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 Table of Contents
 Variety and planting date for cotton...
 Cotton nitrogen requirements
 Follow soil test for cotton...
 Conservation tillage planted...
 Peanut varieties
 Peanut legislation
 Tobacco grading referendum
 Tobacco buyout legislation
 Stored tobacco
 Blue mold of tobacco
 Publications
 Prospective plantings for 2002


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00021
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: April 2002
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00021

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Variety and planting date for cotton have big impact on yield
        Page 2
    Cotton nitrogen requirements
        Page 2
    Follow soil test for cotton production
        Page 2
    Conservation tillage planted cotton
        Page 2
    Peanut varieties
        Page 2
    Peanut legislation
        Page 2
    Tobacco grading referendum
        Page 3
    Tobacco buyout legislation
        Page 3
    Stored tobacco
        Page 3
    Blue mold of tobacco
        Page 3
    Publications
        Page 3
    Prospective plantings for 2002
        Page 4
Full Text






AGRONOMY

.-*. UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
EXTENSION
Insrtu.eor Focid and Agric.turil San S N O T E S April 2002



DATES TO REMEMBER
April 23 Extension Specialist Workshop & In-Service Training Gainesville, FL
May 1-3 Beef Cattle Shortcourse Gainesville, FL
May 19-24 Aquatic Weed Control, Aquatic Plant Culture and Revegetation Short Course Fort Lauderdale,
FL
May 22-24 Florida Soil & Crop Science Society Meeting C 1.ian\.iic Beach, FL
May 23 Beef Forage Field Day Brooksville, FL



IN THIS ISSUE PAGE


COTTON
Variety and Planting Date for Cotton have big Impacts on Yield............................................ 2
C otton N itrogen R equirem ents ......................................... ................................................... 2
Follow Soil Test for Cotton Production .......................... ..... ........................................ 2
Conservation Tillage Planted Cotton ........................... ..... ......................................... 2

PEANUT
P eanu t V varieties ....................................................................... .................... .................. ...... 2
P eanu t L egislatio n ................................................................... .................... .................. ...... 2

TOBACCO
Tobacco G reading R referendum .......................................... ................................................... 3
T tobacco B uyout L legislation ............................................ .................................................... 3
Stored Tobacco ............................. .................... ............... 3
B lue M old of T tobacco ...................................................................... ........................... 3

MISCELLANEOUS
P u b licatio n s .......................................................... ........................... ........ ................. ...... 3
Prospective Plantings for 2002 ......................................... ................................................... 4


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining
other extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences / University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director.








VARIETYAND PLANTING DATE FOR COTTON
HAVE BIG IMPACTS ON YIELD

Generally, irrigated cotton does best when planted in the May
5-20 range but this has varied from year to year. Highest
yield can be expected about 70% of the time from planting
in this window as compared to about 10% of the time in
April and 20% of the time from late May. Establishing a
stand is the primary consideration for non-irrigated cotton.
In 2000, much cotton was planted in May and did not ger-
minate until rains came in mid June. Growers may need to
plant dry land cotton in early April if adequate moisture and
soil temperatures allow. Early April planted cotton can have
more boll rot due to bottom bolls opening in late August.


DLW

COTTON NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS

Vegetative growth of cotton will respond to high rates of N
while yields are often decreased. A four-year study at NFREC
on cotton has shown that rates of N above 60 lbs./A resulted in
lower yields in most years on soils with a clay layer no more
than 6-8 inches deep. Nitrogen applications should not be made
later than squaring, as applications made after the 3rd week of
bloom consistently reduced yield. Both high (180 lbs/A) and
late applications (after 3rd week of bloom) of N resulted in
loweryields than the recommended N application, and the yield
loss was due to excessive vegetative growth and more hard
lock.


DLW

FOLLOW SOIL TEST FOR COTTON
PRODUCTION

Results from several years of study has shown that the UF
soil test recommendation is on target. Where nutrients were
called for, we were able to consistently get yield responses
with both P and K while applications made on soils with
higher levels resulted in no yield response. Following these
recommendations can save you money and still maintain
fertility levels.

DLW

CONSERVATION TILLAGE PLANTED
COTTON

About 50% of the Florida cotton acreage is planted using
conservation tillage, more in some counties. Some of the
worst weeds encountered are horseweed, ryegrass, cut leaf
evening primrose, wild radish, and nut sedge; these are of-
ten found in the small grain cover crop. Primrose and radish


can be controlled with an early application of 2,4-D while
the other weeds must be controlled later (but still 3-4 weeks
before planting). If glyphosate is used 3-4 weeks before plant-
ing and there is still green material at planting, paraquat
should be used at planting to get full control of weeds within
4-5 days to reduce weed competition from developing seed-
lings. Higher rates of residue are superior to low amounts if
it does not interfere with planting operations and all of it is
dead and brittle at planting.

DLW

PEANUT VARIETIES

Georgia Green has been the most popular variety planted in
Florida and other southeastern states in recent years, and will
probably be popular again in 2002 because of high yields and
grades, along with good tolerance to tomato spotted wilt virus.
There have been complaints about shelling and blanching prob-
lems with the variety. The C-99R variety would be a good
alternative variety to consider, because it has the highest toler-
ance available to tomato spotted wilt virus, and also produces
high yields and grades. The variety also has resistance to leaf
spot, white mold, and rust. C-99R takes longer to mature (about
150 days than most other varieties), and therefore should be
planted in late April or early May in order for it to have time to
properly mature before cool weather in the late growing sea-
son slows growth and development. A relatively new variety,
AT 201, has performed well in Florida tests. This variety pro-
duces fast early growth and more total vine growth than many
other popular varieties. Seed supplies may be somewhat lim-
ited in 2002. A new early-maturing variety, AT 1-1, should be
available in adequate seed supplies for 2002. Andru 93, an-
other early-maturing variety, also continues to produce good
yields in Florida. In 2001, about 5000 tons of virginia-type
peanuts were grown in Florida. VC 2, Perry, Gregory, NC
V11, and VA 92R are virginia varieties that have yielded well
in Florida tests.

EBW

PEANUT LEGISLATION

The legislation for the new farm bill, which includes pea-
nuts, was not completed by the joint House-Senate commit-
tee before the Easter recess. According to press releases, the
joint committee will hold public meetings during the week
of April 9 and it is expected that both the House and Senate
will approve the compromise bill and then submit it to the
President. It would then be effective for the 2002 crop year.
After final approval by the legislative branch and approval
by the President, the Farm Service Agency of the USDA will
have to write specific rules and procedures for implement-
ing the program. Major changes are being proposed in the
peanut program, including the end of the quota system, and








VARIETYAND PLANTING DATE FOR COTTON
HAVE BIG IMPACTS ON YIELD

Generally, irrigated cotton does best when planted in the May
5-20 range but this has varied from year to year. Highest
yield can be expected about 70% of the time from planting
in this window as compared to about 10% of the time in
April and 20% of the time from late May. Establishing a
stand is the primary consideration for non-irrigated cotton.
In 2000, much cotton was planted in May and did not ger-
minate until rains came in mid June. Growers may need to
plant dry land cotton in early April if adequate moisture and
soil temperatures allow. Early April planted cotton can have
more boll rot due to bottom bolls opening in late August.


DLW

COTTON NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS

Vegetative growth of cotton will respond to high rates of N
while yields are often decreased. A four-year study at NFREC
on cotton has shown that rates of N above 60 lbs./A resulted in
lower yields in most years on soils with a clay layer no more
than 6-8 inches deep. Nitrogen applications should not be made
later than squaring, as applications made after the 3rd week of
bloom consistently reduced yield. Both high (180 lbs/A) and
late applications (after 3rd week of bloom) of N resulted in
loweryields than the recommended N application, and the yield
loss was due to excessive vegetative growth and more hard
lock.


DLW

FOLLOW SOIL TEST FOR COTTON
PRODUCTION

Results from several years of study has shown that the UF
soil test recommendation is on target. Where nutrients were
called for, we were able to consistently get yield responses
with both P and K while applications made on soils with
higher levels resulted in no yield response. Following these
recommendations can save you money and still maintain
fertility levels.

DLW

CONSERVATION TILLAGE PLANTED
COTTON

About 50% of the Florida cotton acreage is planted using
conservation tillage, more in some counties. Some of the
worst weeds encountered are horseweed, ryegrass, cut leaf
evening primrose, wild radish, and nut sedge; these are of-
ten found in the small grain cover crop. Primrose and radish


can be controlled with an early application of 2,4-D while
the other weeds must be controlled later (but still 3-4 weeks
before planting). If glyphosate is used 3-4 weeks before plant-
ing and there is still green material at planting, paraquat
should be used at planting to get full control of weeds within
4-5 days to reduce weed competition from developing seed-
lings. Higher rates of residue are superior to low amounts if
it does not interfere with planting operations and all of it is
dead and brittle at planting.

DLW

PEANUT VARIETIES

Georgia Green has been the most popular variety planted in
Florida and other southeastern states in recent years, and will
probably be popular again in 2002 because of high yields and
grades, along with good tolerance to tomato spotted wilt virus.
There have been complaints about shelling and blanching prob-
lems with the variety. The C-99R variety would be a good
alternative variety to consider, because it has the highest toler-
ance available to tomato spotted wilt virus, and also produces
high yields and grades. The variety also has resistance to leaf
spot, white mold, and rust. C-99R takes longer to mature (about
150 days than most other varieties), and therefore should be
planted in late April or early May in order for it to have time to
properly mature before cool weather in the late growing sea-
son slows growth and development. A relatively new variety,
AT 201, has performed well in Florida tests. This variety pro-
duces fast early growth and more total vine growth than many
other popular varieties. Seed supplies may be somewhat lim-
ited in 2002. A new early-maturing variety, AT 1-1, should be
available in adequate seed supplies for 2002. Andru 93, an-
other early-maturing variety, also continues to produce good
yields in Florida. In 2001, about 5000 tons of virginia-type
peanuts were grown in Florida. VC 2, Perry, Gregory, NC
V11, and VA 92R are virginia varieties that have yielded well
in Florida tests.

EBW

PEANUT LEGISLATION

The legislation for the new farm bill, which includes pea-
nuts, was not completed by the joint House-Senate commit-
tee before the Easter recess. According to press releases, the
joint committee will hold public meetings during the week
of April 9 and it is expected that both the House and Senate
will approve the compromise bill and then submit it to the
President. It would then be effective for the 2002 crop year.
After final approval by the legislative branch and approval
by the President, the Farm Service Agency of the USDA will
have to write specific rules and procedures for implement-
ing the program. Major changes are being proposed in the
peanut program, including the end of the quota system, and








VARIETYAND PLANTING DATE FOR COTTON
HAVE BIG IMPACTS ON YIELD

Generally, irrigated cotton does best when planted in the May
5-20 range but this has varied from year to year. Highest
yield can be expected about 70% of the time from planting
in this window as compared to about 10% of the time in
April and 20% of the time from late May. Establishing a
stand is the primary consideration for non-irrigated cotton.
In 2000, much cotton was planted in May and did not ger-
minate until rains came in mid June. Growers may need to
plant dry land cotton in early April if adequate moisture and
soil temperatures allow. Early April planted cotton can have
more boll rot due to bottom bolls opening in late August.


DLW

COTTON NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS

Vegetative growth of cotton will respond to high rates of N
while yields are often decreased. A four-year study at NFREC
on cotton has shown that rates of N above 60 lbs./A resulted in
lower yields in most years on soils with a clay layer no more
than 6-8 inches deep. Nitrogen applications should not be made
later than squaring, as applications made after the 3rd week of
bloom consistently reduced yield. Both high (180 lbs/A) and
late applications (after 3rd week of bloom) of N resulted in
loweryields than the recommended N application, and the yield
loss was due to excessive vegetative growth and more hard
lock.


DLW

FOLLOW SOIL TEST FOR COTTON
PRODUCTION

Results from several years of study has shown that the UF
soil test recommendation is on target. Where nutrients were
called for, we were able to consistently get yield responses
with both P and K while applications made on soils with
higher levels resulted in no yield response. Following these
recommendations can save you money and still maintain
fertility levels.

DLW

CONSERVATION TILLAGE PLANTED
COTTON

About 50% of the Florida cotton acreage is planted using
conservation tillage, more in some counties. Some of the
worst weeds encountered are horseweed, ryegrass, cut leaf
evening primrose, wild radish, and nut sedge; these are of-
ten found in the small grain cover crop. Primrose and radish


can be controlled with an early application of 2,4-D while
the other weeds must be controlled later (but still 3-4 weeks
before planting). If glyphosate is used 3-4 weeks before plant-
ing and there is still green material at planting, paraquat
should be used at planting to get full control of weeds within
4-5 days to reduce weed competition from developing seed-
lings. Higher rates of residue are superior to low amounts if
it does not interfere with planting operations and all of it is
dead and brittle at planting.

DLW

PEANUT VARIETIES

Georgia Green has been the most popular variety planted in
Florida and other southeastern states in recent years, and will
probably be popular again in 2002 because of high yields and
grades, along with good tolerance to tomato spotted wilt virus.
There have been complaints about shelling and blanching prob-
lems with the variety. The C-99R variety would be a good
alternative variety to consider, because it has the highest toler-
ance available to tomato spotted wilt virus, and also produces
high yields and grades. The variety also has resistance to leaf
spot, white mold, and rust. C-99R takes longer to mature (about
150 days than most other varieties), and therefore should be
planted in late April or early May in order for it to have time to
properly mature before cool weather in the late growing sea-
son slows growth and development. A relatively new variety,
AT 201, has performed well in Florida tests. This variety pro-
duces fast early growth and more total vine growth than many
other popular varieties. Seed supplies may be somewhat lim-
ited in 2002. A new early-maturing variety, AT 1-1, should be
available in adequate seed supplies for 2002. Andru 93, an-
other early-maturing variety, also continues to produce good
yields in Florida. In 2001, about 5000 tons of virginia-type
peanuts were grown in Florida. VC 2, Perry, Gregory, NC
V11, and VA 92R are virginia varieties that have yielded well
in Florida tests.

EBW

PEANUT LEGISLATION

The legislation for the new farm bill, which includes pea-
nuts, was not completed by the joint House-Senate commit-
tee before the Easter recess. According to press releases, the
joint committee will hold public meetings during the week
of April 9 and it is expected that both the House and Senate
will approve the compromise bill and then submit it to the
President. It would then be effective for the 2002 crop year.
After final approval by the legislative branch and approval
by the President, the Farm Service Agency of the USDA will
have to write specific rules and procedures for implement-
ing the program. Major changes are being proposed in the
peanut program, including the end of the quota system, and








VARIETYAND PLANTING DATE FOR COTTON
HAVE BIG IMPACTS ON YIELD

Generally, irrigated cotton does best when planted in the May
5-20 range but this has varied from year to year. Highest
yield can be expected about 70% of the time from planting
in this window as compared to about 10% of the time in
April and 20% of the time from late May. Establishing a
stand is the primary consideration for non-irrigated cotton.
In 2000, much cotton was planted in May and did not ger-
minate until rains came in mid June. Growers may need to
plant dry land cotton in early April if adequate moisture and
soil temperatures allow. Early April planted cotton can have
more boll rot due to bottom bolls opening in late August.


DLW

COTTON NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS

Vegetative growth of cotton will respond to high rates of N
while yields are often decreased. A four-year study at NFREC
on cotton has shown that rates of N above 60 lbs./A resulted in
lower yields in most years on soils with a clay layer no more
than 6-8 inches deep. Nitrogen applications should not be made
later than squaring, as applications made after the 3rd week of
bloom consistently reduced yield. Both high (180 lbs/A) and
late applications (after 3rd week of bloom) of N resulted in
loweryields than the recommended N application, and the yield
loss was due to excessive vegetative growth and more hard
lock.


DLW

FOLLOW SOIL TEST FOR COTTON
PRODUCTION

Results from several years of study has shown that the UF
soil test recommendation is on target. Where nutrients were
called for, we were able to consistently get yield responses
with both P and K while applications made on soils with
higher levels resulted in no yield response. Following these
recommendations can save you money and still maintain
fertility levels.

DLW

CONSERVATION TILLAGE PLANTED
COTTON

About 50% of the Florida cotton acreage is planted using
conservation tillage, more in some counties. Some of the
worst weeds encountered are horseweed, ryegrass, cut leaf
evening primrose, wild radish, and nut sedge; these are of-
ten found in the small grain cover crop. Primrose and radish


can be controlled with an early application of 2,4-D while
the other weeds must be controlled later (but still 3-4 weeks
before planting). If glyphosate is used 3-4 weeks before plant-
ing and there is still green material at planting, paraquat
should be used at planting to get full control of weeds within
4-5 days to reduce weed competition from developing seed-
lings. Higher rates of residue are superior to low amounts if
it does not interfere with planting operations and all of it is
dead and brittle at planting.

DLW

PEANUT VARIETIES

Georgia Green has been the most popular variety planted in
Florida and other southeastern states in recent years, and will
probably be popular again in 2002 because of high yields and
grades, along with good tolerance to tomato spotted wilt virus.
There have been complaints about shelling and blanching prob-
lems with the variety. The C-99R variety would be a good
alternative variety to consider, because it has the highest toler-
ance available to tomato spotted wilt virus, and also produces
high yields and grades. The variety also has resistance to leaf
spot, white mold, and rust. C-99R takes longer to mature (about
150 days than most other varieties), and therefore should be
planted in late April or early May in order for it to have time to
properly mature before cool weather in the late growing sea-
son slows growth and development. A relatively new variety,
AT 201, has performed well in Florida tests. This variety pro-
duces fast early growth and more total vine growth than many
other popular varieties. Seed supplies may be somewhat lim-
ited in 2002. A new early-maturing variety, AT 1-1, should be
available in adequate seed supplies for 2002. Andru 93, an-
other early-maturing variety, also continues to produce good
yields in Florida. In 2001, about 5000 tons of virginia-type
peanuts were grown in Florida. VC 2, Perry, Gregory, NC
V11, and VA 92R are virginia varieties that have yielded well
in Florida tests.

EBW

PEANUT LEGISLATION

The legislation for the new farm bill, which includes pea-
nuts, was not completed by the joint House-Senate commit-
tee before the Easter recess. According to press releases, the
joint committee will hold public meetings during the week
of April 9 and it is expected that both the House and Senate
will approve the compromise bill and then submit it to the
President. It would then be effective for the 2002 crop year.
After final approval by the legislative branch and approval
by the President, the Farm Service Agency of the USDA will
have to write specific rules and procedures for implement-
ing the program. Major changes are being proposed in the
peanut program, including the end of the quota system, and








VARIETYAND PLANTING DATE FOR COTTON
HAVE BIG IMPACTS ON YIELD

Generally, irrigated cotton does best when planted in the May
5-20 range but this has varied from year to year. Highest
yield can be expected about 70% of the time from planting
in this window as compared to about 10% of the time in
April and 20% of the time from late May. Establishing a
stand is the primary consideration for non-irrigated cotton.
In 2000, much cotton was planted in May and did not ger-
minate until rains came in mid June. Growers may need to
plant dry land cotton in early April if adequate moisture and
soil temperatures allow. Early April planted cotton can have
more boll rot due to bottom bolls opening in late August.


DLW

COTTON NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS

Vegetative growth of cotton will respond to high rates of N
while yields are often decreased. A four-year study at NFREC
on cotton has shown that rates of N above 60 lbs./A resulted in
lower yields in most years on soils with a clay layer no more
than 6-8 inches deep. Nitrogen applications should not be made
later than squaring, as applications made after the 3rd week of
bloom consistently reduced yield. Both high (180 lbs/A) and
late applications (after 3rd week of bloom) of N resulted in
loweryields than the recommended N application, and the yield
loss was due to excessive vegetative growth and more hard
lock.


DLW

FOLLOW SOIL TEST FOR COTTON
PRODUCTION

Results from several years of study has shown that the UF
soil test recommendation is on target. Where nutrients were
called for, we were able to consistently get yield responses
with both P and K while applications made on soils with
higher levels resulted in no yield response. Following these
recommendations can save you money and still maintain
fertility levels.

DLW

CONSERVATION TILLAGE PLANTED
COTTON

About 50% of the Florida cotton acreage is planted using
conservation tillage, more in some counties. Some of the
worst weeds encountered are horseweed, ryegrass, cut leaf
evening primrose, wild radish, and nut sedge; these are of-
ten found in the small grain cover crop. Primrose and radish


can be controlled with an early application of 2,4-D while
the other weeds must be controlled later (but still 3-4 weeks
before planting). If glyphosate is used 3-4 weeks before plant-
ing and there is still green material at planting, paraquat
should be used at planting to get full control of weeds within
4-5 days to reduce weed competition from developing seed-
lings. Higher rates of residue are superior to low amounts if
it does not interfere with planting operations and all of it is
dead and brittle at planting.

DLW

PEANUT VARIETIES

Georgia Green has been the most popular variety planted in
Florida and other southeastern states in recent years, and will
probably be popular again in 2002 because of high yields and
grades, along with good tolerance to tomato spotted wilt virus.
There have been complaints about shelling and blanching prob-
lems with the variety. The C-99R variety would be a good
alternative variety to consider, because it has the highest toler-
ance available to tomato spotted wilt virus, and also produces
high yields and grades. The variety also has resistance to leaf
spot, white mold, and rust. C-99R takes longer to mature (about
150 days than most other varieties), and therefore should be
planted in late April or early May in order for it to have time to
properly mature before cool weather in the late growing sea-
son slows growth and development. A relatively new variety,
AT 201, has performed well in Florida tests. This variety pro-
duces fast early growth and more total vine growth than many
other popular varieties. Seed supplies may be somewhat lim-
ited in 2002. A new early-maturing variety, AT 1-1, should be
available in adequate seed supplies for 2002. Andru 93, an-
other early-maturing variety, also continues to produce good
yields in Florida. In 2001, about 5000 tons of virginia-type
peanuts were grown in Florida. VC 2, Perry, Gregory, NC
V11, and VA 92R are virginia varieties that have yielded well
in Florida tests.

EBW

PEANUT LEGISLATION

The legislation for the new farm bill, which includes pea-
nuts, was not completed by the joint House-Senate commit-
tee before the Easter recess. According to press releases, the
joint committee will hold public meetings during the week
of April 9 and it is expected that both the House and Senate
will approve the compromise bill and then submit it to the
President. It would then be effective for the 2002 crop year.
After final approval by the legislative branch and approval
by the President, the Farm Service Agency of the USDA will
have to write specific rules and procedures for implement-
ing the program. Major changes are being proposed in the
peanut program, including the end of the quota system, and








VARIETYAND PLANTING DATE FOR COTTON
HAVE BIG IMPACTS ON YIELD

Generally, irrigated cotton does best when planted in the May
5-20 range but this has varied from year to year. Highest
yield can be expected about 70% of the time from planting
in this window as compared to about 10% of the time in
April and 20% of the time from late May. Establishing a
stand is the primary consideration for non-irrigated cotton.
In 2000, much cotton was planted in May and did not ger-
minate until rains came in mid June. Growers may need to
plant dry land cotton in early April if adequate moisture and
soil temperatures allow. Early April planted cotton can have
more boll rot due to bottom bolls opening in late August.


DLW

COTTON NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS

Vegetative growth of cotton will respond to high rates of N
while yields are often decreased. A four-year study at NFREC
on cotton has shown that rates of N above 60 lbs./A resulted in
lower yields in most years on soils with a clay layer no more
than 6-8 inches deep. Nitrogen applications should not be made
later than squaring, as applications made after the 3rd week of
bloom consistently reduced yield. Both high (180 lbs/A) and
late applications (after 3rd week of bloom) of N resulted in
loweryields than the recommended N application, and the yield
loss was due to excessive vegetative growth and more hard
lock.


DLW

FOLLOW SOIL TEST FOR COTTON
PRODUCTION

Results from several years of study has shown that the UF
soil test recommendation is on target. Where nutrients were
called for, we were able to consistently get yield responses
with both P and K while applications made on soils with
higher levels resulted in no yield response. Following these
recommendations can save you money and still maintain
fertility levels.

DLW

CONSERVATION TILLAGE PLANTED
COTTON

About 50% of the Florida cotton acreage is planted using
conservation tillage, more in some counties. Some of the
worst weeds encountered are horseweed, ryegrass, cut leaf
evening primrose, wild radish, and nut sedge; these are of-
ten found in the small grain cover crop. Primrose and radish


can be controlled with an early application of 2,4-D while
the other weeds must be controlled later (but still 3-4 weeks
before planting). If glyphosate is used 3-4 weeks before plant-
ing and there is still green material at planting, paraquat
should be used at planting to get full control of weeds within
4-5 days to reduce weed competition from developing seed-
lings. Higher rates of residue are superior to low amounts if
it does not interfere with planting operations and all of it is
dead and brittle at planting.

DLW

PEANUT VARIETIES

Georgia Green has been the most popular variety planted in
Florida and other southeastern states in recent years, and will
probably be popular again in 2002 because of high yields and
grades, along with good tolerance to tomato spotted wilt virus.
There have been complaints about shelling and blanching prob-
lems with the variety. The C-99R variety would be a good
alternative variety to consider, because it has the highest toler-
ance available to tomato spotted wilt virus, and also produces
high yields and grades. The variety also has resistance to leaf
spot, white mold, and rust. C-99R takes longer to mature (about
150 days than most other varieties), and therefore should be
planted in late April or early May in order for it to have time to
properly mature before cool weather in the late growing sea-
son slows growth and development. A relatively new variety,
AT 201, has performed well in Florida tests. This variety pro-
duces fast early growth and more total vine growth than many
other popular varieties. Seed supplies may be somewhat lim-
ited in 2002. A new early-maturing variety, AT 1-1, should be
available in adequate seed supplies for 2002. Andru 93, an-
other early-maturing variety, also continues to produce good
yields in Florida. In 2001, about 5000 tons of virginia-type
peanuts were grown in Florida. VC 2, Perry, Gregory, NC
V11, and VA 92R are virginia varieties that have yielded well
in Florida tests.

EBW

PEANUT LEGISLATION

The legislation for the new farm bill, which includes pea-
nuts, was not completed by the joint House-Senate commit-
tee before the Easter recess. According to press releases, the
joint committee will hold public meetings during the week
of April 9 and it is expected that both the House and Senate
will approve the compromise bill and then submit it to the
President. It would then be effective for the 2002 crop year.
After final approval by the legislative branch and approval
by the President, the Farm Service Agency of the USDA will
have to write specific rules and procedures for implement-
ing the program. Major changes are being proposed in the
peanut program, including the end of the quota system, and








growers may have to make decisions about planting the 2002
crop before program details are available. While determin-
ing how many acres and which varieties of peanuts to plant,
and more importantly obtaining loans to produce the crop,
are decisions and actions that may have to be made with
limited knowledge of program details. Growers will also
have to make other decisions, such as which farm to assign
the peanut basis, if the legislation is approved. An important
factor to consider when planning where and how many pea-
nuts to plant is the need for crop rotation. Plan on planting
peanuts on the same field only once in every 3-4 years. As
growers move into this new phase of peanut production, there
are many other fundamental principles of peanut production
that should not be forgotten.


BLUE MOLD OF TOBACCO

Blue mold has been reported in some Georgia plant beds.
Growers should make frequent inspections of beds and fields
of transplanted tobacco for signs of the disease. A bluish
fungus growth on the underside of leaves would be an early
sign, which progresses to yellow spots on the affected leaves.
Preventive applications of a fungicide on plant beds would
be much cheaper and more effective than waiting and hav-
ing to make applications in the field to control outbreaks.
Blue mold will be much more damaging during cool, wet
conditions.

EBW


EBW


TOBACCO GRADING REFERENDUM

The USDA has announced that the recent referendum to de-
termine if mandatory grading would be required for all to-
bacco has passed according to preliminary results. The flue-
cured tobacco growers favored mandatory grading at a 56
percent level, while burley growers were 75 percent in fa-
vor. Final results are expected in early April, and if the pre-
liminary results are confirmed, all tobacco, including that
contracted, would be graded by the federal grading service.


EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT LEGISLATION

A bill has been introduced in the House of Representatives
that, among other things, would provide for a buyout of quota.
Such a buyout would end the current system of production
control by paying quota holders and growers a total of $8
and $4 per pound, respectively, over a period of five years.
To provide these funds, a 'user fee' would be placed on to-
bacco. The proposal would also provide for some degree of
FDA regulation of tobacco. Other provisions are included
in the bill, but it is expected that there will be a number of
changes in the proposal before it reaches a vote.


EBW

STORED TOBACCO

With the warmer weather, insect pests that attack stored to-
bacco become more active. Increase the frequency of in-
spections for evidence of insect damage, and also of any
deterioration caused by high moisture content. If the tobacco
is still in racks or boxes in the curing barns, the fans can be
turned on during dry and warm days. This can reduce the
moisture content of the tobacco to protect against molds and
helps prevent insect damage.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR15 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Diagnosing
Herbicide Injury-2002
SSAGR35 Perennial Peanut Establishment Guide
SSAGR44 Peanut Varieties for 2002
SSAGR50 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Tropical Soda
Apple in Florida-2002
SSAGR52 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Cogongrass
(Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.) Biology,
Ecology and Management in Florida
SSAGR63 Forage Testing
SSAGR151 Harvesting and Storage of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR152 Fertilization of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR153 Liming of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR154 Inoculation of Agronomic Crop Legumes
SSAGR155 Water Use and Irrigation Management of Ag-
ronomic Crops
SSAGR161 Forage Planting and Establishment Guide
SSAGR162 Florida 2001 Short, Mid and Full-Season
Corn-Variety Tests for Silage and Grain
SSAGR163 2001 Florida Early, Mid, and Full Season
Cotton Variety Tests at Quincy and Jay

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.

SSAGR42 Rye and Triticale Breeding in the South

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Database Search
Engine. Type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click on the appropriate
button below (Find Keywords or Find Publication No.). You
will get a listing of publications. Please be sure to check the
date in the footnote on the first page to be sure it is the most up-
to-date publication for that topic.








growers may have to make decisions about planting the 2002
crop before program details are available. While determin-
ing how many acres and which varieties of peanuts to plant,
and more importantly obtaining loans to produce the crop,
are decisions and actions that may have to be made with
limited knowledge of program details. Growers will also
have to make other decisions, such as which farm to assign
the peanut basis, if the legislation is approved. An important
factor to consider when planning where and how many pea-
nuts to plant is the need for crop rotation. Plan on planting
peanuts on the same field only once in every 3-4 years. As
growers move into this new phase of peanut production, there
are many other fundamental principles of peanut production
that should not be forgotten.


BLUE MOLD OF TOBACCO

Blue mold has been reported in some Georgia plant beds.
Growers should make frequent inspections of beds and fields
of transplanted tobacco for signs of the disease. A bluish
fungus growth on the underside of leaves would be an early
sign, which progresses to yellow spots on the affected leaves.
Preventive applications of a fungicide on plant beds would
be much cheaper and more effective than waiting and hav-
ing to make applications in the field to control outbreaks.
Blue mold will be much more damaging during cool, wet
conditions.

EBW


EBW


TOBACCO GRADING REFERENDUM

The USDA has announced that the recent referendum to de-
termine if mandatory grading would be required for all to-
bacco has passed according to preliminary results. The flue-
cured tobacco growers favored mandatory grading at a 56
percent level, while burley growers were 75 percent in fa-
vor. Final results are expected in early April, and if the pre-
liminary results are confirmed, all tobacco, including that
contracted, would be graded by the federal grading service.


EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT LEGISLATION

A bill has been introduced in the House of Representatives
that, among other things, would provide for a buyout of quota.
Such a buyout would end the current system of production
control by paying quota holders and growers a total of $8
and $4 per pound, respectively, over a period of five years.
To provide these funds, a 'user fee' would be placed on to-
bacco. The proposal would also provide for some degree of
FDA regulation of tobacco. Other provisions are included
in the bill, but it is expected that there will be a number of
changes in the proposal before it reaches a vote.


EBW

STORED TOBACCO

With the warmer weather, insect pests that attack stored to-
bacco become more active. Increase the frequency of in-
spections for evidence of insect damage, and also of any
deterioration caused by high moisture content. If the tobacco
is still in racks or boxes in the curing barns, the fans can be
turned on during dry and warm days. This can reduce the
moisture content of the tobacco to protect against molds and
helps prevent insect damage.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR15 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Diagnosing
Herbicide Injury-2002
SSAGR35 Perennial Peanut Establishment Guide
SSAGR44 Peanut Varieties for 2002
SSAGR50 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Tropical Soda
Apple in Florida-2002
SSAGR52 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Cogongrass
(Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.) Biology,
Ecology and Management in Florida
SSAGR63 Forage Testing
SSAGR151 Harvesting and Storage of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR152 Fertilization of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR153 Liming of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR154 Inoculation of Agronomic Crop Legumes
SSAGR155 Water Use and Irrigation Management of Ag-
ronomic Crops
SSAGR161 Forage Planting and Establishment Guide
SSAGR162 Florida 2001 Short, Mid and Full-Season
Corn-Variety Tests for Silage and Grain
SSAGR163 2001 Florida Early, Mid, and Full Season
Cotton Variety Tests at Quincy and Jay

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.

SSAGR42 Rye and Triticale Breeding in the South

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Database Search
Engine. Type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click on the appropriate
button below (Find Keywords or Find Publication No.). You
will get a listing of publications. Please be sure to check the
date in the footnote on the first page to be sure it is the most up-
to-date publication for that topic.








growers may have to make decisions about planting the 2002
crop before program details are available. While determin-
ing how many acres and which varieties of peanuts to plant,
and more importantly obtaining loans to produce the crop,
are decisions and actions that may have to be made with
limited knowledge of program details. Growers will also
have to make other decisions, such as which farm to assign
the peanut basis, if the legislation is approved. An important
factor to consider when planning where and how many pea-
nuts to plant is the need for crop rotation. Plan on planting
peanuts on the same field only once in every 3-4 years. As
growers move into this new phase of peanut production, there
are many other fundamental principles of peanut production
that should not be forgotten.


BLUE MOLD OF TOBACCO

Blue mold has been reported in some Georgia plant beds.
Growers should make frequent inspections of beds and fields
of transplanted tobacco for signs of the disease. A bluish
fungus growth on the underside of leaves would be an early
sign, which progresses to yellow spots on the affected leaves.
Preventive applications of a fungicide on plant beds would
be much cheaper and more effective than waiting and hav-
ing to make applications in the field to control outbreaks.
Blue mold will be much more damaging during cool, wet
conditions.

EBW


EBW


TOBACCO GRADING REFERENDUM

The USDA has announced that the recent referendum to de-
termine if mandatory grading would be required for all to-
bacco has passed according to preliminary results. The flue-
cured tobacco growers favored mandatory grading at a 56
percent level, while burley growers were 75 percent in fa-
vor. Final results are expected in early April, and if the pre-
liminary results are confirmed, all tobacco, including that
contracted, would be graded by the federal grading service.


EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT LEGISLATION

A bill has been introduced in the House of Representatives
that, among other things, would provide for a buyout of quota.
Such a buyout would end the current system of production
control by paying quota holders and growers a total of $8
and $4 per pound, respectively, over a period of five years.
To provide these funds, a 'user fee' would be placed on to-
bacco. The proposal would also provide for some degree of
FDA regulation of tobacco. Other provisions are included
in the bill, but it is expected that there will be a number of
changes in the proposal before it reaches a vote.


EBW

STORED TOBACCO

With the warmer weather, insect pests that attack stored to-
bacco become more active. Increase the frequency of in-
spections for evidence of insect damage, and also of any
deterioration caused by high moisture content. If the tobacco
is still in racks or boxes in the curing barns, the fans can be
turned on during dry and warm days. This can reduce the
moisture content of the tobacco to protect against molds and
helps prevent insect damage.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR15 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Diagnosing
Herbicide Injury-2002
SSAGR35 Perennial Peanut Establishment Guide
SSAGR44 Peanut Varieties for 2002
SSAGR50 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Tropical Soda
Apple in Florida-2002
SSAGR52 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Cogongrass
(Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.) Biology,
Ecology and Management in Florida
SSAGR63 Forage Testing
SSAGR151 Harvesting and Storage of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR152 Fertilization of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR153 Liming of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR154 Inoculation of Agronomic Crop Legumes
SSAGR155 Water Use and Irrigation Management of Ag-
ronomic Crops
SSAGR161 Forage Planting and Establishment Guide
SSAGR162 Florida 2001 Short, Mid and Full-Season
Corn-Variety Tests for Silage and Grain
SSAGR163 2001 Florida Early, Mid, and Full Season
Cotton Variety Tests at Quincy and Jay

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.

SSAGR42 Rye and Triticale Breeding in the South

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Database Search
Engine. Type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click on the appropriate
button below (Find Keywords or Find Publication No.). You
will get a listing of publications. Please be sure to check the
date in the footnote on the first page to be sure it is the most up-
to-date publication for that topic.








growers may have to make decisions about planting the 2002
crop before program details are available. While determin-
ing how many acres and which varieties of peanuts to plant,
and more importantly obtaining loans to produce the crop,
are decisions and actions that may have to be made with
limited knowledge of program details. Growers will also
have to make other decisions, such as which farm to assign
the peanut basis, if the legislation is approved. An important
factor to consider when planning where and how many pea-
nuts to plant is the need for crop rotation. Plan on planting
peanuts on the same field only once in every 3-4 years. As
growers move into this new phase of peanut production, there
are many other fundamental principles of peanut production
that should not be forgotten.


BLUE MOLD OF TOBACCO

Blue mold has been reported in some Georgia plant beds.
Growers should make frequent inspections of beds and fields
of transplanted tobacco for signs of the disease. A bluish
fungus growth on the underside of leaves would be an early
sign, which progresses to yellow spots on the affected leaves.
Preventive applications of a fungicide on plant beds would
be much cheaper and more effective than waiting and hav-
ing to make applications in the field to control outbreaks.
Blue mold will be much more damaging during cool, wet
conditions.

EBW


EBW


TOBACCO GRADING REFERENDUM

The USDA has announced that the recent referendum to de-
termine if mandatory grading would be required for all to-
bacco has passed according to preliminary results. The flue-
cured tobacco growers favored mandatory grading at a 56
percent level, while burley growers were 75 percent in fa-
vor. Final results are expected in early April, and if the pre-
liminary results are confirmed, all tobacco, including that
contracted, would be graded by the federal grading service.


EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT LEGISLATION

A bill has been introduced in the House of Representatives
that, among other things, would provide for a buyout of quota.
Such a buyout would end the current system of production
control by paying quota holders and growers a total of $8
and $4 per pound, respectively, over a period of five years.
To provide these funds, a 'user fee' would be placed on to-
bacco. The proposal would also provide for some degree of
FDA regulation of tobacco. Other provisions are included
in the bill, but it is expected that there will be a number of
changes in the proposal before it reaches a vote.


EBW

STORED TOBACCO

With the warmer weather, insect pests that attack stored to-
bacco become more active. Increase the frequency of in-
spections for evidence of insect damage, and also of any
deterioration caused by high moisture content. If the tobacco
is still in racks or boxes in the curing barns, the fans can be
turned on during dry and warm days. This can reduce the
moisture content of the tobacco to protect against molds and
helps prevent insect damage.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR15 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Diagnosing
Herbicide Injury-2002
SSAGR35 Perennial Peanut Establishment Guide
SSAGR44 Peanut Varieties for 2002
SSAGR50 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Tropical Soda
Apple in Florida-2002
SSAGR52 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Cogongrass
(Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.) Biology,
Ecology and Management in Florida
SSAGR63 Forage Testing
SSAGR151 Harvesting and Storage of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR152 Fertilization of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR153 Liming of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR154 Inoculation of Agronomic Crop Legumes
SSAGR155 Water Use and Irrigation Management of Ag-
ronomic Crops
SSAGR161 Forage Planting and Establishment Guide
SSAGR162 Florida 2001 Short, Mid and Full-Season
Corn-Variety Tests for Silage and Grain
SSAGR163 2001 Florida Early, Mid, and Full Season
Cotton Variety Tests at Quincy and Jay

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.

SSAGR42 Rye and Triticale Breeding in the South

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Database Search
Engine. Type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click on the appropriate
button below (Find Keywords or Find Publication No.). You
will get a listing of publications. Please be sure to check the
date in the footnote on the first page to be sure it is the most up-
to-date publication for that topic.








growers may have to make decisions about planting the 2002
crop before program details are available. While determin-
ing how many acres and which varieties of peanuts to plant,
and more importantly obtaining loans to produce the crop,
are decisions and actions that may have to be made with
limited knowledge of program details. Growers will also
have to make other decisions, such as which farm to assign
the peanut basis, if the legislation is approved. An important
factor to consider when planning where and how many pea-
nuts to plant is the need for crop rotation. Plan on planting
peanuts on the same field only once in every 3-4 years. As
growers move into this new phase of peanut production, there
are many other fundamental principles of peanut production
that should not be forgotten.


BLUE MOLD OF TOBACCO

Blue mold has been reported in some Georgia plant beds.
Growers should make frequent inspections of beds and fields
of transplanted tobacco for signs of the disease. A bluish
fungus growth on the underside of leaves would be an early
sign, which progresses to yellow spots on the affected leaves.
Preventive applications of a fungicide on plant beds would
be much cheaper and more effective than waiting and hav-
ing to make applications in the field to control outbreaks.
Blue mold will be much more damaging during cool, wet
conditions.

EBW


EBW


TOBACCO GRADING REFERENDUM

The USDA has announced that the recent referendum to de-
termine if mandatory grading would be required for all to-
bacco has passed according to preliminary results. The flue-
cured tobacco growers favored mandatory grading at a 56
percent level, while burley growers were 75 percent in fa-
vor. Final results are expected in early April, and if the pre-
liminary results are confirmed, all tobacco, including that
contracted, would be graded by the federal grading service.


EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT LEGISLATION

A bill has been introduced in the House of Representatives
that, among other things, would provide for a buyout of quota.
Such a buyout would end the current system of production
control by paying quota holders and growers a total of $8
and $4 per pound, respectively, over a period of five years.
To provide these funds, a 'user fee' would be placed on to-
bacco. The proposal would also provide for some degree of
FDA regulation of tobacco. Other provisions are included
in the bill, but it is expected that there will be a number of
changes in the proposal before it reaches a vote.


EBW

STORED TOBACCO

With the warmer weather, insect pests that attack stored to-
bacco become more active. Increase the frequency of in-
spections for evidence of insect damage, and also of any
deterioration caused by high moisture content. If the tobacco
is still in racks or boxes in the curing barns, the fans can be
turned on during dry and warm days. This can reduce the
moisture content of the tobacco to protect against molds and
helps prevent insect damage.

EBW


PUBLICATIONS


The following publications have been recently UPDATED
and are available through EDIS. PDF files for these publi-
cations are also available.

SSAGR15 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Diagnosing
Herbicide Injury-2002
SSAGR35 Perennial Peanut Establishment Guide
SSAGR44 Peanut Varieties for 2002
SSAGR50 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Tropical Soda
Apple in Florida-2002
SSAGR52 WEEDS IN THE SUNSHINE: Cogongrass
(Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.) Biology,
Ecology and Management in Florida
SSAGR63 Forage Testing
SSAGR151 Harvesting and Storage of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR152 Fertilization of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR153 Liming of Agronomic Crops
SSAGR154 Inoculation of Agronomic Crop Legumes
SSAGR155 Water Use and Irrigation Management of Ag-
ronomic Crops
SSAGR161 Forage Planting and Establishment Guide
SSAGR162 Florida 2001 Short, Mid and Full-Season
Corn-Variety Tests for Silage and Grain
SSAGR163 2001 Florida Early, Mid, and Full Season
Cotton Variety Tests at Quincy and Jay

The following NEWpublications are available through EDIS.
A PDF file for each publication is also available.

SSAGR42 Rye and Triticale Breeding in the South

You can find EDIS at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/. Once that screen
fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Database Search
Engine. Type in the publication number (example: SSAGR01)
or Keyword (example: Bahiagrass). Click on the appropriate
button below (Find Keywords or Find Publication No.). You
will get a listing of publications. Please be sure to check the
date in the footnote on the first page to be sure it is the most up-
to-date publication for that topic.









PROSPECTIVE PLANTINGS FOR 2002


According to estimates provided by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the following are the prospective
plantings for 2002:


Crop 2002 Prospective Acres 2002 as a % of 2001

Florida United States Florida United States

Corn 65 79,047 100 104

Wheat, all 9 59,004 90 99

Hay, all 280 63,743 104 100

Soybeans 10 72,966 100 98
Peanuts 90 1,465 99 95

Cotton 110 14,770 88 94

Tobacco 4.5 429.4 100 99



In the same report, the USDA also gave the estimated percentage in the United States of three crops that are
planted to genetically modified varieties:


Crop 2001(% of total acres) 2002 (% of total acres)

Corn 26 32

Cotton 69 71

Soybeans 68 74


The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; E. B. Whitty, Extension Agronomist; and D. L. Wright, Extension Agronomist, North Florida Research
and Education Center.