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 Table of Contents
 Colored cotton
 Cotton in Florida
 Pasture establishment
 Pasture renovation
 Drought again!
 Poinsonous plants in pastures
 Chinch bugs on pasture grasses
 Life cycle and damage
 Soybean and acreage
 Valor receives section 3 in peanuts...
 Publications


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00014
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: May 2001
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00014

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Colored cotton
        Page 2
    Cotton in Florida
        Page 2
    Pasture establishment
        Page 2
    Pasture renovation
        Page 2
    Drought again!
        Page 2
    Poinsonous plants in pastures
        Page 2
    Chinch bugs on pasture grasses
        Page 3
    Life cycle and damage
        Page 3
    Soybean and acreage
        Page 3
    Valor receives section 3 in peanuts and soybeans
        Page 3
    Publications
        Page 4
Full Text






AGRONOMY

"- L. UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
EXTENSION My
Institute of Food and Agricl.tural Sciences May 2001





DATES TO REMEMBER

American Peanut Research & Education Society (APRES) July 17-20



IN THIS ISSUE PAGE



COTTON
C colored C otton ............................................................................................................................... 2
C otton in F lorida ............................................................................................................................ 2

FORAGE
Pasture E stablishm ent .............................................................................. ............................. 2
Pasture R enovation .................................................................................. ............................. 2
D rough t A gain ........................................................................................ ............................. 2
Poisonous Plants in Pastures .............................................. ................................................... 2
Chinch Bugs on Pasture Grasses ............................................. ..................................... 3
L ife C ycle and D am age ............................................................................ ............................. 3

SOYBEAN
Soybean A creage ............................................................................................................................ 3
Valor Receives Section Three in Peanuts and Soybeans ............................................................... 3

MISCELLANEOUS
P ub location s .................................................................................................................................... 4


The Institute of Food andAgricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other
extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food andAgricultural Sciences
/ University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director.









COLORED COTTON


We are often asked about colored cotton. There are shades
of brown, from light brown to a reddish brown, and green,
from yellowish green to a bluish green. Don't .... find
bright blue or red or other vivid colors. Colored cotton has
not had much : :. .::::. work done on it, and fiber is typi-
cally short, which results in discounts for growers because
of: ; ...... .:.. .... ..- !. W ith genetic technology, in
the : ...... we could see colored cotton that has I qual-
ity lint as well as more vivid color. A few companies have
done some work with it, but little is commercially available
and few companies are set up to make : .... : i:....... the cloth.

DLW

COTTON IN FLORIDA

F: : 14:- -. ... -.':: in cotton production of 17 states
that produce cotton across the cotton belt. Cotton is be-
i.. .i. have been planted i.: i i. .:. early as 1556 which
was :.. '. .- the first cotton grown in North America. We
expect to grow about 125,000 acres in :::: because pro-
grams favor cotton more than the :i: : :: : i::: :: :i :. w crops
grown in ... I ..: acreage is about : more than was
grox ... : : : Most of this cotton will be grown across the
with a small amount grown in :-. '.: *

DLW

PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

i:and May are...: :. too dry to plant a new :... or
hay field, : in peninsular Florida. :.:: :i:: .the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of. ,:- : -. start ..." the land
for i.' :.:F by plowing and/or : :. plus I .... :. to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed : : land
S. ... :.. begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur .. *:... June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. :... final i: ..
. ...... "... I .-.. .... :. :.. will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't :. : to use a land roller or
.::: : :.. : to pack or fiin the seed bed after planting.

CGC

PASTURE RENOVATION

It may be desirable to renovate an : : :.... if it has
deteriorated to the point that ... production is .:.
reduced. Renovation : .... i : : ..:- .": to fill in bull
holes, control weeds, ::: : : : lime, : :: i iand estab-
lish a new improved .


O n e .: : .. . i .. .. : ... .. .' : : '. [
: ::: .is where the cows will graze if the existing pasture
is destroyed. '.` : visiting .. recently, 1 learned that
one of the practices some of the ranchers there :.. ...' is to
:' part of the land in sorghum x sudangrass : 1
let. i :::: ::i. herbicide was used to kill the I i::: vegeta-
tion and pearl millet or sorghum x sudangrass was drilled
into the killed sod. This will, in a very short time, *.: .:' a
large volume of forage per unit of land. -.. : this area is
ready to graze, the remaining land area can be 1: r :: 1 for
. 1 ...:..: One of the i .. 1. :.. with using these productive
summer annual grasses is estimating what the forage pro-
duction will be how much and for how long.

CGC


DROUGHT AGAIN!


The : .:: ... note was --I '': i in Agronomy Notes April/
M ay 99, and :::::.:::::: :: it bears:. i. :il::-: this year.

The : .......: .: At this time of year (/. .. 1 T" ') the chances
of not i: :- a rain are greater than the chances of. : : a
rain. We are in a serious drought. Many i:::. have no
grass left or any grass remaining has "bro' ... :: Ranch-
ers must decide if and how they can feed their cattle in order
to sustain them through this drought. If feed has run out and
cattle are losing weight : :.i: a rancher may .:: ::- : to
hold on, thinking that a rain will come :.......... It will
take at least two weeks or longer after a rain : :.... there is
any ; ..:- .... : (grazable) :' :p on .: i:. that
have been grubbed to the sand. Do not wait too long to do
something about a difficult situation.

CGC

POISONOUS PLANTS IN PASTURES

Poisonous plants can be a serious problem in pastures dur-
ing a drought. Even though the plants have been in the pas-
ture for some time and the cattle have not : : :,: ::: some-
thing may '. : i. :. to cause the animals to start to graze. Ani-
mals are most likely to eat poisonous plants
in the fall after a frost
in the :...:: at greenup
during a drought
when animals are moved to a new area
Ranchers may be moving animals out : :::::. .i : :::
to rented pasture or woods in search of : ... The rancher
should check the new area for :... ........ plants and also
watch his animals for a i t- i:- 1 of time after they are placed
in the new area to see what plants they are eating. For ex-
ample, on one occasion in :-.. : : animals were hauled to a
:.. ... not normally used for grazing. It was one of those
"waste" areas, mostly woods. The animals found some green









COLORED COTTON


We are often asked about colored cotton. There are shades
of brown, from light brown to a reddish brown, and green,
from yellowish green to a bluish green. Don't .... find
bright blue or red or other vivid colors. Colored cotton has
not had much : :. .::::. work done on it, and fiber is typi-
cally short, which results in discounts for growers because
of: ; ...... .:.. .... ..- !. W ith genetic technology, in
the : ...... we could see colored cotton that has I qual-
ity lint as well as more vivid color. A few companies have
done some work with it, but little is commercially available
and few companies are set up to make : .... : i:....... the cloth.

DLW

COTTON IN FLORIDA

F: : 14:- -. ... -.':: in cotton production of 17 states
that produce cotton across the cotton belt. Cotton is be-
i.. .i. have been planted i.: i i. .:. early as 1556 which
was :.. '. .- the first cotton grown in North America. We
expect to grow about 125,000 acres in :::: because pro-
grams favor cotton more than the :i: : :: : i::: :: :i :. w crops
grown in ... I ..: acreage is about : more than was
grox ... : : : Most of this cotton will be grown across the
with a small amount grown in :-. '.: *

DLW

PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

i:and May are...: :. too dry to plant a new :... or
hay field, : in peninsular Florida. :.:: :i:: .the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of. ,:- : -. start ..." the land
for i.' :.:F by plowing and/or : :. plus I .... :. to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed : : land
S. ... :.. begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur .. *:... June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. :... final i: ..
. ...... "... I .-.. .... :. :.. will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't :. : to use a land roller or
.::: : :.. : to pack or fiin the seed bed after planting.

CGC

PASTURE RENOVATION

It may be desirable to renovate an : : :.... if it has
deteriorated to the point that ... production is .:.
reduced. Renovation : .... i : : ..:- .": to fill in bull
holes, control weeds, ::: : : : lime, : :: i iand estab-
lish a new improved .


O n e .: : .. . i .. .. : ... .. .' : : '. [
: ::: .is where the cows will graze if the existing pasture
is destroyed. '.` : visiting .. recently, 1 learned that
one of the practices some of the ranchers there :.. ...' is to
:' part of the land in sorghum x sudangrass : 1
let. i :::: ::i. herbicide was used to kill the I i::: vegeta-
tion and pearl millet or sorghum x sudangrass was drilled
into the killed sod. This will, in a very short time, *.: .:' a
large volume of forage per unit of land. -.. : this area is
ready to graze, the remaining land area can be 1: r :: 1 for
. 1 ...:..: One of the i .. 1. :.. with using these productive
summer annual grasses is estimating what the forage pro-
duction will be how much and for how long.

CGC


DROUGHT AGAIN!


The : .:: ... note was --I '': i in Agronomy Notes April/
M ay 99, and :::::.:::::: :: it bears:. i. :il::-: this year.

The : .......: .: At this time of year (/. .. 1 T" ') the chances
of not i: :- a rain are greater than the chances of. : : a
rain. We are in a serious drought. Many i:::. have no
grass left or any grass remaining has "bro' ... :: Ranch-
ers must decide if and how they can feed their cattle in order
to sustain them through this drought. If feed has run out and
cattle are losing weight : :.i: a rancher may .:: ::- : to
hold on, thinking that a rain will come :.......... It will
take at least two weeks or longer after a rain : :.... there is
any ; ..:- .... : (grazable) :' :p on .: i:. that
have been grubbed to the sand. Do not wait too long to do
something about a difficult situation.

CGC

POISONOUS PLANTS IN PASTURES

Poisonous plants can be a serious problem in pastures dur-
ing a drought. Even though the plants have been in the pas-
ture for some time and the cattle have not : : :,: ::: some-
thing may '. : i. :. to cause the animals to start to graze. Ani-
mals are most likely to eat poisonous plants
in the fall after a frost
in the :...:: at greenup
during a drought
when animals are moved to a new area
Ranchers may be moving animals out : :::::. .i : :::
to rented pasture or woods in search of : ... The rancher
should check the new area for :... ........ plants and also
watch his animals for a i t- i:- 1 of time after they are placed
in the new area to see what plants they are eating. For ex-
ample, on one occasion in :-.. : : animals were hauled to a
:.. ... not normally used for grazing. It was one of those
"waste" areas, mostly woods. The animals found some green









COLORED COTTON


We are often asked about colored cotton. There are shades
of brown, from light brown to a reddish brown, and green,
from yellowish green to a bluish green. Don't .... find
bright blue or red or other vivid colors. Colored cotton has
not had much : :. .::::. work done on it, and fiber is typi-
cally short, which results in discounts for growers because
of: ; ...... .:.. .... ..- !. W ith genetic technology, in
the : ...... we could see colored cotton that has I qual-
ity lint as well as more vivid color. A few companies have
done some work with it, but little is commercially available
and few companies are set up to make : .... : i:....... the cloth.

DLW

COTTON IN FLORIDA

F: : 14:- -. ... -.':: in cotton production of 17 states
that produce cotton across the cotton belt. Cotton is be-
i.. .i. have been planted i.: i i. .:. early as 1556 which
was :.. '. .- the first cotton grown in North America. We
expect to grow about 125,000 acres in :::: because pro-
grams favor cotton more than the :i: : :: : i::: :: :i :. w crops
grown in ... I ..: acreage is about : more than was
grox ... : : : Most of this cotton will be grown across the
with a small amount grown in :-. '.: *

DLW

PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

i:and May are...: :. too dry to plant a new :... or
hay field, : in peninsular Florida. :.:: :i:: .the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of. ,:- : -. start ..." the land
for i.' :.:F by plowing and/or : :. plus I .... :. to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed : : land
S. ... :.. begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur .. *:... June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. :... final i: ..
. ...... "... I .-.. .... :. :.. will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't :. : to use a land roller or
.::: : :.. : to pack or fiin the seed bed after planting.

CGC

PASTURE RENOVATION

It may be desirable to renovate an : : :.... if it has
deteriorated to the point that ... production is .:.
reduced. Renovation : .... i : : ..:- .": to fill in bull
holes, control weeds, ::: : : : lime, : :: i iand estab-
lish a new improved .


