• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Fortune's favourite; or, the very...
 The prophetic dream
 The golden duck
 The glass hatchet
 The courageous flute-player
 The serpent prince
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Fortune's favourite, and other famous fairy tales
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066165/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fortune's favourite, and other famous fairy tales
Physical Description: 112 p., 2 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Doyle, Richard, 1824-1883 ( Illustrator )
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean and Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1871?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1871   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1871   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1871   ( local )
Bldn -- 1871
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with illustrations by Richard Doyle.
General Note: Published in 1871, according to the British Museum Catalogue.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in color.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066165
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002226421
notis - ALG6706
oclc - 05452886

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Fortune's favourite; or, the very wonderful adventures of Pista, the swineherd
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Plate
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The prophetic dream
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The golden duck
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The glass hatchet
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    The courageous flute-player
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    The serpent prince
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text









FORTUNE'S FAVOURITE,

AND OTHER


FAMOUS FAIRY TALES.



Wit/if illustrationss by
Richard Doylf.













LONDON:


DEAN AND SON, 65, LUDGATE HILL, E.C.


















FORTUNE'S FAVOURITE;
OR, THE VERY WONDERFUL ADVENTURES OF PISTA,
THE SWINEHERD.
[Hungarian.]


TREAR the centre of a thick forest once
dwelt a forester with his beloved wife.
The chase was his occupation, and he
lived contentedly on the provision which his
ever-active bow procured him from day to
day. In this manner he passed two years
very happily; although the blessing of
children, which he earnestly desired, had
been hitherto denied him. But the saying,
" Patience brings roses," consoled him, ana
indeed the saying did at last prove true, ana


I


Q






Fortune's Favourite.

in so striking a manner, that it seemed as if
destiny had exerted its utmost power to fulfil
it, in his case, even to excess. In the third
year, whilst the forester was away hunting in
the wood, his family was increased by the
addition of twelve fine, healthy sons, upon
whom the attendant midwife bestowed every
necessary care, and then placed them in a
circle on the floor in the centre of the room,
where the sturdy infants stretched their limbs
and raised their voices for the first time in a
tremendously loud Tutti.
Whilst these events were taking place, the
day declined, and evening gradually threw its
shade over field and mountain. The light-
hearted hunter bethought him of his supper,
and returned, laden with two or three hares,
to his cottage.
But how thunderstruck was he when he
heard that Heaven had showered down upon
him such an abundant blessing. He entered,
gazed, and at the sight of the liberal gift, at
once lost his reason, and rushed raving out
2





Fortune's Favourite.


of doors back into the depths of the dark
forest, never to return again.
The poor forsaken wife now remained in
her hut with her twelve little sons, desiring
nothing more ardently than to be able to
leave her bed, in order to provide food for
her children.
The midwife afforded her all the assistance
in her power, and when at length she re-
covered, she prepared a bow and arrows,
scoured the woods and hills, and daily
brought home as much game as was requisite
for the support of herself and her children.
Thus she lived fifteen years; during which
period the little ones grew strong and healthy,
and learned from her to provide, by hunting,
for their own necessities.
But before they. reached their sixteenth
year, it pleased Heaven to call their mother
to itself, and now the youths, deprived of
parental care, were abandoned to their fate.
They continued to live as before, on the
products of the chase, which they fraternally
8






Fortune's Favourite.

divided amongst them, and remained together
in harmony and peace.
The distracted father meanwhile continued
to wander incessantly through the forest.
His habiliments had long been torn to rags,
and his appearance terrified every one who
beheld him. Although other foresters oc-
casionally met him, and brought tidings of
him to his sons, yet no one could ever lay
hold of him, as he shunned the approach of
everybody, and at the aspect of a human
being he hastened like a frightened beast to
hide himself in the thicket. But his un-
happy fate was a daily increasing source of
sorrow to his sons, who at length consulted
seriously together, how they might get him
into their hands, so as to be able to take
care of him, and, if possible, restore him to
reason.
They at length agreed to betake them-
selves, provided with a roasted goose, a pitcher
of brandy, and one large boot, to a certain
spring in the forest, near which the foresters
4





Fortune's Favourite.


frequently saw him. With these things they
went to the appointed spot, placed them close
to the spring, and then concealed themselves
in the bushes to watch for his arrival.
They had waited a considerable time
when they heard the sound of foot-steps, and
beheld a dark figure approaching the spring.
With ardent curiosity they peeped from their
concealment, and at length saw, with surprise
and horror, a being more like a ghost than
a man, but who, however, perfectly corres-
ponded to the description which the foresters
had given them of their unfortunate father.
When he approached the spring to slake
his thirst he started on perceiving the un-
accustomed objects which were beside it, and
prepared to start off at the moment, should
he perceive a human form. But as the
youths kept themselves entirely concealed,
and made not the least noise, his alarm
subsided, and he ventured to drink from the
spring.
After he had refreshed himself, the roasted
5





Fortune s Fa'vouirite.

goose, the little pitcher, and the large boot
seemed again to attract his attention, and he
could not resist the desire to make himself
master of them. He laid himself down
quite leisurely by the boot, devoured the
goose with the greatest avidity, and emptied
the pitcher with a satyr-like expression of
countenance.
The liquor seemed quickly to affect him;
for almost as soon as he had swallowed it he
manifested his satisfaction by fantastic leaps,
and all kinds of ridiculous antics. He soon
laid hold of the boot, examined it attentively
on all sides, and nodded his head knowingly,
as if in self-approval for having devised its
purpose.
Thus satisfied with himself, he again seated
himself on the ground, and endeavoured to
draw the boot over both feet at once; and
although it was large enough to admit the
foot of a demi-giant, it cost the lunatic extra-
ordinary efforts to effect his object. Over-
powered by fatigue, and the strength of the
6





Fortune's Favourite.

liquor he had drunk, he gradually sank down
by the stream, and fell asleep.
His sons, when they perceived this, hastened
with the greatest caution from the bushes,
raised the intoxicated sleeper from the ground,
and carried him home. But before they had
half reached the hut, they discovered with
horror that the burthen, which at every step
had appeared to grow heavier, was a corpse.
Whether it was the effect of the too hastily
swallowed drink, or the too rapid satisfaction
of his appetite after long fasting, in either
case, the father lay dead in the arms of
his sons. With tears of regret, and self-
reproaches for their ill-advised attempt, the
afflicted sons buried the beloved corpse, under
an oak not far from the cottage.
They lived together for some time after
this event, but at length, being imbued with
the desire of seeing foreign countries, they
resolved to renounce their hitherto rude mode
of life, and each to set out in a different
direction to seekshis fortune.
7





Fortune's Favourite.

When they had fixed the day for their
separation, they once more went hunting
together, in order to provide so much food as
they might require for at least the first day of
their wandering. On the day appointed for
their departure they went to the oak which
shaded their father's grave, swore eternal
brotherly love to each other, and after
mutually taking an affectionate leave, each
pursued his separate way.
To relate what occurred to each of these
twelve brethren, and how each fulfilled his
appointed destiny, would be a very tedious
task, and the more so as the fate of the
younger brother was alone sufficiently re-
markable to deserve attention.
This youth had from his earliest years an
aversion to all kind of labour and trouble;
hence, in all his necessities he always relied
on the favour of Fortune, and the more so
as he had more than once had reason to
surmise that she was favourably inclined to-
wards him. Whilst his brothers laboriously
8





Fortune's Favourite.

pursued their game under every disadvantage
of time, place, and weather, he would lie at
his ease, with his weapons beside him, on a
grassy hill, beneath the shade of the trees;
and it generally came to pass that whilst his
brothers pursued some poor hare, in the
sweat of their brow, a roebuck would come,
as if at his call, so near to him that he could
shoot it without the least exertion. Owing
to this, he had to endure many a jeer from
his brethren, whose jealousy was excited by
his good luck, and they called him in de-
rision Lazy Bones.
His confidence in the favour of the blind
goddess guided him prosperously on his way.
By day he shot all kinds of game, which
came in abundance towards him, kindled a
fire, roasted and eat it; at night, he stretched
himself on the soft grass, and slept refreshingly
till the next morning. After he had pursued
his way in this manner for six days, he arrived
at a royal city altogether unknown to him.
He entered one of the best inns, and offered
9





N Fortune's Favourite.

the host a hare in e:.:ch nge for a draught of
wine, to refresh himself with after the fatigue
of his journey. The host gave him credit for
more than he was able both to eat and drink,
offered him a bed, and charged him the most
moderate price.
Just as he sat down to table, a multitude
of persons assembled in the room of the inn,
and conversed with each other about a most
remarkable occurrence which had just taken
place. The affair was indeed one of no
trifling importance, for it concerned the royal
establishment. The king had had ninety-
nine swineherds, who one and all had disap-
peared, and in all probability would never
again be heard of. The nine-and-ninetieth
of these had been missed only the night
before, and it was much doubted whether the
king would be able to find any one again who
would be willing to undertake so perilous a
charge. For although the highest wages
were offered to any one who would undertake
to tend the royal swine but for a single day,
10





Fortune's Favourite.


yet no one throughout the whole kingdom
had yet offered himself, and the illustrious
owner of the swine was in great risk of
losing them all.
The young stranger listened to this nar-
ration with surprise, but could not conjecture
what could be the difficulty attached to the
service. As the host had for some time been
employed in looking out for swineherds for
the king, he asked his young guest whether
he would undertake the office, adding at the
same time, that the king would give a year's
wages for a single day's service.
"Why not?" replied Pi.. ,, (that was the
young adventurer's name) and he declared
himself quite willing to undertake the charge,
as he thought the business of a swineherd did
not demand more skill and trouble than he
was accustomed to exert. His consent thus
given, the host joyfully conducted him to the
king, and praised throughout the whole city
the courageous resolution of his guest.
The monarch received them both gra-
11





Fortune's Favourite.


ciously, and not only confirmed the offer
made by the host to the youth, but promised
him a gratuity into the bargain, in case of his
discharging his duty with zeal and per-
severance.
He commanded a capital supper to be
placed before him, and appointing him to
drive the swine in the morning to the heath,
he dismissed him with the most gracious
wishes for his welfare.
Before the dawn of day, Pista was already
at his post. The heath lay in a pleasant
district, inclosed on the one side by mountains,
and on the other by a thick forest. On his
arrival there he found all tranquil, and could
not imagine what danger was to be ap-
prehended.
He passed the day in expectation, and the
evening approached as peacefully as the day
had departed. The moon and stars shed
their light over the district, and the refreshing
coolness of the air invited the carefree herds-
man to repose. He lay calmly down near
12





Fortune's Favourite.

his herd, commended them and himself to
fortune, and slept in peace.
He had not slept an hour, when the most
extraordinary of all night visions awakened
him. The oldest patriarch of the herd
stood before him, and thus addressed him:
"' Fear not, for I am thy friend, and come to
thee as a well-intentioned counsellor, to warn
thee of the danger that awaits thee. As I
have selected thee for my protege, I will
assist thee to the best of my power. When
thou drivest us home to-morrow, mind to
request the king to give thee a loaf of bread
and a flask of wine, for the following day.
These shall preserve thee from all misfortune.
A great dragon, who rules this forest, will
endeavour to overthrow and swallow thee.
But if thou givest him these gifts, thou
wilt not only be able to resist him, but
after he shall have drunk the wine thou
mayest destroy him."
Pista was not a little astonished at this
apparition; he rubbed his eyes, pricked up
13





Fortune's Favourite.


his ears, and collected all his senses, to con-
vince himself that he was really awake and
not dreaming. But when he saw the boar
standing bodily before him, and distinctly
heard every word, he at last returned him
grateful thanks for his friendly admonition,
and promised punctually to observe his in-
structions.
The following evening he drove the herd
home. The king met him, not without
astonishment, caused the year's wages to be:
paid to him immediately, and gave him per-
mission further to ask some favour. Pista,
well pleased, put the money in his pocket, and
for the present asked for nothing more than
bread and wine for the following evening.
The cock had scarcely crowed to welcome
the first hour of the morning, when our
herdsman again passed out of the city gate
with his herd. He betook himself to the
same heath where he had passed the fore-
going night, and had the strange tite-ad-tte
with the boar.
14





Fortune's Favourite.

As soon as he reached the spot, his bristly
Mentor again approached him and said:-
"Up and mount me without fear,
Swift on my back I thee will bear !
So that, ere many minutes' space,
Thou shalt reach the appointed place."

The youth bestrode the boar, and in a trice
found himself in the neighboring wood,
and deposited under an enormous oak. The
boar then repeated what he had said to his
protege the preceding day, and hastened back
to the herd.
Pista prepared himself for his adventure,
and before he could accurately reconnoitre
the field of battle, so dreadful a noise pro-
ceeding from the interior of the forest pierced
his ears, that all the trees round him creaked
and rustled as in a storm. It came nearer
and nearer, and he soon perceived a mon-
strous dragon, rapidly making towards him,
tearing the bushes and trees as he passed,
and even throwing them to the ground.
Mindful of his Mentor's words, Pista took
15





Fortune's Favourite.

courage, offered the bread and wine to the
dragon, and besought him to spare his life.
This liberal offer astonished the dragon
more than the resistance of a whole band of
herdsmen would have done. He quietly
received the gifts, devoured the bread with
much satisfaction, and as the wine speedily
took effect, he drowsily tumbled on the earth.
Pista did not delay to avail himself of the
opportunity. When he perceived that the
dragon slept, he drew out his knife and cut
the throat of the drunken monster; before,
however, he had completed the operation, he
saw a copper key fall out of his jaws, which
he picked up and put in his pocket.
In the meantime, the herd had gradually
moved towards the interior of the forest, to a
considerable distance from the spot where the
dragon had met his death. Pista, fearing he
might lose the objects of his charge, resolved
to cut across the bend of the forest, and to
go in a straight line, the same by which the
dragon had come, to look after them.
16











I,
- I



1 11
Ii

I
I



S '.; :.,


III I, -


I, -
- *: ^M f. IS




, ., .-. : ,

I,' -,

,II .;': ,- , 1 I!,'i!' iJ .'.:
*'" i I ,I,,.. I
Pista took courage, and offered the bread and wine to the dragon.
page 16.


I





Fortunes Favourite.

He had not gone far, when a new over-
whelming surprise banished them from his
thoughts. An immense castle, entirely
built of copper, stood before .him, far
surpassing in splendour the residence of his
king, and which seemed the more to invite
him to enter, inasmuch as he could no-
where descry a single guard to forbid his
approach.
Solitary and silent was all around him:
not even the song of a bird broke the stillness.
Hastening up to the castle, he found all the
gates locked; but suddenly remembering the
key in his pocket, he drew it out and tried it:
in the nearest gate, and discovered to his:
joyful surprise that it opened every lock.
He soon found himself in the interior of a
most magnificent palace, with such a number
of state rooms opening round him, that he
could hardly tell which he should first enter.
He passed through the grand hall and went
from room to room, until he at last reached a.
great saloon, the walls of which were mirrors,,


17


Kg





Fortune's Favourite.

whilst all manner of gold and silver articles of
furniture glittered round him. In the centre
of the room stood a table of silver, whereon
lay a golden rod. Without precisely know-
ing wherefore, he took up the rod and struck
the table with it, upon which a young dragon
immediately appeared, and with indescribable
courtesy begged that he would honour him
with his commands.
Recovering from his surprise, Pista ex-
pressed a wish to be shown the whole interior
of the palace, with the gardens belonging to
it. The obliging dragon immediately com-
plied with, and requested his guest to follow
him. He led him through all the chambers
and halls of the palace, each of which seemed
to contain the treasure of a whole kingdom;
thence into the stables, where splendid coursers
fed from silver mangers on golden oats, and
who neighed loudly at the entrance of their
visitors.
At last Pista and his attendant came into a
garden full of marvellously beautiful flowers
18





Fortune's Favourite.


and delicious fruits, which seemed to the
stranger like a second paradise. He could
not refrain from plucking a rose, which he
stuck in his cap.
When he had seen all, he inquired of the
dragon for the lord of the palace. The
dragon bowed before him with the greatest
reverence, and begged him, as the owner from
thenceforth of the palace and its treasures,
graciously to accept his homage, promising at
the same time that he would guard all with
the utmost vigilance, and endeavour to deserve
his apjpr:.bati. .n.
Pista was not a little astonished at this
address, but as all the events which had
befallen him within the last few days ap-
peared to him to be nothing less than natural,
he accepted the dragon's homage, and played
the part of master as well as he could.
Having nodded approbation to his new
servitor, he left the castle with proud gravity.
The portals closed of themselves after him
with thundering noise; he then carefully
19






Fortune's Favourite.

locked all the gates with his key, and re-
turned to seek his swine.
It was not long before he met the whole*
herd in the best order. The sun was already
glowing in the west, and the shadows of the
mountains stretched across the plains. It
seemed time to turn homewards; he whistled;
the herd put itself in motion; and before the-
evening star shone in the heavens, they were"
all at home again in their sheds.
Pista had no sooner housed his charge,,
than the king's daughters came running to-
wards him with the most unusual friendliness.
The youngest had seen from afar the rose irn
his cap, and as she could not resist the desire-
to possess it, she begged from him the lovely
flower. The swineherd instantly presented it
to the princess, and thought himself highly
honoured when he saw his gift placed in
the bosom of the most charming of the royal
maidens.
The king, meanwhile, deeply amazed at
the no less punctual than safe return of his-
20






Fortune's Favourite.

herdsman, sent for him into his presence, and
inquired particularly about all that had oc-
curred to him on the heath. But Pista
carefully avoided satisfying his curiosity;
gave very brief answers to his questions; and
said nothing that could betray his fortunate
adventure.
"This rose," said he, "which I found
already plucked, and lying on the stem of a
tree, is all that I saw on my way. I stuck
it in my hat that it might not fade quite
unenjoyed."
The king again expressed his entire satis-
faction and favour; and promised for the
future days the same rich reward he had
already enjoyed.
The herdsman thanked his patron and re-
turned to his swine, in order to pass the
,night near them on his bed of straw.
Just about midnight the friendly boar
awakened him as on the preceding night, and
,said, Pista must provide himself with bread
and wine for the coming day also, as he
21





Forttune' s Favourite.

would have to do with a still larger dragon
than the former."
He advised him to double the measure of
provisions, and told him he would have
nothing to fear if he encountered the monster
as c.iiuragcouLiy as he 'did that of the day
before.
E3f.:re daybreak Pista supplied himself
with two loaves and two flaski of wine, and
went as usual with the swine to the heath.
Arrived there, the boar again approached him
and said:-

Up and mount me without fear,
Swift on my back I will thee bear;
i I: day thou must higher go,
And still higher fortune know."
The youth obeyed the boar, and sooner
than if on a racer's back he found himself by
an inclosure, considerably beyond the place
where he stopped the day before. The boar
again depi-zited him under an oak, repeated
several times what he had before enforced,
and left him to his destiny.
22





Fortune's Favourite.


Pista had not long to wait; he soon heard
a terrible rustling descending from the tops
of the trees. By degrees it grew darker
around him, and at once a monstrous dragon,
much larger than the first, came sailing
through the air, whose out-spread wings
shaded, like a thunder-cloud, the district
beneath, as with furious haste he seemed
descending on the herdsman. But Pista lost
no time in offering him the two loaves and
the two flasks, which so fortunately appeased
the monster that he immediately stretched
himself on the grass, and, much at his ease,
swallowed the provisions, and then fell asleep
and snored like thunder. Pista again seized
the favourable moment and cut the dragon's
throat, from whose jaws fell a silver key,
which he put at once into his pocket.
Then he went, as on the preceding day,
into the interior of the forest, and soon saw a
palace built entirely of silver, which dazzled
his eyes from afar by its brilliancy. All that
he saw and did in the Copper Palace, he saw
23





Fortune's Favourite.


and did here; only the magnificence of the
one far exceeded that of the other, and caused
him to linger here much longer. After a very
obsequious dragon had shown him all the
treasures, and at last led him into the garden,
he plucked there a silver rose, of which there
were great numbers, and stuck it in his cap.
He then locked the gates of his beautiful
palace with the silver key, returned to his
herd, and as the day was declining, drove
them quietly home.
As before, the king's daughters came
familiarly to meet him, and the youngest
snatched the silver rose from him, and ran
playfully with it to her father. The king sent
for him as before, questioned him of all that
had occurred, and having received satisfactory
answers, expressed his entire approbation.
The same adventure occurred on the third
day, with the sole difference that the herds-
man this time entered a Golden Palace, and
brought from the garden a golden rose, which
the fair princess appropriated as before.
24





Fortune's Favourite.

It happened that a festival which the king
had long resolved to give to the suitors of
his daughters, was just about to be held. He
caused three golden apples of the same size to
be made, on each of which he had inscribed
the name of one of the princesses. These he
ordered to be suspended by golden threads in
the front court of his castle, as the prize of a
trial of skill, for which the victor was to
receive the hand of one of the princesses.
Whoever, at full gallop, should succeed in
striking down with his lance one of these
apples, was to receive the golden fruit and
the princess whose name it bore. As the
three sisters were no less extraordinary beauti-
ful than rich, it may easily be guessed that
the number of their suitors was not small.
A countless number of princes from far and
near were assembled in the royal city, and
the king's brother was also present with his
nine daughters. The whole kingdom took a
lively interest in this festival, and young and
old rejoiced at its commencement. Whatever
25






FOrw:l:i.'s Favourite.


the royal treasures could produce was ex-
hibited there, and all the rich and noble
flocked thither to contribute their share
towards enhancing the pomp of the long
looked for feast.
As it was to be supposed that Pista would
not willingly be absent from such a grand
sight, the youngest princess, out of gratitude
for her three roses, invited him to witness it;
advising him not to stay away if he had any
curiosity to see all the most precious of her
father's possessions, in horses, clothes, and
jewels. But to the no small surprise of the
princess, the herdsman thanked her for her
invitation, but said he preferred remaining
with his equals, and would tend the swine
as usual.
The morning arrived, and all within and
around the city was in motion. The streets
swarmed with countless people: even the
most helpless cripples dragged themselves
along, anxious to see the show. Pista alone
drove forth his swine with the utmost in-
26








difference, and did not evince the dlighte-t
'curiosity.
Who could have guessed, however, what
the homely youth had secretly determined,
and what a trick he had resolved to play on
all the princely suitors ? He no sooner
reached the heath then he hastened to the
forest where his late adventures had occurred.
He went to the Copper Palace, entered the
hall, and with a stroke of the golden wand
commanded the serviceable dragon to provide
for him the most magnificent attire and the
finest courser. The dragon rapidly obeyed
his master's order, dre-sed him as expeditioily
and handily as the most experienced valet
could have done, and then as quickly cantered
up a splendidly caparisoned steed, who
seemed to breathe fire as he neighed with
desire for the combat.
Pista mounted his horse, and the courts of
the castle thundered beneath his tramp. He
flew, as if borne on the lightning's wing,
over the heath and road, and suddenly ap-
27


F. .,!:/'s Favourite.





Fortune's Favourite.


peared in the lists of the royal disputants.
The brilliancy of his attire, the swiftness and
strength of his horse, and the costly jewels
that adorned him, dazzled all eyes, and it
could not have occurred to any one that in
-him they beheld the swineherd. The king
himself thought he must be his equal in
dignity, and offered him the honour of pre-
cedence. But Pista declined this distinction,
and requested, on the contrary, to be allowed
.to be the last on the list of suitors.
At last the signal was given. All pressed
to the lists, and the race began. Riders and
horses flew emulously towards the prize, but
not one succeeded in even touching either
of the apples with his lance.
Suddenly the unknown guest darted over
the course like an arrow, and hit the first
of the three apples so dexterously, that it,
together with the golden thread to which it
was fastened, remained hanging on his lance.
The gaze of all was fixed upon him; but
without vouchsafing a look on any, he flew
28





Fortune's Favourite.


with his prize straight across the lists and
disappeared.
This unexpected circumstance created uni-
versal embarrassment amongst the disconcerted
suitors, and determined the king to postpone
the remainder of the festival until the fol-
lowing day. Meanwhile he sent some of his
swiftest riders in search of the strange fugitive,
in order to discover, if possible, whence he
came. But before these were ready to start,
our knight had already become invisible, and,
in his herdsman's dress, had again rejoined
his swine.
In the evening, as usual, he brought them,
home, and attended to them in the customary
manner. But before he retired to rest, the
3 youngest of the princesses described, him, and
hastening to him, related in great agitation
the untoward event which had that day
deprived her of the apple destined to her, and
at the same time of him who should have-
been her bridegroom. The herdsman ex--
prese:.d his great sympathy, and tried to
29





Fortune's Favourite.


console her, by saying that no one could
tell whether the misfortune that had hap-
pened might not in the end turn out to
her advantage.
The next day, before the ceremonies re-
commenced, Pista was again on the heath
with his herd. This day he went to the
Silver Palace, attired himself still more
splendidly, and mounted a yet finer horse.
Swift as the wind, and resplendent in gold
and jewels, he again sprang to the lists. All
were astonished at this second apparition.
All inclined themselves before him, and no
one recognized in him the same guest who
had so distinguished himself on the pre-
ceding day.
But, as yesterday, all eyes were riveted on
him; he set spurs to his horse, and sprang
with hanging bridle to the prize, then flew
like an arrow, bearing the second apple across
the lists, and disappeared from the sight of
the astonished multitude.
The king and his illustrious guests now
30





Fortunes Favourite.

began to apprehend that some supernatural
power influenced these events, and they had
nearly determined not to renew the trial of
skill till the following year. But as already
two of the golden apples were lost, they
could not resist their curiosity respecting the
third and last. The king therefore appointed
the conclusion of the festival for the next
morning, and in the meantime endeavoured
to tranquillise himself as well as he could.
As before, so was it on this third occasion.


The herdsman had gone
and now appeared in an
on a horse, this time
Golden Palace, both of
passed the two former.
third apple, and fled, to
swift as the wind, far out
The festival was now


early to the heath,
attire, and mounted
procured from the
which infinitely sur-
He carried off the
the wonder of all,
of sight.
over; the assembly


separated; the suitors returned to their homes,
and the king lamented the fate of his beloved
daughters. The daughters shed many tears,
and mourned over their fate as an ap-
81





Fortune's Favourite.

pointment of Heaven, forbidding them ever
to have a bridegroom.
As the very first of these occurrences had
caused the king entirely to forget to pay the
herdsman his daily wages, the latter had now
three days' hire due to him. Pista therefore
availed himself of the pretext of demanding
his wages as a good opportunity to learn
what impression his three adventures had
made at court. That same evening, when he
brought home his herd, he presented himself
before the king, but apprehending that, if he
left his-three apples in the stall, they might
be purloined, he concealed them in his hat,
which he retained on his head, although in
presence of his monarch.
The king perceived this disrespectful con-
duct of his herdsman not without surprise;
but, as he was exceedingly well disposed
towards him, on account of his great services,
he indulgently asked him what he required.
Pista had scarcely prepared himself to make
his request, when the youngest, and now
32





Fortune's Favourite.


exceedingly discontented princess entered, and
with an air of highly offended pride, snatched
his hat off his head.
The golden apples fell out of it, and rolled
to the monarch's feet.
What was the astonishment of the whole
court! The princesses recognized their
names, and could not express their delight
at finding their apples. The king pressed
the youth in the most gracious terms to
explain how he had come by them.
Pista replied, with the utmost frankness,
that he was the winner of the three apples,
and therefore thought he had a full right to
one of the princesses for his bride.
Now, as the king, mindful of the un-
exampled splendour, as also the extraordinary
good fortune by which the stranger had
distinguished himself in the lists, anticipated
some still greater advantage behind the
darkness of this mysterious occurrence, he
admitted the herdsman's claim with very
little hesitation.





Fortune's Favourite.

The youngest of the princesses felt her-
self suddenly cheered, and so powerfully
attracted to the metamorphosed swineherd,
that in spite of his peasant's dress she threw
her arms around his neck. The king im-
mediately decided that he should become her
husband, and the following morning the
wedding was celebrated with the utmost
magnificence, in presence of the whole court,
at the Golden Palace in the forest, which
Pista immediately selected for his residence.
When the banquet was over, the bride-
groom commanded his faithful dragon;
who had already the day before provided a
numerous establishment of domestics of his
own winged race, immediately to bring hither
his eleven brothers, whose respective names
he had furnished him with, and had described
their persons as accurately as he could.
Before the sun went -down the eleven
brothers were seen coming at full gallop
to the Golden Palace. By the care of the
ever active dragon they were all splendidly
34





Fortune's Favourite.


dressed, and they rejoiced and wondered not
a little at the unexpected change in their
destiny.
Two of them married the sisters of their
royal sister-in-law, and the rest married the
nine daughters of the other king. They
soon conquered for themselves as many king-
doms, and lived happily together till their
dying day.








"a __-- .:'


385
















THE PROPHETIC DREAM
[Oral.]


N a little obscure village, there once dwelt
a poor shepherd, who, for many years,
supported himself and his family upon
the very trifling wages he earned by his
labour. Besides his wife he had one only
child, a boy. He had accustomed this boy,
from a very early age, to go out with him to
the pastures, and had instructed him in the
duties of a faithful shepherd, so that as the
child grew up he could entrust the flocks to
his care, whilst he himself could earn a few
pence by basket weaving. The young shep-
86






The Prophetic Dream.


herd gaily led his flocks over the fields and
pastures, whistling or singing some cheerful
song, or cracking his whip, that the time
should not pass heavily with him. At noon
he lay down at his ease by his flock, eat his
bread, and quenched his thirst at the rivulet,
and then slept for a short time before he
drove it further.
One day, when he had lain down under a
shady tree for his noontide rest, the young
shepherd slept and had a remarkable dream.
He was journeying on, far, far on-he
heard a loud clinking sound, like to a heap of
coins incessantly falling on the ground-a
thundering noise like the report of incessant
firing-he saw a countless band of soldiers,
with glittering armour and weapons-all
these sights and sounds encircled him and
resounded about him. Then he seemed to
wander on, constantly ascending a mountain
until he arrived at the summit, where a throne
was erected on which he seated himself,
leaving beside him a vacant place, which a
87





The Prophetic Dream.

beautiful woman who suddenly appeared, im-
mediately occupied. The young shepherd
still dreaming, rose up, saying in a solemn
and earnest voice :. "I am King of Spain;"
and at that moment he awoke.
Pondering on his strange dream, the youth
led on his flock, and in the evening, whilst he
assisted his parents in their work as they sat
before the cottage door cutting fodder, he
related it to them, and concluded by saying:
"Verily, if I dream that again, I will be
off to Spain to see whether I shall be made
king."
"Foolish boy," murmured the old father;
"thou be made king? Don't go and make
yourself a laughingstock."
His mother laughed outright, rubbing her
hands, and repeating in amaze, King of
Spain! king of Spain !"
The next day at noon he lay down again
under the same tree, and oh, wonder! the
same dream took possession of his senses.
He hardly had patience to watch his flock till
38





The Prophetic Dream.

evening; gladly would he have run home,
and at once set out on his journey to Spain.
When at length his work was done, he again
related his romantic dream, saying: "If I do
but dream this once again, I will go off
directly, on the very same day."
The third day he lay down again under the
same tree, and the same dream again visited
him for the third time. The youth raised
himself up in his sleep, exclaiming: "I am
King of Spain," and thereupon he awoke.
He gathered up his hat, his whip, and his
provision bag, collected his sheep, and went
back straight to the village. When he got
there the people began to chide him for
returning so long before vespers; but the
youth was so excited that he paid no heed
to the reproofs either of the neighbours or
of his parents, but packed up his Sunday
clothes, hung the bundle on a hazel stick,
and throwing it over his shoulder started off
without another word. He put his best
foot foremost, and ran so fast that one would
39





The Prophetic Dream.

have thought he hoped to reach Spain that
same night.
He got no further, however, that day than
to the borders of a forest, and not a village
nor even a solitary cottage could he descry;
so he resolved to take his night's rest in a
thick bush. He had scarcely fallen asleep
when he was disturbed by a great noise. A
company .of men, conversing loudly, passed
before the bush which he had made his bed.
The youth crept softly forward, and followed
the men at a little distance, saying to himself:
"Perhaps thou mayest still find a lodging;
where these men pass the night, thou surely
mayest also sleep." They had not gone
much further before they came to a house of
considerable dimensions, which, however, was
situated in the centre of the dark forest.
The men knocked, and were admitted, and
the young shepherd unperceived slipped in
with them into the house. Another door
was then thrown open, and they all entered a
large and very imperfectly lighted room, on
40





The Prophetic Dream.

the floor of which lay numerous trusses of
straw, beds and coverlids, which seemed
ready prepared for the men's night repose.
The shepherd boy crept quickly under a heap
of straw, which was scattered near the door,
and lay in his concealment on the look-out
for all he might see and hear. As he was a
very sharp boy, with all his senses about him,
it was not long before he made out that he
was amongst a band of robbers, whose captain
was the owner of the house. This latter,
as soon as the newly arrived members of
the band had stretched themselves on their
couches, ascended an elevated seat, and said
in a deep bass voice : My brave comrades,
give me an account of your day's work;
where you have been, and what booty you
have got!"
A tall man, with a coal-black beard, was
the first to raise himself from his bed, and
answered: My good captain, early this
morning I robbed a rich nobleman of his
leather breeches; these have two pockets,
41





The Prophetic Dream.


and as often as they are turned inside out,
and well shaken, a heap of ducats falls on
the ground."
"That sounds well, indeed!" said the
captain.
Then uprose another, and said: "I stole
from a great general his three-cornered hat;
and this hat has the property, that so long as
it is turned round upon the head shots are
fired off incessantly from its three corners."
"That's worth hearing," replied the cap-
tain; upon which a third man sat up, saying:
"I have deprived a knight of his sword, and
when you stick the point of this sword into
the earth, up starts at that very moment a
regiment of soldiers."
A brave deed," exclaimed the captain;
as the fourth robber then began: "I drew
off the boots of a traveller whilst he slept,
and whoever puts on those boots goes seven
miles at every step."
"I commend a bold deed," said the
captain, highly pleased; "hang up your
42





The Prophetic Dream.

prizes against the wall, and now eat and
drink heartily, and sleep well." So saying,
he left the sleeping apartment of the robbers,
who caroused lustily, and then slept soundly.
When all was still and the men indeep sleep,
the young shepherd stole from his hiding-
place, put on the leather breeches, set the
hat upon his head, girded on the sword, drew
on the boots, and slipped softly out of the
house. As soon as he was outside the door,
the boots, to his infinite delight, at once
manifested their magic virtue, and it was
not long before the youth entered the great
capital of Spain; it is called Madrid.
He asked the very first person he met to
direct him to the most considerable hotel in
the city; but received for answer, You
little urchin, get off with you to some place
where such as yourself lodge, and not to
where great lords dine." A shining gold
piece, however, soon made his adviser a little
more courteous, so that now he willingly con-
ducted the youth to the best hotel. Arrived
43





The Prophetic Dream.


there, he at once engaged the best apart-
ments, and said to his host: "Well, how
goes it in your city? What is the latest
news here?"
The host made a long face, and replied:
"My little gentleman, you must be indeed
quite a stranger here. It seems that you
have not yet heard that his majesty, our king,
is on the eve of departing for the wars with
an army of twenty thousand men. You
must know we have enemies, powerful
enemies. Oh, these are, indeed, dreadful
times Is your little worship disposed to join
the army ?"
"No doubt!" said the stripling, whose
countenance beamed with joy.
No sooner had the host left him, than he
quickly drew off his leather breeches, shook
out a heap of gold pieces, and purchased for
himself costly garments with arms and ac-
coutrements, dressed himself in them, and
then craved an audience of the king. As he
entered the palace, and was being conducted
44






The Prophetic Dream.

by two chamberlains through a spacious and
magnificent hall, he was met by a young and
wondrously beautiful lady, who graciously
saluted him, and whom he beheld surrounded
by courtiers, who bowed to her as he passed,
whilst they whispered to him, "That is the
princess-the king's daughter."
The young shepherd was not a little en-
raptured by the beauty of the princess; and
he was so inspired by his admiration and
delight, that he was able to speak boldly and
confidently to the monarch.
I come," said he, most humbly to offer
to your majesty my services as a warrior.
The army I bring to you shall gain the
victory for you; and it shall win for your
majesty whatever you may be pleased to
desire. But I ask of you one recompense,
namely, that if I gain the victory for you, I
may receive your lovely daughter in marriage.
Will you grant me this, my most gracious
king ?"
The king was astonished at the youth's
45





The Prophetic Dream.

bold address, and answered: Be it so-I
agree to your request. If you return home a
conqueror, you shall be my successor, and I
will give you my daughter in marriage."
The ci-devant shepherd now betook himself
all alone to the open plain, and began to
strike his sword here and there in the ground,
and in a few minutes there stood on the plain
many thousand well-armed combatants, and
the youth himself, richly armed and adorned,
sat as their leader on a noble horse decked
with gold embroidered housings and a
lustrous bridle. The young general led his
troops against the foe, and a bloody battle
was fought. Unceasing death-shots thundered
from the commander's hat, and his sword
called up one regiment after another from the
ground, so that in a few hours the enemy
was vanquished and scattered, and the flag of
victory waved above the conquered camp.
The victor pursued and conquered from his
foe a considerable portion of his country.
Victorious, and crowned with glory, he re-
46





The Prophetic Dream.


turned to Spain, where his greatest good
fortune still awaited him. The fair daughter
of the king had been no less struck by the
handsome youth whom she met in the hall,
than he had been by her; and the most
gracious monarch knew how to value duly
the great service rendered to him by the
brave young man. He kept his word-gave
him his daughter in marriage, and made him
heir to his throne.
The nuptials were celebrated with the
greatest magnificence, and he who had so
shortly before been only a shepherd youth sat
now in high estate. Soon after the wedding
the old king resigned his crown and sceptre
into the hands of his son-in-law, who, seated
proudly on the throne, with his beautiful
consort beside him, received the oath of
allegiance from his people.
Then he thought of his so quickly-fulfilled
dream and of his poor parents; and when he
was alone with his wife, he thus addressed'
her: "My beloved, know that I have
47






The Prophetic Dream.

parents living still, but they are very poor;
my father is a village herdsman, dwelling far
away in Germany, where I myself, as a boy,
looked after cattle, until a marvellous dream
revealed to me that I should become king of
Spain. Fortune has been favourable to me;
I am now a king, but I would wil ingly see
my parents also prosperous, therefore with
your kind consent I will return to my former
home, and bring my parents hither."
The young queen was well content that
her hurband should do as he proposed, so he
set off and travelled of course very fast, being
possessed of the seven-mile boots. On his
way the young monarch restored the magical
articles which he had taken trom the robbers
to their rightful owners, retaining only the
boots; he carried back \\ith him his parents,
who were almost beside themnieles for joy,
and to the former owner of the boots he gave
a dukedom in exchange for them. After
that he lived happily and worthily all the
rest of his days.
48

















THE GOLDEN DUCK.
[Bohemian.]



EEP in the bosom of a wood once stood
a little cottage, inhabited by a poor
widow. Her name was Jutta, and
she had formerly lived, in easy circumstances,
but through various misfortunes, without any
fault of her own, she had fallen into poverty.
By the labour of her hands she with
difficulty contrived to support herself, her
daughter Adelheid, and the two children of
her departed brother, Henry and Emma.
The children, who were good and pious,
especially Henry and Emma, did their utmost
T 49





The Golden Duck.

to assist her by their diligence: the girls
spun, and the boy helped the old woman to
cultivate the garden, and tended the sheep,
whose milk formed the principal part of
their daily sustenance.
One evening they were all sitting together
in the little cottage, whilst a tremendous
storm raged without. The rain poured down
in torrents, and flash after flash of lightning
followed the thunder, which broke over the
mountains, and seemed as if it would never
cease.
The old woman had just sung to the
children the song of the water-sprite who
danced with a young maiden till he drew
her down into the abyss, when suddenly
they heard a tap at the door. The startled
children: huddled close together, but the
mother took courage and opened it, when
a soft female voice begged her to give shelter
to a traveller who had been overtaken in the
forest by the storm.
The stranger was an elderly woman of a
50





The Golden Duck.

noble and dignified appearance, but so kind
and friendly in her manner that all were
anxious to show her some attention. Whilst
the widow was regretting that her poverty
did not allow her to receive such a guest in a
more worthy manner, Henry lighted the fire,
and Emma was anxious to kill her favourite
pigeons for her supper, but the lady would
not permit this, and took only a little milk.
The following morning, when Jutta and
the children awoke, they were not a little
astonished at beholding, instead of the aged
woman who had entered the hut the night
before, a youthful one of superhuman beauty,
arrayed in a magnificent dress which sparkled
with diamonds.
Know," said the stranger to the widow,
"that you yesterday received into your
dwelling no mortal, but a fairy; I always try
those mortals whom I desire to benefit, and
you have stood the trial. To little Emma I
am especially beholden, because she would
yesterday have killed for my supper what she
61





The Golden Duck.


most values, her pigeons. For this she shall
be gifted. Whenever she weeps, either for
joy or sorrow, pearls instead of tears shall
drop from her eyes, and the hairs she combs
from her head shall turn into threads of pure
gold. But beware that no ray of sun ever
shine upon her uncovered countenance, for
then a great misfortune will befall her; from
henceforth never let her go into the open air
without being covered with a veil."
The beneficent fairy having thus spoken,
vanished; but Jutta, who was desirous to
prove the truth of her words, hastily spread a
large cloth on the ground, placed the little
maiden on it, and commenced combing her
long fair locks. Immediately the hairs that
fell on the cloth became threads of gold,
and when the old woman told the child how
rich and grand she might now become, and
what pretty toys she might buy, she wept for
joy, and the most beautiful pearls rolled from
her eyes upon the linen cloth.
The next day the old woman betook her-
52





The Golden Duck.


self to the nearest town, sold the pearls and
the threads of gold, and bought a fine veil,
without which Emma was never suffered to
leave the house. She often combed the
child's hair several times in the day, telling
her all the time the prettiest tales, which
drew from her eyes abundance of tears, either
of pleasure or compassion, so that in a short
time Jutta possessed a considerable treasure in
gold and pearls.
At first she sold her treasures to Jews, and
received but little for them, as they believed
the goods were stolen. By and by, however,
when she had become possessed of a small
landed estate in the district, she traded with
jewellers and goldsmiths, who paid her ac-
cording to the value of her goods, and so
at length she collected a very considerable
treasure.
Meanwhile Adelheid and Emma grew into
young women. But the increasing wealth of
the old woman, whom her neighbours had
formerly known to be in such straitened cir-
53





The Golden Duck.


cumstances, and who knew not how she had
acquired her riches, gave occasion for envious
tongues to utter many an evil speech against
her. Still further were their curiosity and
ill-nature excited by the singular circumstance
that Emma always went about veiled, and
under these circumstances, what could be
more natural than that the greater part of
them were ready to swear without hesitation
that old Jutta was a vile witch, and ought
to be burned ?
Now although these evil speeches were
unable to do the widow any real injury, still
she was not a little vexed and annoyed when
they reached her ears, or when she perceived
that she was looked upon with suspicious and
wondering looks; and finding it impossible
by obliging and friendly conduct, or even by
conferring benefits, to win the hearts of her
neighbours, or to stop their calumnies, she
preferred to abandon altogether the place
where she had been known in indifferent cir-
cumstances, and to go far away, where her
54





The Golden Duck.


riches would not excite suspicions against her.
She therefore resolved to sell her estate, and
to take up her residence in the city of Prague.
In order, however, not to be too precipitate,
she first sent thither her nephew, Henry,
that she might become a little acquainted
with their future residence, before removing
from the former one.
So Henry went to the Bohemian capital,
and, as he was a personable youth, had good
manners, and was richly provided with
money by his aunt, so that he could live in
as good style as any of the nobles of the
land, he soon became on friendly terms
with numerous counts and other illustrious
persons. Judging by his personal ap-
pearance and expenditure, they took him for
one of their own station; nay, one of
them, a young count, became his confi-
dential friend, and, as wine often unlocks
the secrets of the heart, it happened one
day that Henry let out the whole secret
concerning his sister, quite forgetting at the
55





The Golden Duck.

moment his aunt's strict prohibition ever to
reveal it.
When the count heard so much of the
extraordinary understanding, good heart,
sweetness, and beauty of the young maiden
who was possessed of such wonderful gifts,
his heart at once glowed with love for her,
and he said with great warmth:-
I myself possess a domain of such great
value, that I am in no need of the riches
of another; but I have ever desired to have a
wife distinguished above all others for her
beauty, virtue, and other rare gifts; therefore
I offer my hand to your sister, and I swear to
you that I will do all in my power that I
may call so wonderful a maiden my own."
Henry perceived his indiscretion now that
it was too late, and he could not withstand
the earnest entreaties of his friend to obtain
for him the hand of his sister. In order,
indeed, to lose no time, the count imme-
diately caused to be constructed an entirely
closed and well-covered carriage in which to
56





The Golden Duck.


transport Emma to him, without her being
exposed to a breath of air.
Surprising as was his proposal, it was so
honourable a one, that after a few minutes'
reflection, Emma could not think of refusing
such an illustrious and amiable young man
as Henry described the count to be. The
brother, therefore, hastened back with the
news of her consent, and the count im-
mediately went to his residence, in order
to make preparations for the reception of
his bride, and for a magnificent bridal en-
tertainment.
During the interval, Emma, accompanied
by her mother and Adelheid, began her
journey, and when they had proceeded about
half-way, they came to a great forest. The
heat was oppressive, and Emma happened to
draw aside her veil, just as Jutta, in order to
look after the attendants whom the count
had sent to escort his bride on the journey,
thoughtlessly opened the door of the carriage.
No sooner did a sunbeam shine on the
57





The Golden Duck.


maiden, than she was suddenly transformed
into a golden duck, flew out of the carriage,
and vanished from the sight of her terrified
aunt.
As soon as the old woman had recovered
from her first alarm, she was greatly troubled
how to escape the wrath of the count. They
had still to traverse a considerable portion of
the forest. So she sent the servants who had
not perceived the occurrence, under some
pretext, to a village at some distance, and
during their absence she covered her own
daughter with Emma's veil. On their return
they found the old woman in great distress:
she wrung her hands, and related with well
simulated despair, that having gone with her
daughter only a few steps from the carriage,
armed men had surprised them, and carried
off her Adelheid.
The count's servants, deceived by the
despairing words and gestures of the old
woman, searched the forest, in hopes of
tracing the robbers, but as was to be ex-
58





The Goldeu Duck.

pected, without success. Meanwhile Jutta
instructed her daughter in the part she was
to play, in order that she in 'Emma's place
might become the count's wife. And as she
feared she might not be able to conceal the
cheat from Henry, she desired the servants
not to go through Prague, but to take the
direct road to the count's castle.
When they arrived, Jutta descended alone
from the carriage, carefully closed it again,
and besought the count, that until her niece
had entirely recovered from the fatigue of
the journey, he would permit them both to
occupy a chamber from which all daylight
could be excluded, and she forbade at first
any visit from the bridegroom. Impatient
as the latter was to see his bride, he yet
submitted to this delay which the old woman
so earnestly requested of him. The most
splendid apartments were now thrown open
to the mother and daughter, and the most
inner chamber of the suite was so hung with
curtains that no daylight could penetrate. In
59





The Golden Duck.


this room dwelt Jutta with her daughter,
and even Henry, who came to visit his
supposed sister, was, under pretext of her
being indisposed, not allowed to enter. As
his aunt, however, provided him with plenty
of money, and the merry life in Prague
pleased him better than the retirement of the
country, he soon returned thither.
The count, whom Jutta put off from day
to day under various pretexts from visiting
his bride, at length lost patience, and would
not be longer withheld by the gold and pearls
which Jutta continually brought him; he
forced his way into the chamber, and clasped
Adelheid in his arms.
Although the count could not but remark
that Adelheid in no degree corresponded to
the description her brother had given of her,
he was still prepared to fulfil his word, and
was therefore married, though with the
greatest privacy, to the false bride. Very
shortly, he became aware that neither her
heart nor mind possessed the excellence that
60





The Golden Duck.


had been represented to him; and in con-
sequence of this discovery, when he next
met his brother-in-law, he overwhelmed him
with reproaches. The contemptuous expres-
sions which the count used respecting his
bride, whom Henry had only known as the
loveliest and most amiable maiden in all
Bohemia, so incensed Henry, that he forgot
all the consideration due to the rich and
powerful man, and the count, who, besides
this, believed himself to have been deceived
by Henry, caused him to be seized, brought
to his castle, and thrown into a deep dungeon.
The wife of the count, who was also most
severely punished for the crime in which she
had taken part, overwhelmed her mother
with the bitterest reproaches. More than
once she was on the point of confessing the
fraud to her husband, but he drove her from
him, and would not listen to her.
Whilst these women were thus suffering
for their crime, Henry sat in his dungeon,
hopeless of ever recovering his freedom, or of
61





The Golden Duck.


being able to take vengeance on him who
had so unjustly treated him; when one day,
as he lay in despair, a sweet voice reached
him, which sang a song he had often listened
to when his sister Emma used to sing it in
former days.
The youth, who distinctly recognized his
sister's voice, uttered her name, and on
looking upwards, he saw by the light of the
moon, a duck fluttering before him, whose
feathers were of gold, and whose neck was
adorned by a costly row of pearls.
Then said the golden duck to the astonished
youth, I am thy sister Emma, who, trans-
formed into a golden duck, fly about without
a home."
She then related to her brother what had
occurred during the journey, and the decep-
tion her aunt had been guilty of. As she
thus recounted her unhappy fate, which con-
strained her to fly about unprotected, her life
exposed to the snares of the hunters, whilst
her beloved brother was languishing in prison,
62






The Golden Duck.

she wept abundantly; and the tears rolled
about the tower as costly pearls, and golden
feathers fell from her, and glittered on the
dark ground.
The brother and sister pitied and tried to
console each other. Henry especially la-
mented his talkativeness, which had brought
all this misfortune upon them. At daybreak
the duck flew away, after promising to visit
her brother every night.
After this intercourse had lasted some time,
one night she did not make her appearance,
which threw poor Henry into the greatest
anxiety, for he feared she might, for the sake
of her precious feathers, have been caught, or
perhaps even killed. Then, for the first
time, the door of his prison was opened; the
count's superintendent entered, announced
that he was free, and conducted him to the
very same apartments which he had occupied
in happier days.
Before Henry could recover from his sur-
prise, the count himself entered, tenderly
63






The Golden Duck.


embraced him, and besought his forgiveness
for all the suffering that had been inflicted
on him.
The warder of the tower, it appeared, had
remarked the golden duck, and heard with
astonishment how she spoke with a human
voice, and conversed with the prisoner; all of
which he had disclosed to the count. The
count thus discovered, by listening in secret
to their conversation, the fraud which had
imposed the false bride upon him instead of
the true and beautiful one. Vain, however,
were his efforts the following night to get the
golden duck into his power; she escaped
from all the attendants who endeavoured to
catch her; and snares and nets and all the
artifices they practised, and all the pains they
took, were of no avail.
Then the count entreated the intercession
of the brother. Since his hard fate had
robbed him of such an amiable wife, he
besought her at least in her present form to
inhabit his castle. It was possible,that his
64






The Golden Duck.

grief, his love, might move the offended fairy
to restore her to her former shape.
Henry freely forgave the count, and pro-
mised to make his request known to his sister
the next time she should visit him. Before,
however, the duck's next visit, Adelheid
expired, for the reproaches of her husband,
and her own grief and remorse, had brought
her to the grave. As soon as she was dead,
the count banished Jutta to a remote place,
and forbade her ever to appear in his presence
again. With Henry he lived on his former
friendly terms.
Both lived in hopes of the reappearance of
the golden duck. Long did they wait in
vain, and they began to fear that the en-
deavours of the count to catch her had scared
her from the place for ever, when one
afternoon, as Henry was sitting alone in the
dining-hall, she flew in at the window, and
began gathering up the scattered crumbs on
the table. How great was the brother's
joy! He addressed her by the tenderest
v 65





The Golden Duck.

names, stroked her golden feathers, and in-
quired why she had remained so long absent.
Then Emma complained of the efforts to
catch her, which the count's servants had
made, and threatened never to return should
such be repeated. The entreaty which Henry
made in the count's name that she would
dwell in the castle she decidedly rejected;
and as she heard a noise in the adjoining
chamber, she hastily flew away.
For a long time the youth hesitated
whether he should tell the count of his
sister's visit; as, however, he knew the strong
affection of his friend, and feared he might
not refrain from fresh attempts against the
liberty of the golden duck, he resolved to say
nothing about it. But the count had seen
the duck fly past, and when Henry said
nothing about it, he conceived mistrust of
him, and laid a new plan to get possession
of her.
The following morning, when Emma flew
into her brother's chamber, the window was
66





The Golden Duck.

suddenly closed, the count having fastened a
cord to it from above, and in a few moments
he entered the room thinking he had now
made sure of the much-desired prize. But
the duck fluttered about, and made her exit
through the keyhole.
Henry was much distressed, for he feared
that he should now see his beloved sister no
more, and heaped reproaches on the astonished
count, who returned them to him so liberally,
that they separated in mutual disgust, and
Henry resolved to quit the city and wander
through the wide world.
One day, after he had long travelled, he
found himself in a thick fir wood, when sud-
denly a female form of great dignity stood
before him, in whom Henry at once recog-
nised the fairy who had so richly gifted
his sister.
Wherefore," said she, with a reproachful
look, didst thou leave the castle at the time
when thy sister's ill fortune, of which thou
wert the cause, was beginning to turn to good ?
67





The Golden Duck.


Hasten back immediately, confirm the count
in the remorse for his profligate life which is
now awakening in him, and the golden duck
will then be released from her enchantment.
And not only shall she retain the wonderful
gifts she has hitherto possessed, but hence-
forth she shall no longer have to fear air
and sun-light."
The fairy disappeared, and Henry returned
full of hope to the castle. On his way
thither he met several of the count's servants,
who told him their lord had sent them out
with commands not to return until they
found him. For, they added, since Henry's
departure had left the count so lonely and
forsaken, he had fallen sick through sorrow
and longing after his friend.
When Henry entered the count's chamber,
he found him lying on his bed really ill
and unhappy. He comforted him with
the fairy's promise, and the count solemnly
vowed that he would never more return to
his wild and sinful mode of life.
68





The. Golden Duck.

Scarcely had he uttered this solemn vow,
when the window flew open of itself, the
golden duck flew into the chamber, and,
perching on the bed-post, said "The period
of my trials is completed. I may now return
to my former figure, and remain with you
for ever."
Then the golden feathers dropped from
her body; the long beak rounded into mouth
and chin, above which gazed a pair of
lovely eyes; before they could look round,
a wondrously beautiful maiden stood before
them, magnificently habited, and her joy at
being re-united to her brother and her bride-
groom drew the purest pearls from her eyes.
At the sight of her the count felt himself
at once cured of his illness; and, a few days
after, the nuptial feast was celebrated with all
the pomp and magnificence befitting the high
station and great wealth of the count.

'-''r-i_'' ~~ ,% J'


69

















THE GLASS HATCHET.
[Hungarian.]


N a remote land there dwelt, in former
days, a wealthy count. He and his
consort most ardently wished for a
child, to whom they might bequeath their
riches; but a long time passed ere their wish
was gratified. At length, after twelve weary
years, the countess bore a son; but short was
the time granted her to rejoice at the ac-
complishment of her desire, for she died the
day after the child's birth. Before she ex-
pired, she warned her husband never to allow
the child to touch the earth with his feet,





The Glass Hatchet.


for, from the moment he should do so he
would fall into the power of a bad fairy who
was on the watch for him. The countess
then breathed her last.
The boy throve well, and when he had
outgrown the age for being in the nurse's
arms, a peculiarly-formed chair was con-
structed for him, in which he could, unas-
sisted, convey himself about the garden of
his father's castle. At other times he was
carried in a litter, and most carefully attended
to and watched, in order that he might never
touch the earth with his feet.
As, however, the physicians, in order to
supply the absence of other exercise, pre-
scribed riding on horseback, he was instructed
in that art as soon as he was ten years of age,
and soon became proficient enough in it to be
allowed to ride out daily, without any ap-
prehension of danger to him being felt by his
father. On these occasions he was always
attended by a numerous suite.
He rode almost every day in the forest and
71





The Glass Hatchet.


on the plain, and returned safely home. In
this manner many years glided away; and the
warning given by the late countess almost
ceased to be dwelt upon, and the enjoined
precautions were observed rather from old
habit than from any immediate sense of their
importance.
One day the youth, with his attendants,
rode across the fields to a wood, where his
father frequently took the diversion of hunting.
The path led to a rivulet, the borders of
which were overgrown with bushes. The
riders crossed it; when suddenly a hare,
startled by the tramp of the horses, sprang
from the bush and fled through the wood.
The young count pursued, and had almost
overtaken it, when the saddle-girth of his
horse broke; saddle and rider rolled together
on the ground, and at the same moment he
vanished from the sight of his terrified at-
tendants, leaving no trace behind.
All search or enquiry was vain; and they
recognized in the misfortune the power of the






The Glass Hatchet.


evil fairy, against whom the countess had
uttered her dying warning. The old count
was deeply afflicted; but as he could do
nothing to effect the deliverance of his son,
he resigned himself to fate, and lived patiently
and solitary, in the hope that a more favour-
able destiny might yet one day rescue the
youth from the hands of his enemy.
The young count had scarcely touched the
earth before he was seized by the invisible
fairy, and carried off by her. He seemed
now transported to quite a new world, and
without a hope of ever being released from it.,
A strangely-built castle, surrounded by a
spacious lake, was the fairy's residence. A
floating bridge, which rested only on clouds,
afforded a passage across it. On the other
side were only forests and mountains, which
were constantly wrapped in a dense fog, and
in which no human voice, nor even that of
anyo their living creature was ever heard. All
around him was awful, mysterious, and
gloomy; and only on the eastern side of the
73





The Glass Hatchet.


castle, where a little promontory stretched
out into the lake, a narrow path wound
through a valley in the rocks, behind which
a river glistened.
As soon as the fairy with her captive
arrived on her territory, she commanded him
fiercely to execute all her behests with the
extremest precision, at the risk of being
punished severely for disobedience and delay.
She then gave him a glass hatchet, bidding
him cross the bridge of clouds and go into
the forest, where she expected him to cut
down all the timber before sun-set. At the
same time she warned him, on pain of her
severest displeasure, not to speak to the dark
maiden whom in all probability he would
meet in the forest.
The young count listened respectfully to
her orders, and betook himself with his glass
hatchet to the appointed place. The bridge
of clouds seemed at each step he took to
sink beneath him; but fear would not admit
of his delaying; and so he soon arrived,
74





The Glass Hatchet.


although much fatigued by his mode of pas-
sage, at the wood, where he immediately
began his work.
But he had no sooner made his first stroke
at a tree, than the glass hatchet flew into a
thousand splinters. The youth was so dis-
tressed he knew not what to do, so much did
he fear the chastisement that the cruel fairy
would inflict on him. He wandered hither
and thither, and at length, quite exhausted
by anxiety and fatigue, he sank on the
ground and slept.
After a time something roused him; when
upon opening his eyes, he beheld the black
maiden standing before him. Remembering
the prohibition he did not venture to address
her. But she greeted him kindly, and in-
quired if he did not belong to the owner of
the domain. The young count made a sign
in the affirmative. The maiden then related
that she was in like manner bound to obey
the fairy who had I'y magic transformed her
and forced her to wander in that ugly form,
75





The Glass Hatchet.


until some youth should take pity on her and
conduct her over that river beyond which
the domain of the fairy and her power did
not extend. On the further side of the river
she was powerless to harm any one who, by
swimming through the waves, should reach
the other shore.
The words inspired the young count with
so much courage, that he revealed to the
black maiden the whole of his destiny, and
asked her counsel how he might escape
punishment, since the wood was not cut
down, and the hatchet was broken.
"I know," resumed the maiden, "that the
fairy, in whose power we both are, is my
own mother; but thou must not betray that
I have told thee this, for it would cost me
my life. If thou wilt promise to deliver me,
I will assist thee, and will perform for thee
all that my mother commands thee to do."
The youth promised joyfully; she again
warned him several times not to say a word
to the fairy that should betray her, and
76





The Glass Hatchet.

then gave him a beverage, which he had
no sooner drunk then he fell into a soft
slumber.
How great was his astonishment on waking
to find the glass hatchet unbroken at his feet,
all the trees of the forest cut down and lying
round him !
He instantly hastened back across the cloud
bridge, and informed the fairy that her behest
was obeyed. She heard with much surprise
that the forest was cut down, and that the
glass hatchet was still uninjured, and being
unable to believe that he had performed all
that unassisted, she closely questioned him
whether he had seen and spoken to the black
maiden. But the count strongly denied that
he had, and affirmed that he had not once
looked up from his work. When she found
that she could learn nothing further from
him, she gave him some bread and water,
and showed him a little dark closet where
she bade him pass the night.
Almost before day-break the fairy again
77





The 'Glass Hatchet.

wakened him, assigned him for that day's
task to cleave, with the same glass hatchet,
all the wood he had felled into billets, and
then to arrange them in heaps; at the same
time she again warned him, with redoubled
threats, not to go near the black maiden,
or dare converse with her.
Although his present work was in no
respect easier than that of the preceding day,
the youth set off in much better spirits, for
he hoped for the assistance of the black
maiden. He crossed the bridge quicker and
more lightly than the day before, and had
scarcely passed it when he beheld her. She
received him with a friendly salutation; and
when she heard what the fairy had now
required of him, she said, smiling, Do not
be uneasy," and handed to him a similar
beverage to that of yesterday. The count
again fell into a deep sleep. When he awoke
his work was done; for all the trees of the
forest were cut up into blocks and arranged
in heaps.
78





The Glass Hatchet.


He returned home quickly. When the
fairy heard that he had performed this task
also, she was still more surprised than before.
She again inquired if he had seen or spoken
to the maiden; but the count had the pru-
dence to preserve his secret, and she was
again obliged to content herself with his
denial.
On the third day she set him a new task,
and this was the most difficult of all. She
commanded him to build, on the further
side of the lake, a magnificent castle, which
should consist of nothing but gold, silver, and
precious stones; and if he did not build the
said castle in less than one hour's time, he
might expect the most dreadful fate.
The count listened to her commands with-
out alarm, such was the confidence he reposed
in the black maiden. Cherrily he hastened
across the bridge, and immediately recognized
the spot where the palace was to be erected.
Pickaxes, hammers, spades, and all manner
of tools requisite for building, lay scattered
79





The Glass Hatchet.

around; but neither gold, nor silver, nor jewels
could he spy. He had, however, scarcely
begun to feel uneasy at this circumstance,
when the black maiden beckoned to him
from a rock at some distance, behind which
she had concealed herself from her mother's
searching looks. The youth hastened to her
well pleased, and besought her to assist him
in the execution of her mother's orders.
This time, however, the fairy had watched
the count from a window of her castle, and
described him and her daughter just as they
were about to conceal themselves behind the
rock. She sat up such a frightful scream,
that the mountains and the lake re-echoed
with it, and the terrified pair scarcely dared
to look out from their hiding-place, whilst
the infuriated fairy, with violent gestures and
hasty strides, her hair and garments streaming
in the wind, hastened across the bridge of
clouds. The youth gave himself up for lost;
each step of the fairy seemed to bring him
nearer to destruction. The maiden, however,
80





The Glass Hatchet.

took courage, and bade him follow her as
quickly as possible. Before they hastened
from the spot she broke a stone from the
rock, uttered a spell over it, and threw it
towards the place from which her mother
was advancing. At once a glittering palace
arose before the eyes of the fairy, which
dazzled her with its lustre, and delayed her
by the numerous windings of its avenue,
through which she was obliged to thread
her way.
Meanwhile the black maiden hurried the
count along, in order to reach the river, the
opposite bank of which alone could protect
her for ever from the persecutions of the
raging fairy. But before they had got half
way, she was again so near them that her
imprecations, and even the rustling of her
garments reached their ears.
The terror of the youth was extreme; he
dared not to look behind him, and had
scarcely power left to advance. At every
breath he fancied that he felt the hand of the


81


x





The Glass Hatchet.


terrible fairy on his neck. Then the maiden
stopped, again uttered a spell, and was at
once transformed into a pond, whilst the
count swam upon its waters under the figure
of a drake.
The fairy, incensed to the utmost at this
new transformation, called down thunder and
hail on the two fugitives; but the water
refused to be disturbed, and whilst it remained
calm no thunder-cloud would approach it.
She now employed her power to cause the
pond to vanish from the spot: she pronounced
a magic spell, and called up a hill of sand at
her feet, which she intended should choke
up the pond. But the sand-hill drove the
water still further on, and seemed rather to
augment than diminish it. When the fairy
found this would not answer, and that her
art failed so entirely, she had recourse to
cunning. She threw a heap of golden nuts
into the pond, hoping thereby to entice the
drake, and catch him; but he snapped at the
nuts with his bill, pushed them all back to
82





The Glass Hatchet.


the margin, dived here and there, and made
game of the fairy in various ways.
Finding herself again cheated, and un-
willing to see the reflection of her face in the
pond, glowing, as it was, with rage and
mortification, she turned back full of fury to
devise some other stratagem by which to
catch the fugitives.
She concealed herself behind the very same
rock which had served them for a place of
refuge, and watched for the moment when
they should both resume their natural form
in order to pursue their way.
It was not long before the maiden disen-
chanted herself, as well as the count, and as
they could nowhere perceive their persecutor,
they both hastened in good spirits to the river.
But scarcely had they proceeded a hundred
paces, when the fairy burst out again after
them with redoubled speed, shaking at them
the dagger with which she meant to pierce
them both. But she was doomed to see her
intentions again frustrated and derided; for





The Glass Hatchet.

just as she thought she had reached the
flying pair, a marble chapel rose before her,
in the narrow portal of which stood a colossal
monk, to prevent her entrance.
Foaming with passion she struck at the
monk's face with her dagger, but behold, it
fell into shivers at her feet. She was beside
herself with desperation, and raved at the
chapel till the columns and dome resounded.
Then she determined to annihilate the whole
building and the fugitives with it at once.
She stamped thrice, and the earth began to
quake. A hollow murmur like that of a
rising tempest was heard from below, and
the monk and chapel began to totter.
As soon as she perceived this, she retired
to some distance behind the edifice, that she
might not be buried under its ruins. But she
was again deceived in her expectations; for
she no sooner retired from the steps, than the
monk and chapel disappeared, and an awful
forest surrounded her with its black shade,
whence issued a terrible sound of the mingled
84





The Glass Hatchet.


bellowing, roaring, howling and baying of
wild bulls, bears, and wolves.
Her rage gave way to terror at this new
apparition, for she dreaded every moment
to be destroyed by these creatures, who all
seemed to set her power at defiance. She
therefore deemed it most prudent to work
her way back through bush and briar to-
wards the lighter side of the forest, in order
from thence again to try her might and
cunning against the hated pair.
Meantime, both had pursued their way
to the river with their utmost speed. As
this river resisted all kind of enchantment,
consequently it was hostile to the black
maiden whose hour of deliverance had not
yet struck, and it might have proved fatal to
her; she therefore did not let the moment
for her complete disenchantment escape, but
reminded the youth of his promise. She
gave him a bow and arrows and a dagger,
and instructed him in the use he was to
make of these weapons.
85





The Glass Hatchet.

She then vanished from his sight, and at
the moment of her disappearance a raging
boar rushed upon him, menacing to rip him
up. But the youth took courage and shot an
arrow at him with such good aim, that it
pierced the animal's skull. It fell to the
ground, and from its jaws sprang a hare,
which fled as on the wings of the wind along
the bank of the river. The youth again bent
his bow, and stretched the hare on the earth,
when a snow-white dove rose into the air,
and circled round him with friendly cooings.
As by the directions he had received from the
black maiden he was equally forbidden to
spare the dove, he sent another arrow from
his bow, and brought it down. Approaching
to examine it more closely, he found in its
place an egg, which spontaneously rolled to
his feet.
The final transformation now drew near.
A powerful vulture sailed down upon him
with wide stretched beak threatening him
with destruction. But the youth seized the
86





The Glass Hatchet.

egg, waited till the bird approached him,
and cast it into its throat. The monster at
once disappeared, and the loveliest maiden
the count had ever beheld stood before his
delighted eyes.
Whilst these events were occurring, the
fairy had worked her way out of the forest,
and now adopted her last means of reaching
the fugitives in case they should not already
have passed the river. As soon as she
emerged from the forest, she called up her
dragon-drawn car and mounted high in the
air. She soon described the lovers, with in-
terlaced arms, swimming easily as a couple of
fish towards the opposite bank.
Swift as lightning she bore down with her
dragon-car, and regardless of all peril, she
endeavoured to reach them, even though
they were in the river. But the hostile
stream drew down the car into its depths,
and dashed her about with its waves until
she hung upon the bushes a prey to its finny
inhabitants. Thus the lovers were finally
87






The Glass Hatchet.


rescued. They hastened to the paternal
castle, where the old count received them
with transport. The following day their
nuptials were celebrated with great mag-
nificence, and all the inhabitants far and
near rejoiced at the happy event.












-r ,

V' -*t. .', r j


88


















THE COURAGEOUS FLUTE-PLAYER.
[A traditional tale in Franconia,]



HERE lived once a gay-hearted musician,
i who played the flute in a masterly
style, and earned his living by wander-
ing about, and playing on his instrument in
all the towns and villages he came to. One
evening he arrived at a farm-house, and
resolved to stay there, as he could not reach
the next village before night-fall. The
farmer gave him a very friendly reception,
made him sit down at his own table, and
after supper requested him to play him an
89





The Courageous Flute-Player.


air on his flute. When the musician had
finished, he looked out of the window, and
saw by the light of the moon, at no great
distance from the farm, an ancient castle,
which was partly in ruins.
"What old castle is that?" said the
musician; "and to whom did it belong ?"
The farmer than related to him, that many,
many years ago, a count had dwelt there,
who was very rich, but also very avaricious.
He had been very harsh to his vassals, had
never given any alms to the poor, and had
finally died without heirs, as his avarice had
deterred him from marrying. His nearest
relations had then taken possession of the
castle, but had not been able to discover any
money whatever in it. It was, therefore,
supposed that he must have buried the
treasure, and that it must still be lying con-
cealed in some part of the old castle. Many
persons had gone into the castle in hopes of
finding the treasure, but no one had ever
appeared again; and on this account the
90






The Courageous Flute-Player.

authorities of the village had forbidden any
access to it, and had seriously warned all
people throughout the country against going
there.
The musician listened attentively, and
when the farmer had finished his narration,
he expressed the most ardent desire to go
into the castle, for he had a brave heart, and
knew not fear.. The farmer, however, en-
treated him earnestly, even on his knees, to
have regard for his young life, and not to
enter the castle. But prayers and entreaties
were vain: the musician was not to be
shaken in his resolution. Two of the
farmer's men were obliged to light a couple
of lanterns and accompany the courageous
musician to the old and dreaded castle.
When he reached it, he sent them home
again with one of the lanterns, and taking the
other in his hand, he boldly ascended a long
flight of steps. Arrived at the top, he found
himself in a spacious hall, which had doors
on all sides. He opened the first he came
91





The Courageous Flute-Player.


to, entered a chamber, and seating himself
at an old-fashioned table, placed his light
thereon, and began playing on his flute.
Meanwhile, the farmer could not close his
eyes all night, through anxiety for his fate,
and often looked out of the window towards
the tower, and rejoiced exceedingly when he
heard each time his guest still making sweet
music. But when, at length, the clock
against the wall struck eleven, and the flute-
playing ceased, he became dreadfully alarmed,
believing no otherwise than that the ghost, or
devil, or whoever it might be that inhabited
the castle, had, doubtless, twisted the poor
youth's neck. The musician, however, had
continued playing without fear until he was
tired, and at length finding himself hungry,
as he had not eaten much at the farmer's, he
walked up and down the room, and looked
about him. At last he spied a pot full of
uncooked lentils, and on another table stood
a vessel full of water, another full of salt, and
a flask of wine. He quickly poured the





The Courageous Flute-Player.


water over the lentils, added the salt, made a
fire in the stove, as there was plenty of wood
by the side of it, and began to cook soup.
Whilst the lentils were stewing, he emptied
the flask of wine, and began playing again on
his flute. As soon as the lentils were ready,
he took them off the fire, shook them into
the plate that stood ready on the table, and
eat heartily of them. He then looked at his
watch, and saw it was about eleven o'clock.
At that moment the door suddenly flew open,
and two tall black men entered, carrying on
their shoulders a bier, on which lay a coffin.
Without uttering a word, they placed the
bier before the musician, who did not in-
terrupt himself in his meal on account of
them, and then they went out again at the
same door, as silently as they had come in.
As soon as they were gone the musician
hastily rose from his seat, and uncovered the
coffin. A little old and shrivelled man, with
grey hair and a grey beard, lay therein; but
the young man felt no fear, and lifting him
93





The Courageous Flute-Player.

out of the coffin, placed him by the stove,
and no sooner did the body become warm,
than life returned to it. Then the musician
became quite busy with the old man, gave
him some of the lentils to eat, and even fed
him as a mother does her child. At last the
old man became quite animated, and said to
him, "Follow me!"
The little old man led the way, and the
young flutist, taking his lantern, followed
without trepidation. They descended a long
and dilapidated flight of steps, and at last
arrived in a deep gloomy vault.
On the ground lay a great heap of money.
Then the little man said to the youth,
"Divide this heap for me into two equal
portions; but mind that thou leave not any-
thing over, for if thou dost I will deprive
thee of life!"
The youth merely smiled in reply, and
immediately began to count out the money
upon two great tables, laying a piece al-
ternately on each, and so in no long time
94





The Courageous Flute-Player.

he had separated the heap into two equal
portions; but just at the last he found there
was one kreutzer over. After a moment's
thought he drew out his pocket-knife, set the
blade upon the kreutzer, and striking it with
a hammer that was lying there, cut the coin
in half. When he had thrown one half on
each of the heaps, the little man became
right joyous, and said: "Thou courageous
man, thou hast released me! It is now
already a hundred years that I have been
doomed to watch my treasure, which I
collected out of avarice, until some one should
succeed in dividing the money into two equal
portions. Not one of the many who have
tried could do it; and I was obliged to
strangle them all. One of the heaps of
gold is thine; distribute the other among
the poor. Thou happy man, thou hast
released me!"
When he had uttered these words, the
little man vanished. The youth, however,
re-ascended the steps, and began again to
95




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