<%BANNER%>
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 Tobacco quota for 1999
 Tobacco buyout proposal
 Tobacco baling updates
 Tobacco plant bed maintenance
 Peanut quotes 1999
 Line source for peanuts
 Establishment of perennial peanut...
 Corn silage acreage and yields
 Sources of hay
 Grass tetany in cattle
 Corrections in December Agronomy...
 Update on methyl bromide situa...
 Agronomists with Extension...


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00005
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: January 1999
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00005

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Tobacco quota for 1999
        Page 2
    Tobacco buyout proposal
        Page 2
    Tobacco baling updates
        Page 2
    Tobacco plant bed maintenance
        Page 2
    Peanut quotes 1999
        Page 2
    Line source for peanuts
        Page 2
    Establishment of perennial peanut in highway mediums
        Page 3
    Corn silage acreage and yields
        Page 3
    Sources of hay
        Page 3
    Grass tetany in cattle
        Page 3
    Corrections in December Agronomy Notes
        Page 4
    Update on methyl bromide situation
        Page 4
    Agronomists with Extension responsibilities
        Page 4
Full Text






AGRONOMY


UNIVERSITY OF
"FLORIDA
Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


NOTES


January 1999


DATES TO REMEMBER


January 26 27
January 30 February 3
February 8


Agronomic Crops In-Service Training Quincy, FL
Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists Memphis, TN
Tobacco Shortcourse Live Oak, FL


IN THIS ISSUE


TOBACCO
T ob acco Q uota for 1999 ................................................................................................................ 2
T tobacco B uyout P proposal ........................................................ ................................................ 2
Tobacco Baling Update ........................................................................ ........................... 2
Tobacco Plant Bed Maintenance ........................................... .................................................. 2

PEANUT
P eanut Q u otas for 1999 .................................................................................................................. 2
L im e Source for P eanuts ................................................................................................................ 2

PERENNIAL PEANUT
Establishment ofArachis glabrata in Highway Medians ........................................ ... ....... 3

CORN
Corn Silage Acreage and Yields ............................................ ............................................ 3

FORAGE
Sources of Hay .......................... ..... ..................... 3
G rass T etany in C battle ............................................................................... ............................... 3

MISCELLANEOUS
Corrections in December Agronomy Notes ......................................... .............................. 4
Update on Methyl Bromide Situation ...................................... ................................................ 4
Agronomists with Extension Responsibilites .......................................................... ................. 4


PAGE


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other
extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
/ University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director









TOBACCO QUOTA FOR 1999


The USDA announced on: .:.:.. 15 that the 1999
flue- .... .. ...... .::... million pounds. which
is a reduction of 18% from the 1998 quota. This reduction
comes on top of the :::1: i qi:: : :: ::the 1997
level. These cuts are due to lower intentions to purchase by
the manufacturers and to increased levels of stocks in stor-
age. The 1999 quota will be the lowest since the :..... ....
began in the 1930's. i : : : has about '.. of the national
quota, which.., i .: .... 14 million pounds. If this quota is
produced and average yields are received, the value of the
1999 crop will be about $24 million. In 1996, the value of
tobacco i- i:: i :: i:: ii ::i was over $36 million.

EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT PROPOSAL

S: ::: ::: of some of the tobacco-producing states
and the domestic : ... ::. manufacturers are discussing pos-
sible quota buyouts as a means of replacing some of the
farm income lost by the reductions in tobacco quotas. No
agreements have been reached, bi: ::::i: : ::: :::. will be
held in late January.

EBW

TOBACCO BALING UPDATE

The .' ... .. r Flue Cured Advisory Committee met
on December 30 and 1..: ... 1 the : .:: ... rules for:.....
in 1999:

1. The dimensions of the bales for 1999 .:: be identical to
those of 1997 and 1998 : cube).

2. : .1 : lb (+/- 100 lb) with no price support.. i i
over 850 lb and strong discouragement for bales under 650
lb.


3. The nominal density is still 18 iii .. : foot.


4. Moisture no more than 18%, but great enough to prevent
shattering. Bale temperature no more than 1050 F

5. Bale wire may be round or oval. 12 to 13 V2 gauge, un-
coated, and may range from 144 to 150" in length. It must be
pre-knotted (have pre-formed loops). No : .. :. :ii ..
and bales must have a minimum of 4 wires.

6. :.. :. : must be white on both sides, 250 lb test strength,
have two side :i : and have a water resistant coating on the
bottom. Any slipsheets in inventory from 1998 that do not
.... .the above (i.e. brown on one or both sides) may
be used within 6 weeks of the : -..:. sale in 1999.


7. The Committee failed to reach an agreement on tags and
sent it to a sub-committee.

8. Bales will be -. i : : i on the warehouse floor with a 12"
i : between bales in a row and have 30" between rows.

9. The Committee recommended that the Secretary of Agri-
culture approve bales as a :* i.: :- option (the other is
sheets) for flue cured tobacco in 1 i::: far, bales have
been marketed under an :. ... .1 option.

EBW

TOBACCO PLANT BED MAINTENANCE

During January. a .... ... .. :'. tobacco plant beds is
to insure that good germination and stands are obtained. In-
spect the beds :: .::: : :i to see if the soil ::: : is moist
and if seed are germinating. Under normal weather condi-
tions, seed should germinate in about 2 weeks. If a good
stand is not 1 .. ': .- try to determine the cause and cor-
rectit. !:::.1 :: :! moistureis :: :::: .. :i : majorreasonfor
slow germination and poor stands, but there could be other
reasons. It is important to get a good stand in January in
order to have plants ready i .. ... ..:... in March. Ifun-
S: : warm temperatures develop, be sure to : .: 1: .1
in the : .1 i :i covers if this was not done at the time of seed-
ing. In the case of extreme heat. the covers may have to be
removed to ... ... .. : of stand. On the other hand, be pre-
S:: toi .:' IT extra cover for the beds if extremely cold
' : ,. : ,; .. : .: ,1, !. . .: 11 asthe i. : getolder.
Inspect the beds for the presence of insects, :-. 11 cut-
worms or larvae of vegetable. :i and for :. .. such
as i::::i::. ..' Be prepared to :t : F::::.5 i:i to.: ::
blue mold when the covers are removed or :: : : : the dis-
ease is reported to be in the area. Another operation to con-
sider is :*-- ........: ditches around the beds. :-:: -. are located
in wet areas or if soil or water could wash across the beds.
i .. : contamination of the plant bed soil with non-fumi-
gated soil when covering or uncovering the beds.


EBW


PEANUT QUOTAS FOR 1999

The USDA has announced that the national ....:...
for : .- ,.- -: be : : .: 100 tn, which is 1% above the 1998
.::. : The peanut quota is the amount considered to be ad-
equate to meet the domestic demand. The 1999 support level
is : : :.. Florida's .....: ::i. national quota will be same
as in 1998.

EBW


LIME SOURCE FOR PEANUTS


1:: :.:i i:: ::i I :: i::. :': soil pH, lime is used to provide









TOBACCO QUOTA FOR 1999


The USDA announced on: .:.:.. 15 that the 1999
flue- .... .. ...... .::... million pounds. which
is a reduction of 18% from the 1998 quota. This reduction
comes on top of the :::1: i qi:: : :: ::the 1997
level. These cuts are due to lower intentions to purchase by
the manufacturers and to increased levels of stocks in stor-
age. The 1999 quota will be the lowest since the :..... ....
began in the 1930's. i : : : has about '.. of the national
quota, which.., i .: .... 14 million pounds. If this quota is
produced and average yields are received, the value of the
1999 crop will be about $24 million. In 1996, the value of
tobacco i- i:: i :: i:: ii ::i was over $36 million.

EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT PROPOSAL

S: ::: ::: of some of the tobacco-producing states
and the domestic : ... ::. manufacturers are discussing pos-
sible quota buyouts as a means of replacing some of the
farm income lost by the reductions in tobacco quotas. No
agreements have been reached, bi: ::::i: : ::: :::. will be
held in late January.

EBW

TOBACCO BALING UPDATE

The .' ... .. r Flue Cured Advisory Committee met
on December 30 and 1..: ... 1 the : .:: ... rules for:.....
in 1999:

1. The dimensions of the bales for 1999 .:: be identical to
those of 1997 and 1998 : cube).

2. : .1 : lb (+/- 100 lb) with no price support.. i i
over 850 lb and strong discouragement for bales under 650
lb.


3. The nominal density is still 18 iii .. : foot.


4. Moisture no more than 18%, but great enough to prevent
shattering. Bale temperature no more than 1050 F

5. Bale wire may be round or oval. 12 to 13 V2 gauge, un-
coated, and may range from 144 to 150" in length. It must be
pre-knotted (have pre-formed loops). No : .. :. :ii ..
and bales must have a minimum of 4 wires.

6. :.. :. : must be white on both sides, 250 lb test strength,
have two side :i : and have a water resistant coating on the
bottom. Any slipsheets in inventory from 1998 that do not
.... .the above (i.e. brown on one or both sides) may
be used within 6 weeks of the : -..:. sale in 1999.


7. The Committee failed to reach an agreement on tags and
sent it to a sub-committee.

8. Bales will be -. i : : i on the warehouse floor with a 12"
i : between bales in a row and have 30" between rows.

9. The Committee recommended that the Secretary of Agri-
culture approve bales as a :* i.: :- option (the other is
sheets) for flue cured tobacco in 1 i::: far, bales have
been marketed under an :. ... .1 option.

EBW

TOBACCO PLANT BED MAINTENANCE

During January. a .... ... .. :'. tobacco plant beds is
to insure that good germination and stands are obtained. In-
spect the beds :: .::: : :i to see if the soil ::: : is moist
and if seed are germinating. Under normal weather condi-
tions, seed should germinate in about 2 weeks. If a good
stand is not 1 .. ': .- try to determine the cause and cor-
rectit. !:::.1 :: :! moistureis :: :::: .. :i : majorreasonfor
slow germination and poor stands, but there could be other
reasons. It is important to get a good stand in January in
order to have plants ready i .. ... ..:... in March. Ifun-
S: : warm temperatures develop, be sure to : .: 1: .1
in the : .1 i :i covers if this was not done at the time of seed-
ing. In the case of extreme heat. the covers may have to be
removed to ... ... .. : of stand. On the other hand, be pre-
S:: toi .:' IT extra cover for the beds if extremely cold
' : ,. : ,; .. : .: ,1, !. . .: 11 asthe i. : getolder.
Inspect the beds for the presence of insects, :-. 11 cut-
worms or larvae of vegetable. :i and for :. .. such
as i::::i::. ..' Be prepared to :t : F::::.5 i:i to.: ::
blue mold when the covers are removed or :: : : : the dis-
ease is reported to be in the area. Another operation to con-
sider is :*-- ........: ditches around the beds. :-:: -. are located
in wet areas or if soil or water could wash across the beds.
i .. : contamination of the plant bed soil with non-fumi-
gated soil when covering or uncovering the beds.


EBW


PEANUT QUOTAS FOR 1999

The USDA has announced that the national ....:...
for : .- ,.- -: be : : .: 100 tn, which is 1% above the 1998
.::. : The peanut quota is the amount considered to be ad-
equate to meet the domestic demand. The 1999 support level
is : : :.. Florida's .....: ::i. national quota will be same
as in 1998.

EBW


LIME SOURCE FOR PEANUTS


1:: :.:i i:: ::i I :: i::. :': soil pH, lime is used to provide









TOBACCO QUOTA FOR 1999


The USDA announced on: .:.:.. 15 that the 1999
flue- .... .. ...... .::... million pounds. which
is a reduction of 18% from the 1998 quota. This reduction
comes on top of the :::1: i qi:: : :: ::the 1997
level. These cuts are due to lower intentions to purchase by
the manufacturers and to increased levels of stocks in stor-
age. The 1999 quota will be the lowest since the :..... ....
began in the 1930's. i : : : has about '.. of the national
quota, which.., i .: .... 14 million pounds. If this quota is
produced and average yields are received, the value of the
1999 crop will be about $24 million. In 1996, the value of
tobacco i- i:: i :: i:: ii ::i was over $36 million.

EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT PROPOSAL

S: ::: ::: of some of the tobacco-producing states
and the domestic : ... ::. manufacturers are discussing pos-
sible quota buyouts as a means of replacing some of the
farm income lost by the reductions in tobacco quotas. No
agreements have been reached, bi: ::::i: : ::: :::. will be
held in late January.

EBW

TOBACCO BALING UPDATE

The .' ... .. r Flue Cured Advisory Committee met
on December 30 and 1..: ... 1 the : .:: ... rules for:.....
in 1999:

1. The dimensions of the bales for 1999 .:: be identical to
those of 1997 and 1998 : cube).

2. : .1 : lb (+/- 100 lb) with no price support.. i i
over 850 lb and strong discouragement for bales under 650
lb.


3. The nominal density is still 18 iii .. : foot.


4. Moisture no more than 18%, but great enough to prevent
shattering. Bale temperature no more than 1050 F

5. Bale wire may be round or oval. 12 to 13 V2 gauge, un-
coated, and may range from 144 to 150" in length. It must be
pre-knotted (have pre-formed loops). No : .. :. :ii ..
and bales must have a minimum of 4 wires.

6. :.. :. : must be white on both sides, 250 lb test strength,
have two side :i : and have a water resistant coating on the
bottom. Any slipsheets in inventory from 1998 that do not
.... .the above (i.e. brown on one or both sides) may
be used within 6 weeks of the : -..:. sale in 1999.


7. The Committee failed to reach an agreement on tags and
sent it to a sub-committee.

8. Bales will be -. i : : i on the warehouse floor with a 12"
i : between bales in a row and have 30" between rows.

9. The Committee recommended that the Secretary of Agri-
culture approve bales as a :* i.: :- option (the other is
sheets) for flue cured tobacco in 1 i::: far, bales have
been marketed under an :. ... .1 option.

EBW

TOBACCO PLANT BED MAINTENANCE

During January. a .... ... .. :'. tobacco plant beds is
to insure that good germination and stands are obtained. In-
spect the beds :: .::: : :i to see if the soil ::: : is moist
and if seed are germinating. Under normal weather condi-
tions, seed should germinate in about 2 weeks. If a good
stand is not 1 .. ': .- try to determine the cause and cor-
rectit. !:::.1 :: :! moistureis :: :::: .. :i : majorreasonfor
slow germination and poor stands, but there could be other
reasons. It is important to get a good stand in January in
order to have plants ready i .. ... ..:... in March. Ifun-
S: : warm temperatures develop, be sure to : .: 1: .1
in the : .1 i :i covers if this was not done at the time of seed-
ing. In the case of extreme heat. the covers may have to be
removed to ... ... .. : of stand. On the other hand, be pre-
S:: toi .:' IT extra cover for the beds if extremely cold
' : ,. : ,; .. : .: ,1, !. . .: 11 asthe i. : getolder.
Inspect the beds for the presence of insects, :-. 11 cut-
worms or larvae of vegetable. :i and for :. .. such
as i::::i::. ..' Be prepared to :t : F::::.5 i:i to.: ::
blue mold when the covers are removed or :: : : : the dis-
ease is reported to be in the area. Another operation to con-
sider is :*-- ........: ditches around the beds. :-:: -. are located
in wet areas or if soil or water could wash across the beds.
i .. : contamination of the plant bed soil with non-fumi-
gated soil when covering or uncovering the beds.


EBW


PEANUT QUOTAS FOR 1999

The USDA has announced that the national ....:...
for : .- ,.- -: be : : .: 100 tn, which is 1% above the 1998
.::. : The peanut quota is the amount considered to be ad-
equate to meet the domestic demand. The 1999 support level
is : : :.. Florida's .....: ::i. national quota will be same
as in 1998.

EBW


LIME SOURCE FOR PEANUTS


1:: :.:i i:: ::i I :: i::. :': soil pH, lime is used to provide









TOBACCO QUOTA FOR 1999


The USDA announced on: .:.:.. 15 that the 1999
flue- .... .. ...... .::... million pounds. which
is a reduction of 18% from the 1998 quota. This reduction
comes on top of the :::1: i qi:: : :: ::the 1997
level. These cuts are due to lower intentions to purchase by
the manufacturers and to increased levels of stocks in stor-
age. The 1999 quota will be the lowest since the :..... ....
began in the 1930's. i : : : has about '.. of the national
quota, which.., i .: .... 14 million pounds. If this quota is
produced and average yields are received, the value of the
1999 crop will be about $24 million. In 1996, the value of
tobacco i- i:: i :: i:: ii ::i was over $36 million.

EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT PROPOSAL

S: ::: ::: of some of the tobacco-producing states
and the domestic : ... ::. manufacturers are discussing pos-
sible quota buyouts as a means of replacing some of the
farm income lost by the reductions in tobacco quotas. No
agreements have been reached, bi: ::::i: : ::: :::. will be
held in late January.

EBW

TOBACCO BALING UPDATE

The .' ... .. r Flue Cured Advisory Committee met
on December 30 and 1..: ... 1 the : .:: ... rules for:.....
in 1999:

1. The dimensions of the bales for 1999 .:: be identical to
those of 1997 and 1998 : cube).

2. : .1 : lb (+/- 100 lb) with no price support.. i i
over 850 lb and strong discouragement for bales under 650
lb.


3. The nominal density is still 18 iii .. : foot.


4. Moisture no more than 18%, but great enough to prevent
shattering. Bale temperature no more than 1050 F

5. Bale wire may be round or oval. 12 to 13 V2 gauge, un-
coated, and may range from 144 to 150" in length. It must be
pre-knotted (have pre-formed loops). No : .. :. :ii ..
and bales must have a minimum of 4 wires.

6. :.. :. : must be white on both sides, 250 lb test strength,
have two side :i : and have a water resistant coating on the
bottom. Any slipsheets in inventory from 1998 that do not
.... .the above (i.e. brown on one or both sides) may
be used within 6 weeks of the : -..:. sale in 1999.


7. The Committee failed to reach an agreement on tags and
sent it to a sub-committee.

8. Bales will be -. i : : i on the warehouse floor with a 12"
i : between bales in a row and have 30" between rows.

9. The Committee recommended that the Secretary of Agri-
culture approve bales as a :* i.: :- option (the other is
sheets) for flue cured tobacco in 1 i::: far, bales have
been marketed under an :. ... .1 option.

EBW

TOBACCO PLANT BED MAINTENANCE

During January. a .... ... .. :'. tobacco plant beds is
to insure that good germination and stands are obtained. In-
spect the beds :: .::: : :i to see if the soil ::: : is moist
and if seed are germinating. Under normal weather condi-
tions, seed should germinate in about 2 weeks. If a good
stand is not 1 .. ': .- try to determine the cause and cor-
rectit. !:::.1 :: :! moistureis :: :::: .. :i : majorreasonfor
slow germination and poor stands, but there could be other
reasons. It is important to get a good stand in January in
order to have plants ready i .. ... ..:... in March. Ifun-
S: : warm temperatures develop, be sure to : .: 1: .1
in the : .1 i :i covers if this was not done at the time of seed-
ing. In the case of extreme heat. the covers may have to be
removed to ... ... .. : of stand. On the other hand, be pre-
S:: toi .:' IT extra cover for the beds if extremely cold
' : ,. : ,; .. : .: ,1, !. . .: 11 asthe i. : getolder.
Inspect the beds for the presence of insects, :-. 11 cut-
worms or larvae of vegetable. :i and for :. .. such
as i::::i::. ..' Be prepared to :t : F::::.5 i:i to.: ::
blue mold when the covers are removed or :: : : : the dis-
ease is reported to be in the area. Another operation to con-
sider is :*-- ........: ditches around the beds. :-:: -. are located
in wet areas or if soil or water could wash across the beds.
i .. : contamination of the plant bed soil with non-fumi-
gated soil when covering or uncovering the beds.


EBW


PEANUT QUOTAS FOR 1999

The USDA has announced that the national ....:...
for : .- ,.- -: be : : .: 100 tn, which is 1% above the 1998
.::. : The peanut quota is the amount considered to be ad-
equate to meet the domestic demand. The 1999 support level
is : : :.. Florida's .....: ::i. national quota will be same
as in 1998.

EBW


LIME SOURCE FOR PEANUTS


1:: :.:i i:: ::i I :: i::. :': soil pH, lime is used to provide









TOBACCO QUOTA FOR 1999


The USDA announced on: .:.:.. 15 that the 1999
flue- .... .. ...... .::... million pounds. which
is a reduction of 18% from the 1998 quota. This reduction
comes on top of the :::1: i qi:: : :: ::the 1997
level. These cuts are due to lower intentions to purchase by
the manufacturers and to increased levels of stocks in stor-
age. The 1999 quota will be the lowest since the :..... ....
began in the 1930's. i : : : has about '.. of the national
quota, which.., i .: .... 14 million pounds. If this quota is
produced and average yields are received, the value of the
1999 crop will be about $24 million. In 1996, the value of
tobacco i- i:: i :: i:: ii ::i was over $36 million.

EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT PROPOSAL

S: ::: ::: of some of the tobacco-producing states
and the domestic : ... ::. manufacturers are discussing pos-
sible quota buyouts as a means of replacing some of the
farm income lost by the reductions in tobacco quotas. No
agreements have been reached, bi: ::::i: : ::: :::. will be
held in late January.

EBW

TOBACCO BALING UPDATE

The .' ... .. r Flue Cured Advisory Committee met
on December 30 and 1..: ... 1 the : .:: ... rules for:.....
in 1999:

1. The dimensions of the bales for 1999 .:: be identical to
those of 1997 and 1998 : cube).

2. : .1 : lb (+/- 100 lb) with no price support.. i i
over 850 lb and strong discouragement for bales under 650
lb.


3. The nominal density is still 18 iii .. : foot.


4. Moisture no more than 18%, but great enough to prevent
shattering. Bale temperature no more than 1050 F

5. Bale wire may be round or oval. 12 to 13 V2 gauge, un-
coated, and may range from 144 to 150" in length. It must be
pre-knotted (have pre-formed loops). No : .. :. :ii ..
and bales must have a minimum of 4 wires.

6. :.. :. : must be white on both sides, 250 lb test strength,
have two side :i : and have a water resistant coating on the
bottom. Any slipsheets in inventory from 1998 that do not
.... .the above (i.e. brown on one or both sides) may
be used within 6 weeks of the : -..:. sale in 1999.


7. The Committee failed to reach an agreement on tags and
sent it to a sub-committee.

8. Bales will be -. i : : i on the warehouse floor with a 12"
i : between bales in a row and have 30" between rows.

9. The Committee recommended that the Secretary of Agri-
culture approve bales as a :* i.: :- option (the other is
sheets) for flue cured tobacco in 1 i::: far, bales have
been marketed under an :. ... .1 option.

EBW

TOBACCO PLANT BED MAINTENANCE

During January. a .... ... .. :'. tobacco plant beds is
to insure that good germination and stands are obtained. In-
spect the beds :: .::: : :i to see if the soil ::: : is moist
and if seed are germinating. Under normal weather condi-
tions, seed should germinate in about 2 weeks. If a good
stand is not 1 .. ': .- try to determine the cause and cor-
rectit. !:::.1 :: :! moistureis :: :::: .. :i : majorreasonfor
slow germination and poor stands, but there could be other
reasons. It is important to get a good stand in January in
order to have plants ready i .. ... ..:... in March. Ifun-
S: : warm temperatures develop, be sure to : .: 1: .1
in the : .1 i :i covers if this was not done at the time of seed-
ing. In the case of extreme heat. the covers may have to be
removed to ... ... .. : of stand. On the other hand, be pre-
S:: toi .:' IT extra cover for the beds if extremely cold
' : ,. : ,; .. : .: ,1, !. . .: 11 asthe i. : getolder.
Inspect the beds for the presence of insects, :-. 11 cut-
worms or larvae of vegetable. :i and for :. .. such
as i::::i::. ..' Be prepared to :t : F::::.5 i:i to.: ::
blue mold when the covers are removed or :: : : : the dis-
ease is reported to be in the area. Another operation to con-
sider is :*-- ........: ditches around the beds. :-:: -. are located
in wet areas or if soil or water could wash across the beds.
i .. : contamination of the plant bed soil with non-fumi-
gated soil when covering or uncovering the beds.


EBW


PEANUT QUOTAS FOR 1999

The USDA has announced that the national ....:...
for : .- ,.- -: be : : .: 100 tn, which is 1% above the 1998
.::. : The peanut quota is the amount considered to be ad-
equate to meet the domestic demand. The 1999 support level
is : : :.. Florida's .....: ::i. national quota will be same
as in 1998.

EBW


LIME SOURCE FOR PEANUTS


1:: :.:i i:: ::i I :: i::. :': soil pH, lime is used to provide









TOBACCO QUOTA FOR 1999


The USDA announced on: .:.:.. 15 that the 1999
flue- .... .. ...... .::... million pounds. which
is a reduction of 18% from the 1998 quota. This reduction
comes on top of the :::1: i qi:: : :: ::the 1997
level. These cuts are due to lower intentions to purchase by
the manufacturers and to increased levels of stocks in stor-
age. The 1999 quota will be the lowest since the :..... ....
began in the 1930's. i : : : has about '.. of the national
quota, which.., i .: .... 14 million pounds. If this quota is
produced and average yields are received, the value of the
1999 crop will be about $24 million. In 1996, the value of
tobacco i- i:: i :: i:: ii ::i was over $36 million.

EBW

TOBACCO BUYOUT PROPOSAL

S: ::: ::: of some of the tobacco-producing states
and the domestic : ... ::. manufacturers are discussing pos-
sible quota buyouts as a means of replacing some of the
farm income lost by the reductions in tobacco quotas. No
agreements have been reached, bi: ::::i: : ::: :::. will be
held in late January.

EBW

TOBACCO BALING UPDATE

The .' ... .. r Flue Cured Advisory Committee met
on December 30 and 1..: ... 1 the : .:: ... rules for:.....
in 1999:

1. The dimensions of the bales for 1999 .:: be identical to
those of 1997 and 1998 : cube).

2. : .1 : lb (+/- 100 lb) with no price support.. i i
over 850 lb and strong discouragement for bales under 650
lb.


3. The nominal density is still 18 iii .. : foot.


4. Moisture no more than 18%, but great enough to prevent
shattering. Bale temperature no more than 1050 F

5. Bale wire may be round or oval. 12 to 13 V2 gauge, un-
coated, and may range from 144 to 150" in length. It must be
pre-knotted (have pre-formed loops). No : .. :. :ii ..
and bales must have a minimum of 4 wires.

6. :.. :. : must be white on both sides, 250 lb test strength,
have two side :i : and have a water resistant coating on the
bottom. Any slipsheets in inventory from 1998 that do not
.... .the above (i.e. brown on one or both sides) may
be used within 6 weeks of the : -..:. sale in 1999.


7. The Committee failed to reach an agreement on tags and
sent it to a sub-committee.

8. Bales will be -. i : : i on the warehouse floor with a 12"
i : between bales in a row and have 30" between rows.

9. The Committee recommended that the Secretary of Agri-
culture approve bales as a :* i.: :- option (the other is
sheets) for flue cured tobacco in 1 i::: far, bales have
been marketed under an :. ... .1 option.

EBW

TOBACCO PLANT BED MAINTENANCE

During January. a .... ... .. :'. tobacco plant beds is
to insure that good germination and stands are obtained. In-
spect the beds :: .::: : :i to see if the soil ::: : is moist
and if seed are germinating. Under normal weather condi-
tions, seed should germinate in about 2 weeks. If a good
stand is not 1 .. ': .- try to determine the cause and cor-
rectit. !:::.1 :: :! moistureis :: :::: .. :i : majorreasonfor
slow germination and poor stands, but there could be other
reasons. It is important to get a good stand in January in
order to have plants ready i .. ... ..:... in March. Ifun-
S: : warm temperatures develop, be sure to : .: 1: .1
in the : .1 i :i covers if this was not done at the time of seed-
ing. In the case of extreme heat. the covers may have to be
removed to ... ... .. : of stand. On the other hand, be pre-
S:: toi .:' IT extra cover for the beds if extremely cold
' : ,. : ,; .. : .: ,1, !. . .: 11 asthe i. : getolder.
Inspect the beds for the presence of insects, :-. 11 cut-
worms or larvae of vegetable. :i and for :. .. such
as i::::i::. ..' Be prepared to :t : F::::.5 i:i to.: ::
blue mold when the covers are removed or :: : : : the dis-
ease is reported to be in the area. Another operation to con-
sider is :*-- ........: ditches around the beds. :-:: -. are located
in wet areas or if soil or water could wash across the beds.
i .. : contamination of the plant bed soil with non-fumi-
gated soil when covering or uncovering the beds.


EBW


PEANUT QUOTAS FOR 1999

The USDA has announced that the national ....:...
for : .- ,.- -: be : : .: 100 tn, which is 1% above the 1998
.::. : The peanut quota is the amount considered to be ad-
equate to meet the domestic demand. The 1999 support level
is : : :.. Florida's .....: ::i. national quota will be same
as in 1998.

EBW


LIME SOURCE FOR PEANUTS


1:: :.:i i:: ::i I :: i::. :': soil pH, lime is used to provide









calcium to the developing :::::: pods. In some cases, ::::
S all the needed calcium for peanuts, therefore elimi-
nating the need to .: : gypsum. Dolomite and calcite lime
are the two conventional sources oflime: 1 .*: :..:i If
raising the soil pH is the primary reason for :::::::: and the
: .... : about the same, dolomite would generally be
'. .. over calcite. Dolomite has a higher .....: ...
value and it also .. : a relatively inexpensive source of
magnesium. Also, other :. in the rotation may benefit
more from dolomite than calcite. However, if the lime is
used -. ..... for *;.... :.- calcium to the ;- ..... 1 podsbe-
cause no i: ..-- is to be :i i :' then calcite may be the
better source because : :: .i: .. more elemental calcium than
dolomite. Since the magnesium ion competes with the cal-
S...: ... .... '1 by the : .....1 pod, dolomite also adds an
element that may result in less calcium uptake than might
occur from a calcite :: i : :: : :: Magnesium is an essential
element for peanuts, but it is .:. 1.i that the needs .:: be
met with calcite because some of the Florida-mined calcite
contains magnesium carbonate, :1- :. not at concentra-
tions that would .ii. -. it to be i :i. labeled as dolomite.
Magnesium can also be .......: by various fertilizer materi-
als.

EBW

ESTABLISHMENT OF PERENNIAL PEANUT
(ARACHIS GLABRATA) IN HIGHWAY MEDIANS

As :. of an ongoing effort by the Florida Department
of T. : portation to. '.:: plant that can serve to
*: :: ::: reduce maintenance : .i::: ::: ::: and::i : the
esthetic value of road shoulders and medians, two ..... .
ofArachis glabrata, Arblick (PI 262839) and ': ..:.... (PI
.; were planted in July I at three highway sites in
Central Florida and monitored :1:: : i: sites in-
clude S.R. 60 east ofBrandon, U.S. 41 north,.: :. .:i.. Beach,
and 1-275 north of the ....... Bridge. Plant mate-
rial in the form of sod strips and rhizome sprigs of both
Arachis ::. :i were planted into Roto-tilled and unpre-
:... .I. .. 1, ....I. ... with:' asthemain treatment
and .....1 : .... ..... .1 .. ( .: ( .. ....! :..: assub-treat-
ments. The . : :' :. : .... :..j was determined
by averaging a grid plant count at 3 locations per plot.

