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 Table of Contents
 Tobacco sales report
 Tobacco marketing options
 Planning the 1999 tobacco crop
 Maturity of late season peanut...
 Drying peanuts during cold...
 A problem in bermudagrass...
 Bermudagrass and potassium
 New alfalfa varieties
 Planting cool season forages
 Sorghums-fall grazing caution
 September field crops report


FLAG IFAS PALMM UF



Agronomy notes
ALL VOLUMES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066352/00002
 Material Information
Title: Agronomy notes
Uniform Title: Agronomy notes (Gainesville, Fl.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Cooperative Extension Service
Publisher: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Creation Date: October 1998
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Crops and soils -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crop yields -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agriculture -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Agronomy -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: Florida Cooperative Extension Service, University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
General Note: Description based on: January 1971; title from caption.
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000956365
notis - AER9014
System ID: UF00066352:00002

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Tobacco sales report
        Page 2
    Tobacco marketing options
        Page 2
    Planning the 1999 tobacco crop
        Page 2
    Maturity of late season peanuts
        Page 2
    Drying peanuts during cold weather
        Page 2
    A problem in bermudagrass hay fields
        Page 2
    Bermudagrass and potassium
        Page 3
    New alfalfa varieties
        Page 3
    Planting cool season forages
        Page 3
    Sorghums-fall grazing caution
        Page 3
    September field crops report
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text






AGRONOMY


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
Cooperative Extension Service
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences


NOTES


DATES TO REMEMBER


October 8
October 18-22
October 20-22


IN THIS ISSUE


Range Cattle REC Field Day Ona
American Society of Agronomy Annual Meetings Baltimore, MD
Sunbelt Agricultural Exposition Moultrie, GA


PAGE


TOBACCO
Tobacco Sales Report ........................................................... ............................................... 2
Tobacco M marketing Options .................................................. .................................................. 2
Planning the 1999 Tobacco Crop ............................................... .............................................. 2

PEANUT
M maturity of Late-Season Peanuts ........................................... .................................................. 2
D trying Peanuts D during Cold W weather ........................................ ............................................. 2

FORAGE
A Problem in Berm udagrass H ay Fields ............................................................ ...................... 2
Berm udagrass and Potassium .................................................... ............................................... 3
N ew A lfalfa V varieties ................................................................................ .............................. 3
Planting Cool Season Forages .................................................. ................................................ 3
Sorghum s-Fall G razing Caution........................................................................ ................. 3

MISCELLANEOUS
Septem ber Field Crops Report ................................................. ................................................ 3


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. For information on obtaining other
extension publications, contact your county Cooperative Extension Service office. Florida Cooperative Extension Service / Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
/ University of Florida / Christine Taylor Waddill, Director









TOBACCO SALES REPORT

As of September 24, gross sales on Florida flue-cured
tobacco markets totaled just over 14 million pounds, with an
average .: i ': i .59 per cwt. Over two thirds of the quota
for the (.. ..:. -: i. :.. belt has now been sold. However it
is not expected that all of the quota will be produced this
year. Also gross sales include producer sales plus resales.
Less tobacco is I::. into loan : .: :::: than :: :: : in the
marketing season. i ..: :: last week 7.3 :. : :. of the gross
sales went into the loan: ... lowering the season level
to 9.3 :.- .- *" Through September 1, a total of 19,566 bales
of tobacco had been sold on all markets, with 1072 1 ::
sold on the i i..:.. markets.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING OPTIONS

With minor exceptions, ::... -cured tobacco is sold
.....:.. an auction : ... Fanners 1 :.:. the auction
warehouse or w arehouses where they .:i sell their tobacco.
In some cases a single warehouse is designated for the entire
crop, but many :. ... .. : at two or more markets. In either
case, most fanners choose to sell portions of their tobacco at
:-: : ::: :::: :::::: the marketing season, which runs from
July into October. The fanner and the warehouse. .:. .
mutually agree on when and how much the fanner will de-
liver to the warehouse for each sale. The warehouse is lim-
ited as to how much tobacco it can i: on any given day
because there are many warehouses operating at the same
time and only so much tobacco can be transported and pro-
cessed in : : 7. During the auction, : .:: dealers or buyers for
dom estic or foreign i: :: :: i:: :::. ::::::: ::: .:: offer
bids on the tobacco being sold. Most of the tobacco is sold to
the highest bidder. The warehouseman may also bid on the
tobacco to .. : : ,. :. ; i':- but he also :
to : :: the tobacco at a later sale for a profit. The grower
has the. :.i :.. to :.. .. : ..i bids if he thinks he can get abetter
:. :. at a later sale. If the bid on each pile of tobacco does
not exceed the ::ii : 1- that tobacco goes into the loan
program. It does not matter if the tobacco is bought by a
buyer, the warehouse, or if it goes into loan, the :.. ..
get a single check for the entire lot from the warehouse in a
short time :=: : :.- sale is complete.

EBW

PLANNING THE 1999 TOBACCO CROP

Although the 1999 quota will not be known until De-
cember, growers can begin I.T .,:..:. for the next crop. The
two major decisions to be made would concern plant beds
and selection : .. ... :.. For most growers, there would be
little, if any, changes :: 1 .1 ::: 1 :::i production. Exceptions
wouldbe if there istobe a 1..:. to greenhouse .: ..1... : ..


or if: :- :. :: :::. :::: :. ws is adopted. i: .. fanners that
experienced damage from soil erosion or flooding this past
yearmay want to .....- :.. ... beds to a saferarea.
Due to increased .... with black shank and brown spot
in 1 .:., variety selection could be more critical. There are
new varieties with high resistance to black shank, and more
information on how they .:....... : in variety tests will be
available in a = weeks. U .....:... 1t there may not be
much information as to brown spot tolerance, : : ii of
the new varieties.

EBW

MATURITY OF LATE-SEASON PEANUTS

Many of the late-planted peanuts could be subject to
cool weather before they reach maturity. If so, maturity will
be much slower than normal. A few nights with temperatures
in the low -'s or into the 40's and daytime temperatures
only into the 70's or low 80's may result in:. ...... that are
no longer : ..... toward maturity or gaining in pod
yields. If the hull-scrape method ::: : :i that maturity is
.:... i... -. theonly ..i.i .:.:... beto harvest :.1 ....
the grade may be lower than would nonnally be desirable.

EBW

DRYING PEANUTS DURING COLD WEATHER

used to dry ...... should be no more
than about 15 degrees above the ambient temperature, with
the drying maximum being 95 degrees. It is common for the
thennostat to be set at 90-95 degrees for both night and day
during ..'. .. .. .. ; ... and early October. How-
ever as the outside i - :' : drop in October, the ther-
mostat should be lowered so that the 15-degree rise is the
maximum. Drying peanuts too fast can result in greater skin
. ... and kernel .:..... !....:. : 1 : : .... operation.

EBW

A PROBLEM IN BERMUDAGRASS HAY FIELDS

In late summer several producers have reported poor
regrowth :: : : the first or second harvest, and spots where
the stand has thinned. This may be due to damage from the
bermudagrass mite. or :... 1.. ... ..... ..:.. .r
The : ..:.:... i .** on these farms i ..:.. 1 to be more
than adequate with no i.: : : .- : ::::: Low potassium
has been associated with i. i:.:. stands.

.= should a producer do at this time?

(1) If the stand..i :,:.... :: is severely 1. i1 .1
the .....: .... want to plow and seed oats. This will pro-
vide a hay crop in the ,... .::. .. .. i:. the bermudagrass









TOBACCO SALES REPORT

As of September 24, gross sales on Florida flue-cured
tobacco markets totaled just over 14 million pounds, with an
average .: i ': i .59 per cwt. Over two thirds of the quota
for the (.. ..:. -: i. :.. belt has now been sold. However it
is not expected that all of the quota will be produced this
year. Also gross sales include producer sales plus resales.
Less tobacco is I::. into loan : .: :::: than :: :: : in the
marketing season. i ..: :: last week 7.3 :. : :. of the gross
sales went into the loan: ... lowering the season level
to 9.3 :.- .- *" Through September 1, a total of 19,566 bales
of tobacco had been sold on all markets, with 1072 1 ::
sold on the i i..:.. markets.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING OPTIONS

With minor exceptions, ::... -cured tobacco is sold
.....:.. an auction : ... Fanners 1 :.:. the auction
warehouse or w arehouses where they .:i sell their tobacco.
In some cases a single warehouse is designated for the entire
crop, but many :. ... .. : at two or more markets. In either
case, most fanners choose to sell portions of their tobacco at
:-: : ::: :::: :::::: the marketing season, which runs from
July into October. The fanner and the warehouse. .:. .
mutually agree on when and how much the fanner will de-
liver to the warehouse for each sale. The warehouse is lim-
ited as to how much tobacco it can i: on any given day
because there are many warehouses operating at the same
time and only so much tobacco can be transported and pro-
cessed in : : 7. During the auction, : .:: dealers or buyers for
dom estic or foreign i: :: :: i:: :::. ::::::: ::: .:: offer
bids on the tobacco being sold. Most of the tobacco is sold to
the highest bidder. The warehouseman may also bid on the
tobacco to .. : : ,. :. ; i':- but he also :
to : :: the tobacco at a later sale for a profit. The grower
has the. :.i :.. to :.. .. : ..i bids if he thinks he can get abetter
:. :. at a later sale. If the bid on each pile of tobacco does
not exceed the ::ii : 1- that tobacco goes into the loan
program. It does not matter if the tobacco is bought by a
buyer, the warehouse, or if it goes into loan, the :.. ..
get a single check for the entire lot from the warehouse in a
short time :=: : :.- sale is complete.

EBW

PLANNING THE 1999 TOBACCO CROP

Although the 1999 quota will not be known until De-
cember, growers can begin I.T .,:..:. for the next crop. The
two major decisions to be made would concern plant beds
and selection : .. ... :.. For most growers, there would be
little, if any, changes :: 1 .1 ::: 1 :::i production. Exceptions
wouldbe if there istobe a 1..:. to greenhouse .: ..1... : ..


or if: :- :. :: :::. :::: :. ws is adopted. i: .. fanners that
experienced damage from soil erosion or flooding this past
yearmay want to .....- :.. ... beds to a saferarea.
Due to increased .... with black shank and brown spot
in 1 .:., variety selection could be more critical. There are
new varieties with high resistance to black shank, and more
information on how they .:....... : in variety tests will be
available in a = weeks. U .....:... 1t there may not be
much information as to brown spot tolerance, : : ii of
the new varieties.

EBW

MATURITY OF LATE-SEASON PEANUTS

Many of the late-planted peanuts could be subject to
cool weather before they reach maturity. If so, maturity will
be much slower than normal. A few nights with temperatures
in the low -'s or into the 40's and daytime temperatures
only into the 70's or low 80's may result in:. ...... that are
no longer : ..... toward maturity or gaining in pod
yields. If the hull-scrape method ::: : :i that maturity is
.:... i... -. theonly ..i.i .:.:... beto harvest :.1 ....
the grade may be lower than would nonnally be desirable.

EBW

DRYING PEANUTS DURING COLD WEATHER

used to dry ...... should be no more
than about 15 degrees above the ambient temperature, with
the drying maximum being 95 degrees. It is common for the
thennostat to be set at 90-95 degrees for both night and day
during ..'. .. .. .. ; ... and early October. How-
ever as the outside i - :' : drop in October, the ther-
mostat should be lowered so that the 15-degree rise is the
maximum. Drying peanuts too fast can result in greater skin
. ... and kernel .:..... !....:. : 1 : : .... operation.

EBW

A PROBLEM IN BERMUDAGRASS HAY FIELDS

In late summer several producers have reported poor
regrowth :: : : the first or second harvest, and spots where
the stand has thinned. This may be due to damage from the
bermudagrass mite. or :... 1.. ... ..... ..:.. .r
The : ..:.:... i .** on these farms i ..:.. 1 to be more
than adequate with no i.: : : .- : ::::: Low potassium
has been associated with i. i:.:. stands.

.= should a producer do at this time?

(1) If the stand..i :,:.... :: is severely 1. i1 .1
the .....: .... want to plow and seed oats. This will pro-
vide a hay crop in the ,... .::. .. .. i:. the bermudagrass









TOBACCO SALES REPORT

As of September 24, gross sales on Florida flue-cured
tobacco markets totaled just over 14 million pounds, with an
average .: i ': i .59 per cwt. Over two thirds of the quota
for the (.. ..:. -: i. :.. belt has now been sold. However it
is not expected that all of the quota will be produced this
year. Also gross sales include producer sales plus resales.
Less tobacco is I::. into loan : .: :::: than :: :: : in the
marketing season. i ..: :: last week 7.3 :. : :. of the gross
sales went into the loan: ... lowering the season level
to 9.3 :.- .- *" Through September 1, a total of 19,566 bales
of tobacco had been sold on all markets, with 1072 1 ::
sold on the i i..:.. markets.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING OPTIONS

With minor exceptions, ::... -cured tobacco is sold
.....:.. an auction : ... Fanners 1 :.:. the auction
warehouse or w arehouses where they .:i sell their tobacco.
In some cases a single warehouse is designated for the entire
crop, but many :. ... .. : at two or more markets. In either
case, most fanners choose to sell portions of their tobacco at
:-: : ::: :::: :::::: the marketing season, which runs from
July into October. The fanner and the warehouse. .:. .
mutually agree on when and how much the fanner will de-
liver to the warehouse for each sale. The warehouse is lim-
ited as to how much tobacco it can i: on any given day
because there are many warehouses operating at the same
time and only so much tobacco can be transported and pro-
cessed in : : 7. During the auction, : .:: dealers or buyers for
dom estic or foreign i: :: :: i:: :::. ::::::: ::: .:: offer
bids on the tobacco being sold. Most of the tobacco is sold to
the highest bidder. The warehouseman may also bid on the
tobacco to .. : : ,. :. ; i':- but he also :
to : :: the tobacco at a later sale for a profit. The grower
has the. :.i :.. to :.. .. : ..i bids if he thinks he can get abetter
:. :. at a later sale. If the bid on each pile of tobacco does
not exceed the ::ii : 1- that tobacco goes into the loan
program. It does not matter if the tobacco is bought by a
buyer, the warehouse, or if it goes into loan, the :.. ..
get a single check for the entire lot from the warehouse in a
short time :=: : :.- sale is complete.

EBW

PLANNING THE 1999 TOBACCO CROP

Although the 1999 quota will not be known until De-
cember, growers can begin I.T .,:..:. for the next crop. The
two major decisions to be made would concern plant beds
and selection : .. ... :.. For most growers, there would be
little, if any, changes :: 1 .1 ::: 1 :::i production. Exceptions
wouldbe if there istobe a 1..:. to greenhouse .: ..1... : ..


or if: :- :. :: :::. :::: :. ws is adopted. i: .. fanners that
experienced damage from soil erosion or flooding this past
yearmay want to .....- :.. ... beds to a saferarea.
Due to increased .... with black shank and brown spot
in 1 .:., variety selection could be more critical. There are
new varieties with high resistance to black shank, and more
information on how they .:....... : in variety tests will be
available in a = weeks. U .....:... 1t there may not be
much information as to brown spot tolerance, : : ii of
the new varieties.

EBW

MATURITY OF LATE-SEASON PEANUTS

Many of the late-planted peanuts could be subject to
cool weather before they reach maturity. If so, maturity will
be much slower than normal. A few nights with temperatures
in the low -'s or into the 40's and daytime temperatures
only into the 70's or low 80's may result in:. ...... that are
no longer : ..... toward maturity or gaining in pod
yields. If the hull-scrape method ::: : :i that maturity is
.:... i... -. theonly ..i.i .:.:... beto harvest :.1 ....
the grade may be lower than would nonnally be desirable.

EBW

DRYING PEANUTS DURING COLD WEATHER

used to dry ...... should be no more
than about 15 degrees above the ambient temperature, with
the drying maximum being 95 degrees. It is common for the
thennostat to be set at 90-95 degrees for both night and day
during ..'. .. .. .. ; ... and early October. How-
ever as the outside i - :' : drop in October, the ther-
mostat should be lowered so that the 15-degree rise is the
maximum. Drying peanuts too fast can result in greater skin
. ... and kernel .:..... !....:. : 1 : : .... operation.

EBW

A PROBLEM IN BERMUDAGRASS HAY FIELDS

In late summer several producers have reported poor
regrowth :: : : the first or second harvest, and spots where
the stand has thinned. This may be due to damage from the
bermudagrass mite. or :... 1.. ... ..... ..:.. .r
The : ..:.:... i .** on these farms i ..:.. 1 to be more
than adequate with no i.: : : .- : ::::: Low potassium
has been associated with i. i:.:. stands.

.= should a producer do at this time?

(1) If the stand..i :,:.... :: is severely 1. i1 .1
the .....: .... want to plow and seed oats. This will pro-
vide a hay crop in the ,... .::. .. .. i:. the bermudagrass









TOBACCO SALES REPORT

As of September 24, gross sales on Florida flue-cured
tobacco markets totaled just over 14 million pounds, with an
average .: i ': i .59 per cwt. Over two thirds of the quota
for the (.. ..:. -: i. :.. belt has now been sold. However it
is not expected that all of the quota will be produced this
year. Also gross sales include producer sales plus resales.
Less tobacco is I::. into loan : .: :::: than :: :: : in the
marketing season. i ..: :: last week 7.3 :. : :. of the gross
sales went into the loan: ... lowering the season level
to 9.3 :.- .- *" Through September 1, a total of 19,566 bales
of tobacco had been sold on all markets, with 1072 1 ::
sold on the i i..:.. markets.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING OPTIONS

With minor exceptions, ::... -cured tobacco is sold
.....:.. an auction : ... Fanners 1 :.:. the auction
warehouse or w arehouses where they .:i sell their tobacco.
In some cases a single warehouse is designated for the entire
crop, but many :. ... .. : at two or more markets. In either
case, most fanners choose to sell portions of their tobacco at
:-: : ::: :::: :::::: the marketing season, which runs from
July into October. The fanner and the warehouse. .:. .
mutually agree on when and how much the fanner will de-
liver to the warehouse for each sale. The warehouse is lim-
ited as to how much tobacco it can i: on any given day
because there are many warehouses operating at the same
time and only so much tobacco can be transported and pro-
cessed in : : 7. During the auction, : .:: dealers or buyers for
dom estic or foreign i: :: :: i:: :::. ::::::: ::: .:: offer
bids on the tobacco being sold. Most of the tobacco is sold to
the highest bidder. The warehouseman may also bid on the
tobacco to .. : : ,. :. ; i':- but he also :
to : :: the tobacco at a later sale for a profit. The grower
has the. :.i :.. to :.. .. : ..i bids if he thinks he can get abetter
:. :. at a later sale. If the bid on each pile of tobacco does
not exceed the ::ii : 1- that tobacco goes into the loan
program. It does not matter if the tobacco is bought by a
buyer, the warehouse, or if it goes into loan, the :.. ..
get a single check for the entire lot from the warehouse in a
short time :=: : :.- sale is complete.

EBW

PLANNING THE 1999 TOBACCO CROP

Although the 1999 quota will not be known until De-
cember, growers can begin I.T .,:..:. for the next crop. The
two major decisions to be made would concern plant beds
and selection : .. ... :.. For most growers, there would be
little, if any, changes :: 1 .1 ::: 1 :::i production. Exceptions
wouldbe if there istobe a 1..:. to greenhouse .: ..1... : ..


or if: :- :. :: :::. :::: :. ws is adopted. i: .. fanners that
experienced damage from soil erosion or flooding this past
yearmay want to .....- :.. ... beds to a saferarea.
Due to increased .... with black shank and brown spot
in 1 .:., variety selection could be more critical. There are
new varieties with high resistance to black shank, and more
information on how they .:....... : in variety tests will be
available in a = weeks. U .....:... 1t there may not be
much information as to brown spot tolerance, : : ii of
the new varieties.

EBW

MATURITY OF LATE-SEASON PEANUTS

Many of the late-planted peanuts could be subject to
cool weather before they reach maturity. If so, maturity will
be much slower than normal. A few nights with temperatures
in the low -'s or into the 40's and daytime temperatures
only into the 70's or low 80's may result in:. ...... that are
no longer : ..... toward maturity or gaining in pod
yields. If the hull-scrape method ::: : :i that maturity is
.:... i... -. theonly ..i.i .:.:... beto harvest :.1 ....
the grade may be lower than would nonnally be desirable.

EBW

DRYING PEANUTS DURING COLD WEATHER

used to dry ...... should be no more
than about 15 degrees above the ambient temperature, with
the drying maximum being 95 degrees. It is common for the
thennostat to be set at 90-95 degrees for both night and day
during ..'. .. .. .. ; ... and early October. How-
ever as the outside i - :' : drop in October, the ther-
mostat should be lowered so that the 15-degree rise is the
maximum. Drying peanuts too fast can result in greater skin
. ... and kernel .:..... !....:. : 1 : : .... operation.

EBW

A PROBLEM IN BERMUDAGRASS HAY FIELDS

In late summer several producers have reported poor
regrowth :: : : the first or second harvest, and spots where
the stand has thinned. This may be due to damage from the
bermudagrass mite. or :... 1.. ... ..... ..:.. .r
The : ..:.:... i .** on these farms i ..:.. 1 to be more
than adequate with no i.: : : .- : ::::: Low potassium
has been associated with i. i:.:. stands.

.= should a producer do at this time?

(1) If the stand..i :,:.... :: is severely 1. i1 .1
the .....: .... want to plow and seed oats. This will pro-
vide a hay crop in the ,... .::. .. .. i:. the bermudagrass









TOBACCO SALES REPORT

As of September 24, gross sales on Florida flue-cured
tobacco markets totaled just over 14 million pounds, with an
average .: i ': i .59 per cwt. Over two thirds of the quota
for the (.. ..:. -: i. :.. belt has now been sold. However it
is not expected that all of the quota will be produced this
year. Also gross sales include producer sales plus resales.
Less tobacco is I::. into loan : .: :::: than :: :: : in the
marketing season. i ..: :: last week 7.3 :. : :. of the gross
sales went into the loan: ... lowering the season level
to 9.3 :.- .- *" Through September 1, a total of 19,566 bales
of tobacco had been sold on all markets, with 1072 1 ::
sold on the i i..:.. markets.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING OPTIONS

With minor exceptions, ::... -cured tobacco is sold
.....:.. an auction : ... Fanners 1 :.:. the auction
warehouse or w arehouses where they .:i sell their tobacco.
In some cases a single warehouse is designated for the entire
crop, but many :. ... .. : at two or more markets. In either
case, most fanners choose to sell portions of their tobacco at
:-: : ::: :::: :::::: the marketing season, which runs from
July into October. The fanner and the warehouse. .:. .
mutually agree on when and how much the fanner will de-
liver to the warehouse for each sale. The warehouse is lim-
ited as to how much tobacco it can i: on any given day
because there are many warehouses operating at the same
time and only so much tobacco can be transported and pro-
cessed in : : 7. During the auction, : .:: dealers or buyers for
dom estic or foreign i: :: :: i:: :::. ::::::: ::: .:: offer
bids on the tobacco being sold. Most of the tobacco is sold to
the highest bidder. The warehouseman may also bid on the
tobacco to .. : : ,. :. ; i':- but he also :
to : :: the tobacco at a later sale for a profit. The grower
has the. :.i :.. to :.. .. : ..i bids if he thinks he can get abetter
:. :. at a later sale. If the bid on each pile of tobacco does
not exceed the ::ii : 1- that tobacco goes into the loan
program. It does not matter if the tobacco is bought by a
buyer, the warehouse, or if it goes into loan, the :.. ..
get a single check for the entire lot from the warehouse in a
short time :=: : :.- sale is complete.

EBW

PLANNING THE 1999 TOBACCO CROP

Although the 1999 quota will not be known until De-
cember, growers can begin I.T .,:..:. for the next crop. The
two major decisions to be made would concern plant beds
and selection : .. ... :.. For most growers, there would be
little, if any, changes :: 1 .1 ::: 1 :::i production. Exceptions
wouldbe if there istobe a 1..:. to greenhouse .: ..1... : ..


or if: :- :. :: :::. :::: :. ws is adopted. i: .. fanners that
experienced damage from soil erosion or flooding this past
yearmay want to .....- :.. ... beds to a saferarea.
Due to increased .... with black shank and brown spot
in 1 .:., variety selection could be more critical. There are
new varieties with high resistance to black shank, and more
information on how they .:....... : in variety tests will be
available in a = weeks. U .....:... 1t there may not be
much information as to brown spot tolerance, : : ii of
the new varieties.

EBW

MATURITY OF LATE-SEASON PEANUTS

Many of the late-planted peanuts could be subject to
cool weather before they reach maturity. If so, maturity will
be much slower than normal. A few nights with temperatures
in the low -'s or into the 40's and daytime temperatures
only into the 70's or low 80's may result in:. ...... that are
no longer : ..... toward maturity or gaining in pod
yields. If the hull-scrape method ::: : :i that maturity is
.:... i... -. theonly ..i.i .:.:... beto harvest :.1 ....
the grade may be lower than would nonnally be desirable.

EBW

DRYING PEANUTS DURING COLD WEATHER

used to dry ...... should be no more
than about 15 degrees above the ambient temperature, with
the drying maximum being 95 degrees. It is common for the
thennostat to be set at 90-95 degrees for both night and day
during ..'. .. .. .. ; ... and early October. How-
ever as the outside i - :' : drop in October, the ther-
mostat should be lowered so that the 15-degree rise is the
maximum. Drying peanuts too fast can result in greater skin
. ... and kernel .:..... !....:. : 1 : : .... operation.

EBW

A PROBLEM IN BERMUDAGRASS HAY FIELDS

In late summer several producers have reported poor
regrowth :: : : the first or second harvest, and spots where
the stand has thinned. This may be due to damage from the
bermudagrass mite. or :... 1.. ... ..... ..:.. .r
The : ..:.:... i .** on these farms i ..:.. 1 to be more
than adequate with no i.: : : .- : ::::: Low potassium
has been associated with i. i:.:. stands.

.= should a producer do at this time?

(1) If the stand..i :,:.... :: is severely 1. i1 .1
the .....: .... want to plow and seed oats. This will pro-
vide a hay crop in the ,... .::. .. .. i:. the bermudagrass









TOBACCO SALES REPORT

As of September 24, gross sales on Florida flue-cured
tobacco markets totaled just over 14 million pounds, with an
average .: i ': i .59 per cwt. Over two thirds of the quota
for the (.. ..:. -: i. :.. belt has now been sold. However it
is not expected that all of the quota will be produced this
year. Also gross sales include producer sales plus resales.
Less tobacco is I::. into loan : .: :::: than :: :: : in the
marketing season. i ..: :: last week 7.3 :. : :. of the gross
sales went into the loan: ... lowering the season level
to 9.3 :.- .- *" Through September 1, a total of 19,566 bales
of tobacco had been sold on all markets, with 1072 1 ::
sold on the i i..:.. markets.

EBW

TOBACCO MARKETING OPTIONS

With minor exceptions, ::... -cured tobacco is sold
.....:.. an auction : ... Fanners 1 :.:. the auction
warehouse or w arehouses where they .:i sell their tobacco.
In some cases a single warehouse is designated for the entire
crop, but many :. ... .. : at two or more markets. In either
case, most fanners choose to sell portions of their tobacco at
:-: : ::: :::: :::::: the marketing season, which runs from
July into October. The fanner and the warehouse. .:. .
mutually agree on when and how much the fanner will de-
liver to the warehouse for each sale. The warehouse is lim-
ited as to how much tobacco it can i: on any given day
because there are many warehouses operating at the same
time and only so much tobacco can be transported and pro-
cessed in : : 7. During the auction, : .:: dealers or buyers for
dom estic or foreign i: :: :: i:: :::. ::::::: ::: .:: offer
bids on the tobacco being sold. Most of the tobacco is sold to
the highest bidder. The warehouseman may also bid on the
tobacco to .. : : ,. :. ; i':- but he also :
to : :: the tobacco at a later sale for a profit. The grower
has the. :.i :.. to :.. .. : ..i bids if he thinks he can get abetter
:. :. at a later sale. If the bid on each pile of tobacco does
not exceed the ::ii : 1- that tobacco goes into the loan
program. It does not matter if the tobacco is bought by a
buyer, the warehouse, or if it goes into loan, the :.. ..
get a single check for the entire lot from the warehouse in a
short time :=: : :.- sale is complete.

EBW

PLANNING THE 1999 TOBACCO CROP

Although the 1999 quota will not be known until De-
cember, growers can begin I.T .,:..:. for the next crop. The
two major decisions to be made would concern plant beds
and selection : .. ... :.. For most growers, there would be
little, if any, changes :: 1 .1 ::: 1 :::i production. Exceptions
wouldbe if there istobe a 1..:. to greenhouse .: ..1... : ..


or if: :- :. :: :::. :::: :. ws is adopted. i: .. fanners that
experienced damage from soil erosion or flooding this past
yearmay want to .....- :.. ... beds to a saferarea.
Due to increased .... with black shank and brown spot
in 1 .:., variety selection could be more critical. There are
new varieties with high resistance to black shank, and more
information on how they .:....... : in variety tests will be
available in a = weeks. U .....:... 1t there may not be
much information as to brown spot tolerance, : : ii of
the new varieties.

EBW

MATURITY OF LATE-SEASON PEANUTS

Many of the late-planted peanuts could be subject to
cool weather before they reach maturity. If so, maturity will
be much slower than normal. A few nights with temperatures
in the low -'s or into the 40's and daytime temperatures
only into the 70's or low 80's may result in:. ...... that are
no longer : ..... toward maturity or gaining in pod
yields. If the hull-scrape method ::: : :i that maturity is
.:... i... -. theonly ..i.i .:.:... beto harvest :.1 ....
the grade may be lower than would nonnally be desirable.

EBW

DRYING PEANUTS DURING COLD WEATHER

used to dry ...... should be no more
than about 15 degrees above the ambient temperature, with
the drying maximum being 95 degrees. It is common for the
thennostat to be set at 90-95 degrees for both night and day
during ..'. .. .. .. ; ... and early October. How-
ever as the outside i - :' : drop in October, the ther-
mostat should be lowered so that the 15-degree rise is the
maximum. Drying peanuts too fast can result in greater skin
. ... and kernel .:..... !....:. : 1 : : .... operation.

EBW

A PROBLEM IN BERMUDAGRASS HAY FIELDS

In late summer several producers have reported poor
regrowth :: : : the first or second harvest, and spots where
the stand has thinned. This may be due to damage from the
bermudagrass mite. or :... 1.. ... ..... ..:.. .r
The : ..:.:... i .** on these farms i ..:.. 1 to be more
than adequate with no i.: : : .- : ::::: Low potassium
has been associated with i. i:.:. stands.

.= should a producer do at this time?

(1) If the stand..i :,:.... :: is severely 1. i1 .1
the .....: .... want to plow and seed oats. This will pro-
vide a hay crop in the ,... .::. .. .. i:. the bermudagrass









PLANTING COOL SEASON FORAGES


(2) The :..... ... may want to sod seed the oats into
the bennudagrass. After the oats have been harvested in the
i :: a decision can be made as to whether of not the
bermuda grass should be plowed and replanted.

(3) The ..: ..:' 1 do nothing at this time,' .: i' :*
to burn the stubble of frosted grass in February or early March
at the : : sign of new growth. As new growth develops it
will be easy to determine if the stand needs to be replanted.

CGC

BERMUDAGRASS AND POTASSIUM

.,:. . .. ... :..... .... ... .. ...: in h eat. .. .. ... ... *
cold tolerance of f : : grasses. : '- : : may be
the first ::.i..::: of K.i :. K recognized in Coastal and
otherhybridi'.. .... ... .... of older leaves. fol-
lowed by leaf tip and leaf .. : chloroses, can occur with
severe:i :':i :: : i : : : : : :: )purple i:- causedby
fungal infection, may also be scattered over younger leaf
blades. Thinning stands and reduced growth. -. .....: by
death of older leaves, are : .: ... :....

Source: : (.: ,I '..i 82 (1998, No. 3).

CGC

NEW ALFALFA VARIETIES

Dr. Joe Bouton, forage breeder, at the Univ. of Ga. has
developed two new nondonnant, :.. : alfalfavariet-
ies. They were released by the U- :. of Georgia under
the variety names of. :. and AmeriGraze 702..' 1:.:. :: *:
these new varieties have notbeen tested extensively inFlorida,
they have the :- 1: .! to ;..- .... better in Florida than other
varieties .... :: i. Alfagraze. If anyone is i : i 1:"
ing .::: :ii:ii::: : : .::.. : .1: .1 be the best varieties to
try. Since it is not known how well these varieties will with-
stand Florida's insect, .... and nematode :-... .. it is
: 1 .. .- :: p lant o n ly ..... : I : -: A ... ::
acreage could bej .:: as a : graze pasture for calves
oras a ....: .... ..: :1.. beef herd.

ABT 805 is marketed by ABT(Agro Biotech) Seed Co.,
and AmeriGraze 702 is marketed by America's Alfalfa Seed
Co.. '. i:..... called a grazing alfalfa these varieties can also
be harvested for hay.

A new variety dev i .: ::: i. :: whichc :: I -
ment for the old FI-77 variety, is :-. ..' to be available in
the fall of 1999.

CGC


The traditional window for planting the cool season
S.. ... falls between October 15 and November 15; with
;!... :. in north Florida :" in the early :.I of the
window and planting in South *': :. : occurring in the last
halfofthe window. i :: .:.... .. : i ..:::.: seemstowork
well for crops that are : .1 ... .1 on a clean, tilled, seedbed.
W1 ... :.:: :... ... ;. .:ia bermudagrass sod in north Florida,
:::. should be delayed two to four weeks .::: :: :. to
.::. into a clean, tilled . ,I ..: : : should be
disced before :.1 ...:... and planting may need to be delayed
ev e ." .. .. : ... .. :
::: into grass sods in *" :::i: i : :i: (south of Orlando)
is not recommended unless 1::: .il .: I ; available. More of-
ten than not, soil moisture .:: be inadequate for ..:
production.

CGC

SORGHUMS-FALL GRAZING CAUTION

A number of producers planted : .....
hybrids in late summer with the intention of making hay. There
is. i : .be some regrowth after the hay has been harvested,
and .......... will want to graze this regrowth.

Be careful when grazing sorghums in the fall. Prussic
acid ,::. :.) poisoning can be a problem when cattle are graz-
ing sorghums, sorghun-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, and
1.... .... ..: Cattle ....;..* : are .:.:.:11 concerned about
grazing young sorghum i :::i .. which are known to be high in
prussic acid. This risk can be managed simply by waiting
until the plants are 18 to 24 inches high before grazing. But,
S: acid ; : is even a greater threat .:..' a '.
Frosted forage .:: i :. .1:: large quantities of ::: i acid
when the plant cells breakdown in the cow's rumen. Cattle
should be removed from sorghum ...... ,, .. .. pre-
.'. i i When the frosted plant tissue has dried, it is :: to
graze.

CGC

SEPTEMBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

Table 1 and Table 2 on the I. : ::. .. show the
Florida Agricultural Statistics Service field '.
of September 1.


can be : i 1 .::' 1









PLANTING COOL SEASON FORAGES


(2) The :..... ... may want to sod seed the oats into
the bennudagrass. After the oats have been harvested in the
i :: a decision can be made as to whether of not the
bermuda grass should be plowed and replanted.

(3) The ..: ..:' 1 do nothing at this time,' .: i' :*
to burn the stubble of frosted grass in February or early March
at the : : sign of new growth. As new growth develops it
will be easy to determine if the stand needs to be replanted.

CGC

BERMUDAGRASS AND POTASSIUM

.,:. . .. ... :..... .... ... .. ...: in h eat. .. .. ... ... *
cold tolerance of f : : grasses. : '- : : may be
the first ::.i..::: of K.i :. K recognized in Coastal and
otherhybridi'.. .... ... .... of older leaves. fol-
lowed by leaf tip and leaf .. : chloroses, can occur with
severe:i :':i :: : i : : : : : :: )purple i:- causedby
fungal infection, may also be scattered over younger leaf
blades. Thinning stands and reduced growth. -. .....: by
death of older leaves, are : .: ... :....

Source: : (.: ,I '..i 82 (1998, No. 3).

CGC

NEW ALFALFA VARIETIES

Dr. Joe Bouton, forage breeder, at the Univ. of Ga. has
developed two new nondonnant, :.. : alfalfavariet-
ies. They were released by the U- :. of Georgia under
the variety names of. :. and AmeriGraze 702..' 1:.:. :: *:
these new varieties have notbeen tested extensively inFlorida,
they have the :- 1: .! to ;..- .... better in Florida than other
varieties .... :: i. Alfagraze. If anyone is i : i 1:"
ing .::: :ii:ii::: : : .::.. : .1: .1 be the best varieties to
try. Since it is not known how well these varieties will with-
stand Florida's insect, .... and nematode :-... .. it is
: 1 .. .- :: p lant o n ly ..... : I : -: A ... ::
acreage could bej .:: as a : graze pasture for calves
oras a ....: .... ..: :1.. beef herd.

ABT 805 is marketed by ABT(Agro Biotech) Seed Co.,
and AmeriGraze 702 is marketed by America's Alfalfa Seed
Co.. '. i:..... called a grazing alfalfa these varieties can also
be harvested for hay.

A new variety dev i .: ::: i. :: whichc :: I -
ment for the old FI-77 variety, is :-. ..' to be available in
the fall of 1999.

CGC


The traditional window for planting the cool season
S.. ... falls between October 15 and November 15; with
;!... :. in north Florida :" in the early :.I of the
window and planting in South *': :. : occurring in the last
halfofthe window. i :: .:.... .. : i ..:::.: seemstowork
well for crops that are : .1 ... .1 on a clean, tilled, seedbed.
W1 ... :.:: :... ... ;. .:ia bermudagrass sod in north Florida,
:::. should be delayed two to four weeks .::: :: :. to
.::. into a clean, tilled . ,I ..: : : should be
disced before :.1 ...:... and planting may need to be delayed
ev e ." .. .. : ... .. :
::: into grass sods in *" :::i: i : :i: (south of Orlando)
is not recommended unless 1::: .il .: I ; available. More of-
ten than not, soil moisture .:: be inadequate for ..:
production.

CGC

SORGHUMS-FALL GRAZING CAUTION

A number of producers planted : .....
hybrids in late summer with the intention of making hay. There
is. i : .be some regrowth after the hay has been harvested,
and .......... will want to graze this regrowth.

Be careful when grazing sorghums in the fall. Prussic
acid ,::. :.) poisoning can be a problem when cattle are graz-
ing sorghums, sorghun-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, and
1.... .... ..: Cattle ....;..* : are .:.:.:11 concerned about
grazing young sorghum i :::i .. which are known to be high in
prussic acid. This risk can be managed simply by waiting
until the plants are 18 to 24 inches high before grazing. But,
S: acid ; : is even a greater threat .:..' a '.
Frosted forage .:: i :. .1:: large quantities of ::: i acid
when the plant cells breakdown in the cow's rumen. Cattle
should be removed from sorghum ...... ,, .. .. pre-
.'. i i When the frosted plant tissue has dried, it is :: to
graze.

CGC

SEPTEMBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

Table 1 and Table 2 on the I. : ::. .. show the
Florida Agricultural Statistics Service field '.
of September 1.


can be : i 1 .::' 1









PLANTING COOL SEASON FORAGES


(2) The :..... ... may want to sod seed the oats into
the bennudagrass. After the oats have been harvested in the
i :: a decision can be made as to whether of not the
bermuda grass should be plowed and replanted.

(3) The ..: ..:' 1 do nothing at this time,' .: i' :*
to burn the stubble of frosted grass in February or early March
at the : : sign of new growth. As new growth develops it
will be easy to determine if the stand needs to be replanted.

CGC

BERMUDAGRASS AND POTASSIUM

.,:. . .. ... :..... .... ... .. ...: in h eat. .. .. ... ... *
cold tolerance of f : : grasses. : '- : : may be
the first ::.i..::: of K.i :. K recognized in Coastal and
otherhybridi'.. .... ... .... of older leaves. fol-
lowed by leaf tip and leaf .. : chloroses, can occur with
severe:i :':i :: : i : : : : : :: )purple i:- causedby
fungal infection, may also be scattered over younger leaf
blades. Thinning stands and reduced growth. -. .....: by
death of older leaves, are : .: ... :....

Source: : (.: ,I '..i 82 (1998, No. 3).

CGC

NEW ALFALFA VARIETIES

Dr. Joe Bouton, forage breeder, at the Univ. of Ga. has
developed two new nondonnant, :.. : alfalfavariet-
ies. They were released by the U- :. of Georgia under
the variety names of. :. and AmeriGraze 702..' 1:.:. :: *:
these new varieties have notbeen tested extensively inFlorida,
they have the :- 1: .! to ;..- .... better in Florida than other
varieties .... :: i. Alfagraze. If anyone is i : i 1:"
ing .::: :ii:ii::: : : .::.. : .1: .1 be the best varieties to
try. Since it is not known how well these varieties will with-
stand Florida's insect, .... and nematode :-... .. it is
: 1 .. .- :: p lant o n ly ..... : I : -: A ... ::
acreage could bej .:: as a : graze pasture for calves
oras a ....: .... ..: :1.. beef herd.

ABT 805 is marketed by ABT(Agro Biotech) Seed Co.,
and AmeriGraze 702 is marketed by America's Alfalfa Seed
Co.. '. i:..... called a grazing alfalfa these varieties can also
be harvested for hay.

A new variety dev i .: ::: i. :: whichc :: I -
ment for the old FI-77 variety, is :-. ..' to be available in
the fall of 1999.

CGC


The traditional window for planting the cool season
S.. ... falls between October 15 and November 15; with
;!... :. in north Florida :" in the early :.I of the
window and planting in South *': :. : occurring in the last
halfofthe window. i :: .:.... .. : i ..:::.: seemstowork
well for crops that are : .1 ... .1 on a clean, tilled, seedbed.
W1 ... :.:: :... ... ;. .:ia bermudagrass sod in north Florida,
:::. should be delayed two to four weeks .::: :: :. to
.::. into a clean, tilled . ,I ..: : : should be
disced before :.1 ...:... and planting may need to be delayed
ev e ." .. .. : ... .. :
::: into grass sods in *" :::i: i : :i: (south of Orlando)
is not recommended unless 1::: .il .: I ; available. More of-
ten than not, soil moisture .:: be inadequate for ..:
production.

CGC

SORGHUMS-FALL GRAZING CAUTION

A number of producers planted : .....
hybrids in late summer with the intention of making hay. There
is. i : .be some regrowth after the hay has been harvested,
and .......... will want to graze this regrowth.

Be careful when grazing sorghums in the fall. Prussic
acid ,::. :.) poisoning can be a problem when cattle are graz-
ing sorghums, sorghun-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, and
1.... .... ..: Cattle ....;..* : are .:.:.:11 concerned about
grazing young sorghum i :::i .. which are known to be high in
prussic acid. This risk can be managed simply by waiting
until the plants are 18 to 24 inches high before grazing. But,
S: acid ; : is even a greater threat .:..' a '.
Frosted forage .:: i :. .1:: large quantities of ::: i acid
when the plant cells breakdown in the cow's rumen. Cattle
should be removed from sorghum ...... ,, .. .. pre-
.'. i i When the frosted plant tissue has dried, it is :: to
graze.

CGC

SEPTEMBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

Table 1 and Table 2 on the I. : ::. .. show the
Florida Agricultural Statistics Service field '.
of September 1.


can be : i 1 .::' 1









PLANTING COOL SEASON FORAGES


(2) The :..... ... may want to sod seed the oats into
the bennudagrass. After the oats have been harvested in the
i :: a decision can be made as to whether of not the
bermuda grass should be plowed and replanted.

(3) The ..: ..:' 1 do nothing at this time,' .: i' :*
to burn the stubble of frosted grass in February or early March
at the : : sign of new growth. As new growth develops it
will be easy to determine if the stand needs to be replanted.

CGC

BERMUDAGRASS AND POTASSIUM

.,:. . .. ... :..... .... ... .. ...: in h eat. .. .. ... ... *
cold tolerance of f : : grasses. : '- : : may be
the first ::.i..::: of K.i :. K recognized in Coastal and
otherhybridi'.. .... ... .... of older leaves. fol-
lowed by leaf tip and leaf .. : chloroses, can occur with
severe:i :':i :: : i : : : : : :: )purple i:- causedby
fungal infection, may also be scattered over younger leaf
blades. Thinning stands and reduced growth. -. .....: by
death of older leaves, are : .: ... :....

Source: : (.: ,I '..i 82 (1998, No. 3).

CGC

NEW ALFALFA VARIETIES

Dr. Joe Bouton, forage breeder, at the Univ. of Ga. has
developed two new nondonnant, :.. : alfalfavariet-
ies. They were released by the U- :. of Georgia under
the variety names of. :. and AmeriGraze 702..' 1:.:. :: *:
these new varieties have notbeen tested extensively inFlorida,
they have the :- 1: .! to ;..- .... better in Florida than other
varieties .... :: i. Alfagraze. If anyone is i : i 1:"
ing .::: :ii:ii::: : : .::.. : .1: .1 be the best varieties to
try. Since it is not known how well these varieties will with-
stand Florida's insect, .... and nematode :-... .. it is
: 1 .. .- :: p lant o n ly ..... : I : -: A ... ::
acreage could bej .:: as a : graze pasture for calves
oras a ....: .... ..: :1.. beef herd.

ABT 805 is marketed by ABT(Agro Biotech) Seed Co.,
and AmeriGraze 702 is marketed by America's Alfalfa Seed
Co.. '. i:..... called a grazing alfalfa these varieties can also
be harvested for hay.

A new variety dev i .: ::: i. :: whichc :: I -
ment for the old FI-77 variety, is :-. ..' to be available in
the fall of 1999.

CGC


The traditional window for planting the cool season
S.. ... falls between October 15 and November 15; with
;!... :. in north Florida :" in the early :.I of the
window and planting in South *': :. : occurring in the last
halfofthe window. i :: .:.... .. : i ..:::.: seemstowork
well for crops that are : .1 ... .1 on a clean, tilled, seedbed.
W1 ... :.:: :... ... ;. .:ia bermudagrass sod in north Florida,
:::. should be delayed two to four weeks .::: :: :. to
.::. into a clean, tilled . ,I ..: : : should be
disced before :.1 ...:... and planting may need to be delayed
ev e ." .. .. : ... .. :
::: into grass sods in *" :::i: i : :i: (south of Orlando)
is not recommended unless 1::: .il .: I ; available. More of-
ten than not, soil moisture .:: be inadequate for ..:
production.

CGC

SORGHUMS-FALL GRAZING CAUTION

A number of producers planted : .....
hybrids in late summer with the intention of making hay. There
is. i : .be some regrowth after the hay has been harvested,
and .......... will want to graze this regrowth.

Be careful when grazing sorghums in the fall. Prussic
acid ,::. :.) poisoning can be a problem when cattle are graz-
ing sorghums, sorghun-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, and
1.... .... ..: Cattle ....;..* : are .:.:.:11 concerned about
grazing young sorghum i :::i .. which are known to be high in
prussic acid. This risk can be managed simply by waiting
until the plants are 18 to 24 inches high before grazing. But,
S: acid ; : is even a greater threat .:..' a '.
Frosted forage .:: i :. .1:: large quantities of ::: i acid
when the plant cells breakdown in the cow's rumen. Cattle
should be removed from sorghum ...... ,, .. .. pre-
.'. i i When the frosted plant tissue has dried, it is :: to
graze.

CGC

SEPTEMBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

Table 1 and Table 2 on the I. : ::. .. show the
Florida Agricultural Statistics Service field '.
of September 1.


can be : i 1 .::' 1









PLANTING COOL SEASON FORAGES


(2) The :..... ... may want to sod seed the oats into
the bennudagrass. After the oats have been harvested in the
i :: a decision can be made as to whether of not the
bermuda grass should be plowed and replanted.

(3) The ..: ..:' 1 do nothing at this time,' .: i' :*
to burn the stubble of frosted grass in February or early March
at the : : sign of new growth. As new growth develops it
will be easy to determine if the stand needs to be replanted.

CGC

BERMUDAGRASS AND POTASSIUM

.,:. . .. ... :..... .... ... .. ...: in h eat. .. .. ... ... *
cold tolerance of f : : grasses. : '- : : may be
the first ::.i..::: of K.i :. K recognized in Coastal and
otherhybridi'.. .... ... .... of older leaves. fol-
lowed by leaf tip and leaf .. : chloroses, can occur with
severe:i :':i :: : i : : : : : :: )purple i:- causedby
fungal infection, may also be scattered over younger leaf
blades. Thinning stands and reduced growth. -. .....: by
death of older leaves, are : .: ... :....

Source: : (.: ,I '..i 82 (1998, No. 3).

CGC

NEW ALFALFA VARIETIES

Dr. Joe Bouton, forage breeder, at the Univ. of Ga. has
developed two new nondonnant, :.. : alfalfavariet-
ies. They were released by the U- :. of Georgia under
the variety names of. :. and AmeriGraze 702..' 1:.:. :: *:
these new varieties have notbeen tested extensively inFlorida,
they have the :- 1: .! to ;..- .... better in Florida than other
varieties .... :: i. Alfagraze. If anyone is i : i 1:"
ing .::: :ii:ii::: : : .::.. : .1: .1 be the best varieties to
try. Since it is not known how well these varieties will with-
stand Florida's insect, .... and nematode :-... .. it is
: 1 .. .- :: p lant o n ly ..... : I : -: A ... ::
acreage could bej .:: as a : graze pasture for calves
oras a ....: .... ..: :1.. beef herd.

ABT 805 is marketed by ABT(Agro Biotech) Seed Co.,
and AmeriGraze 702 is marketed by America's Alfalfa Seed
Co.. '. i:..... called a grazing alfalfa these varieties can also
be harvested for hay.

A new variety dev i .: ::: i. :: whichc :: I -
ment for the old FI-77 variety, is :-. ..' to be available in
the fall of 1999.

CGC


The traditional window for planting the cool season
S.. ... falls between October 15 and November 15; with
;!... :. in north Florida :" in the early :.I of the
window and planting in South *': :. : occurring in the last
halfofthe window. i :: .:.... .. : i ..:::.: seemstowork
well for crops that are : .1 ... .1 on a clean, tilled, seedbed.
W1 ... :.:: :... ... ;. .:ia bermudagrass sod in north Florida,
:::. should be delayed two to four weeks .::: :: :. to
.::. into a clean, tilled . ,I ..: : : should be
disced before :.1 ...:... and planting may need to be delayed
ev e ." .. .. : ... .. :
::: into grass sods in *" :::i: i : :i: (south of Orlando)
is not recommended unless 1::: .il .: I ; available. More of-
ten than not, soil moisture .:: be inadequate for ..:
production.

CGC

SORGHUMS-FALL GRAZING CAUTION

A number of producers planted : .....
hybrids in late summer with the intention of making hay. There
is. i : .be some regrowth after the hay has been harvested,
and .......... will want to graze this regrowth.

Be careful when grazing sorghums in the fall. Prussic
acid ,::. :.) poisoning can be a problem when cattle are graz-
ing sorghums, sorghun-sudangrass hybrids, sudangrass, and
1.... .... ..: Cattle ....;..* : are .:.:.:11 concerned about
grazing young sorghum i :::i .. which are known to be high in
prussic acid. This risk can be managed simply by waiting
until the plants are 18 to 24 inches high before grazing. But,
S: acid ; : is even a greater threat .:..' a '.
Frosted forage .:: i :. .1:: large quantities of ::: i acid
when the plant cells breakdown in the cow's rumen. Cattle
should be removed from sorghum ...... ,, .. .. pre-
.'. i i When the frosted plant tissue has dried, it is :: to
graze.

CGC

SEPTEMBER FIELD CROPS REPORT

Table 1 and Table 2 on the I. : ::. .. show the
Florida Agricultural Statistics Service field '.
of September 1.


can be : i 1 .::' 1










Acreage (X1000)
Crop
Florida United States

Corn for grain 55 73,789

Cotton, all 80 10,604.5

Hay, all 270 59,819

Peanuts 81 1475.5

S. 35 71,570

Sugarcane 44 8939

Tobacco, all 6.5 749.5

Wheat, all 13 59,211





Yield per acre
Crop
Florida United States Unit

Corn for grain 60 132 bu

Cotton, all 498 614 Ib

H all 2.0 2.48 tn

Peanuts 2400 2459 lb

Soybeans 23 40.6 bu

.: .: ::-. :36.0 33.3 tn

Tobacco, all 2300 2048 Ib

all 41 43.3 bu


The use of tradenames does not constitute a guarantee orwarrant of products named : ... : : ,:: ::. :.. of similar products.

Prepared by:
J. M. Bennett, Chairman, jmbt@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
E. B. Whitty, Professor, Extension Agronomist, ebw@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu
C. G. Chambliss, Associate Professor, Extension Agronomist, cgc@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu