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 Table of Contents
 Prospects for the 1999 tobacco...
 Tobacco marketings for 1998
 Maleic hydrazide residues...
 Tobacco varieties for 1999
 Tobacco baling
 New peanut organization
 Fall fumigation
 Pasture renovation
 October field crops report


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00003
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: November 1998
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00003

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Prospects for the 1999 tobacco quota
        Page 2
    Tobacco marketings for 1998
        Page 2
    Maleic hydrazide residues on tobacco
        Page 2
    Tobacco varieties for 1999
        Page 2
    Tobacco baling
        Page 2
    New peanut organization
        Page 3
    Fall fumigation
        Page 3
    Pasture renovation
        Page 3
    October field crops report
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text





AGRONOMY


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


NOTES


DATES TO REMEMBER


December 3
January 26 27


IN THIS ISSUE


Excellence in Tobacco Awards Program Lake City
Agronomic Crops In-Service Training Quincy


PAGE


TOBACCO
Prospects for the 1999 Tobacco Quota ................................................ .............................. 2
T tobacco M arketings for 1998 ................................................. ................................................. 2
M aleic Hydrazide Residues on Tobacco ............................................ ............................... 2
Tobacco V varieties for 1999 ..................................................................... ......................... 2
T tobacco B aling .................................... ...... ... ................... 2

PEANUT
N ew P eanut O organization ........................................................ ................................................ 3

NEMATOLOGY
Fall Fum igation ............................... ........ ... ................... 3

FORAGE
P astu re R enov atio n ................................................................................... ............................... 3

MISCELLANEOUS
O ctober F ield C rops R report ...................................................... ............................................... 3


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other
extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
/ University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director









PROSPECTS FOR THE 1999 TOBACCO QUOTA

The 1999 tobacco marketing quota will be announced
by the Secretary of Agriculture no later than December 15.
1998. The quota is not more than 103 : .- *- nor less than
97 : :: of the total of: (1) the total amount domestic ciga-
rette .:. .:...- : :.... : estimate they intend to purchase on the
auction markets or from producers during the marketing sea-
son; (2):" . :annm ual U.. .. : .:. .... i.. United
S: .1: :::_ the three marketing years : : ::: the year
for which the quota is being set: and (3) the amount the Sec-
retary determines is necessary to increase or decrease the
producer association inventory to reachthe reserve stock level.
The : ::: T: : intentions report from the five domestic ciga-
rette manufacturers is due o:. i" :: :: 1. For 1998, inten-
tions totaled almost 455 million :.. .....1 15 percent below
the 1997 total. The 3-year average of : .- is 350.2 mil-
lion: :::::1 which is 21.7 ::::i: :: pounds below the :
: ..:. used for the 1998 quota determination. The reserve
stock level adjustment for the 1999 quota will be about a
minus 160 million : ... .1 considerably more than the 1998
::ii:: ::: : of : ::::::: I 4 millionpounds. The ::::: .. i:
two components of the. .. : a minus of about 180 million
pounds, v.. .... ... : .. :.. : ,,.... intentions would have
to increase by that amount to keep the basic quota .....: .
that of 1998.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING FOR 1998

The i .:. auctions have closed and the total volume of
..... c pricece:. :.were 1 .: lower than they
were in 1997. Quality of the crop was not as good as in
1997 because of the heavy rains that delayed land
i: i :' : and then the hot, dry summer lowering .:: : .
Gross sales on the Florida markets were :. 1 over 19 million
:...' in 1998 and the average :..:. was :. '*.67 per cwt.
compared to almost 21 million pounds and a price of $172.40
per cwt in Gross sales include :. .1:: : sales plus
resales. Resales amounted to 10.6 ... ... -. of gross sales in
1998. .... there is considerable cross-state movement of
tobacco for sales, the actual amount of-' : ,i .. i: ..i to-
bacco -..: i not be known until it is calculated over the next
few days. The amount of Florida-Georgia tobacco placed in
the loan program was 8.6 percent of sales, a : :.: increase
over last year.

EBW

MALEIC HYDRAZIDE RESIDUES ON TOBACCO

S : of the tobacco sucker control chemical, maleic
hydrazide ( i::: were higher in 1998 than in I which is


i :. :1 due to the lack of rainfall during the summer.
... are collected on the warehouse floor and
may be analy: .: ... .:. : .. :. ... well as forMH. There
are no legal residue : ..... on MH, but low levels are consid-
ered to be an advantage when marketing the tobacco. In : .:.
the mean MH residue on samples collected on the T :.. 14
(Florida-Georgia) was 194.07 :....* an increase from the
130.53 ppm in 1997. For samples from all ::': -cured mar-
kets, the 1 .:. mean was 132.56 ppm, and the 1997 mean
was 120.43 ppm.

EBW

TOBACCO VARIETIES FOR 1999

Tobacco variety selection should be based on the needs
for a :- .!: -1 -- farm and field. Black shank resistance is
needed in many instances, and there are ::: I:: : :.::_ num-
ber of choices for varieties with high resistance. Potato vi-
rus-Y (PVY) is a problem for some growers and there is now
a resistant variety. Other growers want a variety that holds
well in the field, which :: : .. :i. ::i in hanrest sched-
ules. i ::: to nematodes and tolerance to brown spot
are often two of the reasons .- .. variety -... ::.._ .. :: in the
field. If there is a need to extend the harvest season, a com-
bination of ::1 ::: ::::::. and late-maturing varieties would
be desirable. Ease of :.. ::. and ..:::. is plus for any
variety, and acceptable yields and good .:.. .1: are always
required. The ..! i : :.. .1 :. !. grown in Florida and also
the -:i: : Fi:: -cured states has been K 326. It has been popu-
lar because it i: ..1... good yields and. .. :11: over a wide
. *... f conditions, ....1 .. ::, and is easy to grow and cure.
However, the ,.,:..: .'- '.: of K 326 seems to be A- -.::
mostly because black shank is increasing and this variety has
only low resistance to the i: Some varieties with high
resistance to black shank include several relatively new vari-
eties, such as NC 71, NC 72. OX 207, ": : 1.. 168, ':. : .
NF 3, and 1: ::: 172. Each of these varieties is resistant
the major races of root knot nematodes. Coker 371-Gold, K
346, and K 394 are older varieties with high black shank
resistance. NC 55 is the r : .. :, ,. to be resistant to PVY.
but otherwise it is very ::::: :: K 326. In the 1998 variety
tests in .:.. :. NC 55 waste .: : : :i :
Other high- ..'1.:. varieties included ":- 1* G-117, NC
71, ": : 1. 178, and OX 414NF. More information about
the variety choices for 1999 will soon be : :::i

EBW

TOBACCO BALING

It is expected that tobacco : :::l ..: i increase in 1
with balers being located onfarms. All of Florida's baling in
1998 was done at a warehouse. Through September, over









PROSPECTS FOR THE 1999 TOBACCO QUOTA

The 1999 tobacco marketing quota will be announced
by the Secretary of Agriculture no later than December 15.
1998. The quota is not more than 103 : .- *- nor less than
97 : :: of the total of: (1) the total amount domestic ciga-
rette .:. .:...- : :.... : estimate they intend to purchase on the
auction markets or from producers during the marketing sea-
son; (2):" . :annm ual U.. .. : .:. .... i.. United
S: .1: :::_ the three marketing years : : ::: the year
for which the quota is being set: and (3) the amount the Sec-
retary determines is necessary to increase or decrease the
producer association inventory to reachthe reserve stock level.
The : ::: T: : intentions report from the five domestic ciga-
rette manufacturers is due o:. i" :: :: 1. For 1998, inten-
tions totaled almost 455 million :.. .....1 15 percent below
the 1997 total. The 3-year average of : .- is 350.2 mil-
lion: :::::1 which is 21.7 ::::i: :: pounds below the :
: ..:. used for the 1998 quota determination. The reserve
stock level adjustment for the 1999 quota will be about a
minus 160 million : ... .1 considerably more than the 1998
::ii:: ::: : of : ::::::: I 4 millionpounds. The ::::: .. i:
two components of the. .. : a minus of about 180 million
pounds, v.. .... ... : .. :.. : ,,.... intentions would have
to increase by that amount to keep the basic quota .....: .
that of 1998.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING FOR 1998

The i .:. auctions have closed and the total volume of
..... c pricece:. :.were 1 .: lower than they
were in 1997. Quality of the crop was not as good as in
1997 because of the heavy rains that delayed land
i: i :' : and then the hot, dry summer lowering .:: : .
Gross sales on the Florida markets were :. 1 over 19 million
:...' in 1998 and the average :..:. was :. '*.67 per cwt.
compared to almost 21 million pounds and a price of $172.40
per cwt in Gross sales include :. .1:: : sales plus
resales. Resales amounted to 10.6 ... ... -. of gross sales in
1998. .... there is considerable cross-state movement of
tobacco for sales, the actual amount of-' : ,i .. i: ..i to-
bacco -..: i not be known until it is calculated over the next
few days. The amount of Florida-Georgia tobacco placed in
the loan program was 8.6 percent of sales, a : :.: increase
over last year.

EBW

MALEIC HYDRAZIDE RESIDUES ON TOBACCO

S : of the tobacco sucker control chemical, maleic
hydrazide ( i::: were higher in 1998 than in I which is


i :. :1 due to the lack of rainfall during the summer.
... are collected on the warehouse floor and
may be analy: .: ... .:. : .. :. ... well as forMH. There
are no legal residue : ..... on MH, but low levels are consid-
ered to be an advantage when marketing the tobacco. In : .:.
the mean MH residue on samples collected on the T :.. 14
(Florida-Georgia) was 194.07 :....* an increase from the
130.53 ppm in 1997. For samples from all ::': -cured mar-
kets, the 1 .:. mean was 132.56 ppm, and the 1997 mean
was 120.43 ppm.

EBW

TOBACCO VARIETIES FOR 1999

Tobacco variety selection should be based on the needs
for a :- .!: -1 -- farm and field. Black shank resistance is
needed in many instances, and there are ::: I:: : :.::_ num-
ber of choices for varieties with high resistance. Potato vi-
rus-Y (PVY) is a problem for some growers and there is now
a resistant variety. Other growers want a variety that holds
well in the field, which :: : .. :i. ::i in hanrest sched-
ules. i ::: to nematodes and tolerance to brown spot
are often two of the reasons .- .. variety -... ::.._ .. :: in the
field. If there is a need to extend the harvest season, a com-
bination of ::1 ::: ::::::. and late-maturing varieties would
be desirable. Ease of :.. ::. and ..:::. is plus for any
variety, and acceptable yields and good .:.. .1: are always
required. The ..! i : :.. .1 :. !. grown in Florida and also
the -:i: : Fi:: -cured states has been K 326. It has been popu-
lar because it i: ..1... good yields and. .. :11: over a wide
. *... f conditions, ....1 .. ::, and is easy to grow and cure.
However, the ,.,:..: .'- '.: of K 326 seems to be A- -.::
mostly because black shank is increasing and this variety has
only low resistance to the i: Some varieties with high
resistance to black shank include several relatively new vari-
eties, such as NC 71, NC 72. OX 207, ": : 1.. 168, ':. : .
NF 3, and 1: ::: 172. Each of these varieties is resistant
the major races of root knot nematodes. Coker 371-Gold, K
346, and K 394 are older varieties with high black shank
resistance. NC 55 is the r : .. :, ,. to be resistant to PVY.
but otherwise it is very ::::: :: K 326. In the 1998 variety
tests in .:.. :. NC 55 waste .: : : :i :
Other high- ..'1.:. varieties included ":- 1* G-117, NC
71, ": : 1. 178, and OX 414NF. More information about
the variety choices for 1999 will soon be : :::i

EBW

TOBACCO BALING

It is expected that tobacco : :::l ..: i increase in 1
with balers being located onfarms. All of Florida's baling in
1998 was done at a warehouse. Through September, over









PROSPECTS FOR THE 1999 TOBACCO QUOTA

The 1999 tobacco marketing quota will be announced
by the Secretary of Agriculture no later than December 15.
1998. The quota is not more than 103 : .- *- nor less than
97 : :: of the total of: (1) the total amount domestic ciga-
rette .:. .:...- : :.... : estimate they intend to purchase on the
auction markets or from producers during the marketing sea-
son; (2):" . :annm ual U.. .. : .:. .... i.. United
S: .1: :::_ the three marketing years : : ::: the year
for which the quota is being set: and (3) the amount the Sec-
retary determines is necessary to increase or decrease the
producer association inventory to reachthe reserve stock level.
The : ::: T: : intentions report from the five domestic ciga-
rette manufacturers is due o:. i" :: :: 1. For 1998, inten-
tions totaled almost 455 million :.. .....1 15 percent below
the 1997 total. The 3-year average of : .- is 350.2 mil-
lion: :::::1 which is 21.7 ::::i: :: pounds below the :
: ..:. used for the 1998 quota determination. The reserve
stock level adjustment for the 1999 quota will be about a
minus 160 million : ... .1 considerably more than the 1998
::ii:: ::: : of : ::::::: I 4 millionpounds. The ::::: .. i:
two components of the. .. : a minus of about 180 million
pounds, v.. .... ... : .. :.. : ,,.... intentions would have
to increase by that amount to keep the basic quota .....: .
that of 1998.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING FOR 1998

The i .:. auctions have closed and the total volume of
..... c pricece:. :.were 1 .: lower than they
were in 1997. Quality of the crop was not as good as in
1997 because of the heavy rains that delayed land
i: i :' : and then the hot, dry summer lowering .:: : .
Gross sales on the Florida markets were :. 1 over 19 million
:...' in 1998 and the average :..:. was :. '*.67 per cwt.
compared to almost 21 million pounds and a price of $172.40
per cwt in Gross sales include :. .1:: : sales plus
resales. Resales amounted to 10.6 ... ... -. of gross sales in
1998. .... there is considerable cross-state movement of
tobacco for sales, the actual amount of-' : ,i .. i: ..i to-
bacco -..: i not be known until it is calculated over the next
few days. The amount of Florida-Georgia tobacco placed in
the loan program was 8.6 percent of sales, a : :.: increase
over last year.

EBW

MALEIC HYDRAZIDE RESIDUES ON TOBACCO

S : of the tobacco sucker control chemical, maleic
hydrazide ( i::: were higher in 1998 than in I which is


i :. :1 due to the lack of rainfall during the summer.
... are collected on the warehouse floor and
may be analy: .: ... .:. : .. :. ... well as forMH. There
are no legal residue : ..... on MH, but low levels are consid-
ered to be an advantage when marketing the tobacco. In : .:.
the mean MH residue on samples collected on the T :.. 14
(Florida-Georgia) was 194.07 :....* an increase from the
130.53 ppm in 1997. For samples from all ::': -cured mar-
kets, the 1 .:. mean was 132.56 ppm, and the 1997 mean
was 120.43 ppm.

EBW

TOBACCO VARIETIES FOR 1999

Tobacco variety selection should be based on the needs
for a :- .!: -1 -- farm and field. Black shank resistance is
needed in many instances, and there are ::: I:: : :.::_ num-
ber of choices for varieties with high resistance. Potato vi-
rus-Y (PVY) is a problem for some growers and there is now
a resistant variety. Other growers want a variety that holds
well in the field, which :: : .. :i. ::i in hanrest sched-
ules. i ::: to nematodes and tolerance to brown spot
are often two of the reasons .- .. variety -... ::.._ .. :: in the
field. If there is a need to extend the harvest season, a com-
bination of ::1 ::: ::::::. and late-maturing varieties would
be desirable. Ease of :.. ::. and ..:::. is plus for any
variety, and acceptable yields and good .:.. .1: are always
required. The ..! i : :.. .1 :. !. grown in Florida and also
the -:i: : Fi:: -cured states has been K 326. It has been popu-
lar because it i: ..1... good yields and. .. :11: over a wide
. *... f conditions, ....1 .. ::, and is easy to grow and cure.
However, the ,.,:..: .'- '.: of K 326 seems to be A- -.::
mostly because black shank is increasing and this variety has
only low resistance to the i: Some varieties with high
resistance to black shank include several relatively new vari-
eties, such as NC 71, NC 72. OX 207, ": : 1.. 168, ':. : .
NF 3, and 1: ::: 172. Each of these varieties is resistant
the major races of root knot nematodes. Coker 371-Gold, K
346, and K 394 are older varieties with high black shank
resistance. NC 55 is the r : .. :, ,. to be resistant to PVY.
but otherwise it is very ::::: :: K 326. In the 1998 variety
tests in .:.. :. NC 55 waste .: : : :i :
Other high- ..'1.:. varieties included ":- 1* G-117, NC
71, ": : 1. 178, and OX 414NF. More information about
the variety choices for 1999 will soon be : :::i

EBW

TOBACCO BALING

It is expected that tobacco : :::l ..: i increase in 1
with balers being located onfarms. All of Florida's baling in
1998 was done at a warehouse. Through September, over









PROSPECTS FOR THE 1999 TOBACCO QUOTA

The 1999 tobacco marketing quota will be announced
by the Secretary of Agriculture no later than December 15.
1998. The quota is not more than 103 : .- *- nor less than
97 : :: of the total of: (1) the total amount domestic ciga-
rette .:. .:...- : :.... : estimate they intend to purchase on the
auction markets or from producers during the marketing sea-
son; (2):" . :annm ual U.. .. : .:. .... i.. United
S: .1: :::_ the three marketing years : : ::: the year
for which the quota is being set: and (3) the amount the Sec-
retary determines is necessary to increase or decrease the
producer association inventory to reachthe reserve stock level.
The : ::: T: : intentions report from the five domestic ciga-
rette manufacturers is due o:. i" :: :: 1. For 1998, inten-
tions totaled almost 455 million :.. .....1 15 percent below
the 1997 total. The 3-year average of : .- is 350.2 mil-
lion: :::::1 which is 21.7 ::::i: :: pounds below the :
: ..:. used for the 1998 quota determination. The reserve
stock level adjustment for the 1999 quota will be about a
minus 160 million : ... .1 considerably more than the 1998
::ii:: ::: : of : ::::::: I 4 millionpounds. The ::::: .. i:
two components of the. .. : a minus of about 180 million
pounds, v.. .... ... : .. :.. : ,,.... intentions would have
to increase by that amount to keep the basic quota .....: .
that of 1998.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING FOR 1998

The i .:. auctions have closed and the total volume of
..... c pricece:. :.were 1 .: lower than they
were in 1997. Quality of the crop was not as good as in
1997 because of the heavy rains that delayed land
i: i :' : and then the hot, dry summer lowering .:: : .
Gross sales on the Florida markets were :. 1 over 19 million
:...' in 1998 and the average :..:. was :. '*.67 per cwt.
compared to almost 21 million pounds and a price of $172.40
per cwt in Gross sales include :. .1:: : sales plus
resales. Resales amounted to 10.6 ... ... -. of gross sales in
1998. .... there is considerable cross-state movement of
tobacco for sales, the actual amount of-' : ,i .. i: ..i to-
bacco -..: i not be known until it is calculated over the next
few days. The amount of Florida-Georgia tobacco placed in
the loan program was 8.6 percent of sales, a : :.: increase
over last year.

EBW

MALEIC HYDRAZIDE RESIDUES ON TOBACCO

S : of the tobacco sucker control chemical, maleic
hydrazide ( i::: were higher in 1998 than in I which is


i :. :1 due to the lack of rainfall during the summer.
... are collected on the warehouse floor and
may be analy: .: ... .:. : .. :. ... well as forMH. There
are no legal residue : ..... on MH, but low levels are consid-
ered to be an advantage when marketing the tobacco. In : .:.
the mean MH residue on samples collected on the T :.. 14
(Florida-Georgia) was 194.07 :....* an increase from the
130.53 ppm in 1997. For samples from all ::': -cured mar-
kets, the 1 .:. mean was 132.56 ppm, and the 1997 mean
was 120.43 ppm.

EBW

TOBACCO VARIETIES FOR 1999

Tobacco variety selection should be based on the needs
for a :- .!: -1 -- farm and field. Black shank resistance is
needed in many instances, and there are ::: I:: : :.::_ num-
ber of choices for varieties with high resistance. Potato vi-
rus-Y (PVY) is a problem for some growers and there is now
a resistant variety. Other growers want a variety that holds
well in the field, which :: : .. :i. ::i in hanrest sched-
ules. i ::: to nematodes and tolerance to brown spot
are often two of the reasons .- .. variety -... ::.._ .. :: in the
field. If there is a need to extend the harvest season, a com-
bination of ::1 ::: ::::::. and late-maturing varieties would
be desirable. Ease of :.. ::. and ..:::. is plus for any
variety, and acceptable yields and good .:.. .1: are always
required. The ..! i : :.. .1 :. !. grown in Florida and also
the -:i: : Fi:: -cured states has been K 326. It has been popu-
lar because it i: ..1... good yields and. .. :11: over a wide
. *... f conditions, ....1 .. ::, and is easy to grow and cure.
However, the ,.,:..: .'- '.: of K 326 seems to be A- -.::
mostly because black shank is increasing and this variety has
only low resistance to the i: Some varieties with high
resistance to black shank include several relatively new vari-
eties, such as NC 71, NC 72. OX 207, ": : 1.. 168, ':. : .
NF 3, and 1: ::: 172. Each of these varieties is resistant
the major races of root knot nematodes. Coker 371-Gold, K
346, and K 394 are older varieties with high black shank
resistance. NC 55 is the r : .. :, ,. to be resistant to PVY.
but otherwise it is very ::::: :: K 326. In the 1998 variety
tests in .:.. :. NC 55 waste .: : : :i :
Other high- ..'1.:. varieties included ":- 1* G-117, NC
71, ": : 1. 178, and OX 414NF. More information about
the variety choices for 1999 will soon be : :::i

EBW

TOBACCO BALING

It is expected that tobacco : :::l ..: i increase in 1
with balers being located onfarms. All of Florida's baling in
1998 was done at a warehouse. Through September, over









PROSPECTS FOR THE 1999 TOBACCO QUOTA

The 1999 tobacco marketing quota will be announced
by the Secretary of Agriculture no later than December 15.
1998. The quota is not more than 103 : .- *- nor less than
97 : :: of the total of: (1) the total amount domestic ciga-
rette .:. .:...- : :.... : estimate they intend to purchase on the
auction markets or from producers during the marketing sea-
son; (2):" . :annm ual U.. .. : .:. .... i.. United
S: .1: :::_ the three marketing years : : ::: the year
for which the quota is being set: and (3) the amount the Sec-
retary determines is necessary to increase or decrease the
producer association inventory to reachthe reserve stock level.
The : ::: T: : intentions report from the five domestic ciga-
rette manufacturers is due o:. i" :: :: 1. For 1998, inten-
tions totaled almost 455 million :.. .....1 15 percent below
the 1997 total. The 3-year average of : .- is 350.2 mil-
lion: :::::1 which is 21.7 ::::i: :: pounds below the :
: ..:. used for the 1998 quota determination. The reserve
stock level adjustment for the 1999 quota will be about a
minus 160 million : ... .1 considerably more than the 1998
::ii:: ::: : of : ::::::: I 4 millionpounds. The ::::: .. i:
two components of the. .. : a minus of about 180 million
pounds, v.. .... ... : .. :.. : ,,.... intentions would have
to increase by that amount to keep the basic quota .....: .
that of 1998.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING FOR 1998

The i .:. auctions have closed and the total volume of
..... c pricece:. :.were 1 .: lower than they
were in 1997. Quality of the crop was not as good as in
1997 because of the heavy rains that delayed land
i: i :' : and then the hot, dry summer lowering .:: : .
Gross sales on the Florida markets were :. 1 over 19 million
:...' in 1998 and the average :..:. was :. '*.67 per cwt.
compared to almost 21 million pounds and a price of $172.40
per cwt in Gross sales include :. .1:: : sales plus
resales. Resales amounted to 10.6 ... ... -. of gross sales in
1998. .... there is considerable cross-state movement of
tobacco for sales, the actual amount of-' : ,i .. i: ..i to-
bacco -..: i not be known until it is calculated over the next
few days. The amount of Florida-Georgia tobacco placed in
the loan program was 8.6 percent of sales, a : :.: increase
over last year.

EBW

MALEIC HYDRAZIDE RESIDUES ON TOBACCO

S : of the tobacco sucker control chemical, maleic
hydrazide ( i::: were higher in 1998 than in I which is


i :. :1 due to the lack of rainfall during the summer.
... are collected on the warehouse floor and
may be analy: .: ... .:. : .. :. ... well as forMH. There
are no legal residue : ..... on MH, but low levels are consid-
ered to be an advantage when marketing the tobacco. In : .:.
the mean MH residue on samples collected on the T :.. 14
(Florida-Georgia) was 194.07 :....* an increase from the
130.53 ppm in 1997. For samples from all ::': -cured mar-
kets, the 1 .:. mean was 132.56 ppm, and the 1997 mean
was 120.43 ppm.

EBW

TOBACCO VARIETIES FOR 1999

Tobacco variety selection should be based on the needs
for a :- .!: -1 -- farm and field. Black shank resistance is
needed in many instances, and there are ::: I:: : :.::_ num-
ber of choices for varieties with high resistance. Potato vi-
rus-Y (PVY) is a problem for some growers and there is now
a resistant variety. Other growers want a variety that holds
well in the field, which :: : .. :i. ::i in hanrest sched-
ules. i ::: to nematodes and tolerance to brown spot
are often two of the reasons .- .. variety -... ::.._ .. :: in the
field. If there is a need to extend the harvest season, a com-
bination of ::1 ::: ::::::. and late-maturing varieties would
be desirable. Ease of :.. ::. and ..:::. is plus for any
variety, and acceptable yields and good .:.. .1: are always
required. The ..! i : :.. .1 :. !. grown in Florida and also
the -:i: : Fi:: -cured states has been K 326. It has been popu-
lar because it i: ..1... good yields and. .. :11: over a wide
. *... f conditions, ....1 .. ::, and is easy to grow and cure.
However, the ,.,:..: .'- '.: of K 326 seems to be A- -.::
mostly because black shank is increasing and this variety has
only low resistance to the i: Some varieties with high
resistance to black shank include several relatively new vari-
eties, such as NC 71, NC 72. OX 207, ": : 1.. 168, ':. : .
NF 3, and 1: ::: 172. Each of these varieties is resistant
the major races of root knot nematodes. Coker 371-Gold, K
346, and K 394 are older varieties with high black shank
resistance. NC 55 is the r : .. :, ,. to be resistant to PVY.
but otherwise it is very ::::: :: K 326. In the 1998 variety
tests in .:.. :. NC 55 waste .: : : :i :
Other high- ..'1.:. varieties included ":- 1* G-117, NC
71, ": : 1. 178, and OX 414NF. More information about
the variety choices for 1999 will soon be : :::i

EBW

TOBACCO BALING

It is expected that tobacco : :::l ..: i increase in 1
with balers being located onfarms. All of Florida's baling in
1998 was done at a warehouse. Through September, over









1600 bales had sold on Florida markets, and nmay : :: -*
when the final counts are reported. Information on the :.. .
fications of balers that will be available for ::* should be
released soon after the first of the year. .::.:. :''. there ::
be new ? .i ::: ::: into the sunner. Some fanners may
wish to build or have balers built for them. Some factors to
consider when planning a baling operation include the num-
ber of bales expected, location of barns, whether racks or
boxes are used for curing, how the tobacco will be moved
from the barn to the baler, if a forklift or front-end loader will
be used to move the bales, location and: .. of pack house,
and how to .. : :: a harvesting and :' I:. i.' :i .'.
Some :::::: : may choose to have the warehouse or some-
one else bale for them, while others may continue to sell in
sheets.

EBW

NEW PEANUT ORGANIZATION

Farmer organizations in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia
have joined together to form the ::i : ::: '.. :::::; Farmers
Federation. The ...::. ofthistri-state : ... is to increase
the iT.. :: .'... of peanut growers in: ............ research.
legislation, and in regulatory matters. For a number of years,
i: i i ..' ::::: : i::::: by the three states and used for
i. ::, .!i : have been ...: i.:. .. i .1.: ....1. a single organi-
zation, the Peanut Advisory Board. There are several other
instances where the three states have cooperated in conduct-
Si :: efforts .:: :: I .relatedto :::::. The new group
has planned the first peanut grower's conference to be held
next July in Panama City.

EBW

FALL FUMIGATION

Now is good time to .. .. .. .:....'
.: : .: :...... : : apply : .: :':.... :.:, suchasTelone
11 (1, .: i: .... .. : :: ; Peanut, tobacco, cotton and other
growers who use Telone for nematode management should
S:.1 :. .': -: now rather than wait until early
spring. W hy consider a fall : .:". ::* .. ( .... .:.. .. I... :.:
migations are :: ::1 ideal this time of year, when the ::
are still fairly warm and on the dry side (near wilting .... .. .
Incontrast, .: ... generally cool and wi : : .::- spring.
Such .... : ..... are not suitable for soil :.:.... ::. Many
times growers :i :: less than ideal nematode manage-
mentwhhenthey ..:. :.. F:.... ...: ..:. a moist, cool or cold
soil, ....- .. ::- .: generally exist in late February and early
March). i'i' the :-:- .. .: -. either broadcast or in the row.
Make certain to apply at least 8 to 10 inches deep and seal


the chisel traces by .:i: i ::: :::::: : :: : following fumiga-
tion. Do not leave chisels traces open because they act as a
flue for Telone to quickly vent into the air. Ideally, the fumi-
gant should remain in the soil for up to 72 hours for best
nematode management. i .i .... :: ::: .:: : plant a win-
ter cover crop, such as rye.

DWD

PASTURE RENOVATION

Pasture renovation has been defined as "The :. .-
ment of a pasture by partial or .-...1.:.!- destruction of the
sod, plus i::::::: i :::: :: weed control, ::: ::: : may
be required to : i i: desirable :...: .:.1 In ...:
S renov;: .. ...:. .. .. .. start in the fall with
the ..? and ........' of a cool season annual such as
ryegrass, ::::il grain, clover, or a combination, i:i: The
permanent .... grass is then planted the next year at the
beginning of or during the summer rainy season. The : '...
ing or primary :ii j done in the fall .:: .. the cool season
S: :crop to be i 1::: 1 on a clean, tilled seed bed which
... means more and earlier production as compared to
over ..... on a sod. Tillage in the fall and again .:r, : .
cool s ...... : ... has stopped ". ( ,) : ........ for
more complete : ::: .i :: i any weeds and remnants of the
old pasture sod. i .. i i.. strategy should result in a clean,
smooth, i :. : ... i site E :.1 ...:.. of the new pasture.

A ::: :: strategy has :: : : :i :the use of a herbi-
cide in an ::: .:.i.r to insure ::. .1. i. kill of certain weedy
grasses. The herbicide ...... ..:. has been used in late sum-
mer to kill the old : .. ... sod and weedy plants such as
smutgrass and common' :::::::1:_:: To be iT ` : the
herbicide must be :i.i .: before plant growth slows. In the
fall,;. .... :: drill :.. .... drill) is then used to: .- ..: :r. cool
season -- .L into the killed sod. This practice would con-
serve soil moisture as compared to ::: : which could be an
advantage in getting the cool season crop started. Producers
should weight the costs and advantages before choosing one
system over another.

CGC

OCTOBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

The tables on the :...:....... page show the October 1
estimates of field crop :: .::: :: ::: : Florida and the United
. .. were made by the Florida and National ..
Statistics

EBW









1600 bales had sold on Florida markets, and nmay : :: -*
when the final counts are reported. Information on the :.. .
fications of balers that will be available for ::* should be
released soon after the first of the year. .::.:. :''. there ::
be new ? .i ::: ::: into the sunner. Some fanners may
wish to build or have balers built for them. Some factors to
consider when planning a baling operation include the num-
ber of bales expected, location of barns, whether racks or
boxes are used for curing, how the tobacco will be moved
from the barn to the baler, if a forklift or front-end loader will
be used to move the bales, location and: .. of pack house,
and how to .. : :: a harvesting and :' I:. i.' :i .'.
Some :::::: : may choose to have the warehouse or some-
one else bale for them, while others may continue to sell in
sheets.

EBW

NEW PEANUT ORGANIZATION

Farmer organizations in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia
have joined together to form the ::i : ::: '.. :::::; Farmers
Federation. The ...::. ofthistri-state : ... is to increase
the iT.. :: .'... of peanut growers in: ............ research.
legislation, and in regulatory matters. For a number of years,
i: i i ..' ::::: : i::::: by the three states and used for
i. ::, .!i : have been ...: i.:. .. i .1.: ....1. a single organi-
zation, the Peanut Advisory Board. There are several other
instances where the three states have cooperated in conduct-
Si :: efforts .:: :: I .relatedto :::::. The new group
has planned the first peanut grower's conference to be held
next July in Panama City.

EBW

FALL FUMIGATION

Now is good time to .. .. .. .:....'
.: : .: :...... : : apply : .: :':.... :.:, suchasTelone
11 (1, .: i: .... .. : :: ; Peanut, tobacco, cotton and other
growers who use Telone for nematode management should
S:.1 :. .': -: now rather than wait until early
spring. W hy consider a fall : .:". ::* .. ( .... .:.. .. I... :.:
migations are :: ::1 ideal this time of year, when the ::
are still fairly warm and on the dry side (near wilting .... .. .
Incontrast, .: ... generally cool and wi : : .::- spring.
Such .... : ..... are not suitable for soil :.:.... ::. Many
times growers :i :: less than ideal nematode manage-
mentwhhenthey ..:. :.. F:.... ...: ..:. a moist, cool or cold
soil, ....- .. ::- .: generally exist in late February and early
March). i'i' the :-:- .. .: -. either broadcast or in the row.
Make certain to apply at least 8 to 10 inches deep and seal


the chisel traces by .:i: i ::: :::::: : :: : following fumiga-
tion. Do not leave chisels traces open because they act as a
flue for Telone to quickly vent into the air. Ideally, the fumi-
gant should remain in the soil for up to 72 hours for best
nematode management. i .i .... :: ::: .:: : plant a win-
ter cover crop, such as rye.

DWD

PASTURE RENOVATION

Pasture renovation has been defined as "The :. .-
ment of a pasture by partial or .-...1.:.!- destruction of the
sod, plus i::::::: i :::: :: weed control, ::: ::: : may
be required to : i i: desirable :...: .:.1 In ...:
S renov;: .. ...:. .. .. .. start in the fall with
the ..? and ........' of a cool season annual such as
ryegrass, ::::il grain, clover, or a combination, i:i: The
permanent .... grass is then planted the next year at the
beginning of or during the summer rainy season. The : '...
ing or primary :ii j done in the fall .:: .. the cool season
S: :crop to be i 1::: 1 on a clean, tilled seed bed which
... means more and earlier production as compared to
over ..... on a sod. Tillage in the fall and again .:r, : .
cool s ...... : ... has stopped ". ( ,) : ........ for
more complete : ::: .i :: i any weeds and remnants of the
old pasture sod. i .. i i.. strategy should result in a clean,
smooth, i :. : ... i site E :.1 ...:.. of the new pasture.

A ::: :: strategy has :: : : :i :the use of a herbi-
cide in an ::: .:.i.r to insure ::. .1. i. kill of certain weedy
grasses. The herbicide ...... ..:. has been used in late sum-
mer to kill the old : .. ... sod and weedy plants such as
smutgrass and common' :::::::1:_:: To be iT ` : the
herbicide must be :i.i .: before plant growth slows. In the
fall,;. .... :: drill :.. .... drill) is then used to: .- ..: :r. cool
season -- .L into the killed sod. This practice would con-
serve soil moisture as compared to ::: : which could be an
advantage in getting the cool season crop started. Producers
should weight the costs and advantages before choosing one
system over another.

CGC

OCTOBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

The tables on the :...:....... page show the October 1
estimates of field crop :: .::: :: ::: : Florida and the United
. .. were made by the Florida and National ..
Statistics

EBW









1600 bales had sold on Florida markets, and nmay : :: -*
when the final counts are reported. Information on the :.. .
fications of balers that will be available for ::* should be
released soon after the first of the year. .::.:. :''. there ::
be new ? .i ::: ::: into the sunner. Some fanners may
wish to build or have balers built for them. Some factors to
consider when planning a baling operation include the num-
ber of bales expected, location of barns, whether racks or
boxes are used for curing, how the tobacco will be moved
from the barn to the baler, if a forklift or front-end loader will
be used to move the bales, location and: .. of pack house,
and how to .. : :: a harvesting and :' I:. i.' :i .'.
Some :::::: : may choose to have the warehouse or some-
one else bale for them, while others may continue to sell in
sheets.

EBW

NEW PEANUT ORGANIZATION

Farmer organizations in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia
have joined together to form the ::i : ::: '.. :::::; Farmers
Federation. The ...::. ofthistri-state : ... is to increase
the iT.. :: .'... of peanut growers in: ............ research.
legislation, and in regulatory matters. For a number of years,
i: i i ..' ::::: : i::::: by the three states and used for
i. ::, .!i : have been ...: i.:. .. i .1.: ....1. a single organi-
zation, the Peanut Advisory Board. There are several other
instances where the three states have cooperated in conduct-
Si :: efforts .:: :: I .relatedto :::::. The new group
has planned the first peanut grower's conference to be held
next July in Panama City.

EBW

FALL FUMIGATION

Now is good time to .. .. .. .:....'
.: : .: :...... : : apply : .: :':.... :.:, suchasTelone
11 (1, .: i: .... .. : :: ; Peanut, tobacco, cotton and other
growers who use Telone for nematode management should
S:.1 :. .': -: now rather than wait until early
spring. W hy consider a fall : .:". ::* .. ( .... .:.. .. I... :.:
migations are :: ::1 ideal this time of year, when the ::
are still fairly warm and on the dry side (near wilting .... .. .
Incontrast, .: ... generally cool and wi : : .::- spring.
Such .... : ..... are not suitable for soil :.:.... ::. Many
times growers :i :: less than ideal nematode manage-
mentwhhenthey ..:. :.. F:.... ...: ..:. a moist, cool or cold
soil, ....- .. ::- .: generally exist in late February and early
March). i'i' the :-:- .. .: -. either broadcast or in the row.
Make certain to apply at least 8 to 10 inches deep and seal


the chisel traces by .:i: i ::: :::::: : :: : following fumiga-
tion. Do not leave chisels traces open because they act as a
flue for Telone to quickly vent into the air. Ideally, the fumi-
gant should remain in the soil for up to 72 hours for best
nematode management. i .i .... :: ::: .:: : plant a win-
ter cover crop, such as rye.

DWD

PASTURE RENOVATION

Pasture renovation has been defined as "The :. .-
ment of a pasture by partial or .-...1.:.!- destruction of the
sod, plus i::::::: i :::: :: weed control, ::: ::: : may
be required to : i i: desirable :...: .:.1 In ...:
S renov;: .. ...:. .. .. .. start in the fall with
the ..? and ........' of a cool season annual such as
ryegrass, ::::il grain, clover, or a combination, i:i: The
permanent .... grass is then planted the next year at the
beginning of or during the summer rainy season. The : '...
ing or primary :ii j done in the fall .:: .. the cool season
S: :crop to be i 1::: 1 on a clean, tilled seed bed which
... means more and earlier production as compared to
over ..... on a sod. Tillage in the fall and again .:r, : .
cool s ...... : ... has stopped ". ( ,) : ........ for
more complete : ::: .i :: i any weeds and remnants of the
old pasture sod. i .. i i.. strategy should result in a clean,
smooth, i :. : ... i site E :.1 ...:.. of the new pasture.

A ::: :: strategy has :: : : :i :the use of a herbi-
cide in an ::: .:.i.r to insure ::. .1. i. kill of certain weedy
grasses. The herbicide ...... ..:. has been used in late sum-
mer to kill the old : .. ... sod and weedy plants such as
smutgrass and common' :::::::1:_:: To be iT ` : the
herbicide must be :i.i .: before plant growth slows. In the
fall,;. .... :: drill :.. .... drill) is then used to: .- ..: :r. cool
season -- .L into the killed sod. This practice would con-
serve soil moisture as compared to ::: : which could be an
advantage in getting the cool season crop started. Producers
should weight the costs and advantages before choosing one
system over another.

CGC

OCTOBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

The tables on the :...:....... page show the October 1
estimates of field crop :: .::: :: ::: : Florida and the United
. .. were made by the Florida and National ..
Statistics

EBW









1600 bales had sold on Florida markets, and nmay : :: -*
when the final counts are reported. Information on the :.. .
fications of balers that will be available for ::* should be
released soon after the first of the year. .::.:. :''. there ::
be new ? .i ::: ::: into the sunner. Some fanners may
wish to build or have balers built for them. Some factors to
consider when planning a baling operation include the num-
ber of bales expected, location of barns, whether racks or
boxes are used for curing, how the tobacco will be moved
from the barn to the baler, if a forklift or front-end loader will
be used to move the bales, location and: .. of pack house,
and how to .. : :: a harvesting and :' I:. i.' :i .'.
Some :::::: : may choose to have the warehouse or some-
one else bale for them, while others may continue to sell in
sheets.

EBW

NEW PEANUT ORGANIZATION

Farmer organizations in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia
have joined together to form the ::i : ::: '.. :::::; Farmers
Federation. The ...::. ofthistri-state : ... is to increase
the iT.. :: .'... of peanut growers in: ............ research.
legislation, and in regulatory matters. For a number of years,
i: i i ..' ::::: : i::::: by the three states and used for
i. ::, .!i : have been ...: i.:. .. i .1.: ....1. a single organi-
zation, the Peanut Advisory Board. There are several other
instances where the three states have cooperated in conduct-
Si :: efforts .:: :: I .relatedto :::::. The new group
has planned the first peanut grower's conference to be held
next July in Panama City.

EBW

FALL FUMIGATION

Now is good time to .. .. .. .:....'
.: : .: :...... : : apply : .: :':.... :.:, suchasTelone
11 (1, .: i: .... .. : :: ; Peanut, tobacco, cotton and other
growers who use Telone for nematode management should
S:.1 :. .': -: now rather than wait until early
spring. W hy consider a fall : .:". ::* .. ( .... .:.. .. I... :.:
migations are :: ::1 ideal this time of year, when the ::
are still fairly warm and on the dry side (near wilting .... .. .
Incontrast, .: ... generally cool and wi : : .::- spring.
Such .... : ..... are not suitable for soil :.:.... ::. Many
times growers :i :: less than ideal nematode manage-
mentwhhenthey ..:. :.. F:.... ...: ..:. a moist, cool or cold
soil, ....- .. ::- .: generally exist in late February and early
March). i'i' the :-:- .. .: -. either broadcast or in the row.
Make certain to apply at least 8 to 10 inches deep and seal


the chisel traces by .:i: i ::: :::::: : :: : following fumiga-
tion. Do not leave chisels traces open because they act as a
flue for Telone to quickly vent into the air. Ideally, the fumi-
gant should remain in the soil for up to 72 hours for best
nematode management. i .i .... :: ::: .:: : plant a win-
ter cover crop, such as rye.

DWD

PASTURE RENOVATION

Pasture renovation has been defined as "The :. .-
ment of a pasture by partial or .-...1.:.!- destruction of the
sod, plus i::::::: i :::: :: weed control, ::: ::: : may
be required to : i i: desirable :...: .:.1 In ...:
S renov;: .. ...:. .. .. .. start in the fall with
the ..? and ........' of a cool season annual such as
ryegrass, ::::il grain, clover, or a combination, i:i: The
permanent .... grass is then planted the next year at the
beginning of or during the summer rainy season. The : '...
ing or primary :ii j done in the fall .:: .. the cool season
S: :crop to be i 1::: 1 on a clean, tilled seed bed which
... means more and earlier production as compared to
over ..... on a sod. Tillage in the fall and again .:r, : .
cool s ...... : ... has stopped ". ( ,) : ........ for
more complete : ::: .i :: i any weeds and remnants of the
old pasture sod. i .. i i.. strategy should result in a clean,
smooth, i :. : ... i site E :.1 ...:.. of the new pasture.

A ::: :: strategy has :: : : :i :the use of a herbi-
cide in an ::: .:.i.r to insure ::. .1. i. kill of certain weedy
grasses. The herbicide ...... ..:. has been used in late sum-
mer to kill the old : .. ... sod and weedy plants such as
smutgrass and common' :::::::1:_:: To be iT ` : the
herbicide must be :i.i .: before plant growth slows. In the
fall,;. .... :: drill :.. .... drill) is then used to: .- ..: :r. cool
season -- .L into the killed sod. This practice would con-
serve soil moisture as compared to ::: : which could be an
advantage in getting the cool season crop started. Producers
should weight the costs and advantages before choosing one
system over another.

CGC

OCTOBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

The tables on the :...:....... page show the October 1
estimates of field crop :: .::: :: ::: : Florida and the United
. .. were made by the Florida and National ..
Statistics

EBW










Acreage (X1000)
Crop
Florida United States

Corn for grain 55 73,789

Cotton, all 80 10,354.5

Hay, all 270 59,819

Peanuts 81 1475.5

S. 35 71,570

Sugarcane 448 934

Tobacco, all 6.5 749.5

Wheat, all 13 59,211



Yield per Acre
Crop
Florida United States Unit

Corn for grain 60 132 bu

Cotton, all 498 616 Ib

Hay, all 2.0 2.54 tn

Peanuts 2200 2448 Ib

Soybeans 23 38.7 bu

Sugarcane 36.0 33.43 tn

Tobacco, all 2600 2062 Ib

Wheat, all 41 43.3 bu


The use of tradenames does not constitute a guarantee or warrant of products named and does not signify approval to the exclusion of similar products.

Prepared by:
J.M. Bennett, Chairman, .. : :
E. B. Whitty, Professor, Extension Agronomist, ebw@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
D. W. Dickson, Professor, Extension Nematologist, dwd@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
C. G. Chambliss, Associate Professor, Extension Agronomist, cgc@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu