• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Advertising
 Chattering Jack
 The faithless parrot
 The multiplication table
 The prince with the long nose
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Routledge's coloured picture book : containing Chattering Jack, The faithless parrot, The multiplication table, The prince with the long nose
Title: Routledge's coloured picture book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066180/00001
 Material Information
Title: Routledge's coloured picture book containing Chattering Jack, The faithless parrot, The multiplication table, The prince with the long nose
Alternate Title: Chattering Jack
The faithless parrot
The multiplication table
The prince with the long nose
Physical Description: 1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
New York
Publication Date: [187-?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Multiplication -- Tables -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1875   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1875   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1875
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with thirty-two pages of illustrations.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements precede and follow text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066180
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002219903
notis - ALG0092
oclc - 71280268

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Advertising
        Advertising
    Chattering Jack
        Poem 1
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The faithless parrot
        Unnumbered ( 14 )
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The multiplication table
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The prince with the long nose
        Unnumbered ( 39 )
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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ROUTLEDGE'S




COLOURED PICTURE BOOK.

CONTAINING

CHATTERING A CK.
THE FAITHLESS PARROT.
THE MUL TIPLICATION TABLE.
THE PRINCE WITH THE LONG NOSE.

WITH


THIRTY-TWO PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


LONDON:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND
THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.
NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.


SONS,












TOY BOOKS.



AUNT MAVOR'S TOY BOOKS, or LARGE .COLOURED SIXI'ENNY BOOKS
FOR CHILDREN, with greatly improved Illustrations, super-royal 8vo, in Wrappers, price Sixpence each.


Nursery Aljhkabet.
History of Tom Thumb.
Cinderella; or, The Three Sisters.
The Three Bears.
Aladdin; or, 7he Wonderful Lamp.
The Dogs' Dinner-Party.
Puss in Boots.
Th/e Buttetfies' Ball.
The Cherry Orchard.
Dick Whittington.
History of Our Pets.
Punch and 7udy.
History of rohn Gilpin..


History of Blue Beard.
Little Totty.
Sindbad the Sailor.
Jack and the Bean-Stalk.
The House that 7ack Built.
The Old Woman and her Pig.
History of an Apple Pie.
Tom Th minb's Alpkhabet.
Baron MAJichans'n.
Puck and Pea Blossom's Visit to
London.
The Picture Alphabet.
The White Cat.


Valentine and Orson.
Arthur's Alphabet.
Dorothy Frump and her Six L),-..
Singing Birds.
Parrots and Talking Birds.
Dogs.
Nursery Rhymes.
Birds.
Bible Alphabet.
The Railroad Alphabet.
Alphabet for Good Boys and Girls.
The Sea-Side Alphabet.
The Farm- Yard Alfphabet.


Also kept Mounted on Linen, entitled MAVOR'S EVERLASTING Toys," bound in
stiff Covers, and Coloured, price One S/illing each.




ROUTLEDGE'S NEW SIXPENNY TOY BOOKS, beautifully printed
in Colours by Messrs. LEIGHTON BROTHERS, VINCENT BROOKS, and EDMUND EVANS, in super-
royal 8vo, fancy Wrappers, price Sixpence each.


Greedy 7em andhis Six Brothers.
Our Puss and her Kittens.
Hof o' My Thumb.
Jack the Giant-Killer.
Little Red Riding Hood.
Beauty and the Beast.
Old Mother Hubbard.
Haffy Days of Childhood.
Little Dog Trusty.
Pussy Cat's Tea-Party.
The Babes in the Wood.
Wild Animals.


British Animals.
The Frog who would a- Wooing
Go.
The Old Courtier.
Chattering Jack.
Old King Cole.
The Prince with the Long Nose.
The JMultiplication Table.
The Faithless Parrot.
The Farm- Yard.
Horses.
Old Dame Trot.


Sing a Song of Sixpence.
Gaping, Wide-Mouthed, Waddling
Frog.
The Farmer and the Miller.
The Little Hunchback.
How essie was Lost.
Grammar in Rhyme.
Annie and Jack in London.
One, Two, Buckle my Shoe.
The Fancy Dress Ball.
The juvenile Party.


The above may also be had strongly Mounted on Cloth, price One Shillingl each.


GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS, THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.




















CHATTERING JACK.












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1.

S ONE morning Jack's Mother sat reading her book
But whenever she tried on its pages to look,
Clack, clack, clack! went troublesome Jack,
And she, was obliged to put the book back.












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Besides this, Jack's Mother had letters to write,
But this chatteringl child perplex'd her quite; i
For clack, clack, clack! went wearisome Jack,
So she had to put all her writing things back.

3.
It chanced that a Magpie was flying that way,
And heard how much little Jack had to say,
'I (The Butler was waiting for orders that day;)
But clack, clack, clack said troublesome Jack,
Without hearing a word, the poor Butler went
back.
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The nest, made of sticks, was placed high on a tree,
And in it were chattering Magpies three;
Tho' dizzy with flying and breathless with fright,
Poor Jack had not learned to be silent quite.
" Cl;ck, clack, clack !" faintly sobb'd little Jack,
"Pray-pray--Mrs. Magpie-take-me back!"
7.
"Hold your tongue!" said the Magpie, "and don't
make a fuss;
You'll tumble out if you fidget thus.
Don't say you want this, and you can't eat that,
But be contented, and put on your hat;
SAnd when you are patient, and wait
like a man,
I'11 take you back if I possibly
can."


4















i So Jack leirn'dl tbo eat beetles and
little biri-,' c.Egr ,
Ai. caterpilhlar \ ith soft *_,T en le ;
For lie lihan a sh:l',p peck fromii tlie Mag-
pie's beak,
If he diI not .4'alluw, or triple. to speak.
9.
The young lAafnpis were flegced and
alno,,t full irow\In,
A nl JaIc k often aat in the n-ct alone;
IIe longed fior a breaktIlst of breadl and
tea.
And ohl ho\l he longed for his Mlother's
knee!
But he longer in silence, and did not

Tho' the tiars trickled over his little
brown cliCk.







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()ilt. lljU i ll, \11 hI .n Jai(k .lm ly iL"I Olil l i i )i ,

O( 11- i, liI- e il .lt illiw he f6I iil \\n I\l\l,l
Arid lBlly I (l.oe blY, in hlir own white l.el !
Once' Jack \,u ll IN\e s,-rr.(-ld and a;i\keneCl the

Bi t I \now it i 2111.-. it anidl -till n, i a ti(,t O.e ;
It. W'Ia ileasttirL' Cnii,,.li tl I t lo' tlhe crii :'liin to ,p. CJI,
Aild luook at dtl,' N>;l.)V wIiih_ iC t i -4 U-ILCii'.


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11.


How she clapped her hands in glad surprise,
How Nurse could hardly believe her own eyes,
And Jack's delight, and his Mother's kiss-
You surely can all of you fancy this;
And the joy of the house to find Jack
come back,
Yet never more to hear clack,
c-:clk, cl:l k !


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To all troublesome children this tale is addressed,
Who fidget and talk, and are never at rest;
Let them try to learn patience and silence, like
Jack,
Without taking a flight on the MaI,,'pie's back.


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THE FAITHLESS PARROT.










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TiTTUMJS AND FIUO MA1MNG IT lVP.

LONDON: GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS.
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THE FAITHLESS PARROT.

BY CHARLES H. BENNETT.






THERE once lived happily together, in a fine house, a tortoise-
shell Cat and a pretty white Dog: the Cat's name was Tittums;
the Dog's, Fido. In course of time the pretty Dog fell in love
with the Cat, and only waited for a good chance to disclose
his affections. This came one day, when Tittums had put
her paws on the fender, dropped her head a little on one
side, half closed her eyes, and seemed thinking of nothing at
all. Then Fido, who lay stretched at full length upon the
hearth-rug, looked steadfastly at her, and heaving a gentle
whine, said,-
"Oh, Tittums, I've fallen in love!"







































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FIDO COURTING TITTUMS.


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"Indeed!" replied the prudent Cat, not wishing to snow
him how anxious she was.
"Yes, indeed," continued the. little Doggy, rather hurt at
her coldness: "it's you that I've fallen in love- with. Do you
like me, Tittums?"
But Tittums would not answer, even with a single purr-r:
aiid it was only upon her giving him a sly look out of the
corner of her left eye that he guessed how much she did like
him. However, 'made bold by even this small token of esteem,
he came quietly up, `and sat by her side; even going so far, at
last, s to take her out for a short walk down the garden-path,
where they looked through the railings at the people passing by.
"Well," said Fido to himself, "I have no doubt but she
will love me in time; all the more, as I have great hopes of
growing bigger before the spring."
But one morning, when Tittums came in from a visit she
had been paying her mamma, she was followed by a gentleman
from the tropics, who, with all the impudence of his race,
made himself quite at home, pressed Tittums' paw to his






















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TITTUMS DESERTING FIDO.


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heart, called her "the loveliest of Cats," asked her to oblige
him with a song, which he' had been told she could sing very
sweetly, and never took the least notice of poor Fido, who
was sitting in the corner. To tell the truth, poor Fido was
very cross, and began to growl quite savagely; the more so
when, to his dismay, he beheld the pleasure with which Tit-
tuns heard all this nonsense. He could not think what' right
the bold stranger had to come there unasked; for all that he
had bright red and green feathers, a rakish, broad-brimmed hat,
and a gold-headed walking-cane, he was not good-looking, that
was very certain.
But Tittums was very much struck by his appearance and
bearing; his feathers were so pretty, he spoke so many lan-
guages, shrieked so terribly and in such a loud voice, had
travelled so much, and was so struck by the beauty of
Tittums, that, poor little Cat as she was, she ceased to care a
button for faithful Fido, and kept all her sly glances for Mr.
Paul Parrot.
"Lovely Tittums," said Mr. Paul, "you must forget such








7


upstart puppies as Fido. Listen to me-I am a traveller-I
speak five languages,-I have a palace made of golden bars,
within which is a perch fit for a king,-I have a pension of
bread and milk and Barcelona nuts: all of which I will share
with you. To-morrow we will go for a trip into the field
next to the house. Good-by for the present, my dear Pussy
Cat;" and he went away kissing his hand.
Poor Fido howled. Naughty Tittums!
As day followed day, Miss liss" neglected her little Dog
more and more. She walked out with Mr. Paul Parrot, she
sang to, him, looked kindly at him, and, in fact, only seemed
happy when he was by. Poor Fido was true to his first love,
although almost brought to despair; he got very thin indeed,
and his fine bushy coat, which he had kept nice and .clean,
became ragged and dirty.
Indeed, Mr. Parrot carried all before him; he was so grand,
so loving, and so clever, that Fido from being deserted became
despised, and was indeed thinking about hanging himself on
the meat-hook in the kitchen.,


















































TITTUMS WALKING OUT WITH THE PARROT.





























































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THE PARROT COURTING THE JACKDAW.









10


One evening, just after dark, as he was roaming about,
feeling very sad, and thinking that, perhaps, it would be better
to run away than to use the meat-hook, he all at once found
himself in the next garden, and while he was looking round
him. he heard voices.
"Lovely Mrs. Daw," said one of the voices which he
seemed to recognize, "I am a traveller-I speak five languages
-I have a palace made of golden bars, within which is a
perch fit for a king,-I have a pension of bread and milk and
nuts; all of which I will share with you. To-morrow we will
fly for an excursion on to the great oak-tree in Farmer Hodges'
field."
"Dear me!" thought Fido, ."this must be Mr. Parrot."
And, sure enough, so it was,-Mr. Parrot, indeed, and making
the warmest of love to old Mrs. Daw, the widow of Miser
Jack Daw, who, during a long life, and by means of stealing and
saving, had laid by a large fortune, which he had left Mrs.
Daw to enjoy.
The old widow seemed very much pleased at the warmth of


I









II


Mr. Paul's love, and no doubt thought that every word he said
was true; leering round at him with her old eyes, and wishing
that she had put on a clean muslin cap, as it might have made
her look even*younger than she thought she did.
As for Fido, he almost jumped for joy; he ran home as
soon as ever he could.
"Oh, Tittums!" said he, heedless of her scornful looks,
"what do you think I have found out? There is that rascal
of a Paul Parrot, who pretends so much love for you, courting
Widow Daw at this very moment; and if you come at once
you may see it with your own eyes."
"Nonsense!" replied Tittums: "I do not believe it."
"Well," said the Dog, "to convince you, if you will only
come to the other side of the wall you shall see that what I
have said is quite true."
But Pussy, trusting in the honour of Mr. Paul, would not
believe a word, and-it was only after a great deal of persuasion
that she was induced to jump over the wall and listen.
Mr. Paul and Mrs. Daw were still courting, and the Parrot



















































EAVES-DROPPERS.









13


was trying, by coaxing the old lady, to find out how much she
was worth, and where all her treasures were hid. Indeed
Mrs. Daw was just on the point of telling him her secret,
when Tittums, unable to contain herself, rushed at Mr. Paul
and scratched his face.
Oh, you bad Parrot!" she said; "did you not promise to
marry me, and take me to your golden palace ?"
"Golden palace!" screamed M% Daw: "why, you wicked
bird, that's what you promised me. Stay, ma'am, what did he
say besides ?-did he promise you any bread and milk, or any
Barcelona nuts?"
"Yes, he did-he did-he did," continued the Cat, scratch-
ing and clawing the false, faithless Parrot as she spoke.
"Well," said Pussy, now fairly exhausted, "I hope you are
satisfied: if ever you come near our house again, I'll scratch out
every feather you have on your back;" and so she left him,
taking Fido with her, who, in spite of his general good nature
and the Parrot's rage, could not resist giving him two or three
sharp bites,


















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As soon as Mrs. Daw was left alone with Paul, she began
to upbraid him with his falseness,-" You vulgar, stuck-up,
ugly, awkward deceiver! you have neither honesty enough to
live by, nor wings enough to fly with." Whereupon she
jumped at him and gave him such a plucking as spoilt his
good# loolTs.
Never after this was the Parrot able to hold up his head.
Every one scorned him: even his olden palace turned out to
be a brass cage; and for his misdds a chain was fastened
round his leg. He was confined to a wooden perch, which,
out of pure spite, he was always pecking.
Old Widow Daw kept her secret, and remained unmarried.
Tittums could not help admiring the constancy of Fido;
and when in the spring he had grown bigger, and was pro-
moted to a sweet red and black collar, Pussy found that she
loved him very much indeed, and made up her mind never
more to forsake him.











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WICE ONE are TWO good Boys,
Who come in time for School.


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Twice TWO are FOUR large Swans,
Now swimming on the Pool.



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wice THREE are SIX strong Ropes,

On which we Children swing.


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wice FOUR are EIGHT Church

How merrily they ring!


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wice FIVE are TEN Steam Boats,

Anchored in Plymouth Sound.


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wice SIX are TWELVE milch Cows,

Best in the country round.
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wice SEVEN are FOURTEEN Lambs,

Just taken from fine Ewes.


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wice NINE are EIGHTEEN Pins,
On which we hang our Hats.








wice TEN are TWENTY Lads,
At Cricket with their Bats.

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Ships sailing on the


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THE


PRINCE


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THE PRINCE WITH THE NOSE.
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THERE once lived a King who wished to marry a very beautiful lady
in his dominions, for he had no Queen to share his throne. Whenever
he went to pay this lady a visit, a great ugly black cat came out to the
door to prevent his entering the house. The King was so enraged that
he trod on the cat's tail, upon which the animal immediately changed
into a Magician who threatened him with his vengeance.
1




















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After having said this, the Magician vanished, but the King was too
much in love to care much about his threats, so that the beautiful lady
soon became Queen. In the course of time, a little Prince was born, and
the Magician was quite forgotten. But everybody was surprised when
the nurse brought in the baby to be looked at, to see that the child's
nose was such an enormous size as to throw quite a shadow on his face.
He looked all nose, but as he was a Prince the courtiers and ladies all
declared that he was the sweetest little fellow in the world.
2







































When the Prince who was named PRINCE WISH, had grown a
tall young fellow, quite a new fashion had been set in the shape and size
of noses. All the lords in waiting and servants who had snub or pug noses
had been sent away, or remained only to be laughed at, for it would never
have done for them to be always staring at the Prince. To have a large
nose was declared to be the mark of beauty, so that the Prince learned
to be quite proud of his nose, and might almost have been persuaded to
put a ring in it like a hog, if anybody had thought of such an ornament.








































Now this big nose was a plan of the Magician to punish the King.
It soon became a great trouble to the Prince. He had grown a fine
young man, when a charming Princess paid a visit to the Queen, and her
beauty was so great that all the court was loud in her praises. PRINCE
WISH fell deeply in love with her, and declared to himself that he
would willingly go to the end of the world for the sake of a single smile
from the dear Princess Darling. As it was, however, he found it very
hard to have to keep so far away from her as the length of his nose,
4








































Then he began to doubt about the beauty and convenience of this
striking feature of his face,-for when the Princess, who really liked him
very much, gave him permission to kiss her cheek, he found his nose so
much in the way that he was ready to wring it off. He was found look-
ing at himself in a mirror, and bewailing his awkwardness. In spite of
this, however, Darling agreed to marry him, and the day having been
fixed, the Royal party were going to the church, when they suddenly saw
the Magician flying over the steeple with the Princess in his arms.
5








































PRINCE WISH was deeply grieved, but at last he sprang up, took
his sword, and declared that he would not return till he had found the
Princess Darling. After a long and weary journey he came to a wood,
beyond which, a high barrier of rocks almost shut out the last rays of the
sun; but he saw a strange glimmering from a hole in the rock itself, and
on approaching, found that it came from a cave, where a little old woman
sat reading by the light of a candle. "Who are you, who come here to
interrupt me !" she called out, as she stooped under the low doorway.
6







































The Prince could not reply for laughing, for the old lady wore a
great pair of tortoiseshell spectacles, and her nose was so short that
t1 would hardly stay on it. WISH had never seen such a snub.
'eYou are not very polite to laugh at a woman who is a hundred years
old," said the little dame, growing angry. You'll find your nose will be
laughed at just as much as mine is before you've got far on your travels."
Her words came true enough, for in the very next village the people all
came out and jeered at him, hooting and calling him Nosey."







































The Prince was sorry, and this was what the old woman wanted, for
she was his good fairy, and when PRINCE WISH went into the woods,
he came to a splendid palace that shone like silver. At a window, waving
her handkerchief to him, who should he see but the Princess Darling.
lie was up stairs in a moment, and was about to kiss the Princess, when
he remembered his nose, and feeling for it, found it had shrunk to an
ordinary size. Delighted at this, he took the Princess in his arms, and
at the same moment she was restored from the power of the Magician.
8










Uniform in size and price with ROUTLEDGE'S COLOURED PICTURE BOOK, Fourth Series,
are issued :-

FIRST SERIES,
CONTAINING


The Little Hunchback.
Old Dame Trot and her WonderfZu
Cat.


SECOND SERIES,
CONTAINING


Puss and her Kittens.
The Farm-Yard.


I


Greedy 7em and his Six Brothers.
The Frog that would a-Wooing Go.


THIRD SERIES,
CONTAINING


Happy Days of Childhood.
Sing a Song of Sixpence.


How yessie was Lost.
Grammar in Rhyme.


The Gaping, Wide-Mouthed, Waddling
Frog.
Hop o' My Thumb.


FIFTH SERIES,
CONTAINING
The Babes in the Wood.
Little Dog Trusty.


SIXTH SERIES,
CONTAINING
The Fancy Dress Ball. Aladdin; or, The Wonderful Lamp.
Annie and Jack in London. Jack and the Bean-Stalk.


SEVENTH SERIES,
CONTAINING


The juvenile Party.
One, Two, Buckle my S/oe.


Blue Beard.
Little Totty.


Little Red Riding Hood.
Beauty and the Beast.


I












ROUTLEDGE'S NEW SERIES OF SHILLING TOY BOOKS.


With large Illustrations by H.S. MARKS, J. D. WATSON, H. WEIR, and KEYL, printed in Colours. In
demy 4to, stiff Wrapper, is. each, or Mounted on Linen, 2s. each.


NURSERY RHYMES.
ALPHABET OF TRADES.
CINDERELLA.*
ALPHABET OF PRETTY NAMES.
OLD TESTAMENT ALPHABET.
THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
THE HISTORY OF FIVE LITTLE
PIGS.*
TOM THUMB'S ALPHABET.
NURSERY SONGS.
NEW TESTAMENT ALPHABET.
THE CATS' TEA-PARTY.*
OUR FARM-YARD ALPHABET.
THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.


NURSERY GAMES.
NURSERY RHYMES.
THE LIFE OF OUR LORD.
WILD ANIMALS.
BRITISH ANIMALS.
THE HISTORY OF MOSES.
THE HISTORY OF JOSEPH.
THE ALPHABET OF FLOWERS.
OLD MOTHER HUBBARD, AND
COCK ROBIN.
NURSERY TALES.
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
THE THREE BEARS.
Puss IN BOOTS.


NEW TALE OF A TUB.*
HISTORY OF ENGLAND. Fitrs
Period.
HISTORY OF ENGLAND. Second
Period,
HISTORY OF ENGLAND. Third
Period.
HISTORY OF ENGLAND, FuOZrt
Period.
TOM THUMB.
JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.
THE BABES IN THE WOOD.
THE LAUGHABLE AB C.


* Those marked with an asterisk are not kept Mounted on Linen.


BOOKS


ANIMAL LIFE ALL THE WORLD
0 VER: with 20 Coloured Illustrations. Oblong, cloth,
6s.; fancy boards, 5s.
THE CHILD'S PICTURE BOOK OF
WILD ANIMALS: with 12 large Coloured Illustra-
tions. Oblong, cloth, 6s.; fancy boards, 5s.
THE CHILD'S PICTURE BOOK OF
DOMESTIC ANIMfALS: with 12 large Coloured
Illustrations. Oblong, cloth, 6s.; fancy boards, 5s.
THE CHILD'S PICTURE BOOK OF
WILD AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS: with 24
large Illustrations. Oblong, cloth, los. 6d.
ROUTLEDGE'S SCRIPTURE GIFT-
BOOK: containing the Old and New Testament
Alphabets, the History of Moses, and the History
of Joseph, with 24 pages of Illustrations, printed in
Colours, 4to, cloth, gilt, 5s.
THE CHILD'S COLOURED SCRIP-
TURE BOOK: with Ioo Illustrations. Square
imperial, cloth, 5s.
THE CHILD'S COLOURED GIFT-
BOOK: with ioo Illustrations. Square imperial ,
cloth, 5s.
ROUTLEDGE'S PICTURE GIFT-
BOOK: containing 24 pages of Illustrations, printed
in Colours, 4to, cloth, gilt, 5s.


FOR CHILDREN.

ROUTLEDGE'S NURSERY BOOK
containing 24 pages of Illustrations, printed in Co-
lours, 4to, cloth, gilt, 5s.
THE GOOD CHILD'S COLOURED
BOOK: with 24 large Illustrations, printed in Co-
lours, oblong, cloth, full gilt, 5s.
ROUTLEDGE'S NURSERY TALES:
containing 24 pages of Illustrations, printed in Co-
lours, 4to, cloth, gilt, 5s.
ROUTLEDGE'S SCRIPTURE AL-
PHIABETS, containing the OLD AND NEW TESTA-
MENTS : with 48 Illustrations, printed in Colours,
4to, cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
ROUTLEDGE'S PICTURE BOOK.
With 18 pages of Coloured Illustrations, 4to, orna-
mental boards, 3s. 6d.
A PRESENT FOR MY DARLING.
With 18 pages of Coloured Illustrations, 4to, orna-
mental boards, 3s. 6d.
FOR A GOOD CHILD. With 18 pages
of Coloured Illustrations, 4to, ornamental boards,
3s. 6d.
THE GOOD CHILD'S ALBUM. With
18 pages of Coloured Illustrations, 4to, ornamental
boards, 3s. 6d.


GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS.


PICTURE


~


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