O n e .: : .. . i .. .. : ... .. .' : : '. [
: ::: .is where the cows will graze if the existing pasture
is destroyed. '.` : visiting .. recently, 1 learned that
one of the practices some of the ranchers there :.. ...' is to
:' part of the land in sorghum x sudangrass : 1
let. i :::: ::i. herbicide was used to kill the I i::: vegeta-
tion and pearl millet or sorghum x sudangrass was drilled
into the killed sod. This will, in a very short time, *.: .:' a
large volume of forage per unit of land. -.. : this area is
ready to graze, the remaining land area can be 1: r :: 1 for
. 1 ...:..: One of the i .. 1. :.. with using these productive
summer annual grasses is estimating what the forage pro-
duction will be how much and for how long.

CGC


DROUGHT AGAIN!


The : .:: ... note was --I '': i in Agronomy Notes April/
M ay 99, and :::::.:::::: :: it bears:. i. :il::-: this year.

The : .......: .: At this time of year (/. .. 1 T" ') the chances
of not i: :- a rain are greater than the chances of. : : a
rain. We are in a serious drought. Many i:::. have no
grass left or any grass remaining has "bro' ... :: Ranch-
ers must decide if and how they can feed their cattle in order
to sustain them through this drought. If feed has run out and
cattle are losing weight : :.i: a rancher may .:: ::- : to
hold on, thinking that a rain will come :.......... It will
take at least two weeks or longer after a rain : :.... there is
any ; ..:- .... : (grazable) :' :p on .: i:. that
have been grubbed to the sand. Do not wait too long to do
something about a difficult situation.

CGC

POISONOUS PLANTS IN PASTURES

Poisonous plants can be a serious problem in pastures dur-
ing a drought. Even though the plants have been in the pas-
ture for some time and the cattle have not : : :,: ::: some-
thing may '. : i. :. to cause the animals to start to graze. Ani-
mals are most likely to eat poisonous plants
in the fall after a frost
in the :...:: at greenup
during a drought
when animals are moved to a new area
Ranchers may be moving animals out : :::::. .i : :::
to rented pasture or woods in search of : ... The rancher
should check the new area for :... ........ plants and also
watch his animals for a i t- i:- 1 of time after they are placed
in the new area to see what plants they are eating. For ex-
ample, on one occasion in :-.. : : animals were hauled to a
:.. ... not normally used for grazing. It was one of those
"waste" areas, mostly woods. The animals found some green









COLORED COTTON


We are often asked about colored cotton. There are shades
of brown, from light brown to a reddish brown, and green,
from yellowish green to a bluish green. Don't .... find
bright blue or red or other vivid colors. Colored cotton has
not had much : :. .::::. work done on it, and fiber is typi-
cally short, which results in discounts for growers because
of: ; ...... .:.. .... ..- !. W ith genetic technology, in
the : ...... we could see colored cotton that has I qual-
ity lint as well as more vivid color. A few companies have
done some work with it, but little is commercially available
and few companies are set up to make : .... : i:....... the cloth.

DLW

COTTON IN FLORIDA

F: : 14:- -. ... -.':: in cotton production of 17 states
that produce cotton across the cotton belt. Cotton is be-
i.. .i. have been planted i.: i i. .:. early as 1556 which
was :.. '. .- the first cotton grown in North America. We
expect to grow about 125,000 acres in :::: because pro-
grams favor cotton more than the :i: : :: : i::: :: :i :. w crops
grown in ... I ..: acreage is about : more than was
grox ... : : : Most of this cotton will be grown across the
with a small amount grown in :-. '.: *

DLW

PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

i:and May are...: :. too dry to plant a new :... or
hay field, : in peninsular Florida. :.:: :i:: .the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of. ,:- : -. start ..." the land
for i.' :.:F by plowing and/or : :. plus I .... :. to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed : : land
S. ... :.. begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur .. *:... June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. :... final i: ..
. ...... "... I .-.. .... :. :.. will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't :. : to use a land roller or
.::: : :.. : to pack or fiin the seed bed after planting.

CGC

PASTURE RENOVATION

It may be desirable to renovate an : : :.... if it has
deteriorated to the point that ... production is .:.
reduced. Renovation : .... i : : ..:- .": to fill in bull
holes, control weeds, ::: : : : lime, : :: i iand estab-
lish a new improved .


O n e .: : .. . i .. .. : ... .. .' : : '. [
: ::: .is where the cows will graze if the existing pasture
is destroyed. '.` : visiting .. recently, 1 learned that
one of the practices some of the ranchers there :.. ...' is to
:' part of the land in sorghum x sudangrass : 1
let. i :::: ::i. herbicide was used to kill the I i::: vegeta-
tion and pearl millet or sorghum x sudangrass was drilled
into the killed sod. This will, in a very short time, *.: .:' a
large volume of forage per unit of land. -.. : this area is
ready to graze, the remaining land area can be 1: r :: 1 for
. 1 ...:..: One of the i .. 1. :.. with using these productive
summer annual grasses is estimating what the forage pro-
duction will be how much and for how long.

CGC


DROUGHT AGAIN!


The : .:: ... note was --I '': i in Agronomy Notes April/
M ay 99, and :::::.:::::: :: it bears:. i. :il::-: this year.

The : .......: .: At this time of year (/. .. 1 T" ') the chances
of not i: :- a rain are greater than the chances of. : : a
rain. We are in a serious drought. Many i:::. have no
grass left or any grass remaining has "bro' ... :: Ranch-
ers must decide if and how they can feed their cattle in order
to sustain them through this drought. If feed has run out and
cattle are losing weight : :.i: a rancher may .:: ::- : to
hold on, thinking that a rain will come :.......... It will
take at least two weeks or longer after a rain : :.... there is
any ; ..:- .... : (grazable) :' :p on .: i:. that
have been grubbed to the sand. Do not wait too long to do
something about a difficult situation.

CGC

POISONOUS PLANTS IN PASTURES

Poisonous plants can be a serious problem in pastures dur-
ing a drought. Even though the plants have been in the pas-
ture for some time and the cattle have not : : :,: ::: some-
thing may '. : i. :. to cause the animals to start to graze. Ani-
mals are most likely to eat poisonous plants
in the fall after a frost
in the :...:: at greenup
during a drought
when animals are moved to a new area
Ranchers may be moving animals out : :::::. .i : :::
to rented pasture or woods in search of : ... The rancher
should check the new area for :... ........ plants and also
watch his animals for a i t- i:- 1 of time after they are placed
in the new area to see what plants they are eating. For ex-
ample, on one occasion in :-.. : : animals were hauled to a
:.. ... not normally used for grazing. It was one of those
"waste" areas, mostly woods. The animals found some green









COLORED COTTON


We are often asked about colored cotton. There are shades
of brown, from light brown to a reddish brown, and green,
from yellowish green to a bluish green. Don't .... find
bright blue or red or other vivid colors. Colored cotton has
not had much : :. .::::. work done on it, and fiber is typi-
cally short, which results in discounts for growers because
of: ; ...... .:.. .... ..- !. W ith genetic technology, in
the : ...... we could see colored cotton that has I qual-
ity lint as well as more vivid color. A few companies have
done some work with it, but little is commercially available
and few companies are set up to make : .... : i:....... the cloth.

DLW

COTTON IN FLORIDA

F: : 14:- -. ... -.':: in cotton production of 17 states
that produce cotton across the cotton belt. Cotton is be-
i.. .i. have been planted i.: i i. .:. early as 1556 which
was :.. '. .- the first cotton grown in North America. We
expect to grow about 125,000 acres in :::: because pro-
grams favor cotton more than the :i: : :: : i::: :: :i :. w crops
grown in ... I ..: acreage is about : more than was
grox ... : : : Most of this cotton will be grown across the
with a small amount grown in :-. '.: *

DLW

PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

i:and May are...: :. too dry to plant a new :... or
hay field, : in peninsular Florida. :.:: :i:: .the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of. ,:- : -. start ..." the land
for i.' :.:F by plowing and/or : :. plus I .... :. to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed : : land
S. ... :.. begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur .. *:... June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. :... final i: ..
. ...... "... I .-.. .... :. :.. will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't :. : to use a land roller or
.::: : :.. : to pack or fiin the seed bed after planting.

CGC

PASTURE RENOVATION

It may be desirable to renovate an : : :.... if it has
deteriorated to the point that ... production is .:.
reduced. Renovation : .... i : : ..:- .": to fill in bull
holes, control weeds, ::: : : : lime, : :: i iand estab-
lish a new improved .


O n e .: : .. . i .. .. : ... .. .' : : '. [
: ::: .is where the cows will graze if the existing pasture
is destroyed. '.` : visiting .. recently, 1 learned that
one of the practices some of the ranchers there :.. ...' is to
:' part of the land in sorghum x sudangrass : 1
let. i :::: ::i. herbicide was used to kill the I i::: vegeta-
tion and pearl millet or sorghum x sudangrass was drilled
into the killed sod. This will, in a very short time, *.: .:' a
large volume of forage per unit of land. -.. : this area is
ready to graze, the remaining land area can be 1: r :: 1 for
. 1 ...:..: One of the i .. 1. :.. with using these productive
summer annual grasses is estimating what the forage pro-
duction will be how much and for how long.

CGC


DROUGHT AGAIN!


The : .:: ... note was --I '': i in Agronomy Notes April/
M ay 99, and :::::.:::::: :: it bears:. i. :il::-: this year.

The : .......: .: At this time of year (/. .. 1 T" ') the chances
of not i: :- a rain are greater than the chances of. : : a
rain. We are in a serious drought. Many i:::. have no
grass left or any grass remaining has "bro' ... :: Ranch-
ers must decide if and how they can feed their cattle in order
to sustain them through this drought. If feed has run out and
cattle are losing weight : :.i: a rancher may .:: ::- : to
hold on, thinking that a rain will come :.......... It will
take at least two weeks or longer after a rain : :.... there is
any ; ..:- .... : (grazable) :' :p on .: i:. that
have been grubbed to the sand. Do not wait too long to do
something about a difficult situation.

CGC

POISONOUS PLANTS IN PASTURES

Poisonous plants can be a serious problem in pastures dur-
ing a drought. Even though the plants have been in the pas-
ture for some time and the cattle have not : : :,: ::: some-
thing may '. : i. :. to cause the animals to start to graze. Ani-
mals are most likely to eat poisonous plants
in the fall after a frost
in the :...:: at greenup
during a drought
when animals are moved to a new area
Ranchers may be moving animals out : :::::. .i : :::
to rented pasture or woods in search of : ... The rancher
should check the new area for :... ........ plants and also
watch his animals for a i t- i:- 1 of time after they are placed
in the new area to see what plants they are eating. For ex-
ample, on one occasion in :-.. : : animals were hauled to a
:.. ... not normally used for grazing. It was one of those
"waste" areas, mostly woods. The animals found some green









COLORED COTTON


We are often asked about colored cotton. There are shades
of brown, from light brown to a reddish brown, and green,
from yellowish green to a bluish green. Don't .... find
bright blue or red or other vivid colors. Colored cotton has
not had much : :. .::::. work done on it, and fiber is typi-
cally short, which results in discounts for growers because
of: ; ...... .:.. .... ..- !. W ith genetic technology, in
the : ...... we could see colored cotton that has I qual-
ity lint as well as more vivid color. A few companies have
done some work with it, but little is commercially available
and few companies are set up to make : .... : i:....... the cloth.

DLW

COTTON IN FLORIDA

F: : 14:- -. ... -.':: in cotton production of 17 states
that produce cotton across the cotton belt. Cotton is be-
i.. .i. have been planted i.: i i. .:. early as 1556 which
was :.. '. .- the first cotton grown in North America. We
expect to grow about 125,000 acres in :::: because pro-
grams favor cotton more than the :i: : :: : i::: :: :i :. w crops
grown in ... I ..: acreage is about : more than was
grox ... : : : Most of this cotton will be grown across the
with a small amount grown in :-. '.: *

DLW

PASTURE ESTABLISHMENT

i:and May are...: :. too dry to plant a new :... or
hay field, : in peninsular Florida. :.:: :i:: .the
summer rains usually start and the risk of drought decreases.
During the dry period of. ,:- : -. start ..." the land
for i.' :.:F by plowing and/or : :. plus I .... :. to
smooth and level the land. Add lime if needed : : land
S. ... :.. begins. Be prepared to obtain seed or planting
material and plant when the summer rains start. The fre-
quent rains that occur .. *:... June, July, and August make
this period a particularly good time for pasture establish-
ment. Always plant into a moist seed bed. :... final i: ..
. ...... "... I .-.. .... :. :.. will destroy any weeds that
have germinated. Don't :. : to use a land roller or
.::: : :.. : to pack or fiin the seed bed after planting.

CGC

PASTURE RENOVATION

It may be desirable to renovate an : : :.... if it has
deteriorated to the point that ... production is .:.
reduced. Renovation : .... i : : ..:- .": to fill in bull
holes, control weeds, ::: : : : lime, : :: i iand estab-
lish a new improved .


O n e .: : .. . i .. .. : ... .. .' : : '. [
: ::: .is where the cows will graze if the existing pasture
is destroyed. '.` : visiting .. recently, 1 learned that
one of the practices some of the ranchers there :.. ...' is to
:' part of the land in sorghum x sudangrass : 1
let. i :::: ::i. herbicide was used to kill the I i::: vegeta-
tion and pearl millet or sorghum x sudangrass was drilled
into the killed sod. This will, in a very short time, *.: .:' a
large volume of forage per unit of land. -.. : this area is
ready to graze, the remaining land area can be 1: r :: 1 for
. 1 ...:..: One of the i .. 1. :.. with using these productive
summer annual grasses is estimating what the forage pro-
duction will be how much and for how long.

CGC


DROUGHT AGAIN!


The : .:: ... note was --I '': i in Agronomy Notes April/
M ay 99, and :::::.:::::: :: it bears:. i. :il::-: this year.

The : .......: .: At this time of year (/. .. 1 T" ') the chances
of not i: :- a rain are greater than the chances of. : : a
rain. We are in a serious drought. Many i:::. have no
grass left or any grass remaining has "bro' ... :: Ranch-
ers must decide if and how they can feed their cattle in order
to sustain them through this drought. If feed has run out and
cattle are losing weight : :.i: a rancher may .:: ::- : to
hold on, thinking that a rain will come :.......... It will
take at least two weeks or longer after a rain : :.... there is
any ; ..:- .... : (grazable) :' :p on .: i:. that
have been grubbed to the sand. Do not wait too long to do
something about a difficult situation.

CGC

POISONOUS PLANTS IN PASTURES

Poisonous plants can be a serious problem in pastures dur-
ing a drought. Even though the plants have been in the pas-
ture for some time and the cattle have not : : :,: ::: some-
thing may '. : i. :. to cause the animals to start to graze. Ani-
mals are most likely to eat poisonous plants
in the fall after a frost
in the :...:: at greenup
during a drought
when animals are moved to a new area
Ranchers may be moving animals out : :::::. .i : :::
to rented pasture or woods in search of : ... The rancher
should check the new area for :... ........ plants and also
watch his animals for a i t- i:- 1 of time after they are placed
in the new area to see what plants they are eating. For ex-
ample, on one occasion in :-.. : : animals were hauled to a
:.. ... not normally used for grazing. It was one of those
"waste" areas, mostly woods. The animals found some green









plants growing around the edge of a wooded area. They
were ..... they grazed the bracken fern and -

The :, i. ..... web site lists and shows pictures of various
plants: 1.:: '" : w v ... :... '. .
poisonous/content.htm.

CGC


CHINCH BUGS ON PASTURE GRASSES

Chinch bugs (Order i :.': :. : Family Lygaeidae) are pri-
marily a : of turf grasses in : .... however, they can
seriously ...... pasture grasses. They are most abundant
in dry years. They i': i thin stands of grass that may be
: on poor soils in dry weather or when over grazed.
The adult chinch bug is 1/3 inch long with a black body and
white wing covers, each with a black triangle at the middle
of its outer margin. Ci:::: i: 1 :: : :::r 1: are : i: :: :with a
white band across their backs. Older .: : ..:.. are .. .:.i: :.
brown with a white band. Eggs are white when first laid but
turn bright orange : : .. :'.... hatching. The casual observer
does not :: : :i i see them because they are:: :::i: placed
between the .r sheath and stem.

RKS

LIFE CYCLE AND DAMAGE

During winter, the chinch bug is an adult or a large nymph
in the thatch of infested fields. Activity resumes in the spring
when ...*I ::':' exceed 65F. Females lay 45-100.
over a period of several weeks. Eggs hatch in 8-9 days, and
the young .. ...:.H. usually feed in ..... ..1 areas such as
under the leaf sheaths. The ......:1. go through 5 instars
over a period of 30-50 days. Most of the damage is due to
.: by the nymphs. Nymphs as well as adults, puncture
the plant tissue with their needle-like mouth :. .? and suck
out the plantjuices. Heavily infested areas turn yellow and
then brown. As chinch ... .: ..i : green tissue in one area,
they may migrate to new areas causing the existing area to
.. or new areas to form. :1. ... all pasture grasses
may be infested by the chinch bug, i: .:. i .. ..:.. .and
Callide '.:- .: areparticularly i-.: :. to :
by this pest.

RKS

SOYBEAN ACREAGE

Soybeans represent about. ': of the i. s oilseed
production,with about .::' of that produced in the United
S. Even the though market price of soybean has been
down for the last several years, it is : i that the U.S.
S.ii about73.:.... :. .. which is only exceeded


by corn with about one million more acres. Florida is ex-
S... to have only a few thousand acres in soybean, since
we have the climate to grow many other crops when :
are depressed and there are markets for other crops. In the
early 80s, Florida grew about 1/2 million acres of soybean.


DLW

VALOR RECEIVES SECTION THREE IN PEANUTS AND
SOYBEANS

Valor WDG herbicide recently received a Section 3 federal
label for use in i .....i and soybeans. It can be :; :
either as a burndown in peanuts and soybeans or as a
:.. .... .. for broadleaf weed control. Valor can be used
as : : of an early :- :. :.i bumndown .... ..... in cotton,
field corn, rice, sorghum, sunflowers, and wheat when 'I
: ::. .: more than 30 days prior to i 1 .:::i:: It provides ex-
cellent control of : ... .: .w eed. It also controls'- .;"
croton, Florida pusley, ii... .......... :. .. hairy in-
digo, and ':i:

Valor is rainfast one hour after .: :. : .i:.. .. ..... can
occur if Valor is i-:- : to .... .. drained soils and/or ap-
.i. :, ... : made under cool, wet conditions. Moisture is
necessary to activate Valor in soil for residual weed control;
dry weather may reduce effectiveness. However, if mois-
ture is received : ..ii ... dry conditions, Valor will control
S : .. :. : weeds.

To ensure uniform coverage, use 10 to 30 gallons of :
solution per acre for preemergence *.:- .-. and 15 to
30 gallons of spray solution i : acre for bumndown : .
tions. Valor can be used at 1 to 2 oz/A with Glyphomax,
( .: :...:. (.. 'lus, ( : P s, P .......l .: UltraM ax,
C:i .:... Max, C:. ... :. (glyphosate); Gramoxone Max,
Boa :' : :: '( :. :.. 5) r:: *.:* or2,4-D contain-
ing products to enhance the : of bumrdown and increase
the weed spectrum. A : .: ., interval is required if planting
to cotton, field corn, sorghum, tobacco, sunflowers, or wheat
if no more than 2 oz/A of Valor had been used. Valor can
be used at 1 to 3 oz/A in soybean and peanut bundown


A : .. .... .. I : .::. of Valor should be made within
3 days after planting and prior .:.::. emergence. ,'.i.
cations made after the peanut emerges will result in severe
crop injury or death. Valor can be tank-mixed with Pendimax
3.3, Prow l .i. -. :... : :: ... i or : .... (. ::.: : :.. pro-
vided overhead irrigation :::.i i:::. on the i: i and
.. .. .: .. labels are followed.


JAT









plants growing around the edge of a wooded area. They
were ..... they grazed the bracken fern and -

The :, i. ..... web site lists and shows pictures of various
plants: 1.:: '" : w v ... :... '. .
poisonous/content.htm.

CGC


CHINCH BUGS ON PASTURE GRASSES

Chinch bugs (Order i :.': :. : Family Lygaeidae) are pri-
marily a : of turf grasses in : .... however, they can
seriously ...... pasture grasses. They are most abundant
in dry years. They i': i thin stands of grass that may be
: on poor soils in dry weather or when over grazed.
The adult chinch bug is 1/3 inch long with a black body and
white wing covers, each with a black triangle at the middle
of its outer margin. Ci:::: i: 1 :: : :::r 1: are : i: :: :with a
white band across their backs. Older .: : ..:.. are .. .:.i: :.
brown with a white band. Eggs are white when first laid but
turn bright orange : : .. :'.... hatching. The casual observer
does not :: : :i i see them because they are:: :::i: placed
between the .r sheath and stem.

RKS

LIFE CYCLE AND DAMAGE

During winter, the chinch bug is an adult or a large nymph
in the thatch of infested fields. Activity resumes in the spring
when ...*I ::':' exceed 65F. Females lay 45-100.
over a period of several weeks. Eggs hatch in 8-9 days, and
the young .. ...:.H. usually feed in ..... ..1 areas such as
under the leaf sheaths. The ......:1. go through 5 instars
over a period of 30-50 days. Most of the damage is due to
.: by the nymphs. Nymphs as well as adults, puncture
the plant tissue with their needle-like mouth :. .? and suck
out the plantjuices. Heavily infested areas turn yellow and
then brown. As chinch ... .: ..i : green tissue in one area,
they may migrate to new areas causing the existing area to
.. or new areas to form. :1. ... all pasture grasses
may be infested by the chinch bug, i: .:. i .. ..:.. .and
Callide '.:- .: areparticularly i-.: :. to :
by this pest.

RKS

SOYBEAN ACREAGE

Soybeans represent about. ': of the i. s oilseed
production,with about .::' of that produced in the United
S. Even the though market price of soybean has been
down for the last several years, it is : i that the U.S.
S.ii about73.:.... :. .. which is only exceeded


by corn with about one million more acres. Florida is ex-
S... to have only a few thousand acres in soybean, since
we have the climate to grow many other crops when :
are depressed and there are markets for other crops. In the
early 80s, Florida grew about 1/2 million acres of soybean.


DLW

VALOR RECEIVES SECTION THREE IN PEANUTS AND
SOYBEANS

Valor WDG herbicide recently received a Section 3 federal
label for use in i .....i and soybeans. It can be :; :
either as a burndown in peanuts and soybeans or as a
:.. .... .. for broadleaf weed control. Valor can be used
as : : of an early :- :. :.i bumndown .... ..... in cotton,
field corn, rice, sorghum, sunflowers, and wheat when 'I
: ::. .: more than 30 days prior to i 1 .:::i:: It provides ex-
cellent control of : ... .: .w eed. It also controls'- .;"
croton, Florida pusley, ii... .......... :. .. hairy in-
digo, and ':i:

Valor is rainfast one hour after .: :. : .i:.. .. ..... can
occur if Valor is i-:- : to .... .. drained soils and/or ap-
.i. :, ... : made under cool, wet conditions. Moisture is
necessary to activate Valor in soil for residual weed control;
dry weather may reduce effectiveness. However, if mois-
ture is received : ..ii ... dry conditions, Valor will control
S : .. :. : weeds.

To ensure uniform coverage, use 10 to 30 gallons of :
solution per acre for preemergence *.:- .-. and 15 to
30 gallons of spray solution i : acre for bumndown : .
tions. Valor can be used at 1 to 2 oz/A with Glyphomax,
( .: :...:. (.. 'lus, ( : P s, P .......l .: UltraM ax,
C:i .:... Max, C:. ... :. (glyphosate); Gramoxone Max,
Boa :' : :: '( :. :.. 5) r:: *.:* or2,4-D contain-
ing products to enhance the : of bumrdown and increase
the weed spectrum. A : .: ., interval is required if planting
to cotton, field corn, sorghum, tobacco, sunflowers, or wheat
if no more than 2 oz/A of Valor had been used. Valor can
be used at 1 to 3 oz/A in soybean and peanut bundown


A : .. .... .. I : .::. of Valor should be made within
3 days after planting and prior .:.::. emergence. ,'.i.
cations made after the peanut emerges will result in severe
crop injury or death. Valor can be tank-mixed with Pendimax
3.3, Prow l .i. -. :... : :: ... i or : .... (. ::.: : :.. pro-
vided overhead irrigation :::.i i:::. on the i: i and
.. .. .: .. labels are followed.


JAT









plants growing around the edge of a wooded area. They
were ..... they grazed the bracken fern and -

The :, i. ..... web site lists and shows pictures of various
plants: 1.:: '" : w v ... :... '. .
poisonous/content.htm.

CGC


CHINCH BUGS ON PASTURE GRASSES

Chinch bugs (Order i :.': :. : Family Lygaeidae) are pri-
marily a : of turf grasses in : .... however, they can
seriously ...... pasture grasses. They are most abundant
in dry years. They i': i thin stands of grass that may be
: on poor soils in dry weather or when over grazed.
The adult chinch bug is 1/3 inch long with a black body and
white wing covers, each with a black triangle at the middle
of its outer margin. Ci:::: i: 1 :: : :::r 1: are : i: :: :with a
white band across their backs. Older .: : ..:.. are .. .:.i: :.
brown with a white band. Eggs are white when first laid but
turn bright orange : : .. :'.... hatching. The casual observer
does not :: : :i i see them because they are:: :::i: placed
between the .r sheath and stem.

RKS

LIFE CYCLE AND DAMAGE

During winter, the chinch bug is an adult or a large nymph
in the thatch of infested fields. Activity resumes in the spring
when ...*I ::':' exceed 65F. Females lay 45-100.
over a period of several weeks. Eggs hatch in 8-9 days, and
the young .. ...:.H. usually feed in ..... ..1 areas such as
under the leaf sheaths. The ......:1. go through 5 instars
over a period of 30-50 days. Most of the damage is due to
.: by the nymphs. Nymphs as well as adults, puncture
the plant tissue with their needle-like mouth :. .? and suck
out the plantjuices. Heavily infested areas turn yellow and
then brown. As chinch ... .: ..i : green tissue in one area,
they may migrate to new areas causing the existing area to
.. or new areas to form. :1. ... all pasture grasses
may be infested by the chinch bug, i: .:. i .. ..:.. .and
Callide '.:- .: areparticularly i-.: :. to :
by this pest.

RKS

SOYBEAN ACREAGE

Soybeans represent about. ': of the i. s oilseed
production,with about .::' of that produced in the United
S. Even the though market price of soybean has been
down for the last several years, it is : i that the U.S.
S.ii about73.:.... :. .. which is only exceeded


by corn with about one million more acres. Florida is ex-
S... to have only a few thousand acres in soybean, since
we have the climate to grow many other crops when :
are depressed and there are markets for other crops. In the
early 80s, Florida grew about 1/2 million acres of soybean.


DLW

VALOR RECEIVES SECTION THREE IN PEANUTS AND
SOYBEANS

Valor WDG herbicide recently received a Section 3 federal
label for use in i .....i and soybeans. It can be :; :
either as a burndown in peanuts and soybeans or as a
:.. .... .. for broadleaf weed control. Valor can be used
as : : of an early :- :. :.i bumndown .... ..... in cotton,
field corn, rice, sorghum, sunflowers, and wheat when 'I
: ::. .: more than 30 days prior to i 1 .:::i:: It provides ex-
cellent control of : ... .: .w eed. It also controls'- .;"
croton, Florida pusley, ii... .......... :. .. hairy in-
digo, and ':i:

Valor is rainfast one hour after .: :. : .i:.. .. ..... can
occur if Valor is i-:- : to .... .. drained soils and/or ap-
.i. :, ... : made under cool, wet conditions. Moisture is
necessary to activate Valor in soil for residual weed control;
dry weather may reduce effectiveness. However, if mois-
ture is received : ..ii ... dry conditions, Valor will control
S : .. :. : weeds.

To ensure uniform coverage, use 10 to 30 gallons of :
solution per acre for preemergence *.:- .-. and 15 to
30 gallons of spray solution i : acre for bumndown : .
tions. Valor can be used at 1 to 2 oz/A with Glyphomax,
( .: :...:. (.. 'lus, ( : P s, P .......l .: UltraM ax,
C:i .:... Max, C:. ... :. (glyphosate); Gramoxone Max,
Boa :' : :: '( :. :.. 5) r:: *.:* or2,4-D contain-
ing products to enhance the : of bumrdown and increase
the weed spectrum. A : .: ., interval is required if planting
to cotton, field corn, sorghum, tobacco, sunflowers, or wheat
if no more than 2 oz/A of Valor had been used. Valor can
be used at 1 to 3 oz/A in soybean and peanut bundown


A : .. .... .. I : .::. of Valor should be made within
3 days after planting and prior .:.::. emergence. ,'.i.
cations made after the peanut emerges will result in severe
crop injury or death. Valor can be tank-mixed with Pendimax
3.3, Prow l .i. -. :... : :: ... i or : .... (. ::.: : :.. pro-
vided overhead irrigation :::.i i:::. on the i: i and
.. .. .: .. labels are followed.


JAT









plants growing around the edge of a wooded area. They
were ..... they grazed the bracken fern and -

The :, i. ..... web site lists and shows pictures of various
plants: 1.:: '" : w v ... :... '. .
poisonous/content.htm.

CGC


CHINCH BUGS ON PASTURE GRASSES

Chinch bugs (Order i :.': :. : Family Lygaeidae) are pri-
marily a : of turf grasses in : .... however, they can
seriously ...... pasture grasses. They are most abundant
in dry years. They i': i thin stands of grass that may be
: on poor soils in dry weather or when over grazed.
The adult chinch bug is 1/3 inch long with a black body and
white wing covers, each with a black triangle at the middle
of its outer margin. Ci:::: i: 1 :: : :::r 1: are : i: :: :with a
white band across their backs. Older .: : ..:.. are .. .:.i: :.
brown with a white band. Eggs are white when first laid but
turn bright orange : : .. :'.... hatching. The casual observer
does not :: : :i i see them because they are:: :::i: placed
between the .r sheath and stem.

RKS

LIFE CYCLE AND DAMAGE

During winter, the chinch bug is an adult or a large nymph
in the thatch of infested fields. Activity resumes in the spring
when ...*I ::':' exceed 65F. Females lay 45-100.
over a period of several weeks. Eggs hatch in 8-9 days, and
the young .. ...:.H. usually feed in ..... ..1 areas such as
under the leaf sheaths. The ......:1. go through 5 instars
over a period of 30-50 days. Most of the damage is due to
.: by the nymphs. Nymphs as well as adults, puncture
the plant tissue with their needle-like mouth :. .? and suck
out the plantjuices. Heavily infested areas turn yellow and
then brown. As chinch ... .: ..i : green tissue in one area,
they may migrate to new areas causing the existing area to
.. or new areas to form. :1. ... all pasture grasses
may be infested by the chinch bug, i: .:. i .. ..:.. .and
Callide '.:- .: areparticularly i-.: :. to :
by this pest.

RKS

SOYBEAN ACREAGE

Soybeans represent about. ': of the i. s oilseed
production,with about .::' of that produced in the United
S. Even the though market price of soybean has been
down for the last several years, it is : i that the U.S.
S.ii about73.:.... :. .. which is only exceeded


by corn with about one million more acres. Florida is ex-
S... to have only a few thousand acres in soybean, since
we have the climate to grow many other crops when :
are depressed and there are markets for other crops. In the
early 80s, Florida grew about 1/2 million acres of soybean.


DLW

VALOR RECEIVES SECTION THREE IN PEANUTS AND
SOYBEANS

Valor WDG herbicide recently received a Section 3 federal
label for use in i .....i and soybeans. It can be :; :
either as a burndown in peanuts and soybeans or as a
:.. .... .. for broadleaf weed control. Valor can be used
as : : of an early :- :. :.i bumndown .... ..... in cotton,
field corn, rice, sorghum, sunflowers, and wheat when 'I
: ::. .: more than 30 days prior to i 1 .:::i:: It provides ex-
cellent control of : ... .: .w eed. It also controls'- .;"
croton, Florida pusley, ii... .......... :. .. hairy in-
digo, and ':i:

Valor is rainfast one hour after .: :. : .i:.. .. ..... can
occur if Valor is i-:- : to .... .. drained soils and/or ap-
.i. :, ... : made under cool, wet conditions. Moisture is
necessary to activate Valor in soil for residual weed control;
dry weather may reduce effectiveness. However, if mois-
ture is received : ..ii ... dry conditions, Valor will control
S : .. :. : weeds.

To ensure uniform coverage, use 10 to 30 gallons of :
solution per acre for preemergence *.:- .-. and 15 to
30 gallons of spray solution i : acre for bumndown : .
tions. Valor can be used at 1 to 2 oz/A with Glyphomax,
( .: :...:. (.. 'lus, ( : P s, P .......l .: UltraM ax,
C:i .:... Max, C:. ... :. (glyphosate); Gramoxone Max,
Boa :' : :: '( :. :.. 5) r:: *.:* or2,4-D contain-
ing products to enhance the : of bumrdown and increase
the weed spectrum. A : .: ., interval is required if planting
to cotton, field corn, sorghum, tobacco, sunflowers, or wheat
if no more than 2 oz/A of Valor had been used. Valor can
be used at 1 to 3 oz/A in soybean and peanut bundown


A : .. .... .. I : .::. of Valor should be made within
3 days after planting and prior .:.::. emergence. ,'.i.
cations made after the peanut emerges will result in severe
crop injury or death. Valor can be tank-mixed with Pendimax
3.3, Prow l .i. -. :... : :: ... i or : .... (. ::.: : :.. pro-
vided overhead irrigation :::.i i:::. on the i: i and
.. .. .: .. labels are followed.


JAT









PUBLICATIONS


The . ..: i...i : i... : have been recently .'. : .')
and are available : ...... 1. EDIS. A PDF file for each
: .. ....... is also available.

i '. : .i :... .. :. in T., .:
Herbicide-b .....
: :. .. .. ...... ... "Triansgenic, Herbicide-
: : :::: Cotton
. .::. :.of Herbicide : : .

The: ..- .. VEW: .. ................ through EDIS.
A PDF file for each i.::i:: ::: :: is also : :i

': 9 Perennial Peanut-Source List of Planting Ma-
terial (: : .....* and Hay
Variety and Other T:: : of Several Forage
Grasses and L ..:... i :... .1. Corn and
Grain Sorghum
.. j .. .. : ..:... an d : : .. .. ..... ,: :' -. Id s
S '. of '= : : :: M id-, and Full-Sea-
son :. : Corn Variety : in : .:
..:: of :::: Early and Late. Cot-
ton Variety Tests in '.

.. can find : :: '.:. :,...:i .. Once the screen
fully loads, find the box that says Integrated Database Search
Engine.. .- ," i: -,- : :.. ,.. .......,:,. (example:
or Keyword :::: :. : .. Click on the
ate button below i .:..J Keywords or Find i ..:-.: .. No.).
You willget : :..._ of i...:. .r ..... Please be sure to check
the date in the 5 "*.. on the : -* to be sure it is the
most *:: i -date d :: i: ::: :: for that topic.























The use of trade names does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not approval to the exclusion of ....:
products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman; C. G. Chambliss, Extension Agronomist; R.K. Sprenkel, Extension Agronomist, North Florida rb
and Education Center; J. A. Tredaway, Extension Agronomist; and D. L. : .. Extension Agronomist, North Florida Research and .
Center.