<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 Corn for late planting
 Benefits of conservation tilla...
 Timing of Telone II applications...
 Foliar feeding cotton
 High micronaire cotton in Florida...
 Pre-mature cutout (lack of new...
 Fall forage update
 Planting dates and rates
 Peanut seed production
 Tobacco peoduction estimates
 Field crop acreage for 2002
 Pesticide update on agronomic...
 Publications


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00025
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: August 2002
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00025

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Corn for late planting
        Page 2
    Benefits of conservation tillage
        Page 2
    Timing of Telone II applications on cotton
        Page 2
    Foliar feeding cotton
        Page 2
    High micronaire cotton in Florida and the Southeast
        Page 2
    Pre-mature cutout (lack of new blooms) of cotton
        Page 2
    Fall forage update
        Page 3
    Planting dates and rates
        Page 4
    Peanut seed production
        Page 4
    Tobacco peoduction estimates
        Page 4
    Field crop acreage for 2002
        Page 4
    Pesticide update on agronomic crops
        Page 5
    Publications
        Page 5
Full Text






AGRONOMY


,;4. UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
EXTENSION
Sl..r,,. .... ... aj ..A,-,, .. I I S .......


NOTES


August 2002


August 21
August 29
September 5
September 26


DATES TO REMEMBER
Peanut Field Day Marianna REC
Beef Unit Open House/Field Day Marianna REC
Agronomic Crops Field Day WFREC (Jay)
Row Crops Field Day NFREC (Quincy)


PAGE


CORN
C o rn fo r L ate P lantin g .................................................................................................................. 2
Benefits of Conservation Tillage ........................................................................................... 2

COTTON
Timing of Telone II Applications on Cotton ........................................ ............................ 2
F oliar F feeding C otton ........................................................................... .......................... 2
High Micronaire Cotton in Florida and the Southeast ........................................ ................. 2
Pre-Mature Cutout (Lack of New Blooms) of Cotton ........................................ ................. 2

FORAGE
F all F o rag e U p d ate .................................................................................. ............................... 3
P planting D ates and R ates ........................................................ ................................................ 4

PEANUT
P eanut Seed P rodu action ............................................................................................................... 4

TOBACCO
Tobacco Production Estimates ............................................. ............................................ 4

MISCELLANEOUS
Field Crop Acreage for 2002 ................................................ ............................................ 4
Pesticide Update on Agronomic Crops ........................................................... ................. 5
Publications .................. ................. ...... ........ 5


IN THIS ISSUE


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining
other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences / University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director.









CORN FOR LATE PLANTING

Corn planted after mid May is not successful in most years
due to insect and disease. Years of research have shown
that both insects and disease tolerance are important to get
respectable yields. Research conducted in 2000 and 2001
showed that it was possible to get decent silage and grain
yield planted in late June and late July. Pioneer brand 30F33
a tropical germplasm corn and the Bt version Pioneer brand
30F34 had 28 and 53% of the best early planted silage yield,
respectively, when planted in late July with grain yield
similar. The silage yield from July 24 planting was 14.2
ton/A with a grainyield of 113 bu/A for Pioneer brand 30F34.
These are the first tropicals that we have tested that compare
in grain yield to best yielding conventional hybrids when
planted early in the season.

DLW

BENEFITS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE

Each year, more and more people in Florida are switching
to strip tillage for corn, cotton, and, peanuts. Estimates of
time saved in going from conventional tillage to strip tillage
are from 42 minutes per acre for conventional to only 6
minutes for strip tillage for a savings of 60 ten hour days on
a 1,000 acre farm. The difference in fuel consumption is
about 70%, or about $7,000 savings on a 1,000 acre farm
that uses $10,000 worth of fuel per year. Fewer tillage trips
result in less wear on machinery and lower maintenance
costs, resulting in savings of $5 per acre per year. The direct
cost savings above account for $18,000 in increased profit
or income. Yields may be improved as well.


DLW

TIMING OF TELONE II APPLICATIONS ON
COTTON

Telone II has been recommended for many years for
nematode management in Florida cotton. Southern root-
knot and reniform nematodes are the most important
nematode pests and are widespread in Florida cotton fields.
Resistant cultivars are not available, and nematode
management is by rotation and nematicides. However, many
growers have tended to monoculture cotton due to relatively
high prices for cotton compared to other field crops, leaving
only nematicide application as a management option. The
most effective nematicide for application to Florida cotton
is Telone II. Label directions for application, however,
suggests a 10-to-21-day waiting period prior to planting.
This time delay between treatment and planting presents
logistical problems for growers during the normally rainy
and busy planting period in north Florida. If growers could
apply the product well in advance of planting or at planting,
scheduling farm operations including Telone II application


would be more flexible. We studied a range of in-row
application rates (1.5-4.5 gals./acre) and application timing
(0 to 92 days before planting) in replicated field trials. No
difference in cottonyield was found with application timing,
even with the at-planting application. These studies
indicated that profitable applications of Telone II may be
accomplished much earlier and later than the current
application recommendation of 10-21 days before planting,
thus adding flexibility to Telone II application scheduling.

JRR & DLW

FOLIAR FEEDING COTTON

Foliar feeding of cotton is usually not necessary and is often
not cost effective. There are many water soluble fertilizer
products on the market that are advertised to enhance growth
or boll development. Almost no research shows any
consistent response to foliar feeding of any kind of nutrients.
A lot of the early planted cotton is nearing cut out or the
time that cotton quits blooming and putting on bolls. This
is usually an indication that the plant has all of the bolls that
it can support for the water, nutrients, or plant size. Late
applications of any material at this stage have little to offer
if the crop has an adequate boll load.

DLW

HIGH MICRONAIRE COTTON IN FLORIDA
AND THE SOUTHEAST

In the last few years cotton coming out of the Southeast has
been discounted due to high micronaire values. Micronaire
is a measure of fiber surface area, which is related to fiber
perimeter, maturity and surface properties. Micronaire varies
because bolls mature under different conditions at different
times (bolls mature during an 8 week period from the earliest
to the latest). Conditions that cause high micronaire are:
1. Good early season boll set followed by poor mid and late
season boll set.
2. Mostly 1st position boll set atthe expense of 2nd and 3rd
position bolls.
3. Hot weather between the 3rd and 6th week of bloom
with poor fruit retention during this time.
4. Short fiber caused by water stress during the first three
weeks of bloom followed by good weather for the next
3 weeks.

DLW

PRE-MATURE CUTOUT (LACK OF NEW
BLOOMS) OF COTTON

Many conditions cause cotton to quit blooming, including
drought, poor fertility, or other stresses, and a heavy boll
load. Cutout is not completely understood but is normally
thought to be induced when plants have become loaded with









CORN FOR LATE PLANTING

Corn planted after mid May is not successful in most years
due to insect and disease. Years of research have shown
that both insects and disease tolerance are important to get
respectable yields. Research conducted in 2000 and 2001
showed that it was possible to get decent silage and grain
yield planted in late June and late July. Pioneer brand 30F33
a tropical germplasm corn and the Bt version Pioneer brand
30F34 had 28 and 53% of the best early planted silage yield,
respectively, when planted in late July with grain yield
similar. The silage yield from July 24 planting was 14.2
ton/A with a grainyield of 113 bu/A for Pioneer brand 30F34.
These are the first tropicals that we have tested that compare
in grain yield to best yielding conventional hybrids when
planted early in the season.

DLW

BENEFITS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE

Each year, more and more people in Florida are switching
to strip tillage for corn, cotton, and, peanuts. Estimates of
time saved in going from conventional tillage to strip tillage
are from 42 minutes per acre for conventional to only 6
minutes for strip tillage for a savings of 60 ten hour days on
a 1,000 acre farm. The difference in fuel consumption is
about 70%, or about $7,000 savings on a 1,000 acre farm
that uses $10,000 worth of fuel per year. Fewer tillage trips
result in less wear on machinery and lower maintenance
costs, resulting in savings of $5 per acre per year. The direct
cost savings above account for $18,000 in increased profit
or income. Yields may be improved as well.


DLW

TIMING OF TELONE II APPLICATIONS ON
COTTON

Telone II has been recommended for many years for
nematode management in Florida cotton. Southern root-
knot and reniform nematodes are the most important
nematode pests and are widespread in Florida cotton fields.
Resistant cultivars are not available, and nematode
management is by rotation and nematicides. However, many
growers have tended to monoculture cotton due to relatively
high prices for cotton compared to other field crops, leaving
only nematicide application as a management option. The
most effective nematicide for application to Florida cotton
is Telone II. Label directions for application, however,
suggests a 10-to-21-day waiting period prior to planting.
This time delay between treatment and planting presents
logistical problems for growers during the normally rainy
and busy planting period in north Florida. If growers could
apply the product well in advance of planting or at planting,
scheduling farm operations including Telone II application


would be more flexible. We studied a range of in-row
application rates (1.5-4.5 gals./acre) and application timing
(0 to 92 days before planting) in replicated field trials. No
difference in cottonyield was found with application timing,
even with the at-planting application. These studies
indicated that profitable applications of Telone II may be
accomplished much earlier and later than the current
application recommendation of 10-21 days before planting,
thus adding flexibility to Telone II application scheduling.

JRR & DLW

FOLIAR FEEDING COTTON

Foliar feeding of cotton is usually not necessary and is often
not cost effective. There are many water soluble fertilizer
products on the market that are advertised to enhance growth
or boll development. Almost no research shows any
consistent response to foliar feeding of any kind of nutrients.
A lot of the early planted cotton is nearing cut out or the
time that cotton quits blooming and putting on bolls. This
is usually an indication that the plant has all of the bolls that
it can support for the water, nutrients, or plant size. Late
applications of any material at this stage have little to offer
if the crop has an adequate boll load.

DLW

HIGH MICRONAIRE COTTON IN FLORIDA
AND THE SOUTHEAST

In the last few years cotton coming out of the Southeast has
been discounted due to high micronaire values. Micronaire
is a measure of fiber surface area, which is related to fiber
perimeter, maturity and surface properties. Micronaire varies
because bolls mature under different conditions at different
times (bolls mature during an 8 week period from the earliest
to the latest). Conditions that cause high micronaire are:
1. Good early season boll set followed by poor mid and late
season boll set.
2. Mostly 1st position boll set atthe expense of 2nd and 3rd
position bolls.
3. Hot weather between the 3rd and 6th week of bloom
with poor fruit retention during this time.
4. Short fiber caused by water stress during the first three
weeks of bloom followed by good weather for the next
3 weeks.

DLW

PRE-MATURE CUTOUT (LACK OF NEW
BLOOMS) OF COTTON

Many conditions cause cotton to quit blooming, including
drought, poor fertility, or other stresses, and a heavy boll
load. Cutout is not completely understood but is normally
thought to be induced when plants have become loaded with









CORN FOR LATE PLANTING

Corn planted after mid May is not successful in most years
due to insect and disease. Years of research have shown
that both insects and disease tolerance are important to get
respectable yields. Research conducted in 2000 and 2001
showed that it was possible to get decent silage and grain
yield planted in late June and late July. Pioneer brand 30F33
a tropical germplasm corn and the Bt version Pioneer brand
30F34 had 28 and 53% of the best early planted silage yield,
respectively, when planted in late July with grain yield
similar. The silage yield from July 24 planting was 14.2
ton/A with a grainyield of 113 bu/A for Pioneer brand 30F34.
These are the first tropicals that we have tested that compare
in grain yield to best yielding conventional hybrids when
planted early in the season.

DLW

BENEFITS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE

Each year, more and more people in Florida are switching
to strip tillage for corn, cotton, and, peanuts. Estimates of
time saved in going from conventional tillage to strip tillage
are from 42 minutes per acre for conventional to only 6
minutes for strip tillage for a savings of 60 ten hour days on
a 1,000 acre farm. The difference in fuel consumption is
about 70%, or about $7,000 savings on a 1,000 acre farm
that uses $10,000 worth of fuel per year. Fewer tillage trips
result in less wear on machinery and lower maintenance
costs, resulting in savings of $5 per acre per year. The direct
cost savings above account for $18,000 in increased profit
or income. Yields may be improved as well.


DLW

TIMING OF TELONE II APPLICATIONS ON
COTTON

Telone II has been recommended for many years for
nematode management in Florida cotton. Southern root-
knot and reniform nematodes are the most important
nematode pests and are widespread in Florida cotton fields.
Resistant cultivars are not available, and nematode
management is by rotation and nematicides. However, many
growers have tended to monoculture cotton due to relatively
high prices for cotton compared to other field crops, leaving
only nematicide application as a management option. The
most effective nematicide for application to Florida cotton
is Telone II. Label directions for application, however,
suggests a 10-to-21-day waiting period prior to planting.
This time delay between treatment and planting presents
logistical problems for growers during the normally rainy
and busy planting period in north Florida. If growers could
apply the product well in advance of planting or at planting,
scheduling farm operations including Telone II application


would be more flexible. We studied a range of in-row
application rates (1.5-4.5 gals./acre) and application timing
(0 to 92 days before planting) in replicated field trials. No
difference in cottonyield was found with application timing,
even with the at-planting application. These studies
indicated that profitable applications of Telone II may be
accomplished much earlier and later than the current
application recommendation of 10-21 days before planting,
thus adding flexibility to Telone II application scheduling.

JRR & DLW

FOLIAR FEEDING COTTON

Foliar feeding of cotton is usually not necessary and is often
not cost effective. There are many water soluble fertilizer
products on the market that are advertised to enhance growth
or boll development. Almost no research shows any
consistent response to foliar feeding of any kind of nutrients.
A lot of the early planted cotton is nearing cut out or the
time that cotton quits blooming and putting on bolls. This
is usually an indication that the plant has all of the bolls that
it can support for the water, nutrients, or plant size. Late
applications of any material at this stage have little to offer
if the crop has an adequate boll load.

DLW

HIGH MICRONAIRE COTTON IN FLORIDA
AND THE SOUTHEAST

In the last few years cotton coming out of the Southeast has
been discounted due to high micronaire values. Micronaire
is a measure of fiber surface area, which is related to fiber
perimeter, maturity and surface properties. Micronaire varies
because bolls mature under different conditions at different
times (bolls mature during an 8 week period from the earliest
to the latest). Conditions that cause high micronaire are:
1. Good early season boll set followed by poor mid and late
season boll set.
2. Mostly 1st position boll set atthe expense of 2nd and 3rd
position bolls.
3. Hot weather between the 3rd and 6th week of bloom
with poor fruit retention during this time.
4. Short fiber caused by water stress during the first three
weeks of bloom followed by good weather for the next
3 weeks.

DLW

PRE-MATURE CUTOUT (LACK OF NEW
BLOOMS) OF COTTON

Many conditions cause cotton to quit blooming, including
drought, poor fertility, or other stresses, and a heavy boll
load. Cutout is not completely understood but is normally
thought to be induced when plants have become loaded with









CORN FOR LATE PLANTING

Corn planted after mid May is not successful in most years
due to insect and disease. Years of research have shown
that both insects and disease tolerance are important to get
respectable yields. Research conducted in 2000 and 2001
showed that it was possible to get decent silage and grain
yield planted in late June and late July. Pioneer brand 30F33
a tropical germplasm corn and the Bt version Pioneer brand
30F34 had 28 and 53% of the best early planted silage yield,
respectively, when planted in late July with grain yield
similar. The silage yield from July 24 planting was 14.2
ton/A with a grainyield of 113 bu/A for Pioneer brand 30F34.
These are the first tropicals that we have tested that compare
in grain yield to best yielding conventional hybrids when
planted early in the season.

DLW

BENEFITS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE

Each year, more and more people in Florida are switching
to strip tillage for corn, cotton, and, peanuts. Estimates of
time saved in going from conventional tillage to strip tillage
are from 42 minutes per acre for conventional to only 6
minutes for strip tillage for a savings of 60 ten hour days on
a 1,000 acre farm. The difference in fuel consumption is
about 70%, or about $7,000 savings on a 1,000 acre farm
that uses $10,000 worth of fuel per year. Fewer tillage trips
result in less wear on machinery and lower maintenance
costs, resulting in savings of $5 per acre per year. The direct
cost savings above account for $18,000 in increased profit
or income. Yields may be improved as well.


DLW

TIMING OF TELONE II APPLICATIONS ON
COTTON

Telone II has been recommended for many years for
nematode management in Florida cotton. Southern root-
knot and reniform nematodes are the most important
nematode pests and are widespread in Florida cotton fields.
Resistant cultivars are not available, and nematode
management is by rotation and nematicides. However, many
growers have tended to monoculture cotton due to relatively
high prices for cotton compared to other field crops, leaving
only nematicide application as a management option. The
most effective nematicide for application to Florida cotton
is Telone II. Label directions for application, however,
suggests a 10-to-21-day waiting period prior to planting.
This time delay between treatment and planting presents
logistical problems for growers during the normally rainy
and busy planting period in north Florida. If growers could
apply the product well in advance of planting or at planting,
scheduling farm operations including Telone II application


would be more flexible. We studied a range of in-row
application rates (1.5-4.5 gals./acre) and application timing
(0 to 92 days before planting) in replicated field trials. No
difference in cottonyield was found with application timing,
even with the at-planting application. These studies
indicated that profitable applications of Telone II may be
accomplished much earlier and later than the current
application recommendation of 10-21 days before planting,
thus adding flexibility to Telone II application scheduling.

JRR & DLW

FOLIAR FEEDING COTTON

Foliar feeding of cotton is usually not necessary and is often
not cost effective. There are many water soluble fertilizer
products on the market that are advertised to enhance growth
or boll development. Almost no research shows any
consistent response to foliar feeding of any kind of nutrients.
A lot of the early planted cotton is nearing cut out or the
time that cotton quits blooming and putting on bolls. This
is usually an indication that the plant has all of the bolls that
it can support for the water, nutrients, or plant size. Late
applications of any material at this stage have little to offer
if the crop has an adequate boll load.

DLW

HIGH MICRONAIRE COTTON IN FLORIDA
AND THE SOUTHEAST

In the last few years cotton coming out of the Southeast has
been discounted due to high micronaire values. Micronaire
is a measure of fiber surface area, which is related to fiber
perimeter, maturity and surface properties. Micronaire varies
because bolls mature under different conditions at different
times (bolls mature during an 8 week period from the earliest
to the latest). Conditions that cause high micronaire are:
1. Good early season boll set followed by poor mid and late
season boll set.
2. Mostly 1st position boll set atthe expense of 2nd and 3rd
position bolls.
3. Hot weather between the 3rd and 6th week of bloom
with poor fruit retention during this time.
4. Short fiber caused by water stress during the first three
weeks of bloom followed by good weather for the next
3 weeks.

DLW

PRE-MATURE CUTOUT (LACK OF NEW
BLOOMS) OF COTTON

Many conditions cause cotton to quit blooming, including
drought, poor fertility, or other stresses, and a heavy boll
load. Cutout is not completely understood but is normally
thought to be induced when plants have become loaded with









CORN FOR LATE PLANTING

Corn planted after mid May is not successful in most years
due to insect and disease. Years of research have shown
that both insects and disease tolerance are important to get
respectable yields. Research conducted in 2000 and 2001
showed that it was possible to get decent silage and grain
yield planted in late June and late July. Pioneer brand 30F33
a tropical germplasm corn and the Bt version Pioneer brand
30F34 had 28 and 53% of the best early planted silage yield,
respectively, when planted in late July with grain yield
similar. The silage yield from July 24 planting was 14.2
ton/A with a grainyield of 113 bu/A for Pioneer brand 30F34.
These are the first tropicals that we have tested that compare
in grain yield to best yielding conventional hybrids when
planted early in the season.

DLW

BENEFITS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE

Each year, more and more people in Florida are switching
to strip tillage for corn, cotton, and, peanuts. Estimates of
time saved in going from conventional tillage to strip tillage
are from 42 minutes per acre for conventional to only 6
minutes for strip tillage for a savings of 60 ten hour days on
a 1,000 acre farm. The difference in fuel consumption is
about 70%, or about $7,000 savings on a 1,000 acre farm
that uses $10,000 worth of fuel per year. Fewer tillage trips
result in less wear on machinery and lower maintenance
costs, resulting in savings of $5 per acre per year. The direct
cost savings above account for $18,000 in increased profit
or income. Yields may be improved as well.


