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 Copyright
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Materials and methods
 Eggplant
 Pepper
 Potato
 Tomato
 Summary
 Reference






Title: Seasonal response of vegetable crops for selected cultivars in North Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066208/00001
 Material Information
Title: Seasonal response of vegetable crops for selected cultivars in North Florida
Physical Description: 25 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Halsey, L. H ( Lawrence Henry ), 1915-
Kostewicz, S. R
Publisher: Vegetable Crops Dept., Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subject: Horticultural crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Farm produce -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 25).
Statement of Responsibility: L.H. Halsey, S.R. Kostewicz
General Note: "Vegetable crops research report VC 2-76."
General Note: "July 1976."
General Note: "This work was supported by funds from the IFAS Rural Development Programs."
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066208
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70967005

Table of Contents
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
    Materials and methods
        Page 2
    Eggplant
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Pepper
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Potato
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Tomato
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Summary
        Page 24
    Reference
        Page 25
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida






July 1976 Vegetable Crops
Research Report
VC 2 76






Seasonal Response of Vegetable Crops
for Selected Cultivars in North Florida



II. SOLANACEOUS CROPS


Vegetable Crops Department L. H. Halsey
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611 S. R. Kostewicz

This work was supported by funds from the IFAS Center for Rural Development Programs.











Vegetable Crops
Research Report
VC 2-76


SEASONAL RESPONSE OF VEGETABLE CROPS

FOR SELECTED CULTIVARS IN NORTH FLORIDA

II. SOLANACEOUS CROPS


Vegetable Crops Department
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesville 32611


L. H. Halsey

S. R. Kostewicz


This work was supported by funds from the IFAS Center for Rural Development Programs


July 1976










Seasonal Response of Vegetable Crops for Selected

Cultivars in North Florida. II. Solanaceous Crops
by
L. H. Halsey and S. R. Kostewiczl/


Reports of warm season vegetable crop performance in north Florida have

been for crops produced in traditional spring and fall growing periods (1-5).
The solanaceous crops--eggplant, pepper, potato and tomato--usually have been

grown during times indicated above. Some deviation from this pattern has

occurred with eggplant and potato. Eggplant plantings sometimes have been

made in early summer and potatoes often have been planted in January and
February. The response of these four crops has not been examined for periods
other than the times noted above.

The objectives of the work reported here were to generate data on the

response of various solanaceous crops to a series of plantings over the en-
tire warm-season growing period. Production potential of each of the crops
at seasons other than the traditional planting times was evaluated. Cultivar

responses of each crop were also determined.






I/Associate Horticulturist and Assistant Extension Vegetable Specialist.
Vegetable Crops Department, University of Florida, IFAS, Gainesville 32611.

The authors wish to acknowledge the valuable technical assistance rendered
by C. Lamar Bryant in the development and conduct of the work reported here.












MATERIALS AND METHODS



Plantings of eggplant, pepper and tomato were made at the Horticultural

Unit (Gainesville) at three-week intervals during the period March 19 -

September 5, 1974 and at one-month intervals during the period March 19 -

August 19, 1975. Potatoes were planted March 19, April 9, September 5,

1974, and January 27, February 17, March 19, and April 22, 1975. Three

cultivars were included in most of the 1974 plantings, and in all the 1975

plantings. The soil was fumigated with methyl bromide (MC-33) for control

of soil-borne pests. Fertilizer of 6-8-8 (plus micronutrients) analysis was

incorporated at time of bedding at 1200 pounds per acre. Supplemental applica-

tions of top-dresser (15-0-14) were made at intervals of 10-14 days to offset

the effects of leaching and to provide continuous nutrient availability,

starting 3-4 weeks after plants emerged. The crops were irrigated as needed

and pest control materials were applied as nearly on a weekly schedule as

possible.

During the 1974 season the crops were field-seeded. Comparisons were

made between field seeding and transplanting in 1975 for eggplant, pepper and

tomato. Transplants were one month old when set in the field.

The potatoes were harvested once for each planting. Eggplant and pepper

were harvested at weekly intervals and tomatoes at 3-4 day intervals. Yields

were adjusted to per-acre equivalents of marketable grade (individual plot

size was 4' x 30' in 1974, and 4' x 20' in 1975).











EGGPLANT



1974. The early planting (March 19) was on poorly drained land and it

failed to yield as well as later plantings on better drained land. Fruit

quality was excellent for the entire crop except for the last weeks of har-

vest on any planting when grade and size declined.

1975. The plantings which had been transplanted were more productive

than those which were field-seeded. The difference was greater for the later

plantings. Yields of 'Florida Market' and 'Black Beauty' were similar for

nearly all plantings. 'Moneymaker', with fruits being naturally small and

more slender, yielded only slightly less than the large-fruited types at nearly
all plantings.
Time to reach maturity varied only slightly among the several variables.

However, harvest period was longer as a result of transplanting. Early plant-

ings had longer harvest periods than later ones.
Yields from early plantings (March and April) were very much higher than

from later plantings (May and June).



















Table 1. Performance of eggplant cultivars
for sequential planting in 1974.


Yield--Bushels per Acre
Florida Market Black Beauty


541
1974
1700
1348


333
657
*
*


Days to Mature
105 98
98 98
127 *
106 *

Days Harvest Period
78 71
130 134
85 *
80 *


Number of Harvests
March 19 10 8
April 9 21 18
April 30 14 *
May 21 12 *

*No plants


Date of
planting
March 19
April 9
April 30
May 21


March
April
April
May


March
April
April
May


-1 ----
























EGGPLANT
Florida Market mI-
Black Beauty


MAR APR APR MAY JUN JUL JUL AUG SEP
19 9 30 21 12 2 22 14 5
PLANTING DATES


Fig. 1. Effect of planting date on yield of eggplant
cultivars in 1974.


2000


S1600


S1200
a-

W 800
V)

400


0


1974

















Table 2. Performance of eggplant cultivars for sequential planting in
1975.

Yield--Bushels per Acre
Florida Market Black Beauty Moneymker
Date of Direct Trans- Direct Trans- Direct Trans-
planting seeded planted seeded planted seeded planted
March 19 2088 3112 2070 3176 1585 2545
April 22 1227 3602 1041 3425 674 1984
May 21 447 982 396 768 258 743
June 17 267 840 206 810 182 710
Days to Mature
March 19 96 100 91 100 77 91
April 22 83 88 90 88 79 74
May 21 104 105 104 130 104 77
June 17 97 95 104 95 104 88
Days Harvest Period
March 19 133 159 117 138 146 168
April 22 105 138 112 138 126 131
May 21 62 91 62 62 56 105
June 17 49 77 43 77 33 84
Number of Harvests
March 19 19 23 18 23 21 24
April 22 15 13 16 13 18 16
May 21 10 14 10 10 9 14
June 17 8 10 7 10 6 11


ZDays from seeding




























EGGPLANT (Direct Seed)
Moneymaker .mm
Fla. Market -
Black Beauty r, ,,


MAR APR MAY JUN
19 22 21 17


i. I
ill I- II IIII +


JUL
22


19 23


PLANTING DATES

Effect of planting date on yield of direct seeded
eggplant cultivars in 1975.


3750


3000
LU

2250
LJ

1500


750

0


1975


Fig. 2.




















EGGPLANT (Transplant)
Moneymaker ,--.,
Fla. Market -
Black Beauty T^-*









*1


MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP
19 22 21 17 22 19 23


PLANTING DATES


Fig. 3. Effect of planting date on yield of
eggplant cultivars in 1975.


transplanted


3750

3000

2250.

1500.

750


1975









PEPPER



1974. Production was good during the entire cropping season (March -

Sept.) except for the May planting. The cultivars varied to some degree in

relation to planting date, with 'Yolo Wonder L' responding better at the

first planting.

Time required to reach maturity varied from 85 to 100 days, with no

definite pattern related to cultivar or planting date.

1975. Production was good for the first and second planting, and very

nearly nothing for the third planting. Yields from transplanting were

better than field seeding at all plantings except for 'Early Calwonder' at

the first planting.

Time required to reach maturity was within the usual range, with negli-

gible variation among the cultivars and planting times. Harvest period for

transplanted plots was nearly double that of seeded plots, for the first

planting only (on which a comparison can be made).







-10-


Table 3. Performance of pepper cultivars for sequential plant-
ing in 1974.

Date of Yield--Bushels per Acre
planting Early Calwonder Yolo Wonder LS Keystone Res. Giant


1873
1318
989
305
769
700
1037


*
*
*
606
786
552
1066


March
April
April
May
June
July
July


March
April
April
May
June
July
July


March
April
April
May
June
July
July


March
April
April
May
June
July
July


1201
1594
894
657
1149
367
941


Days to Mature
93
86
93
85
92
92
86

Days Harvest Period
97
65
75
42
82
57
48

Number of Harvests
15
9
12
7
12
10
8


*Not planted


I- ----~c-~- -- ---~"- ~~--- -----







-11-


PEPPER
Early Calwondern I-
Yolo Wonder L. ---
Keystone Res. Giant war


w- m m =- m


APR APR MAY JUN JUL JUL AUG
9 30 21 12 2 22 14


SEP
5


1974 PLANTING DATE

Fig. 4. Effect of planting date on yield of pepper
cultivars in 1974.


2000


1600
Li

" 1200
0.
-3 800
-1-


MAR
19


--


1






-12-


Table 4. Performance of pepper cultivars for sequential planting in 1975.
Yied--Bushels per Acre
Keystone Res. Giant Yolo Wonder L Early Cawonder
Date of Direct Trans- Direct Trans- Direct rans-
planting seeded planted seeded planted seeded planted
March 19 645 1251 619 1075 715 604
April 22 1140 1362 1216
May 21 41 9 82
Days to Mature

March 19 96 95 96 95 96 95
April 22 92 92 92
May 21 91 107 91
Days Harvest Period
March 19 44 75 44 84 38 75
April 22 53 53 53
May 21 16 1 16
Number of Harvests
March 19 7 12 7 12 7 12
April 22 8 8 8
May 21 2 2 2

*Seedlings emerged but plants failed to set and mature fruit.






-13-


PEPPER (Direct Seed)
Keystone mo
Yolo Wonder
Early Cal. ar--


--t
MAR
19
PLANTING DATES


Fig. 5. Effect
pepper


of planting date on yield of direct seeded
cultivars in 1975.


1250


w
C-)

w
0.
-I
wp


1000


750


500 -


250 -


01


1975





-14-


PEPPER (Transplant)
Keystone i .
Yolo Wonder -
Early Cal. rArwr-


MAR APR MAY
19 22 21


PLANTING DATES


Fig. 6. Effect of planting date on
pepper cultivars in 1975.


yield of transplanted


12501-


00oo0

w
a. 750
.J
n 500


250 1


1975


-
-






-15-


POTATO


1974. The low yields of the April planting were due in part to influ-
ence of season and in part to location (poor drainage). In the September
planting the seed pieces for 'Sebago' and 'Wauseon' were from freshly dug
tubers, while those of 'Red LaSoda' were from left over tubers stored from

the spring plantings. Some of the effect was related to cultivar.
1975. Seed pieces of the January 27 plantings were held in storage
from September, 1974 for 'Sebago' and 'Wauseon', and from February, 1974 for
'Red LaSoda'. The long storage period for 'Red LaSoda' was responsible for

the low yield of this cultivar, New supplies of seed pieces used for the
remainder of the 1975 spring season were obtained in January.
Time required for the crop to reach maturity varied only slightly from

a 3-month period, except that the April planting matured sooner.







-16-


Table 5. Performance of Irish potato cul-
tivars for sequential planting
in 1974-1975.


Yield--Cwt. per Acre
Sebago Wauseon Red LaSoa


128
35
60


*
*
121


Days to Mature
87
70
90


Yield--Cwt. per Acre


121
186
143
97


135
181
138
149

Days to Mature
85
77
89
79


43
201
161
166


85
77
89
79


*Not planted


Date of
planting
1974
March 19
April 9
Sept. 5


March
April
Sept.


1975
Jan. 27
Feb. 17
Mar. 19
Apr. 22


Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.


- --






-17-


IRISH POTATO
Sebago Pm a
Wauseon -
Red LaSoda rVA


, 1
I J
i -


MAR APR SEP JAN FEB MAR APR
19 9 5 27 17 19 22
PLANTING DATE


Fig. 7. Effect
potato


of planting date on yield of Irish
cultivars in 1974-75.


200

150

100

s 50


0L


1974-75






-18-


TOMATO



1974. The production of tomatoes was better for the early plantings

in fruit size as well as number of boxes. Fruits of the later plantings

were of marketable grade, but generally were small.

Time required to mature was relatively uniform for all planting times

and all cultivars. The April 30 planting was a bit faster maturing than the

others. Harvest period became more lengthy as the season advanced, except

the August planting was cut-off by frost. Number of harvests generally was

related to the harvest period.

1975. Only for transplanted plots in the first two plantings were the

yields equal to 1974. Direct seeded plots yielded only about 1/3 as many

tomatoes as transplanted. Production in general was much less than in 1974,

with size and quality similar.

Days required to reach maturity were less for direct seeded than for

transplanted systems in all but one instance, the average difference amount-

ing to 8 days.

Duration of harvest was one week greater for transplanted method and the

numbers of harvests were correspondingly greater than for direct seeded method.






-19-


Table 6. Performance of tomato cultivars for
sequential planting in 1974.


Date of
planting
March 19
April 9
April 30
May 21
June 12
July 2
July 22
Aug. 14


lb. Cartons per Acre
Walter Homestead 24


1222
985
1049
418
646
751
860
860


Yield--:
Florida MH-:
734
1008
652
444
551
611
799
648


93
89
78
86
93
87
85
93


Days Harvest Period


March
April
April
May
June
July
July
Aug.


March
April
April
May
June
July
July
Aug.


March
April
April
May
June
July
July
Aug.


*Not planted


Days to Mature
97
94
78
86
88
87
85
93


Number of Harvests
10
7
5
5
10
11
10
4


s^ -


*
*
*
785
661
914
1298
569


*
*
*
86
88
87
85
93


- ---- --







-20-


Table 7. Performance of tomato cultivars for sequential planting in 1975.

Yield--20 lb. Cartons per Acre
Florida MH-1 Walter Homestead 24
Date of Direct Trans- Direct Trans- Direct Trans-
planting seeded planted seeded planted seeded planted


395
807
*
87
341


1730
1283
244
390
300


496
553
164
125
819


2196
1060
255
616
343


Days to Mature


102
89
95
89
86


Days Harvest Period
11 30
22 23
14


March
April
May
June
July


March
April
May
June
July


March
April
May
June
July


March
April
May
June
July


*Crop failure


1518
1060
226
368
427


Number of Harvests






-21-


TOMATO
Fla. MH-1.--mm
Walter m
Homestead 24-w*w


- a a 'M I wIn -m m


MAR APR APR MAY JUN JUI
19 9 30 21 12 2
PLANTING DATE


Effect of
cultivars


JUL
22


planting date on yield of tomato
in 1974.


1250


1000


750


500


250


1974


Fig. 8.


AUG
14


SEP
5







-22-


TOMATO (Direct Seed)
MH-1 --*
Walter --
Homestead 24 rrwr


400 4


MAR APR MAY JUN JUL
19 22 21 17 22
1975 PLANTING DATES

Fig. 9. Effect of planting date on yield of direct seeded
tomato cultivars in 1975.


1600
.-
1200

3 800
0,O
(-i


























2000 Z
0 I TOMATO (Transplant)
:. MH-li-
< 1600 Walterw
SHomestead 24 r,,Aw

C 1200

o 800 -
I I
S400 -


MAR APR MAY JUN JUL
19 22 21 17 22
1975 PLANTING DATES

Fig. 10. Effect of planting date on yield of transplanted
tomato cultivars in 1975.


-23-






-24-


SUMMARY



The patterns of response of the crops in this report were in some

measure consistent with what may be expected. However, certain variations

were observed.

Eggplant grown after July 1 were likely to produce at a low level, due

to the shortness of time before limiting cold weather occurred. With ade-

quate fertilizer and moisture and good pest control, eggplant may be expected

to produce over a long period.

Pepper production in 1974 was more than might be expected, while that

of 1975 was a great deal less. The low values for 1975 were to some degree

related to the relatively high minimum temperature during the early summer.

The later plantings failed to develop because of mosaic.

Potato production was adversely affected by high temperatures for the

April 30 planting in 1974, with no tubers being produced. Conditions follow-

ing the April, 1975 planting were less limiting especially for 'Wauseon' and

'Red LaSoda'.

Tomato production was very good for early season plantings, with reason-

able yields through the summer of 1974. As with pepper the low yields of

1975 were in large measure due to the relative high minimum temperature which

seldom dropped below 690 F the entire summer.







-25-


LITERATURE CITED



1. Bryan, H. H. 1966. Effect of plastic mulch on the yield of several

vegetable crops in North Florida. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 79:

139-146.


2. Halsey, L. H. 1957-64. Florida Agricultural Exp. Sta. Ann. Reports.

1957-1964.


3. Valli, V. J., H. H. Bryan, H. W. Young and D. R. Davis. 1965. The

effect of shade on the bioclimate and production of vegetable crops.

Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 78: 95-101.


4. Young, H. W. 1961. Production of spring vegetables under shade. Proc.

Fla. State Hort. Soc. 74: 209-216.


5. Young, H. W. 1962. Time of planting and harvesting of tender vegetable

crops in the Quincy, Florida area. Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 75: 218-220.




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