• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The canary bird
 The city street
 Story of Roger Williams
 The cat-bird
 Story of a dragoon
 A brave woman
 My cat
 The cabin boy
 The newspaper
 Albert's whip
 Going to church
 The lost boy
 The mother's grave
 Mrs. Brown and her children
 George Hardwood's prayers
 Skipping hard words
 Stories by cousing Agnes
 The spelling trial
 The beggar girl
 The mother's exploit
 Mrs. Clayson anf her daughter
 Helpless John
 The young hunter
 The old sea captain
 The lost children
 The poor German
 The minstrel shepherd
 Albert Barnes's kite
 The beautiful sunrise
 The pretty butterfly
 The brother and sister
 Joseph
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Boy's and girls' pet library
Title: Harry's stories, etc
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066184/00001
 Material Information
Title: Harry's stories, etc
Series Title: Boy's and girls' pet library
Physical Description: 64, 62 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Leavitt & Allen ( Publisher )
Publisher: Leavitt & Allen
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [186-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1865   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication based on binding indicating publication in the 1860's.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066184
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002226839
notis - ALG7135
oclc - 71280266

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The canary bird
        Page 5
    The city street
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Story of Roger Williams
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The cat-bird
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Story of a dragoon
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    A brave woman
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    My cat
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The cabin boy
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The newspaper
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Albert's whip
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Going to church
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The lost boy
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The mother's grave
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Mrs. Brown and her children
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    George Hardwood's prayers
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Skipping hard words
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Stories by cousing Agnes
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The spelling trial
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The beggar girl
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The mother's exploit
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Mrs. Clayson anf her daughter
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Helpless John
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The young hunter
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The old sea captain
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The lost children
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The poor German
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The minstrel shepherd
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Albert Barnes's kite
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The beautiful sunrise
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
    The pretty butterfly
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The brother and sister
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Joseph
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text





























FEEDING TIE CANARY BIRD.







BOY' A-I G-ILT














ETC


NEW YORK:

LEAVIIST & ALLEN,








STORIES.

THE CANARY BIRD.
MRs. JOHNSON had a pretty little canary
bird. It was of a bright yellow color, and
looked as if it had feathers of gold. Mrs.
Johnson had a fine cage made for the bird,
and during the warm days she would
hang it near the open window, where the
bird could get the fresh air and see the
green tree. The little bird would then
sing very sweetly. Sometimes, Mrs. Johni-
son would get some chick-weed and put
it in the cage, and then the bird would
sing still more sweetly.
(5}











THE CITY STREET.
WHAT a bustle is in the streets of a
city! People are seen hurrying up and
down the pavements, intent on business
affairs, and careless who they knock or
jog. Some are going in stores, and others
are coming out. How strange it is to see
so many people together, who do not
seem to know each other any more than
if they lived thousands of miles apart.
This can only be seen in the city. Then,
stages, carts, wagons, and carriages are
driven along the streets in great numbers,
(6)


















































THE CITY STREET.


c;--- -
c-




THE CITY STREET. 9

upon all kinds of business. Now if two
wagons meet upon a road in the country,
the two drivers nearly always bid each
other good day," or ask some questions.
But the drivers of those city carts and
carriages do not speak to each other ex-
cept to say, Get out of the way !" Hur-
ry along !" or some such command. In
some streets, you can see many pretty
things displayed in the windows of the
stores, and a great many handsome build-
ings, such as you never can see in the
country











STORY OF ROGER WILLIAMS,
ROGER WILLIAMS was a minister, who
lived in Massachusetts, soon after its first
settlement. He was a very pious man;
but as he did not think as the greater
number of .the people did, he was ba-
nished, and forced to seek a home in the
wilderness. Some. friend s remained faith-
ful to him and went with him to make a
new settlement, where they could think
and speak with more freedom. It was
in the midst of winter, when Roger Wil-
Hiams and his friends started from Massa-
(10)
































ROGER WILLIAMS AND THE KIND INDIANS.




STORY OF ROGER WILLIAMS. 13

chusetts. After marching for some days
and suffering many hardships, the party
reached Rhode Island. The Indians
received them very kindly, and gave them
shelter and food. The Indian chief
treated Roger Williams well, and gave
him land for a new settlement, which
was called Providence, by Mr. Williams,
because, he said, God had put it in the
hearts of the Indians to shelter and
protect the wanderers.










THE CAT-BIRD.
THE Cat-Bird is nearly as large as a
robin-has plumage of a steel-color, and
is very lively. It is called the Cat-Bird,
because it very often mews and calls
like a cat. But the Cat-Bird has other
notes, and can sometimes sing quite
sweetly. This bird commonly builds its
nest in low trees, and lays four or five
eggs, of a bluish-white color. As it
never fears the sportsmen, like the robin,
it will approach houses very closely, and
permit men to approach its nest, without
(14)



















7 ,l,. '- .;,i _' ._- *, vl]..
: _i
,_ -- .. ... =-.-; --
F- :^^,s^
;r _^ ,< .- .k-^- ^ *


THE CAT-BIRD





THE CAT-BIRD. 17
bowing any great alarm. When dis-
turbed, however, it flutters about and
chirps quickly. A female Cat-Bird has
been known to peck at the hand of a
person who molested its young ones in its
nest; and it is certain, that these birds
will defend themselves stoutly against
other, larger birds.




2










STORY OF A DRAGOON.
DURING the war of the revolution, a
young man, named Martin Stanley, left
his poor widowed mother, and joined the
army of the patriots. He was a brave
fellow, and being a good horseman, he
entered the dragoon service. Not long
afterwards, his company being stationed
at an out-post, Martin was placed as a
guard, near the foot of a hill. A severe
storm came on, and he had much trouble
in keeping his weapons dry, so that they
should be fit for use. While waiting there
(18)













\


THE DRAGOON GUARD.


K>





THE DRAGOON GUARD. 21

upon the watch, he was surprised by a
party of the British, and as he strove to
give the alarm to his friends by shouting
he was shot through the head. Brave
fellow! He preferred saving his company
of patriots to his own life. The alarm
being given, the company was made
ready for action, and the enemy compelled
to retreat.











A BRAVE WOMAN.
FEW women have the courage to go
upon a battle-field, where the cannons
and guns are roaring and many men are
falling on all sides. Such a scene is
enough to daunt even some stout-hearted
men. But there have been women who
can do this. During the fierce wars, many
years ago, a woman lived upon the borders
of France, who never failed to visit any
battle-field within some miles of her
dwelling, to attend to the wounded. At
that time, battles were occurring almost
(22)







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I~-



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-~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~i ^.i" """"*',/*/,1,


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-: -- :..,'.. :.!t:. ,


4N--. ...- -' ..


BINDING tlP A SOLDIER'S WOUND.






e\ery week in that quarter, between the
royalists and the republicans. The hus-
band of this woman had been killed in
battle. She knew much of the horrors
of w. r, and therefore resolved to do all she
coull to lessen them. Taking a basket,
filled with soothing and healing remedies,
and linen for bandages, she would go
to the battle-field, and even while the
fight vws raging, would strive to lessen the
sufetlrings of the groaning wounded. Many
were the prayers sent up for her safety,
and the blessings of those she helped
were like music in her ears.


25


A BRAVE WOMAN.












MY CAT.
1 HAVE a pretty cat of a tortoise-shell
color, of whom J am very fond. She loves
the hearth, and during the chilly days of
winter she can scarcely be coaxed or
driven away from it. Sometimes I am
compelled to pour cold water upon her
back. Then she will jump away very
quickly; for a cat cannot bear water. Se-
veral times has the cook scalded hair off
my cat's back. My cat likes me very much,
I know she does; though some people
say that cats will not attach themselves
(26),































THE CAT.




MY CAT.

to any person. She will jump upon my lap
as soon as I come into the house and sit
down; and she will follow me about as
cliselly as a little dog. I have taught her
to sit up in a corner, and to hold on to a
striin.' while I lift her up by it. Ah! she
is a martt cat. I got her when she was
a kitten, and now she is one of the largest
cats I ever saw.











THE CABIN BOY,
WILLIAM BARNEs was a bad boy. His
parents could do nothing with him, when
he chose to be headstrong, and that was :
nearly all the time. When sent to school,
he would act the truant, and wander off,
hunting for bird's nests. At last, he -
packed up his clothes in a little bundle,
ran off one morning before his parents
were awake, went to the city, and wan-
dered along the wharves, trying to get
on board a ship as a cabin boy. Aftei
much trouble, he was taken on board a
(30)
















.- -. --


--Co. _.




THET SHIP AT SEA.




THE CABIN BOY. 33

ship, by a rough, burly captain aud put
to work. Soon afterwards, the ship sailed
for a distant country. At first William
thought that going to sea was very fine,
but when the vessel was tossed upon the
waves, he became sick, and began to cry
so bitterly, that the captain was glad to
put him on board of another vessel, and
send him home.











THE NEWSPAPER
WE like to see a family grouped around
the fire, listening to the father reading
the newspaper. If the paper is one that
is issued every week, it will be full of
news and pretty stories; and the father
can not only read, but explain them for
the pleasure of the family party.
Tommy Jones was very fond of hearing
his father read the newspaper, by the fire-
side on, winter evenings, when the cold
winds where howling round the house.
Then the little boy would- sit by the hour
. f34)




























READING THE NEWSPAPER





THE NEWSPAPER. 37

and his mother had often to remind him
him that bed-time had come. Tommy
wanted to hear how things went on in
the city. He had heard that there might
be seen a great many fine houses, and
crowds of people; but he had never had
a chance to see a large town. He learned
much from the newspapers ; so that when
he diil go to the city, he was not so much
sll:rprised as he would have been witlhoiut
the knowledge he had gained.











ALBERT'S WHIP
ON Christmas day, the father of Albert
Jackson gave him a whip. Albert now
went about the house, cracking the whip.
But he soon got tired of this kind of sport
and wished for something to lash or drive.
He turned a chair on its side, and sat on
that as if it had been a wagon; but as the
chair would not move, Albert soon left it.
He drove the cat several times around
the room. Puss got tired of the fun, and
jumping out of the back window, escaped.
Albert then went down stairs, found his
(38)































ALBERT WITH HIS WHIP.





ALBERT'S WHIP. 41
father's large dog, Towser, took him up
stairs, tied him by the collar to a chair,
sat on the chair and began to whip the
pool dog to make him pull. Stung by the
lash of the whip the dog started away,
tLire Albert off the chair and hurt him
very much. Albert cried and put 'the
whip away.











GOING TO CHURCH.
IT is very pleasant to go to church in
the country, in the spring or summer.
You start from home on a bright, clear
Sabbath morning, and walk beneath the
shady trees, and through the green fields,
to the church. Mr. Proctor was a pious
farmer. He had a large family, and al-
ways took care that they went to church
on the Sabbath. One of the boys, Samuel.
only went to church because he was
forced to do so. He was very wicked.
While his brothers and sisters were singing
(42)


































GCING TO CIHUiCII.





GOING TO CHURCII. 45

Ae was pinching them or sticking pins
into them. Sometimes he would cut the
benches with his pocket-knife, and Mr.
Proctor had to pay for the damage. Out
of all that family, Samuel was the only
one who came to a bad end. As he grew
up to manhood he became worse. He
robbed a house and was put in prison,
where he died. Do not be like Samuel
Proctor.











THE LOST BOY.
OTTO GOLDSMITH was lost one day. While
the other children were playing together
on the lawn, Otto left them and walked
up the road. He had heard his father
speak of a town not many miles off, where
many pretty things were to be seen; and
he determined to go there. He had no
hat on, and the sun was very hot; but
on he went, thinking only of the town.
Otto had never before gone away from
home alone. After walking about two
miles, he became tired, and sat down by
(46)
































OTTO ASLEEP.





THE LOST BOY. 49

the side of a brook. The brook was clear
and cool. Grass and flowers were grow-
ing on its banks. Otto took pieces of
bark and chips and made boats to sail
on the brook. This was fine sport; but
he soon got tired; and laying his head on
his arm, he stretched himself on the bank,
and fell asleep. There he was found by
his parents, who carried him home.



4











THE MOTHER'S GRAVE.
An! it is a sad thing to lose a mother,
children. It is only when your mother
is laid beneath the cold sod of the grave-
yard, that you feel her worth, and know
that no person can fill her place. Mrs.
Coulter, died, leaving two children. Mary
was ten years old; Henry was only three
years old. The little children cried very
much when their mother died. Soon
after Mary took her little brother and
went to the church-yard, to see her mo-
(50)
































THE MOTHER'S GRAVE.





THE MOTHER S GRAVE. 53

other's grave. It was spring time, and
the flowers were growing among the grass
around the new-made mound. Mary sat
down by the tombstone, and took her
little brother in her arms; for when he
was told that he was sitting on his mo-
ther's grave he began to cry. His sister
then told him that his mother's spirit was
in heaven, where he would go if he was
a good boy; and he became quiet. Mary
often went to her mother's grave, and she
had it covered with beautiful flowers.











MRS. BROWN AND HER CHILDREN.
MRs. BRowN had five daughters. Their
names were Jane, Susan, Harriet, Dora,
and Martha. Jane was the eldest, Mrs.
Brown was very fond of her daughters.
She never would let them go to school;
but taught them herself at home. It was
a pleasant sight to see her sitting in the
library, with her family school around her.
Although Jane was the eldest of the girls,
Harriet was the quickest at learning, and
soon went far beyond her sister. Dora
was a smart girl; but she would not
(54)














!Id


MRS. BROWN AND HER CHILDREN.





MRS. BROWN AND HER CHILDREN. 57

study, when she could avoid it. At the
end of, a few years, Dora was behind all
her sisters in knowledge. She had a sweet
voice, and could sing better than any of
her sisters; but even little Martha learned
more of the notes than she knew. Even
the smartest cannot get along: without
study.












GEORGE HARWOOD'S PRAYERS.
Do you say your prayers before going
to bed at night and on rising in the mnorn-
ing? You should never forget those
prayers. Little George Harwood kneeled
down by his mother every night, and
prayed that God would watch over and
protect him while he slept, and when he
awoke in the morning, his first thought
was to pray for guidance during the day.
George grew up to be a good man and every
body loved him.
(58)































GEORGE SAYING IIIS PRAYERS.





























WILLIAM AND OLIVER, SPELLING.









SKIPPING HARD WORDS.
WILLIAM and Oliver Canden were two
brothers. They went to the same school.
When William could read quite well,
Oliver was just learning to spell. Oliver
was a careless little boy. He got into a
habit of skipping all the hard words he
came across, while trying to spell. One
day William coaxed him to sit down and
show whether he could read. Oliver got
the large family Bible, sat down and
began. In the first few lines all the
words were short, and he got along very
(631




64 SKIPPING HARD WORDS.
well. But he then came to a long word,
which he could neither spell nor pro-
nounce. "There," said William, "that
is the way you have been learning. Now
the proper way is not to go any further
until you can spell and pronounce that
word; so that' when you see it again you
will know, and will not have to stop."






1 1 I I I,


/I


i'


COUSIN AGNES.


&L,1-4







STORIES.


STORIES BY COUSIN AGNES.
AGNES WILSON was a pretty, swoot
tempered and intelligent girl, about four-
teen years of age. She lived in the city,
but during the Christmas Holidays, she
commonly visited her Aupt Martha, at
Bonnynook farm. There she was very
much beloved; and the children, Mary,
Joseph and James, always rejoiced when
"cousin Agnes," as they called her, came
to the farm. They were certain she would
bring them some presents, and spend many
:evenings by the fireside, telling stories.
(5)










THE SPELLING TRIAL.
SOON after Agnes arrived at Bonnynook
she called the children to her, took little
James upon her lap, and said that before
she told any stories, she must know how
he could spell. Joseph brought the spell-
ing-book and James pointed out the little
words he had been learning to spell. The
little scholar got along very well through
such words as a-b-ab, and b-e-be; but
when he came to those of three letters, he
stumbled and made so many mistakes
that he began to cry with vexation. He
(6)











.1
I\


COUSIN AGNES AND THE CHILDREN.





THE SPELLING TRIAL.


had been so anxious to show Cousin Agnes
how well he could spell, that he could
not help crying when he failed. Cousin
Agnes soothed him till he was quiet, and
then told him how to pronounce several
words of three letters. She said he must
never give over trying to learn, and that
she once heard of a boy who threw away
his book because he could not find out
how to pronounce a few words, and never
could be persuaded to try again. When
he grew to be a man, he could neither
read nor write, and was forced to go among
the vicious and profane. He could not
read his Bible, and was ashamed to go
among those who could read it. Finally
he died a drunkard's death. James said
be would always try to learn.










THE BEGGAR GIRL.
"EVER be ready to relieve those who
are in want of food, clothing or shelter,"
said Cousin Agnes to the childern, one
evening, as they were clustered around her
at the fireside. "The poor often suffer
very much, while many persons squander
hundreds of dollars in the most foolish
manner. One summer day, as William
and Annie Barton where going to school.
they saw a little girl, clad in rags, bare-
footed and without a bonnet, sitting undei
a tree, crying. They went up to the child
(10)






























THE BEGGAR GIRL.





THE BEGGAR GIRL.


asked her what was the matter. She re-
plied that she was very hungry, and that
her mother was lying sick at home, and
sent her out to beg some food, or some
money to buy medicine. William and
Annie had two cents, which Mr. Barton
had given them, and their dinners tied
up in a small package. They could not
go home for any thing, but they gave the
beggar their money and food, told her
they would call at her mother's house, and
went on to school. That day William and
Annie had no dinner. But they did not
murmur; for they learned that their
charity had cheered and revived the poor
sick woman and her child.


13












THE MOTHER'S EXPLOIT.
ONE evening, Joseph, who had been
reading about the Indians, asked Cousin
Agnes to tell a story of them. She thought
awhile, and then said, I remember read-
ing about a child being stolen by an In-
dian, who was named Mahtoree. This
savage often visited the house of a hunter
named Duggan, where he was struck with
the beauty and grace of a little boy, called
Edward. One day, in the absence of the
hunter, Mahtoree came to the house, and
asked for some food. Mrs. Duggan .fus.'l
(14)

















`, ,_' -- -




-. .". -.
-,






MAITOREE CARRYING OFF LITTLE EDWARD.




THE MOTHER'S EXPLOIT.


to give him any, and told him that if he
did not leave the house, he should be
turned out like a dog. Of course, the
Indian grew very angry and resolved to
make the woman pay dearly for her insult.
Seizing little Edward, he ran out of the
house and into the woods, bearing the boy
upon his shoulder. The mother followed
shrieking for her child, but the Indian gave
a mocking laugh and ran still faster. Sud-
denly Mrs. Duggan gave up the chase, ran
back to the house, seized a loaded rifle, put
on her bonnet, and renewed the pursuit,
determined not to return without her child.
She followed the trail of the Indian until
she saw him asleep with Edward by his
side, crept forward, shot the savage, and
clasped her boy to her bosom.
2











MRS. CLAYSON AND HER
DAUGHTER.
"Do you say your prayers before going
to bed, at night, and on getting up in the
morning?" asked Cousin Agnes. "Al-
ways," replied Mary. "That is right,"
said cousin Agnes." "Never forget to ask
God to watch over you while you sleep,
and to guide you through the day. Seek
and you shall find," says the Holy Bible.
"I knew a poor widow named Clayson,
and her daughter Emma. They were left
in want when Mr. Clayson died. Tho
(18)






























EMMA AT HER PRAYERS.




MRS. CLAYSON AND HER DAUGHTER. 21

widow then rented a room, and strove to
make a living by sewing. But though
she worked late at night, she could
scarcely get food and clothing for herself
and child, and pay her rent besides. Her
health failed and she was fearful that her
little Emma would be left an orphan.
But Mrs. Clayton was a Christian; and
in the midst of her trials, she did not
forget that God was good and mighty.
She prayed to him often, and with a full,
earnest heart. She taught her little Emma
to kneel down at night, and in the morn-
ing, and pray with her. God heard their
prayers and sent them aid. A wealthy
old lady took Mrs. Clayson to be her house-
keeper; and little Emma was sent to a
boarding-school."











HELPLESS JOHN.
"Mary won't help me to put on my
gloves," said Joseph to Cousin Agnes, one
afternoon, as the party was going out for
a walk. "Well," said Cousin Agnes, you
can put them on without help. Learn to
help yourself, as far as you can. Did I
ever tell you about a little boy who was
called Helpless John ? He was a son of
Mrs. Norton, who lived near our house in
the city. Being accustomed to call for
help whenever he wanted to do anything,
he- became so helpless that he could do
(22)



























FIXING FOR GOING TO SCHOOL.




HELPLESS JOHN.


nothing; while his brother Samuel did
almost everything for himself that he
wanted done. When John wanted to go
to school, his mother had to wait upon
him. So John grew up unfit to take care
of himself, and always looking to others
for aid. At length, Mrs. Norton died,
leaving the two boys orphans. Samuel
was like a little man, and could work and
support himself; but John could do no-
thing. Samuel will now get rich, and live
well and happily, while his brother, if not
taken care of, will live and die in poverty.
Therefore, take warning, Joseph, and learn
to think and act for yourself."


25











THE YOUNG HUNTER.
A KIND action is sure to obtain a re-
ward," said Cousin Agnes. The time and
the form are doubtful, but the reward
must come, for God is good. Mark Racket
was the son of a hunter who lived on the
frontier of Pennsylvania, many years ago.
He was a brave and noble boy, and when
only about twelve years old used to go out
in the woods, with his dog Snap, and a
little gun which his father had given him,
and hunt as if he had been a man. He
was a pretty good shot. Though he
(26)































MARK RACKET AND HIS DOG.


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CI





THE YOUNG HUNTER.


killed no deer, he often shot opossums,
raccoons, rabbits, squirrels and birds.
One day, while hunting in the woods, he
heard a deep groan, and on going forward
a short distance, came upon an old Indian,
who was lying on the ground near a fire,
and seemed to be in great pain. Mark
ran to the old man, and asked him what
was the matter and what could be done
for him. But the Indian, could not speak
Mark then ran home, and told his father
what he had seen, and urged him to go to
the relief of the suffering man. Mr. Racket
complied and took the Indian to his cabin
and treated him well till he recovered.
Some years afterwards, when war broke
out, Mark Racket was captured by the
Indians, but saved by the.old man."


29











THE OLD SEA CAPTAIN.
"CHILDREN," said Cousin Agnes, one
evening, when seated as usual by the fire-
side, "you should ever respect aged per-
sons. I knew an old man named Mar-
shall. He had been a sea-captain during
the greater part of his life, and made a
great deal of money; but having met
with misfortunes, he was reduced to
poverty, and in his old age, was compelled
to depend upon the charity of his friends.
He lived with an only daughter, in a vil-
lage, not far from the city.. Bad boys
(30)






































































































THE OLD SEA CAPTAIN.


~~_ __



~_~~ __ ~__

L----- --i-~-~


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i









-i;-





THE OLD SEA CAPTAIN.


often made fun pf Captain Marshall, when
they saw him tottering about the village,
dressed very poorly. But there were
some good children, who loved to gather
round him, and listen to his many stories
of the sea. To these, he would talk by
the hour, giving them much more know-
ledge, in a pleasant manner, than they
could have obtained from books, by long
and tedious study. He told them about
the distant countries he had visited; the
strange people and their customs; the
storms at sea and shipwrecks. In return,
the children often gave the old captain
presents, which made his heart glad. The
bad boys, who mocked him, never heard
him tell his pretty stories. At length,
worn out by age, Captain Marshall diedY
3


33










THE LOST CHILDREN.
"HAs either of you, children, evei wan-
dered away from home, without being
able to find your way back?" inquired
Cousin Agnes. Neither had ever been so
bewildered. "Well, then," said their
cousinin "then you would not know how to
act if you should happen to get lost.
Robert and Rebecca Barnes one morning
.vandered away from home, in search of
flowers to make garlands. After collect-
ing some in the fields, they strolled into
the wood. This was very extensive, and
(34)






























IOBERT AND REBECCA IN THE WOOD.




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