Seed bed :* i. .. "':' ....;* *1 to be an important fac-
tor, i :i:- .:.. on sites with an : i:... :1:1. andvigor-
ous grass sod or :1. : :1::: i i .:j : : :: in percent
coveragebetween ... ..::...:. '.:;were greater atthe
end of the first season than at the end of the second season,
w :.. .:. .. .. .. il that : .:: ::-w ith"'
in extent of coverage. No : .::: : :::: :':i : :: in percent
coverage w ere .. .... .... .. : ... .. .. ...
ing material at the U.S. 41 and S.R. 60 sites. Sod signifi-
cantly improved : ::.:-- -:..---.. over ,-- under harsh con-
:::. :: Percent coverage estimates were always
'Ecoturf' across all ::. I- .the : .... :..::'of


development. The :: '::: i H : ::: : ::: 'perennialpea-
nut in most treatments, except where weed competition was
excessive or where :. ....i .. ....... .. . : harsh
(i.e., 1-275 site), gives credence to the ability of perennial
:::::ii survive and; :. i ::::.1 : i ::,.::: :: that are con-
siderably less than ideal.

A plant count made in December of 1998 (4 1/2 years
following planting) revealed 100% coverage for all treatments
at the S.R. 60 site and : -: .. coverage for all treatments ex-
cept one (non-roto-tilled, Arblick, sprig) at the U.S. 41 site.
At the 1-275 site the non-roto-tilled treatment significantly
favored .: :: :: ::::: ::: for an undetermined reason. Within
the roto-tilledtreatments, the use of .. i ..... ...:: enhanced
: .: .- : .. : in the .... ... : .: seashell soil" inherent to
the 1-275 site.

For more information, don't hesitate to call Tito French
at 352-392-1811 or send e-mail to e. : ....: ... .:..-:

ECF

CORN SILAGE ACREAGE AND YIELDS

Estimates of corn :i .j production are not included in
monthly estimates by the U Ak National Agricultural Sta-
tistics Service, but annual estimates are available. The I
estimates were recently released and show ti. ; .. :.' i... -
ers harvested ::' 100 acres of co... : .. in 1997, compared
to 19,000 to 2: i -.. acres for each of the years, 1992-96.
The : harvested in all states ranged from about 5.3 to
6.8 ....::..... acres for the same period of time. In each of the
years, average Florida yields were from 15 to 17 tn/A, which
were greater than the average national yields. Yields in the
western states were generally well above those of : :.....
and other eastern states. Due to weather conditions in 1998,
i ..... ". : .... .... ; yields in Florida will probably be lower than
in recent years, .:il: ::_1: ::::: 1:oftheco::: : i :_ isprob-
ably irrigated and used to feed dairy cows.

EBW

SOURCES OF HAY

Check the November : issue of the Florida Market
Bulletin for the Florida Hay Directory. This is a listing of
hay sources in the state. The "Florida Market : .:: :.. is
i :: : : : :.i :::. ::: :.:/ by the Florida i :::j::: ::: of Agriculture
and Consumer Services. Also, if you have access to the
Internet, you can go directly to the hay directory at :-
www.fl-: .... : : :.':798.htn.

CGC

GRASS TETANY IN CATTLE

Grass tetany, sometimes called grass staggers or hypo-









calcium to the developing :::::: pods. In some cases, ::::
S all the needed calcium for peanuts, therefore elimi-
nating the need to .: : gypsum. Dolomite and calcite lime
are the two conventional sources oflime: 1 .*: :..:i If
raising the soil pH is the primary reason for :::::::: and the
: .... : about the same, dolomite would generally be
'. .. over calcite. Dolomite has a higher .....: ...
value and it also .. : a relatively inexpensive source of
magnesium. Also, other :. in the rotation may benefit
more from dolomite than calcite. However, if the lime is
used -. ..... for *;.... :.- calcium to the ;- ..... 1 podsbe-
cause no i: ..-- is to be :i i :' then calcite may be the
better source because : :: .i: .. more elemental calcium than
dolomite. Since the magnesium ion competes with the cal-
S...: ... .... '1 by the : .....1 pod, dolomite also adds an
element that may result in less calcium uptake than might
occur from a calcite :: i : :: : :: Magnesium is an essential
element for peanuts, but it is .:. 1.i that the needs .:: be
met with calcite because some of the Florida-mined calcite
contains magnesium carbonate, :1- :. not at concentra-
tions that would .ii. -. it to be i :i. labeled as dolomite.
Magnesium can also be .......: by various fertilizer materi-
als.

EBW

ESTABLISHMENT OF PERENNIAL PEANUT
(ARACHIS GLABRATA) IN HIGHWAY MEDIANS

As :. of an ongoing effort by the Florida Department
of T. : portation to. '.:: plant that can serve to
*: :: ::: reduce maintenance : .i::: ::: ::: and::i : the
esthetic value of road shoulders and medians, two ..... .
ofArachis glabrata, Arblick (PI 262839) and ': ..:.... (PI
.; were planted in July I at three highway sites in
Central Florida and monitored :1:: : i: sites in-
clude S.R. 60 east ofBrandon, U.S. 41 north,.: :. .:i.. Beach,
and 1-275 north of the ....... Bridge. Plant mate-
rial in the form of sod strips and rhizome sprigs of both
Arachis ::. :i were planted into Roto-tilled and unpre-
:... .I. .. 1, ....I. ... with:' asthemain treatment
and .....1 : .... ..... .1 .. ( .: ( .. ....! :..: assub-treat-
ments. The . : :' :. : .... :..j was determined
by averaging a grid plant count at 3 locations per plot.

Seed bed :* i. .. "':' ....;* *1 to be an important fac-
tor, i :i:- .:.. on sites with an : i:... :1:1. andvigor-
ous grass sod or :1. : :1::: i i .:j : : :: in percent
coveragebetween ... ..::...:. '.:;were greater atthe
end of the first season than at the end of the second season,
w :.. .:. .. .. .. il that : .:: ::-w ith"'
in extent of coverage. No : .::: : :::: :':i : :: in percent
coverage w ere .. .... .... .. : ... .. .. ...
ing material at the U.S. 41 and S.R. 60 sites. Sod signifi-
cantly improved : ::.:-- -:..---.. over ,-- under harsh con-
:::. :: Percent coverage estimates were always
'Ecoturf' across all ::. I- .the : .... :..::'of


development. The :: '::: i H : ::: : ::: 'perennialpea-
nut in most treatments, except where weed competition was
excessive or where :. ....i .. ....... .. . : harsh
(i.e., 1-275 site), gives credence to the ability of perennial
:::::ii survive and; :. i ::::.1 : i ::,.::: :: that are con-
siderably less than ideal.

A plant count made in December of 1998 (4 1/2 years
following planting) revealed 100% coverage for all treatments
at the S.R. 60 site and : -: .. coverage for all treatments ex-
cept one (non-roto-tilled, Arblick, sprig) at the U.S. 41 site.
At the 1-275 site the non-roto-tilled treatment significantly
favored .: :: :: ::::: ::: for an undetermined reason. Within
the roto-tilledtreatments, the use of .. i ..... ...:: enhanced
: .: .- : .. : in the .... ... : .: seashell soil" inherent to
the 1-275 site.

For more information, don't hesitate to call Tito French
at 352-392-1811 or send e-mail to e. : ....: ... .:..-:

ECF

CORN SILAGE ACREAGE AND YIELDS

Estimates of corn :i .j production are not included in
monthly estimates by the U Ak National Agricultural Sta-
tistics Service, but annual estimates are available. The I
estimates were recently released and show ti. ; .. :.' i... -
ers harvested ::' 100 acres of co... : .. in 1997, compared
to 19,000 to 2: i -.. acres for each of the years, 1992-96.
The : harvested in all states ranged from about 5.3 to
6.8 ....::..... acres for the same period of time. In each of the
years, average Florida yields were from 15 to 17 tn/A, which
were greater than the average national yields. Yields in the
western states were generally well above those of : :.....
and other eastern states. Due to weather conditions in 1998,
i ..... ". : .... .... ; yields in Florida will probably be lower than
in recent years, .:il: ::_1: ::::: 1:oftheco::: : i :_ isprob-
ably irrigated and used to feed dairy cows.

EBW

SOURCES OF HAY

Check the November : issue of the Florida Market
Bulletin for the Florida Hay Directory. This is a listing of
hay sources in the state. The "Florida Market : .:: :.. is
i :: : : : :.i :::. ::: :.:/ by the Florida i :::j::: ::: of Agriculture
and Consumer Services. Also, if you have access to the
Internet, you can go directly to the hay directory at :-
www.fl-: .... : : :.':798.htn.

CGC

GRASS TETANY IN CATTLE

Grass tetany, sometimes called grass staggers or hypo-









calcium to the developing :::::: pods. In some cases, ::::
S all the needed calcium for peanuts, therefore elimi-
nating the need to .: : gypsum. Dolomite and calcite lime
are the two conventional sources oflime: 1 .*: :..:i If
raising the soil pH is the primary reason for :::::::: and the
: .... : about the same, dolomite would generally be
'. .. over calcite. Dolomite has a higher .....: ...
value and it also .. : a relatively inexpensive source of
magnesium. Also, other :. in the rotation may benefit
more from dolomite than calcite. However, if the lime is
used -. ..... for *;.... :.- calcium to the ;- ..... 1 podsbe-
cause no i: ..-- is to be :i i :' then calcite may be the
better source because : :: .i: .. more elemental calcium than
dolomite. Since the magnesium ion competes with the cal-
S...: ... .... '1 by the : .....1 pod, dolomite also adds an
element that may result in less calcium uptake than might
occur from a calcite :: i : :: : :: Magnesium is an essential
element for peanuts, but it is .:. 1.i that the needs .:: be
met with calcite because some of the Florida-mined calcite
contains magnesium carbonate, :1- :. not at concentra-
tions that would .ii. -. it to be i :i. labeled as dolomite.
Magnesium can also be .......: by various fertilizer materi-
als.

EBW

ESTABLISHMENT OF PERENNIAL PEANUT
(ARACHIS GLABRATA) IN HIGHWAY MEDIANS

As :. of an ongoing effort by the Florida Department
of T. : portation to. '.:: plant that can serve to
*: :: ::: reduce maintenance : .i::: ::: ::: and::i : the
esthetic value of road shoulders and medians, two ..... .
ofArachis glabrata, Arblick (PI 262839) and ': ..:.... (PI
.; were planted in July I at three highway sites in
Central Florida and monitored :1:: : i: sites in-
clude S.R. 60 east ofBrandon, U.S. 41 north,.: :. .:i.. Beach,
and 1-275 north of the ....... Bridge. Plant mate-
rial in the form of sod strips and rhizome sprigs of both
Arachis ::. :i were planted into Roto-tilled and unpre-
:... .I. .. 1, ....I. ... with:' asthemain treatment
and .....1 : .... ..... .1 .. ( .: ( .. ....! :..: assub-treat-
ments. The . : :' :. : .... :..j was determined
by averaging a grid plant count at 3 locations per plot.

Seed bed :* i. .. "':' ....;* *1 to be an important fac-
tor, i :i:- .:.. on sites with an : i:... :1:1. andvigor-
ous grass sod or :1. : :1::: i i .:j : : :: in percent
coveragebetween ... ..::...:. '.:;were greater atthe
end of the first season than at the end of the second season,
w :.. .:. .. .. .. il that : .:: ::-w ith"'
in extent of coverage. No : .::: : :::: :':i : :: in percent
coverage w ere .. .... .... .. : ... .. .. ...
ing material at the U.S. 41 and S.R. 60 sites. Sod signifi-
cantly improved : ::.:-- -:..---.. over ,-- under harsh con-
:::. :: Percent coverage estimates were always
'Ecoturf' across all ::. I- .the : .... :..::'of


development. The :: '::: i H : ::: : ::: 'perennialpea-
nut in most treatments, except where weed competition was
excessive or where :. ....i .. ....... .. . : harsh
(i.e., 1-275 site), gives credence to the ability of perennial
:::::ii survive and; :. i ::::.1 : i ::,.::: :: that are con-
siderably less than ideal.

A plant count made in December of 1998 (4 1/2 years
following planting) revealed 100% coverage for all treatments
at the S.R. 60 site and : -: .. coverage for all treatments ex-
cept one (non-roto-tilled, Arblick, sprig) at the U.S. 41 site.
At the 1-275 site the non-roto-tilled treatment significantly
favored .: :: :: ::::: ::: for an undetermined reason. Within
the roto-tilledtreatments, the use of .. i ..... ...:: enhanced
: .: .- : .. : in the .... ... : .: seashell soil" inherent to
the 1-275 site.

For more information, don't hesitate to call Tito French
at 352-392-1811 or send e-mail to e. : ....: ... .:..-:

ECF

CORN SILAGE ACREAGE AND YIELDS

Estimates of corn :i .j production are not included in
monthly estimates by the U Ak National Agricultural Sta-
tistics Service, but annual estimates are available. The I
estimates were recently released and show ti. ; .. :.' i... -
ers harvested ::' 100 acres of co... : .. in 1997, compared
to 19,000 to 2: i -.. acres for each of the years, 1992-96.
The : harvested in all states ranged from about 5.3 to
6.8 ....::..... acres for the same period of time. In each of the
years, average Florida yields were from 15 to 17 tn/A, which
were greater than the average national yields. Yields in the
western states were generally well above those of : :.....
and other eastern states. Due to weather conditions in 1998,
i ..... ". : .... .... ; yields in Florida will probably be lower than
in recent years, .:il: ::_1: ::::: 1:oftheco::: : i :_ isprob-
ably irrigated and used to feed dairy cows.

EBW

SOURCES OF HAY

Check the November : issue of the Florida Market
Bulletin for the Florida Hay Directory. This is a listing of
hay sources in the state. The "Florida Market : .:: :.. is
i :: : : : :.i :::. ::: :.:/ by the Florida i :::j::: ::: of Agriculture
and Consumer Services. Also, if you have access to the
Internet, you can go directly to the hay directory at :-
www.fl-: .... : : :.':798.htn.

CGC

GRASS TETANY IN CATTLE

Grass tetany, sometimes called grass staggers or hypo-









calcium to the developing :::::: pods. In some cases, ::::
S all the needed calcium for peanuts, therefore elimi-
nating the need to .: : gypsum. Dolomite and calcite lime
are the two conventional sources oflime: 1 .*: :..:i If
raising the soil pH is the primary reason for :::::::: and the
: .... : about the same, dolomite would generally be
'. .. over calcite. Dolomite has a higher .....: ...
value and it also .. : a relatively inexpensive source of
magnesium. Also, other :. in the rotation may benefit
more from dolomite than calcite. However, if the lime is
used -. ..... for *;.... :.- calcium to the ;- ..... 1 podsbe-
cause no i: ..-- is to be :i i :' then calcite may be the
better source because : :: .i: .. more elemental calcium than
dolomite. Since the magnesium ion competes with the cal-
S...: ... .... '1 by the : .....1 pod, dolomite also adds an
element that may result in less calcium uptake than might
occur from a calcite :: i : :: : :: Magnesium is an essential
element for peanuts, but it is .:. 1.i that the needs .:: be
met with calcite because some of the Florida-mined calcite
contains magnesium carbonate, :1- :. not at concentra-
tions that would .ii. -. it to be i :i. labeled as dolomite.
Magnesium can also be .......: by various fertilizer materi-
als.

EBW

ESTABLISHMENT OF PERENNIAL PEANUT
(ARACHIS GLABRATA) IN HIGHWAY MEDIANS

As :. of an ongoing effort by the Florida Department
of T. : portation to. '.:: plant that can serve to
*: :: ::: reduce maintenance : .i::: ::: ::: and::i : the
esthetic value of road shoulders and medians, two ..... .
ofArachis glabrata, Arblick (PI 262839) and ': ..:.... (PI
.; were planted in July I at three highway sites in
Central Florida and monitored :1:: : i: sites in-
clude S.R. 60 east ofBrandon, U.S. 41 north,.: :. .:i.. Beach,
and 1-275 north of the ....... Bridge. Plant mate-
rial in the form of sod strips and rhizome sprigs of both
Arachis ::. :i were planted into Roto-tilled and unpre-
:... .I. .. 1, ....I. ... with:' asthemain treatment
and .....1 : .... ..... .1 .. ( .: ( .. ....! :..: assub-treat-
ments. The . : :' :. : .... :..j was determined
by averaging a grid plant count at 3 locations per plot.

Seed bed :* i. .. "':' ....;* *1 to be an important fac-
tor, i :i:- .:.. on sites with an : i:... :1:1. andvigor-
ous grass sod or :1. : :1::: i i .:j : : :: in percent
coveragebetween ... ..::...:. '.:;were greater atthe
end of the first season than at the end of the second season,
w :.. .:. .. .. .. il that : .:: ::-w ith"'
in extent of coverage. No : .::: : :::: :':i : :: in percent
coverage w ere .. .... .... .. : ... .. .. ...
ing material at the U.S. 41 and S.R. 60 sites. Sod signifi-
cantly improved : ::.:-- -:..---.. over ,-- under harsh con-
:::. :: Percent coverage estimates were always
'Ecoturf' across all ::. I- .the : .... :..::'of


development. The :: '::: i H : ::: : ::: 'perennialpea-
nut in most treatments, except where weed competition was
excessive or where :. ....i .. ....... .. . : harsh
(i.e., 1-275 site), gives credence to the ability of perennial
:::::ii survive and; :. i ::::.1 : i ::,.::: :: that are con-
siderably less than ideal.

A plant count made in December of 1998 (4 1/2 years
following planting) revealed 100% coverage for all treatments
at the S.R. 60 site and : -: .. coverage for all treatments ex-
cept one (non-roto-tilled, Arblick, sprig) at the U.S. 41 site.
At the 1-275 site the non-roto-tilled treatment significantly
favored .: :: :: ::::: ::: for an undetermined reason. Within
the roto-tilledtreatments, the use of .. i ..... ...:: enhanced
: .: .- : .. : in the .... ... : .: seashell soil" inherent to
the 1-275 site.

For more information, don't hesitate to call Tito French
at 352-392-1811 or send e-mail to e. : ....: ... .:..-:

ECF

CORN SILAGE ACREAGE AND YIELDS

Estimates of corn :i .j production are not included in
monthly estimates by the U Ak National Agricultural Sta-
tistics Service, but annual estimates are available. The I
estimates were recently released and show ti. ; .. :.' i... -
ers harvested ::' 100 acres of co... : .. in 1997, compared
to 19,000 to 2: i -.. acres for each of the years, 1992-96.
The : harvested in all states ranged from about 5.3 to
6.8 ....::..... acres for the same period of time. In each of the
years, average Florida yields were from 15 to 17 tn/A, which
were greater than the average national yields. Yields in the
western states were generally well above those of : :.....
and other eastern states. Due to weather conditions in 1998,
i ..... ". : .... .... ; yields in Florida will probably be lower than
in recent years, .:il: ::_1: ::::: 1:oftheco::: : i :_ isprob-
ably irrigated and used to feed dairy cows.

EBW

SOURCES OF HAY

Check the November : issue of the Florida Market
Bulletin for the Florida Hay Directory. This is a listing of
hay sources in the state. The "Florida Market : .:: :.. is
i :: : : : :.i :::. ::: :.:/ by the Florida i :::j::: ::: of Agriculture
and Consumer Services. Also, if you have access to the
Internet, you can go directly to the hay directory at :-
www.fl-: .... : : :.':798.htn.

CGC

GRASS TETANY IN CATTLE

Grass tetany, sometimes called grass staggers or hypo-









magnesemia, can be a serious :. 11 ::: in Florida with cattle
I : ... .1; grain .. ... .... T he I ......... ... : usu-
confined to lactating cows. The exact cause of the dis-
ease is unknown, : .....-.:.. it is always associated with an
imbalance in the mineral components of blood serum,
Sireduced magnesium levels. In Florida, the :..... is
more severe when cattle are grazing young forage, ... : ..
larly the first flush of growth during December and January.
Once the :. .: ::: .more mature, the::: i::. .iof prob-
lems occurring is reduced. The disease is apt to ... ...
der .....:.:..... of nutritional stress. -i .. :.. cattle on winter
pasture :- := after being on : .: : or other low :.
pasture may cause such a nutritional stress. Mineral : -
ments that contain magnesium should be included in the diet.
Commercial mineral mixtures containing 10-: magnesium
are available for :- i ... during i :- 1-'. of increased grass
tetany ::. : :i:i::' Cattle need to consume 6-12 ounces/head/
day of this mineral.

CGC

CORRECTIONS IN DECEMBER AGRONOMY NOTES

There were two errors in the _: ...1.. issue of


Agronomy Notes. One error was in the -: ?. -out date for
methyl bromide, which will be 2005, rather than 2007. The
other error was an estimate that of the 1998 Florida
flue-cured tobacco was sold, but the correct :' :. is about
96%.

EBW

UPDATE ON METHYL BROMIDE SITUATION

There has been a :. i.. on the 2001 suspension date
... .... :1 bromide. The new time table ..::.. In 1999
we :! : a 25% reduction in amounts of methyl bromide
sold in the USA. It is reported that the formulation available
next year will be methyl bromide 75-25 ".. methyl bro-
mide and ~"". ........ :.. and methyl bromide 67-33 (67%
methyl bromide and 33% chloropricin). The 98-2 formula-
tion will no longer be .: :i:ii In 2001 there .. :::be
reduction in amounts of methyl bromide to be sold. and in
2003, the amount drops to 25%0. It is obvious that growers
....::. the :: ... :".: .... year. andthe pinchwillonly grow.


AGRONOMISTS WITH EXTENSION RESPONSIBILITIES

While a number of agronomists often participate in extension activities, the :i ii .. ::: is a list of those with :
.. .....:...: (See the most recent .: ::: H Directory for more details on .. i...:. :: .:::. as .l: as addresses and
. :.1...... numbers.) Joyce Tredaway joins the faculty on January 19, 1999.


Name

David Anderson
Jerry i ...... ::
Ann Blount
( .: ,ii i. i..:..i i:
Tito French
' 1. .



Bob ": ...:.
Joyce 'm.. .i ./ay,

Ben '.' i::::
David Wright

Vernon'. :::.::- :


I I :: : ::
70
20
30
30
80
60
80

60
40
70

60
70

50


Location
I..:. Cattle REC-Ona
Everglades REC-Belle Glade
Agronomy Dept.-( ..... .:.
N .:1: :. C i:F'TC-Quincy
Agronomy Dept.. .::.. *ille
Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville
Center for Invasive and / -... :
i"! : .- .ville
Southw( :i i ..:...i. i C-Immokalee

Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville

Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville
N, .,, ,Laudere RC :. aud

Ft. Lauderdale REC-Ft. Lauderdale


Forages
Sugarcane :
Department( : ...... ...
Forages
- ... and Grain C:
Alternative Crops
Aquatic Weed Control

F .: and ,. ::. .. :
Grain Crops and Forages
Field and Forage Crop Weed
Control
S... and Peanuts
Cotton, Soybeans, and Grain
Crops
Aquatic Weed Control


The use of tradenames does not constitute a guarantee orwarrant of products named : ... : : .. '::. ::, :.. of similar products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman, .. E. B. Whitty, Professor, Extension Agronomist, ebw@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; C. G. Chambliss, Associate
Professor, Extension Agronomist, cgc@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; E. C. French, Associate Professor, Extension Agronomist, ecf@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; D. W. Dickson, Professor,
Extension Nematoiogist, dwd@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu









magnesemia, can be a serious :. 11 ::: in Florida with cattle
I : ... .1; grain .. ... .... T he I ......... ... : usu-
confined to lactating cows. The exact cause of the dis-
ease is unknown, : .....-.:.. it is always associated with an
imbalance in the mineral components of blood serum,
Sireduced magnesium levels. In Florida, the :..... is
more severe when cattle are grazing young forage, ... : ..
larly the first flush of growth during December and January.
Once the :. .: ::: .more mature, the::: i::. .iof prob-
lems occurring is reduced. The disease is apt to ... ...
der .....:.:..... of nutritional stress. -i .. :.. cattle on winter
pasture :- := after being on : .: : or other low :.
pasture may cause such a nutritional stress. Mineral : -
ments that contain magnesium should be included in the diet.
Commercial mineral mixtures containing 10-: magnesium
are available for :- i ... during i :- 1-'. of increased grass
tetany ::. : :i:i::' Cattle need to consume 6-12 ounces/head/
day of this mineral.

CGC

CORRECTIONS IN DECEMBER AGRONOMY NOTES

There were two errors in the _: ...1.. issue of


Agronomy Notes. One error was in the -: ?. -out date for
methyl bromide, which will be 2005, rather than 2007. The
other error was an estimate that of the 1998 Florida
flue-cured tobacco was sold, but the correct :' :. is about
96%.

EBW

UPDATE ON METHYL BROMIDE SITUATION

There has been a :. i.. on the 2001 suspension date
... .... :1 bromide. The new time table ..::.. In 1999
we :! : a 25% reduction in amounts of methyl bromide
sold in the USA. It is reported that the formulation available
next year will be methyl bromide 75-25 ".. methyl bro-
mide and ~"". ........ :.. and methyl bromide 67-33 (67%
methyl bromide and 33% chloropricin). The 98-2 formula-
tion will no longer be .: :i:ii In 2001 there .. :::be
reduction in amounts of methyl bromide to be sold. and in
2003, the amount drops to 25%0. It is obvious that growers
....::. the :: ... :".: .... year. andthe pinchwillonly grow.


AGRONOMISTS WITH EXTENSION RESPONSIBILITIES

While a number of agronomists often participate in extension activities, the :i ii .. ::: is a list of those with :
.. .....:...: (See the most recent .: ::: H Directory for more details on .. i...:. :: .:::. as .l: as addresses and
. :.1...... numbers.) Joyce Tredaway joins the faculty on January 19, 1999.


Name

David Anderson
Jerry i ...... ::
Ann Blount
( .: ,ii i. i..:..i i:
Tito French
' 1. .



Bob ": ...:.
Joyce 'm.. .i ./ay,

Ben '.' i::::
David Wright

Vernon'. :::.::- :


I I :: : ::
70
20
30
30
80
60
80

60
40
70

60
70

50


Location
I..:. Cattle REC-Ona
Everglades REC-Belle Glade
Agronomy Dept.-( ..... .:.
N .:1: :. C i:F'TC-Quincy
Agronomy Dept.. .::.. *ille
Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville
Center for Invasive and / -... :
i"! : .- .ville
Southw( :i i ..:...i. i C-Immokalee

Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville

Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville
N, .,, ,Laudere RC :. aud

Ft. Lauderdale REC-Ft. Lauderdale


Forages
Sugarcane :
Department( : ...... ...
Forages
- ... and Grain C:
Alternative Crops
Aquatic Weed Control

F .: and ,. ::. .. :
Grain Crops and Forages
Field and Forage Crop Weed
Control
S... and Peanuts
Cotton, Soybeans, and Grain
Crops
Aquatic Weed Control


The use of tradenames does not constitute a guarantee orwarrant of products named : ... : : .. '::. ::, :.. of similar products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman, .. E. B. Whitty, Professor, Extension Agronomist, ebw@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; C. G. Chambliss, Associate
Professor, Extension Agronomist, cgc@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; E. C. French, Associate Professor, Extension Agronomist, ecf@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; D. W. Dickson, Professor,
Extension Nematoiogist, dwd@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu









magnesemia, can be a serious :. 11 ::: in Florida with cattle
I : ... .1; grain .. ... .... T he I ......... ... : usu-
confined to lactating cows. The exact cause of the dis-
ease is unknown, : .....-.:.. it is always associated with an
imbalance in the mineral components of blood serum,
Sireduced magnesium levels. In Florida, the :..... is
more severe when cattle are grazing young forage, ... : ..
larly the first flush of growth during December and January.
Once the :. .: ::: .more mature, the::: i::. .iof prob-
lems occurring is reduced. The disease is apt to ... ...
der .....:.:..... of nutritional stress. -i .. :.. cattle on winter
pasture :- := after being on : .: : or other low :.
pasture may cause such a nutritional stress. Mineral : -
ments that contain magnesium should be included in the diet.
Commercial mineral mixtures containing 10-: magnesium
are available for :- i ... during i :- 1-'. of increased grass
tetany ::. : :i:i::' Cattle need to consume 6-12 ounces/head/
day of this mineral.

CGC

CORRECTIONS IN DECEMBER AGRONOMY NOTES

There were two errors in the _: ...1.. issue of


Agronomy Notes. One error was in the -: ?. -out date for
methyl bromide, which will be 2005, rather than 2007. The
other error was an estimate that of the 1998 Florida
flue-cured tobacco was sold, but the correct :' :. is about
96%.

EBW

UPDATE ON METHYL BROMIDE SITUATION

There has been a :. i.. on the 2001 suspension date
... .... :1 bromide. The new time table ..::.. In 1999
we :! : a 25% reduction in amounts of methyl bromide
sold in the USA. It is reported that the formulation available
next year will be methyl bromide 75-25 ".. methyl bro-
mide and ~"". ........ :.. and methyl bromide 67-33 (67%
methyl bromide and 33% chloropricin). The 98-2 formula-
tion will no longer be .: :i:ii In 2001 there .. :::be
reduction in amounts of methyl bromide to be sold. and in
2003, the amount drops to 25%0. It is obvious that growers
....::. the :: ... :".: .... year. andthe pinchwillonly grow.


AGRONOMISTS WITH EXTENSION RESPONSIBILITIES

While a number of agronomists often participate in extension activities, the :i ii .. ::: is a list of those with :
.. .....:...: (See the most recent .: ::: H Directory for more details on .. i...:. :: .:::. as .l: as addresses and
. :.1...... numbers.) Joyce Tredaway joins the faculty on January 19, 1999.


Name

David Anderson
Jerry i ...... ::
Ann Blount
( .: ,ii i. i..:..i i:
Tito French
' 1. .



Bob ": ...:.
Joyce 'm.. .i ./ay,

Ben '.' i::::
David Wright

Vernon'. :::.::- :


I I :: : ::
70
20
30
30
80
60
80

60
40
70

60
70

50


Location
I..:. Cattle REC-Ona
Everglades REC-Belle Glade
Agronomy Dept.-( ..... .:.
N .:1: :. C i:F'TC-Quincy
Agronomy Dept.. .::.. *ille
Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville
Center for Invasive and / -... :
i"! : .- .ville
Southw( :i i ..:...i. i C-Immokalee

Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville

Agronomy Dept.-Gainesville
N, .,, ,Laudere RC :. aud

Ft. Lauderdale REC-Ft. Lauderdale


Forages
Sugarcane :
Department( : ...... ...
Forages
- ... and Grain C:
Alternative Crops
Aquatic Weed Control

F .: and ,. ::. .. :
Grain Crops and Forages
Field and Forage Crop Weed
Control
S... and Peanuts
Cotton, Soybeans, and Grain
Crops
Aquatic Weed Control


The use of tradenames does not constitute a guarantee orwarrant of products named : ... : : .. '::. ::, :.. of similar products.
Prepared by: J. M. Bennett, Chairman, .. E. B. Whitty, Professor, Extension Agronomist, ebw@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; C. G. Chambliss, Associate
Professor, Extension Agronomist, cgc@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; E. C. French, Associate Professor, Extension Agronomist, ecf@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu; D. W. Dickson, Professor,
Extension Nematoiogist, dwd@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu