Group Title: Notes in Soil Science - University of Florida. Florida Cooperative Extension Service - No. 35 (revised)
Title: IFAS standardized fertilization recommendations for agronomic crops
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066206/00002
 Material Information
Title: IFAS standardized fertilization recommendations for agronomic crops
Alternate Title: Standardized fertilization recommendations for agronomic crops
Physical Description: 4 p. : ; 28.
Language: English
Creator: Kidder, Gerald, 1940-
Hanlon, Edward A ( Edward Aloysius ), 1946-
Chambliss, C. G ( Carrol Gene )
Publisher: University of Florida, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1995
 Subjects
Subject: Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Crops -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Soils -- Testing   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: prepared by Gerald Kidder, E.A. Hanlon, C.G. Chambliss.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "February 1990."
General Note: "Notes in soil science, no. 35 (revised)."
General Note: "SS-SOS-002."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066206
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 70998317

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SL129
U UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
IFAS Extension



UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for

Agronomic Crops 1


R. Mylavarapu, D. Wright, G. Kidder, C.G. Chambliss2


Introduction

This publication presents in abbreviated form the
fertilization recommendations for agronomic crops
based on soil tests performed by the UF/IFAS
Extension Soil Testing Laboratory (ESTL). It
contains the basic information from which ESTL
soil-test reports and fertilization recommendations
are generated.

General Background

Soil testing is a tool in crop fertilization
management. Its successful use requires that: (1) you
send the lab soil samples that best represent your field
or management unit; (2) the laboratory uses
legitimate methods for predicting fertility; and (3) the
fertilizer recommendations are based on measured
crop responses.

The ESTL extracts phosphorus (P), potassium
(K), magnesium (Mg), and calcium (Ca) with the
Mehlich-1 extractant and bases fertilization
recommendations for those nutrients on the test


results. Current interpretation of test results are
presented in Table 1. Nitrogen (N) fertilization is not
based on soil tests but rather is based on crop needs as
documented in research literature.

Liming recommendations are based on the
Adams-Evans lime requirement test, a calibration
equation developed for Florida soils, and on the target
pH for the crop for which the recommendation is
being made.

Soil test reports from the ESTL are
computer-generated from lab data and crop codes. If
a cropping situation is not in the list of crop codes,
routine soil tests may not be appropriate. In such
instances, the local county agent should be consulted
before soil samples are sent for testing. Reports
contain the results of the tests (soil pH, ppm
extractable P, K, Mg, and Ca), a rating of the P, K,
and Mg (very high to very low), and the fertilization
recommendation for the specified crop. The
recommendation is composed of two parts: (1) the
rates of N, P20 and K20 fertilizer to apply; and (2)
footnotes which give important information about


1. This document is SL129, a fact sheet of the Soil and Water Science Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences, University of Florida. First printed February 1990 as "Notes in Soil Science #35", revised as SL129, June 1997. Latest revision December 2007.
Please visit the EDIS Website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.
2. R. Mylavarapu, associate professor, Nutrient Management Specialist and Director of UF/IFAS Extension Soil Testing Laboratory, Soil and Water Science
Department; D. Wright, professor, Agronomy Department, G. Kidder, professor emeritus, Soil and Water Science Department, C.G. Chambliss
(deceased), associate professor, Agronomy Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290.
All chemicals should be used in accordance with directions on the manufacturer's label.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and
other services only to individuals and institutions that function with non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,
sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or affiliations. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative Extension Service,
University of Florida, IFAS, Florida A. & M. University Cooperative Extension Program, and Boards of County Commissioners Cooperating. Larry
Arrington, Dean






UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 2

Table 1. Current Mehlich-1soil-test interpretations used for agronomic crops.
Element Very low Low Med High Very high

-------- parts per million soil ----------
P <10 10-15 16-30 31-60 >60
K <20 20-35 36-60 61-125 >125
Mg <15 15-30 >30


fertilization management such as application timing,
special crop requirements, etc.

Table 2 of this document contains crop codes,
crop descriptions, target pH, N recommendation,
P205 and K20 recommendations for each of the five
soil-test rating levels, the footnotes which will be
printed for each of the crop codes, and the references
upon which the recommendations are based.

The text of the footnotes referred to in Table 2 is
given below.

Text of Footnotes

102. Apply all of the P205, 30% of the KO2, and
30 lb N/A in a preplant or at-planting
application. Four weeks after planting, sidedress
the remaining 70% of the K20. Apply the
remaining 120 lb N/A in two or more
sidedressings, one of which should be at 4 weeks
after planting.

104. Apply all of the P205, 30% of the K O, and
30 lb N/A in a preplant or at-planting
application. Four weeks after planting, sidedress
the remaining 70% of the K20. Apply the
remaining 180 lb N/A in three or more
sidedressings, one of which should be at 4 weeks.

106. Apply all of the P205 and 30% of the K20
and N in a preplant or at-planting application.
Topdress or sidedress the remaining 70% of the
K20 and N. For small grains grown for grain,
silage, or hay, topdress during late January or
early February. For grain sorghum or forage
sorghum, sidedress before plants are too tall to
cultivate or approximately 4 weeks after planting.

107. Apply all of the P205 and 30% of the K20
and N in a preplant or at-planting application.
Apply the remaining 70% of the K20 and N in
one sidedressing.


108. Application of 20 to 30 lb N/A may give
vegetative response but is unlikely to increase
harvested yield.

109. If peanuts are grown for seed or if they are
virginia type, regardless of soil test, apply
gypsum in a band over the potential pegging
zone at early flower. Apply 400 lb gypsum/A for
runner types and 800 lb gypsum/A for virginia
types. Double these rates if broadcasting
granular or phosphogypsum (bulk wet). For
peanuts not grown for seed, apply gypsum as
recommended above only if the calcium soil-test
level is below 250 ppm Ca.

110. Apply 50% of the fertilizer at or before
transplanting and the other half within 3 weeks
of transplanting.

111. Apply 30 lb N/A, 50% of the K20, and all
of the P205 fertilizer in a preplant or at-planting
application. Apply 50 lb N/A and the remaining
K 0 after the first grazing period. Apply an
additional 50 lb N/A after each subsequent
grazing period.

112. When planting on a prepared seed bed,
apply 30 lb N/A, 50% of the K20, and all of the
P205 fertilizer in a preplant or at-planting
application. Apply 50 lb N/A and the remaining
K2 0 after the first grazing period. Apply an
additional 50 lb N/A after each subsequent
grazing period.

When overseeding established perennial grasses
with cool season annual grasses, apply 50 lb N/A
plus all of the P205 and K20 after emergence.
Apply an additional 50 lb N/A after each
subsequent grazing period.






UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 3


115. Apply all of the P205 and K20 fertilizer in
late fall. If legumes are planted in combination
with oats, rye, wheat, and/or ryegrass, apply 30
lb N/A in a preplant or at-planting application
plus one additional 50 lb N/A application after
the grass is well established.

118. Apply 0.75 lb boron/A in the fertilizer or
0.5 lb boron/A as a foliar spray with the first
fungicide application.

120. Fertilizer should contain 15 to 20 lb
sulfur/A. Apply as a sulfate (e.g., gypsum,
ammonium sulfate, magnesium sulfate,
potassium sulfate, potassium magnesium
sulfate), since elemental sulfur will react too
slowly to supply the sulfur needs of the current
crop.

121. Apply all of the P205 and K 0 in spring or
early summer when seedlings or regrowth are 3
to 4 inches tall. Species included are
aeschynomene, alyceclover, desmodiums, hairy
indigo, perennial peanut, and other tropical
legumes.

122. Species included are all true clovers (white,
red, arrowleaf, crimson, subterranean), vetches,
lupines, and sweet clover.

123. Apply all of the P205 and 50% of the K20
fertilizer in late fall. Apply the remaining K20 in
early spring. If the alfalfa is mechanically
harvested rather than grazed, apply an additional
30 lb P20,/A and 60 lb K20/A after each harvest.
An additional application of 100 lb K20/A in
June or July may increase summer survival of
alfalfa. Apply 3 lb boron/A per year to alfalfa in
three 1 lb/A applications. Copper and zinc
fertilizer may be needed if soil pH is above
6.5.The lime requirement shown is adequate for
established alfalfa. However if the alfalfa has not
yet been planted, apply and incorporate one ton
of lime/A if the soil pH is below 6.6. Lime is
especially important for establishment of alfalfa.
It is not practical to incorporate lime once the
alfalfa is planted.

124. UF/IFAS fertilization and liming
recommendations are advisory in nature and
emphasize efficient fertilizer use and


environmentally sound nutrient
management without losses of yield or crop
quality. It is generally assumed the
nutrients will be supplied from purchased,
commercial fertilizer and the expected crop
yields and quality will be typical of
economically viable production. Growers
should consider IFAS recommendations in
the context of their entire management
strategy, such as return on investment in
fertilizer and the benefits of applying
manure or biosolids (sewage sludge) to
their land.

There is insufficient research available to
support the use of UF/IFAS soil test results for
environmental nutrient management purposes.
Such use is discouraged until correlation is
proven.

125. Grass species included are bermuda, star,
digit, and rhodesgrass.

126. FERTILIZATION MANAGEMENT NOTES
FOR BERMIUDAGRASS, STARGRASS,
DIGITGRASS, AND RHODESGRASS

Establishment ofNew Phi i, ing

For establishment of new plantings, apply 100 lb
N/A and split as follows: apply 30 lb N/A, all of
the P20,, and 50% of the K20 as soon as plants
have emerged. Apply the remaining K20 and 70
lb N/A 30 to 50 days later.

Maintenance Fertilization ofEstablished
Pastures

For grazed, established stands, apply 80 lb N/A,
all of the P20,, and 50% of the K20 in early
spring. Apply 80 lb N and the remaining K20 at
mid-season.

Under intensive management in central and
south Florida, up to 200 lb N/A may be
economically viable for stargrass and
bermudagrass. In that situation, apply 80 lb N/A,
all of the P205 and 50% of the K20 in early
spring, follow with 50 lb N/A in mid-season, and






UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 4


70 lb N/A and the remaining K20 in mid- to
late September.

Making Hay, Silage, or Green Chop

Apply 80 lb N/A and all of the recommended
P205 and K20 in early spring. Apply an
additional 80 lb N and 40 lb K20/ A after each
cutting, except the last in the fall. Include 20 lb
of P20 in the supplemental fertilizer if the soil
tested low or medium in P.

Special Note ifApplying Manure or Biosolids

A different set of economic factors are usually
considered when waste materials rather than
purchased fertilizer are supplying the nutrients.
Additionally, it is often impractical to follow the
application timings discussed above when using
waste materials from other operations.

127. Apply all of the P20,, 50% of the K20, and
40 lb N/A at planting. Topdress the remaining N
and K20 in late January. On land which lacks
clayey soil within the top 6 to 8 inches of the
surface, apply 5 to 10 lb sulfate-sulfur/A at
planting and 10 lb sulfate-sulfur/A in the
topdressing. Wettable or other elemental forms
of sulfur will react too slowly to supply the sulfur
needs of the current crop. On flatwoods soils
with pH above 6.1, apply 10 lb manganese/A.
On better-drained sands with pH above 6.5,
apply 6 to 10 lb manganese/A.

128. The recommended rates of fertilizer are
sufficient to produce soybean yields in the 60
bu/A range. If yields from this field have never
exceeded 40 bu/A under current management,
reduce P205 and K20 recommendations by 20
lb/A. If yields from this field have never
exceeded 25 bu/A, reduce P205 and K20
recommendations by 40 lb/A. Often this
adjustment will mean that you will achieve your
yield potential without any P or K fertilizer
additions.

129. These recommendations are made
assuming adequate soil moisture will be
available either from rainfall or irrigation. In
south Florida, lack of adequate rainfall during
the cool season frequently causes stand failure or


limits growth. Under nonirrigated conditions
in south Florida, the probability of
inadequate moisture is high, and the
likelihood that the crop will benefit from
applied fertilizer is low, especially on the
drier soils.

130. For grazing or hay production of perennial
peanuts, apply all of the P2 0 and K20 in early
spring. For hay production, make an annual
application of 20 to 30 lb sulfur/A. Apply as a
sulfate (e.g., gypsum, ammonium sulfate,
magnesium sulfate, potassium sulfate, potassium
magnesium sulfate). After each hay harvest,
apply an additional 15 pounds of PO25 and 40
pounds of K20 per ton of hay removed, unless
the soil tested high or very high .

131. FERTILIZATION MANAGEMENT NOTES
FOR GRAZED BAHIAGRASS

Bahiagrass is probably the most widely-used
planted forage grass in Florida. It responds well
to grazing management and inputs such as
fertilization. However, it also can persist and
give satisfactory yields under low inputs.
Because of the wide range of possible use and
management levels, recommendations for
bahiagrass fertilization differ with the level of
management and the economic inputs.
Management decisions concerning liming and
fertilization of bahiagrass pastures are very
sensitive to cattle productivity and prices.

Liming

In order to obtain maximum fertilization
efficiency, soil pH should be maintained at 5.5 or
higher. If soil pH is tests below 5.3 or lower, a
lime requirement test will be conducted and a
recommendation for lime application will be
made. Optimal use of lime is to apply at least 3
to 6 months prior to fertilization to provide
adequate time for the lime reaction to occur and
the soil pH to adjust to the desired level.

Soils should be tested for pH every 2-3 years.







UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 5


Phosphorus Fertilization


In order to receive phosphorus fertilizer
recommendations for established bahiagrass, soil
AND tissue samples should be submitted to the
ESTL at the same time. As per the preliminary
research findings, soil tests alone are not
adequate to determine bahiagrass P needs. A
companion tissue test has therefore been added
to the testing procedures along with the soil test
to determine the P fertilization needs. Producers
are strongly encouraged to simultaneously test
soil and tissue samples if bahiagrass pastures
have not received P fertilization for long periods.
Phosphorus should not be applied if tissue P
concentrations are at or above 0.15%, even if soil
tested Very Low or Low in P. For Medium and
High soil P levels, P application is not
recommended since there is no added benefit of
P fertilization on bahiagrass yields.

If P recommendations are not desired and the
producer is only interested in either the test for
soil pH and lime requirement recommendations,
or the test for soil pH, lime requirement, K, Mg,
and Ca recommendations, the soil sample alone
can be submitted to the ESTL. In this case, the
soil test report will not include P fertilizer
recommendations. (Please choose the
appropriate test from the Producer Sample
Submission Form).

Both the consolidated representative soil and the
tissue samples should be collected
simultaneously from each field of up to 40 acres.

The testing procedures and the recommendations
for P for bahiagrass may be adjusted as and when
field research data become available.

Table 3. Interpretation for Bahiagrass Soil and Tissue Test
Soil Test Tissue Test Recommendations
P Med / High No Tissue 0
Test
P Low/ V Low P > 0.15% 0
P Low/ V Low P < 0.15% 25 or 40 Ibs
P /acret
t 2 5
Recommended amount of P 05 depends upon nitrogen
option chosen.


Maintenance Fertilization ofEstablished
Bahiagrass Pasture

Four fertilization options are presented below for
bahiagrass pastures. Choose the option which
most closely fits your fertilizer budget,
management objectives, and land capability. If
you will only be grazing your bahiagrass, you
should carefully consider the potential for
economical return on your investment in
fertilizer before using the Medium-Nitrogen or
High-Nitrogen options described below. The
added forage produced for grazing animals may
not be worth the added cost.

Low-Nitrogen Option. Do not use this option if
you cut hay since nutrient removal by hay is
much greater than by grazing animals. This
option results in the lowest cost of purchased
fertilizer. Apply 50 to 60 lb N/A in the early
spring. Do not apply K recognizing that N will be
the limiting nutrient in this low-cost option.
Apply 25 lb P20 /A if your soil tests Very Low
or Low in P and tissue P concentration is below
0.15%. Do not apply P if tissue P concentration
is at or above 0.15%, even if the soil tests Very
Low or Low in P. For Medium and High soil P
levels, neither P application nor tissue analysis is
recommended since there will be no added
benefit ofP fertilization on bahiagrass yields.

Medium-Nitrogen Option. Apply 100 lb N/A in
the early spring. Apply 25 lb P20 /A if your soil
tests Very Low or Low in P and tissue P
concentration is below 0.15%. Do not apply P if
tissue P concentration is at or above 0.15%, even
if the soil tests Very Low or Low in P. For
Medium and High soil P levels, neither P
application nor tissue analysis is recommended
since there will be no added benefit of P
fertilization on bahiagrass yields. Apply 50 lb
K20/A if your soil tests Very Low or Low in K






UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 6


and none if it tests Medium or High.

High-Nitrogen Option. Apply 160 lb N/A in two
applications of 80 lb N/A in early spring and
early summer. Apply 40 lb P20,/A if your soil
tests Very Low or Low in P and tissue P
concentration is below 0.15%. Do not apply P if
tissue P concentration is at or above 0.15%, even
if the soil tests Very Low or Low in P. For
Medium and High soil P levels, neither P
application nor tissue analysis is recommended
since there will be no added benefit of P
fertilization on bahiagrass yields. Apply 80 lb
K20/A if your soil tests Very Low or Low in K
and 40 lb K20/A if it tests Medium. No K should
be applied if your soil tests High or Very High in
K. The fertilization rates suggested in this option
are high enough to allow bahiagrass pasture to
achieve well above average production.
Management and environmental factors will
determine how much of the potential production
is achieved and how much of the forage is
utilized. A single cutting of hay can be made
without need for additional fertilization.

Bahiagrass Cut Sometimes for Hay

For a Single Cut Per Year from Pastures. If you
used the Low-N option of pasture fertilization,
apply 80 lb N/A no later than six weeks before
the growing season ends. Apply 50 lb K20/A if
your soil tests Very Low or Low in K and none if
it tests Medium or High. Apply 25 lb P20,/A if
your soil tests Very Low or Low in P and tissue P
concentration is below 0.15%. Do not apply P if
tissue P concentration is at or above 0.15%, even
if the soil tests Very Low or Low in P. If you
used the Medium-N option of pasture
fertilization, apply an additional 80 lb N no later
than six weeks before the growing season ends.
Apply 50 lb K20/A if your soil tests Very Low or
Low in K and none if it tests Medium or High.
Apply 25 lb P20 /A if your soil tests Very Low
or Low in P and tissue P concentration is below
0.15%. If you used the High-N option of pasture
fertilization, you do not need any additional N
fertilization to make one cut of hay. Apply 80 lb
K20/A if your soil tests Very Low or Low in K
and 40 lb K20/A if it tests Medium. Apply 40 lb


P20 /A if your soil tests Very Low or Low in
P and tissue P concentration is below
0.15%.

Bahiagrass Grown Only for Hay

For Multiple Cuts of Hay. Apply 80 lb N/A in
early spring. Also in spring, apply 80 lb K20/A if
your soil tests Very Low or Low in K and 40 lb
K2 /A if it tests Medium. Apply 40 lb P20O/A if
your soil tests Very Low or Low in P and tissue P
concentration is below 0.15%. Apply an
additional 80 lb N and 40 lb K20/A after each
cutting, except the last in the fall. Include 20 lb
of P20O/A after each cutting if the soil tested
Very Low or Low in P.

Bahiagrass for Seed Production

Apply 60 to 80 lb N/A in February or March. At
the same time, apply 80 lb K 2/A if your soil
tests Very Low or Low in K and 40 lb K 2/A if it
tests Medium. Apply 40 lb P 0 /A if your soil
tests Very Low or Low in P and tissue P
concentration is below 0.15%. Graze until May,
June, or July, depending on variety. Remove
cattle before seed heads start to emerge and apply
an additional 60 to 80 lb N/A.

If the bahiagrass is not grazed, do not apply
fertilizer in February or March since this may
stimulate excessive top growth. Mowing from
February to April may be needed to remove
excessive top growth. Apply 60 to 80 lb N/A
before seed heads first appear. Apply 25 lb
P2 0/A if your soil tests Very Low or Low in P
and tissue P concentration is below 0.15%. Do
not apply P if tissue P concentration is at or
above 0.15%, even if the soil tests Very Low or
Low in P. For Medium and High soil P levels,
neither P application nor tissue analysis is
recommended. Apply 50 lb K20/A if your soil
tests Very Low or Low in K and none if it tests
Medium or High. Fertilize Pensacola in
March/April and Argentine and Paraguay in
May/June.

132. HAY OR SILAGE (PERENNIAL GRASS)






UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 7


Making Hay, Silage, or Green Chop


Apply 80 lb N/A and all of the recommended
P205 and K20 in early spring. Apply an
additional 80 lb N and 40 lb K20/A after each
cutting, except the last in the fall. Include 20 lb
of P20O/A in the supplemental fertilizer if the
soil tested low or medium in P.

For a Single, Late Season Cut from Pastures.

If you have not applied N in the past two months,
apply 80 lb N/A and the soil-test recommended
amount of P205 and K20. If you have applied N
in the past two months, do not apply any N now,
but do apply the soil-test recommended amount
ofP25 and K20. Any application of fertilizer
should be made no later than six weeks before
the growing season ends.

Special Note ifApplying Manure or Biosolids

A different set of economic factors are usually
considered when waste materials rather than
purchased fertilizer are supplying the nutrients.
Additionally, it is often impractical to follow the
application timings discussed in this footnote
when using waste materials from other
operations.

133. FERTILIZATION MANAGEMENT NOTES
FOR LIMPOGRASS (Hemarthria)

Establishment ofNew Phi,u,,, g,

For establishment of new plantings, apply 100 lb
N/A and split as follows: apply 30 lb N/A, all of
the P205, and 50% of the K20 as soon as plants
have emerged. Apply the remaining K20 and 70
lb N/A 30 to 50 days later.

Maintenance Fertilization ofEstablished
Pastures

For grazed, established stands, apply 60 lb N/A
and all of the P205 and K20 in late winter or
early spring. Apply an additional 60 lb N in late
summer or early fall. For a minimum
fertilization alternative, ignore the P and K
recommendation and apply only 60 lb N per year.


Apply 80 lb N/A and all of the recommended
P205 and K20 in late winter or early spring.
Apply an additional 80 lb N and 40 lb K20/ A
after each cutting, except the last in the fall.
Include 20 lb of P20 in the supplemental
fertilizer if the soil tested low or medium in P.

Special Note ifApplying Manure or Biosolids

A different set of economic factors are usually
considered when waste materials rather than
purchased fertilizer are supplying the nutrients.
Additionally, it is often impractical to follow the
application timings discussed above when using
waste materials from other operations.


For Multiple Cuts





UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 8


Table 2. Target pH, and recommended annual N, P 05, and K 0 fertilizer rates for agronomic crops. Phosphorus and K rates are based on interpretation of a Mehlich-1 soil
test.


Crop Crop Target ------------------------------b/A/year--- ---------------- Footnotes References*
Code Description pH N ------------- P ------------- -------------- K ---------
E 3


2 Non-irrigated Corn
5 Irrigated Corn
7 Grain Sorghum or
Forage Sorghum for
Silage
8 Triticale, Oats, or Rye
for Grain or Silage

9 Cotton
10 Peanuts
11 Soybeans
12 Flue-cured Tobacco
13 Sugarcane for Syrup
14 SummerAnnual
Grasses
21 Warm Season
Legumes or
Legume-grass
Mixtures
22 Cool Season
Legumes or
Legume-grass
Mixtures
23 Alfalfa
25 Improved Perennial
Grasses (excluding
bahia and limpo)
26 Cool Season Annual
Grasses
27 Wheat for Grain


Ib/A VL LO MED
6.5 150 125 100 50
6.5 210 175 140 70
6.5 150 125 100 50



6.0 70 100 80 40


60 120 90 60
0 100 80 40
0 60 40 20
80 100 80 60
90 100 80 40
80 80 40


6.0 0 30 30 30




6.5 0 100 100 60


0 125 125 80
160 40 40 0


6.0 ** 80 80 40


II VH VL LO MED
0 0 120 100 60
0 0 175 140 70
0 0 125 100 50



0 0 100 80 40


0 125 100 70
0 100 80 40
0 60 40 20
0 200 160 120
0 100 80 40
0 80 80 40


0 0 60 60 30




0 0 160 160 120


0 0 160 160 120
0 0 80 80 40



0 0 80 80 40


6.0 80 100 80 40 0 0 100 80 40


I VH
0 0 102, 120, 124
0 0 104, 120, 124
0 0 106, 124



0 0 106, 124


0 107, 124
0 108
0 108, 124,128
0 110, 124
0 106, 124
0 111, 124


AF70
AF70
AF70



SSAGR45 &
SSAGR46

AF111
AF70
NSS23
AF70
AF70
AF70


0 0 121,124 SSAGR46




0 0 115,122,124,129 SSAGR46


0 120,123,124
0 124,125,126


0 0 112, 124


SSAGR46
AF70 &
SSAGR46

AF70 &
SSAGR46


0 0 124,127 SSAGR45 &
SSAGR46





UF/IFAS Standardized Fertilization Recommendations for Agronomic Crops 9


Table 2. Target pH, and recommended annual N, P20 and K 0 fertilizer rates for agronomic crops. Phosphorus and K rates are based on interpretation of a Mehlich-1 soil
test.


Crop Crop Target -----------------------------A/year ---------------------Footnotes References*
Code Description pH N -------------- P O0------------- --------------- K -----------------


Ib/A VL LO MED HI


VH VL LO MED


28 Perennial Peanuts


36 Bahiagrass, grazed
High-N option


Medium-N option

Low-N option
32 Hay or Silage
(perennial grass)
33 Limpograss
(Hemarthria)


6.0 0 30 30 30 0 0 60 60 60 0 0 124, 130


5.5 160


5.5 100


0 0 0


0 0 0


*** *** 0

80 80 60


* *** 0 0 0 124, 131

* *** 0 0 0 124, 131


0 124, 131
0 124, 132


5.0 120 20 20 0 0 0 40 40 20 0 0 124, 133


Cir S275 &
RWR


AF70 &
SSAGR46
AF70 &
SSAGR46
------------
SP253


MBA


* AF refers to Agronomy Facts, SSAGR refers to the special series fact sheets of the Agronomy Department available on the web at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu, NSS refers to
Notes in Soil Science, RWR to R.W. Rice's 1993 dissertation.
**The N recommendation for this crop is discussed in Footnote 111, 112, or 132.
*** The P and K recommendations for this crop are discussed in Footnote 131.


HI VH




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