

SS-AGR-189


Forage Soybeans for Grazing Hay and Silage
Alfalfa Production in Florida

Sweetclover Production and Use in Florida


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; M. A. Mossler, Pest Management Information Specialist, E. B. Whitty,
Extension Agronomist. D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.









Florida Crop Values for 2002


The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service has released the following estimates of the season average price and
value of production for agronomic crops in 2002, with 2000 and 2001 estimates also included:


Season Average Price ($) Value of Production (1000 $)

Crop 2000 2001 2002 Unit 2000 2001 2002

Corn for grain 2.24 2.25 2.60 bu 4,200 5,090 8,486

Cotton 0.565 0.295 0.380 lb 28,747 22,373 15,139

Cottonseed 100.00 71.50 81.50 ton 3,800 3,790 2,445

Hay, all 82.00 96.00 97.00 ton 55,350 72,575 76,048

Peanuts for nuts 0.300 0.215 0.177 lb 64,113 53,772 35,011

Sugarcane 28.60 31.70 --- ton 487,373 517,915 ---

Tobacco 1.730 1.871 1.879 lb 19,852 21,891 22,473

Wheat 2.25 2.25 2.40 bu 992 830 722


The above figures do not include certain federal payments to growers.
in the February 2003 issue of Agronomy Notes.


Yield and acreage of the crops were given


EBW

Publications


The following publications have been recently UPDATED and are available though EDIS. PDF files for these
publications are also available:


SS-AGR-29

SS-AGR-162

SS-AGR-163


Tobacco Varieties for 2003

Florida 2001 and 2002 Short, Mid, and Full-Season Corn Variety Tests for Silage and Grain

Results of 2002 Early, Mid, and Full Season and Roundup Ready Cotton Variety Tests


The following NEW publications are available through EDIS. A PDF file for each publication is also available.


SS-AGR-180
SS-AGR-188

SS-AGR-189


Forage Soybeans for Grazing Hay and Silage
Alfalfa Production in Florida

Sweetclover Production and Use in Florida


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; M. A. Mossler, Pest Management Information Specialist, E. B. Whitty,
Extension Agronomist. D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.