DLW

TIMING OF TELONE II APPLICATIONS ON
COTTON

Telone II has been recommended for many years for
nematode management in Florida cotton. Southern root-
knot and reniform nematodes are the most important
nematode pests and are widespread in Florida cotton fields.
Resistant cultivars are not available, and nematode
management is by rotation and nematicides. However, many
growers have tended to monoculture cotton due to relatively
high prices for cotton compared to other field crops, leaving
only nematicide application as a management option. The
most effective nematicide for application to Florida cotton
is Telone II. Label directions for application, however,
suggests a 10-to-21-day waiting period prior to planting.
This time delay between treatment and planting presents
logistical problems for growers during the normally rainy
and busy planting period in north Florida. If growers could
apply the product well in advance of planting or at planting,
scheduling farm operations including Telone II application


would be more flexible. We studied a range of in-row
application rates (1.5-4.5 gals./acre) and application timing
(0 to 92 days before planting) in replicated field trials. No
difference in cottonyield was found with application timing,
even with the at-planting application. These studies
indicated that profitable applications of Telone II may be
accomplished much earlier and later than the current
application recommendation of 10-21 days before planting,
thus adding flexibility to Telone II application scheduling.

JRR & DLW

FOLIAR FEEDING COTTON

Foliar feeding of cotton is usually not necessary and is often
not cost effective. There are many water soluble fertilizer
products on the market that are advertised to enhance growth
or boll development. Almost no research shows any
consistent response to foliar feeding of any kind of nutrients.
A lot of the early planted cotton is nearing cut out or the
time that cotton quits blooming and putting on bolls. This
is usually an indication that the plant has all of the bolls that
it can support for the water, nutrients, or plant size. Late
applications of any material at this stage have little to offer
if the crop has an adequate boll load.

DLW

HIGH MICRONAIRE COTTON IN FLORIDA
AND THE SOUTHEAST

In the last few years cotton coming out of the Southeast has
been discounted due to high micronaire values. Micronaire
is a measure of fiber surface area, which is related to fiber
perimeter, maturity and surface properties. Micronaire varies
because bolls mature under different conditions at different
times (bolls mature during an 8 week period from the earliest
to the latest). Conditions that cause high micronaire are:
1. Good early season boll set followed by poor mid and late
season boll set.
2. Mostly 1st position boll set atthe expense of 2nd and 3rd
position bolls.
3. Hot weather between the 3rd and 6th week of bloom
with poor fruit retention during this time.
4. Short fiber caused by water stress during the first three
weeks of bloom followed by good weather for the next
3 weeks.

DLW

PRE-MATURE CUTOUT (LACK OF NEW
BLOOMS) OF COTTON

Many conditions cause cotton to quit blooming, including
drought, poor fertility, or other stresses, and a heavy boll
load. Cutout is not completely understood but is normally
thought to be induced when plants have become loaded with









CORN FOR LATE PLANTING

Corn planted after mid May is not successful in most years
due to insect and disease. Years of research have shown
that both insects and disease tolerance are important to get
respectable yields. Research conducted in 2000 and 2001
showed that it was possible to get decent silage and grain
yield planted in late June and late July. Pioneer brand 30F33
a tropical germplasm corn and the Bt version Pioneer brand
30F34 had 28 and 53% of the best early planted silage yield,
respectively, when planted in late July with grain yield
similar. The silage yield from July 24 planting was 14.2
ton/A with a grainyield of 113 bu/A for Pioneer brand 30F34.
These are the first tropicals that we have tested that compare
in grain yield to best yielding conventional hybrids when
planted early in the season.

DLW

BENEFITS OF CONSERVATION TILLAGE

Each year, more and more people in Florida are switching
to strip tillage for corn, cotton, and, peanuts. Estimates of
time saved in going from conventional tillage to strip tillage
are from 42 minutes per acre for conventional to only 6
minutes for strip tillage for a savings of 60 ten hour days on
a 1,000 acre farm. The difference in fuel consumption is
about 70%, or about $7,000 savings on a 1,000 acre farm
that uses $10,000 worth of fuel per year. Fewer tillage trips
result in less wear on machinery and lower maintenance
costs, resulting in savings of $5 per acre per year. The direct
cost savings above account for $18,000 in increased profit
or income. Yields may be improved as well.


DLW

TIMING OF TELONE II APPLICATIONS ON
COTTON

Telone II has been recommended for many years for
nematode management in Florida cotton. Southern root-
knot and reniform nematodes are the most important
nematode pests and are widespread in Florida cotton fields.
Resistant cultivars are not available, and nematode
management is by rotation and nematicides. However, many
growers have tended to monoculture cotton due to relatively
high prices for cotton compared to other field crops, leaving
only nematicide application as a management option. The
most effective nematicide for application to Florida cotton
is Telone II. Label directions for application, however,
suggests a 10-to-21-day waiting period prior to planting.
This time delay between treatment and planting presents
logistical problems for growers during the normally rainy
and busy planting period in north Florida. If growers could
apply the product well in advance of planting or at planting,
scheduling farm operations including Telone II application


would be more flexible. We studied a range of in-row
application rates (1.5-4.5 gals./acre) and application timing
(0 to 92 days before planting) in replicated field trials. No
difference in cottonyield was found with application timing,
even with the at-planting application. These studies
indicated that profitable applications of Telone II may be
accomplished much earlier and later than the current
application recommendation of 10-21 days before planting,
thus adding flexibility to Telone II application scheduling.

JRR & DLW

FOLIAR FEEDING COTTON

Foliar feeding of cotton is usually not necessary and is often
not cost effective. There are many water soluble fertilizer
products on the market that are advertised to enhance growth
or boll development. Almost no research shows any
consistent response to foliar feeding of any kind of nutrients.
A lot of the early planted cotton is nearing cut out or the
time that cotton quits blooming and putting on bolls. This
is usually an indication that the plant has all of the bolls that
it can support for the water, nutrients, or plant size. Late
applications of any material at this stage have little to offer
if the crop has an adequate boll load.

DLW

HIGH MICRONAIRE COTTON IN FLORIDA
AND THE SOUTHEAST

In the last few years cotton coming out of the Southeast has
been discounted due to high micronaire values. Micronaire
is a measure of fiber surface area, which is related to fiber
perimeter, maturity and surface properties. Micronaire varies
because bolls mature under different conditions at different
times (bolls mature during an 8 week period from the earliest
to the latest). Conditions that cause high micronaire are:
1. Good early season boll set followed by poor mid and late
season boll set.
2. Mostly 1st position boll set atthe expense of 2nd and 3rd
position bolls.
3. Hot weather between the 3rd and 6th week of bloom
with poor fruit retention during this time.
4. Short fiber caused by water stress during the first three
weeks of bloom followed by good weather for the next
3 weeks.

DLW

PRE-MATURE CUTOUT (LACK OF NEW
BLOOMS) OF COTTON

Many conditions cause cotton to quit blooming, including
drought, poor fertility, or other stresses, and a heavy boll
load. Cutout is not completely understood but is normally
thought to be induced when plants have become loaded with









bolls and the photosynthates go into boll production rather than to vegetative growth of the plant. Many plant processes are
regulated by plant hormones, and an increase of growth limiting hormones may be the cause of cutout.

DLW


FALL FORAGE UPDATE


Recommended Cool Season Forage Cultivars for Fall Planting 2002

Rye Recommended varieties are Florida 401 and Florida Black for late fall and early winter grazing.
Wrens 96, Florida 402, Wrens Abruzzi, Bates, Elbon, Bonel, Oklon, Maton, Pennington
Wintergraze 70, Gurley Grazer 2000, and Grazemasterfor winter and spring grazing. (Wrens 96,
a recent cultivar release, is a good seed producer in Florida. Maton, Elbon, Bonel, or Oklon are
very poor seed producers.)

Oats Recommended varieties are Horizon 474, Florida 502, and Florida 501 for early season grazing.
Horizon 314, Chapman, Harrison, Terral Secretariat LA495, Coker 227, Ozark, AR-County Seeds
833,811, LA604 and Plot Spike LA9339 for winter and spring grazing. Horizon 314, Horizon 474
and Plot Spike LA9339 are new varieties. They have improved crown rust resistance, winter
hardiness, and grain and forage production.

Wheat Recommended varieties for grazing are AGS 2000, Pioneer 26R61, Pioneer 2684, Coker 9835,
Roberts, GA-Gore, GA-Dozier. AGS 2000 and Pioneer 26R61 are two new varieties available for
the first time in 2000, and they have performed very well in grain yield trials as well as forage
trials.

Ryegrass Recommended varieties are Jumbo, Florlina, Surrey, Jackson, Magnolia, Rio, Gulf, Southern Star,
Big Daddy, TAM 90, Paseral Plus, Ed, Brigadier, Surrey II, Stampede, Fantastic, Graze-N-Gro,
King, and Prine. (Other new varieties may be suitable but have not been adequately tested in
Florida.)

White Clover Recommended varieties are Osceola (developed in Florida), Louisiana S-1, and Regal Ladino.

Red Clover Recommended varieties are Cherokee, Kenland, Redland III, and Kenstar. (Cherokee, developed
in Florida, is earlier and highest yielding cultivar.)
Alfalfa The recommended variety is Florida 99.

Crimson Recommended varieties are Flame, Dixie, Chief, Tibbee, and AU-Robin.
Clover

Arrowleaf Recommended variety is Yuchi. A new cultivar, Apache with improved virus resistance has been
Clover grown in Florida for one year and performed well.

Sweetclover Recommended varieties are Hubam and Floranna.

Austrian This annual legume is best suited to well drained soils with a high clay content.
Winter Peas

Vetch Recommended varieties are Cahaba White, Hairy, Common, and AU-Early Cover.
CGC









PLANTING DATES AND RATES

Planting dates, seeding rates, and planting depths for certain cool season forage crops.
Seed Propagated Crops' Planting Dates" Seeding Rates Seeding Depth
(b/A Broadcast) (inch)
Alfalfa Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Arrowleaf Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 8- 10 0 -1/2
Clover, Berseem Oct. 1 Nov. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Crimson Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 26 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Red Oct. 1 Nov. 15 6- 12 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Subterranean Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 18- 22 1/4 -1/2
Clover, White Oct. 1 Nov. 15 3 4 0 1/4
Fescue, Tall Nov. 1 Dec. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Oats for forage Sept. 15 Nov. 15 96 128 (3-4 bu) 1 -2
Pea, Austrian Winter Oct. 1 Nov. 15 45 60 1/2 1
Rye for forage Oct. 15 Nov. 15 84 112 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
Ryegrass, Italian (annual) Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 30 0- 1/2
Sweetclover Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12- 15 1/4 -1/2
Turnips Oct. 1 Nov. 15 5- 6 1/4 -1/2
Vetch, hairy Oct. 1 Nov. 15 20- 30 1 -2
Wheat for forage Oct. 15 Nov.15 90 120 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
1 Always check seed quality. Seed germination should be 80% or higher for best results.
2 Planting date range: in general, cool season forage crops in north Florida can be planted in the early part of the
planting date range and in south Florida, the latter part of the planting date range.


CGC


PEANUT SEED PRODUCTION


With the new peanut program, growers may be planning to
save seed for planting in 2003. However, they should be
aware that there may be certain restrictions on saving peanut
seed if the grower has not met patent restrictions. Although
they are not transgenic, high-oleic peanuts are patented very
similarly to transgenic cotton, soybeans, and corn, and
unauthorized saving of seed is prohibited under the patent.
Shelling plants may also be liable if they shell and process
such peanuts. Other peanut varieties released in recent years
that are not high oleic may also have patent restrictions. A
farmer may save certain varieties for planting on his own
farm, but he cannot sell seed to anyone else. Other patented
varieties can be sold to neighbors if the grower is prevented
from planting seed he has saved. Non-patented seed have
no such restrictions; however, any seed sold as a class of
certified seed must meet the specifications of the Florida
Certified Seed Law.
EBW

TOBACCO PRODUCTION ESTIMATES

The National Agricultural Statistics Service has estimated
that the 4,800 acres of tobacco harvested in 2002 in Florida
will yield 2,600 pounds per acre, for a total production of
12,480,000 pounds. The US production is estimated at
530,430,000 pounds.
EBW


FIELD CROP ACREAGE FOR 2002


The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service has issued the
following estimates of crop acreage for 2002: CORN: Corn
planted for all purposes totaled 65,000 acres, the same as
last year. Of this acreage 26,000 acres will be harvested
for grain. The US corn acreage is up 4 percent from 2001.
COTTON: Planted cotton acreage in Florida is 110,000
acres, down 12 percent from last year. The US acreage is
down 9 percent from last year. ALL HAY: Acreage of all
hay in Florida is placed at 280,000 acres, up 4 percent from
last year. The US hay acreage is up almost 2 percent from
last year. PEANUTS: Planted acreage is estimated at
100,000 acres, up 11 percent from last year. It is expected
that 92,000 acres will be harvested for dry nuts, with the
remainder used for green peanuts. The US peanut acreage
is estimated at 5 percent less than in 2001. SOYBEANS:
Florida growers planted 10,000 acres in 2002, the same as
last year. For the US, soybean acreage is down 2 percent.
SUGARCANE: Producers expect to harvest 453,000
acres, compared to 465,000 acres last season. The US
acreage to be harvested is expected to be 1 percent less
than last season. TOBACCO: Florida growers expect to
harvest 4,800 acres, compared to 4,500 acres last year. The
US flue-cured acreage is up 4 percent from last year, while
all types of tobacco have a 1 percent increase in acreage.

EBW









PLANTING DATES AND RATES

Planting dates, seeding rates, and planting depths for certain cool season forage crops.
Seed Propagated Crops' Planting Dates" Seeding Rates Seeding Depth
(b/A Broadcast) (inch)
Alfalfa Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Arrowleaf Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 8- 10 0 -1/2
Clover, Berseem Oct. 1 Nov. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Crimson Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 26 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Red Oct. 1 Nov. 15 6- 12 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Subterranean Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 18- 22 1/4 -1/2
Clover, White Oct. 1 Nov. 15 3 4 0 1/4
Fescue, Tall Nov. 1 Dec. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Oats for forage Sept. 15 Nov. 15 96 128 (3-4 bu) 1 -2
Pea, Austrian Winter Oct. 1 Nov. 15 45 60 1/2 1
Rye for forage Oct. 15 Nov. 15 84 112 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
Ryegrass, Italian (annual) Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 30 0- 1/2
Sweetclover Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12- 15 1/4 -1/2
Turnips Oct. 1 Nov. 15 5- 6 1/4 -1/2
Vetch, hairy Oct. 1 Nov. 15 20- 30 1 -2
Wheat for forage Oct. 15 Nov.15 90 120 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
1 Always check seed quality. Seed germination should be 80% or higher for best results.
2 Planting date range: in general, cool season forage crops in north Florida can be planted in the early part of the
planting date range and in south Florida, the latter part of the planting date range.


CGC


PEANUT SEED PRODUCTION


With the new peanut program, growers may be planning to
save seed for planting in 2003. However, they should be
aware that there may be certain restrictions on saving peanut
seed if the grower has not met patent restrictions. Although
they are not transgenic, high-oleic peanuts are patented very
similarly to transgenic cotton, soybeans, and corn, and
unauthorized saving of seed is prohibited under the patent.
Shelling plants may also be liable if they shell and process
such peanuts. Other peanut varieties released in recent years
that are not high oleic may also have patent restrictions. A
farmer may save certain varieties for planting on his own
farm, but he cannot sell seed to anyone else. Other patented
varieties can be sold to neighbors if the grower is prevented
from planting seed he has saved. Non-patented seed have
no such restrictions; however, any seed sold as a class of
certified seed must meet the specifications of the Florida
Certified Seed Law.
EBW

TOBACCO PRODUCTION ESTIMATES

The National Agricultural Statistics Service has estimated
that the 4,800 acres of tobacco harvested in 2002 in Florida
will yield 2,600 pounds per acre, for a total production of
12,480,000 pounds. The US production is estimated at
530,430,000 pounds.
EBW


FIELD CROP ACREAGE FOR 2002


The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service has issued the
following estimates of crop acreage for 2002: CORN: Corn
planted for all purposes totaled 65,000 acres, the same as
last year. Of this acreage 26,000 acres will be harvested
for grain. The US corn acreage is up 4 percent from 2001.
COTTON: Planted cotton acreage in Florida is 110,000
acres, down 12 percent from last year. The US acreage is
down 9 percent from last year. ALL HAY: Acreage of all
hay in Florida is placed at 280,000 acres, up 4 percent from
last year. The US hay acreage is up almost 2 percent from
last year. PEANUTS: Planted acreage is estimated at
100,000 acres, up 11 percent from last year. It is expected
that 92,000 acres will be harvested for dry nuts, with the
remainder used for green peanuts. The US peanut acreage
is estimated at 5 percent less than in 2001. SOYBEANS:
Florida growers planted 10,000 acres in 2002, the same as
last year. For the US, soybean acreage is down 2 percent.
SUGARCANE: Producers expect to harvest 453,000
acres, compared to 465,000 acres last season. The US
acreage to be harvested is expected to be 1 percent less
than last season. TOBACCO: Florida growers expect to
harvest 4,800 acres, compared to 4,500 acres last year. The
US flue-cured acreage is up 4 percent from last year, while
all types of tobacco have a 1 percent increase in acreage.

EBW









PLANTING DATES AND RATES

Planting dates, seeding rates, and planting depths for certain cool season forage crops.
Seed Propagated Crops' Planting Dates" Seeding Rates Seeding Depth
(b/A Broadcast) (inch)
Alfalfa Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Arrowleaf Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 8- 10 0 -1/2
Clover, Berseem Oct. 1 Nov. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Crimson Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 26 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Red Oct. 1 Nov. 15 6- 12 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Subterranean Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 18- 22 1/4 -1/2
Clover, White Oct. 1 Nov. 15 3 4 0 1/4
Fescue, Tall Nov. 1 Dec. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Oats for forage Sept. 15 Nov. 15 96 128 (3-4 bu) 1 -2
Pea, Austrian Winter Oct. 1 Nov. 15 45 60 1/2 1
Rye for forage Oct. 15 Nov. 15 84 112 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
Ryegrass, Italian (annual) Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 30 0- 1/2
Sweetclover Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12- 15 1/4 -1/2
Turnips Oct. 1 Nov. 15 5- 6 1/4 -1/2
Vetch, hairy Oct. 1 Nov. 15 20- 30 1 -2
Wheat for forage Oct. 15 Nov.15 90 120 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
1 Always check seed quality. Seed germination should be 80% or higher for best results.
2 Planting date range: in general, cool season forage crops in north Florida can be planted in the early part of the
planting date range and in south Florida, the latter part of the planting date range.


CGC


PEANUT SEED PRODUCTION


With the new peanut program, growers may be planning to
save seed for planting in 2003. However, they should be
aware that there may be certain restrictions on saving peanut
seed if the grower has not met patent restrictions. Although
they are not transgenic, high-oleic peanuts are patented very
similarly to transgenic cotton, soybeans, and corn, and
unauthorized saving of seed is prohibited under the patent.
Shelling plants may also be liable if they shell and process
such peanuts. Other peanut varieties released in recent years
that are not high oleic may also have patent restrictions. A
farmer may save certain varieties for planting on his own
farm, but he cannot sell seed to anyone else. Other patented
varieties can be sold to neighbors if the grower is prevented
from planting seed he has saved. Non-patented seed have
no such restrictions; however, any seed sold as a class of
certified seed must meet the specifications of the Florida
Certified Seed Law.
EBW

TOBACCO PRODUCTION ESTIMATES

The National Agricultural Statistics Service has estimated
that the 4,800 acres of tobacco harvested in 2002 in Florida
will yield 2,600 pounds per acre, for a total production of
12,480,000 pounds. The US production is estimated at
530,430,000 pounds.
EBW


FIELD CROP ACREAGE FOR 2002


The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service has issued the
following estimates of crop acreage for 2002: CORN: Corn
planted for all purposes totaled 65,000 acres, the same as
last year. Of this acreage 26,000 acres will be harvested
for grain. The US corn acreage is up 4 percent from 2001.
COTTON: Planted cotton acreage in Florida is 110,000
acres, down 12 percent from last year. The US acreage is
down 9 percent from last year. ALL HAY: Acreage of all
hay in Florida is placed at 280,000 acres, up 4 percent from
last year. The US hay acreage is up almost 2 percent from
last year. PEANUTS: Planted acreage is estimated at
100,000 acres, up 11 percent from last year. It is expected
that 92,000 acres will be harvested for dry nuts, with the
remainder used for green peanuts. The US peanut acreage
is estimated at 5 percent less than in 2001. SOYBEANS:
Florida growers planted 10,000 acres in 2002, the same as
last year. For the US, soybean acreage is down 2 percent.
SUGARCANE: Producers expect to harvest 453,000
acres, compared to 465,000 acres last season. The US
acreage to be harvested is expected to be 1 percent less
than last season. TOBACCO: Florida growers expect to
harvest 4,800 acres, compared to 4,500 acres last year. The
US flue-cured acreage is up 4 percent from last year, while
all types of tobacco have a 1 percent increase in acreage.

EBW









PLANTING DATES AND RATES

Planting dates, seeding rates, and planting depths for certain cool season forage crops.
Seed Propagated Crops' Planting Dates" Seeding Rates Seeding Depth
(b/A Broadcast) (inch)
Alfalfa Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Arrowleaf Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 8- 10 0 -1/2
Clover, Berseem Oct. 1 Nov. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Crimson Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 26 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Red Oct. 1 Nov. 15 6- 12 1/4 -1/2
Clover, Subterranean Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 18- 22 1/4 -1/2
Clover, White Oct. 1 Nov. 15 3 4 0 1/4
Fescue, Tall Nov. 1 Dec. 15 16 20 1/4 -1/2
Oats for forage Sept. 15 Nov. 15 96 128 (3-4 bu) 1 -2
Pea, Austrian Winter Oct. 1 Nov. 15 45 60 1/2 1
Rye for forage Oct. 15 Nov. 15 84 112 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
Ryegrass, Italian (annual) Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 20- 30 0- 1/2
Sweetclover Oct. 1 -Nov. 15 12- 15 1/4 -1/2
Turnips Oct. 1 Nov. 15 5- 6 1/4 -1/2
Vetch, hairy Oct. 1 Nov. 15 20- 30 1 -2
Wheat for forage Oct. 15 Nov.15 90 120 (1.5 2 bu) 1 -2
1 Always check seed quality. Seed germination should be 80% or higher for best results.
2 Planting date range: in general, cool season forage crops in north Florida can be planted in the early part of the
planting date range and in south Florida, the latter part of the planting date range.


CGC


PEANUT SEED PRODUCTION


With the new peanut program, growers may be planning to
save seed for planting in 2003. However, they should be
aware that there may be certain restrictions on saving peanut
seed if the grower has not met patent restrictions. Although
they are not transgenic, high-oleic peanuts are patented very
similarly to transgenic cotton, soybeans, and corn, and
unauthorized saving of seed is prohibited under the patent.
Shelling plants may also be liable if they shell and process
such peanuts. Other peanut varieties released in recent years
that are not high oleic may also have patent restrictions. A
farmer may save certain varieties for planting on his own
farm, but he cannot sell seed to anyone else. Other patented
varieties can be sold to neighbors if the grower is prevented
from planting seed he has saved. Non-patented seed have
no such restrictions; however, any seed sold as a class of
certified seed must meet the specifications of the Florida
Certified Seed Law.
EBW

TOBACCO PRODUCTION ESTIMATES

The National Agricultural Statistics Service has estimated
that the 4,800 acres of tobacco harvested in 2002 in Florida
will yield 2,600 pounds per acre, for a total production of
12,480,000 pounds. The US production is estimated at
530,430,000 pounds.
EBW


FIELD CROP ACREAGE FOR 2002


The Florida Agricultural Statistics Service has issued the
following estimates of crop acreage for 2002: CORN: Corn
planted for all purposes totaled 65,000 acres, the same as
last year. Of this acreage 26,000 acres will be harvested
for grain. The US corn acreage is up 4 percent from 2001.
COTTON: Planted cotton acreage in Florida is 110,000
acres, down 12 percent from last year. The US acreage is
down 9 percent from last year. ALL HAY: Acreage of all
hay in Florida is placed at 280,000 acres, up 4 percent from
last year. The US hay acreage is up almost 2 percent from
last year. PEANUTS: Planted acreage is estimated at
100,000 acres, up 11 percent from last year. It is expected
that 92,000 acres will be harvested for dry nuts, with the
remainder used for green peanuts. The US peanut acreage
is estimated at 5 percent less than in 2001. SOYBEANS:
Florida growers planted 10,000 acres in 2002, the same as
last year. For the US, soybean acreage is down 2 percent.
SUGARCANE: Producers expect to harvest 453,000
acres, compared to 465,000 acres last season. The US
acreage to be harvested is expected to be 1 percent less
than last season. TOBACCO: Florida growers expect to
harvest 4,800 acres, compared to 4,500 acres last year. The
US flue-cured acreage is up 4 percent from last year, while
all types of tobacco have a 1 percent increase in acreage.

EBW








PESTICIDE UPDATE ON AGRONOMIC CROPS

Monsanto Company has received an amendment/extension
from the EPA for an EUP regarding B.t. corn. The crop
destruction requirement was dropped to allow for tissue and
seed collection, and 9,400 acres of the corn can be planted
until February 28, 2003 in multiple states, including Florida.
(Federal Register, 6/26/02).

On June 11, DuPont Crop Protection released a statement
regarding a decision to phase out its azafenidin (Milestone)
herbicide. The company stated that the decision to
discontinue this compound was reached after a thorough
project review process that led to the conclusion that slow
growth in sales, coupled with production and registration
delays, plus increased costs, make it unlikely that the
company could deliver a high value offering for users at a
competitive price while achieving an adequate return on its
investment. The herbicide was slated to become an atrazine
replacement in a number of crops, including citrus and
sugarcane. (DuPont memo of 6/11/02 to FDACS).

On June 5, EPA announced the tolerance reassessment
decision for propanil. Propanil is a selective post-emergent
herbicide registered on rice, barley, oat, and spring wheat
to control broadleaf and grass weeds. Propanil is also
registered (but not currently marketed) for turf use at
commercial sod farms. The Agency's reassessment of
dietary risk, including public exposure through food and
drinking water, indicates that propanil poses no risk
concerns; therefore, no risk mitigation is needed and no
further actions related to dietary risk are warranted at this
time. The Agency will complete a Reregistration Eligibility
Decision (RED) document for propanil later in 2002. The
RED will address risk to workers and the environment and
any additional data requirements. Also, some commodity
definitions must be updated. The established tolerances
remain in effect until such time as a full reassessment of the
cumulative risk from all anilide pesticides, such as propanil,
may be needed and completed. (EPA OPP Update, 6/6/02).

At the request of Dow AgroSciences, the EPA has granted a
time-limited tolerance for the herbicide cyhalofop-butyl and
related metabolite in or on rice grain (0.03 ppm) and rice
straw (8 ppm). The tolerance will expire on June 1, 2007.
(Federal Register, 6/4/02).

On June 13, the EPA announced the request by Universal
Cooperatives to delete clover from their Trifluralin 4 EC
(EPA Reg. # 1386-609) product label. (Federal Register,
6/13/02).


The EPA has reviewed existing tolerances for difenzoquat,
diquat dibromide, fenbutatin-oxide, linuron, and
norflurazon, and considers the 206 associated tolerances
reassessed as having met the safety standard under the
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. EPA had completed
Reregistration Eligibility Decisions (REDs) for these four
pesticides in the mid-1990s, prior to enactment of the Food
Quality Protection Act of 1996. The Agency must review
tolerances and tolerance exemptions that were in effect
when FQPA was enacted to ensure that these existing
pesticide residue limits for food and feed commodities meet
the safety standard brought about by that Act. (EPA OPP
Update, 6/19/02 & 7/1/02).

MAM

PUBLICATIONS

The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR26 Pasture Weed Management
SSAGR32 Horizon 314 Oats: A New Oat for the
Southeastern United States
SSAGR51 Digitgrasses
SSAGR60 Bermudagrass Production in Florida
SSAGR178 Forage Moisture Testing
SSAGR179 Rag Doll Testing for Seed Germination

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also avail-
able.

SSAGR55 Reducing Reinform Nematode Damage by
Alternating Row Patterns in Cotton
SSAGR107 Ryegrass, Small Grains and Tall Fescue
SSAGR173 Alfalfa and Cool Season Clovers
SSAGR174 Pasture Renovation
SSAGR175 Overseeding Warm Season Perennial Grasses
with Cool Season Forages
SSAGR177 Silage Harvesting, Storing and Feeding

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that
screen fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Data-
base Search Engine. Type in the publication number (ex-
ample: SSAGR01) orKeyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click
on the appropriate button below (Find Keywords or Find
Publication No.). You will get a listing of publications. Please
be sure to check the date in the footnote on the first page to be
sure it is the most up-to-date publication for that topic.


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; M. A. Mossier, Pesticide Information Office; J. R. Rich,
Entomology and Nematology; E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist; and D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.








PESTICIDE UPDATE ON AGRONOMIC CROPS

Monsanto Company has received an amendment/extension
from the EPA for an EUP regarding B.t. corn. The crop
destruction requirement was dropped to allow for tissue and
seed collection, and 9,400 acres of the corn can be planted
until February 28, 2003 in multiple states, including Florida.
(Federal Register, 6/26/02).

On June 11, DuPont Crop Protection released a statement
regarding a decision to phase out its azafenidin (Milestone)
herbicide. The company stated that the decision to
discontinue this compound was reached after a thorough
project review process that led to the conclusion that slow
growth in sales, coupled with production and registration
delays, plus increased costs, make it unlikely that the
company could deliver a high value offering for users at a
competitive price while achieving an adequate return on its
investment. The herbicide was slated to become an atrazine
replacement in a number of crops, including citrus and
sugarcane. (DuPont memo of 6/11/02 to FDACS).

On June 5, EPA announced the tolerance reassessment
decision for propanil. Propanil is a selective post-emergent
herbicide registered on rice, barley, oat, and spring wheat
to control broadleaf and grass weeds. Propanil is also
registered (but not currently marketed) for turf use at
commercial sod farms. The Agency's reassessment of
dietary risk, including public exposure through food and
drinking water, indicates that propanil poses no risk
concerns; therefore, no risk mitigation is needed and no
further actions related to dietary risk are warranted at this
time. The Agency will complete a Reregistration Eligibility
Decision (RED) document for propanil later in 2002. The
RED will address risk to workers and the environment and
any additional data requirements. Also, some commodity
definitions must be updated. The established tolerances
remain in effect until such time as a full reassessment of the
cumulative risk from all anilide pesticides, such as propanil,
may be needed and completed. (EPA OPP Update, 6/6/02).

At the request of Dow AgroSciences, the EPA has granted a
time-limited tolerance for the herbicide cyhalofop-butyl and
related metabolite in or on rice grain (0.03 ppm) and rice
straw (8 ppm). The tolerance will expire on June 1, 2007.
(Federal Register, 6/4/02).

On June 13, the EPA announced the request by Universal
Cooperatives to delete clover from their Trifluralin 4 EC
(EPA Reg. # 1386-609) product label. (Federal Register,
6/13/02).


The EPA has reviewed existing tolerances for difenzoquat,
diquat dibromide, fenbutatin-oxide, linuron, and
norflurazon, and considers the 206 associated tolerances
reassessed as having met the safety standard under the
Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. EPA had completed
Reregistration Eligibility Decisions (REDs) for these four
pesticides in the mid-1990s, prior to enactment of the Food
Quality Protection Act of 1996. The Agency must review
tolerances and tolerance exemptions that were in effect
when FQPA was enacted to ensure that these existing
pesticide residue limits for food and feed commodities meet
the safety standard brought about by that Act. (EPA OPP
Update, 6/19/02 & 7/1/02).

MAM

PUBLICATIONS

The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR26 Pasture Weed Management
SSAGR32 Horizon 314 Oats: A New Oat for the
Southeastern United States
SSAGR51 Digitgrasses
SSAGR60 Bermudagrass Production in Florida
SSAGR178 Forage Moisture Testing
SSAGR179 Rag Doll Testing for Seed Germination

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also avail-
able.

SSAGR55 Reducing Reinform Nematode Damage by
Alternating Row Patterns in Cotton
SSAGR107 Ryegrass, Small Grains and Tall Fescue
SSAGR173 Alfalfa and Cool Season Clovers
SSAGR174 Pasture Renovation
SSAGR175 Overseeding Warm Season Perennial Grasses
with Cool Season Forages
SSAGR177 Silage Harvesting, Storing and Feeding

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that
screen fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Data-
base Search Engine. Type in the publication number (ex-
ample: SSAGR01) orKeyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click
on the appropriate button below (Find Keywords or Find
Publication No.). You will get a listing of publications. Please
be sure to check the date in the footnote on the first page to be
sure it is the most up-to-date publication for that topic.


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; M. A. Mossier, Pesticide Information Office; J. R. Rich,
Entomology and Nematology; E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist; and D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist.