• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Red Riding-Hood
 Puss in boots
 Old mother Hubbard
 Cock Robin
 Jack & the bean-stalk
 Tom Thumb
 Back Cover






Group Title: Warne's national nursery library : comprising Red Riding-Hood, Puss-in-Boots, Mother Hubbard, Cock Robin's death, Jack and the bean-stalk, Tom Thumb : with forty-eight pages of coloured illustrations
Title: Warne's national nursery library
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00066157/00001
 Material Information
Title: Warne's national nursery library comprising Red Riding-Hood, Puss-in-Boots, Mother Hubbard, Cock Robin's death, Jack and the bean-stalk, Tom Thumb : with forty-eight pages of coloured illustrations
Uniform Title: Little Red Riding Hood
Puss in Boots
Cock Robin
Jack and the beanstalk
Tom Thumb
Alternate Title: National nursery library
Physical Description: 52 leaves, 48 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Martin, Sarah Catherine, 1768-1826
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Scribner, Welford & Armstrong ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick Warne & Co.
Scribner, Welford, and Armstrong
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: [1873?]
 Subjects
Subject: Fairy tales   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( lcsh )
Cock Robin (Fictitious character) -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1873   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1873   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1873
Genre: Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Restriction: FOR USE IN OSBORNE COLLECTION ONLY. NOT AVAILABLE FOR INTERLOAN.
Citation/Reference: Osborne catalogue,
General Note: One of 6 volumes in the National nursery library, published from 1872-1880.
General Note: On front chromolithographed board: The Red Riding Hood issue--One shilling. Uniform--The Cinderella vol.
General Note: Printed on one side of leaf only, each printed page facing a colour plate.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement on back printed board has caption: New books, 1872-73.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00066157
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002229417
notis - ALG9739
oclc - 63086477

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Preface
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    Red Riding-Hood
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Puss in boots
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Old mother Hubbard
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Cock Robin
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Jack & the bean-stalk
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Tom Thumb
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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NATIONAL

NURSERY LIBRARY.






WARNED'S


NATIONAL


NURSERY LIBRARY,

COMPRISING


RED RIDING-HOOD.
PUSS-IN-BOOTS.
MOTHER HUDBARD.


CocK ROBIN'S DEATH.
JACK AND BEAN-STALK.
Tom THUMB.


WITH


FORTY-EIGHT PAGES OF COLOURED ILLUSTRA TIONS.









FREDERICK WARNE & CO.,
BErDcrD. STREET, COVrENT GARDEN.
NEW YORK: ScRIBNER, WELFORD, AND ARMSTRONG.









PREFA CE.


THE Publishers, in this volume of-the
NATIONAL NURSERY LIBRARY, offer their
young readers "Red Riding- Hood,"
" Puss in Boots," Mother Hubbard,"
"Cock Robin's Death," "Jack and
the Bean-stalk," and "Tom Thumb,"
with new pictures, believing that the
tales which have delighted the children
of all ages will be equally welcome in
nurseries of the present day.
















CONTENTS.



RED RIDING-HOOD.
Puss-IN-BooTs.
MOTHER HUBBARD.

CocK RolIN'S DEATH.
JACK AND THE BEAN STALK.
Tom THUMB.





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RED RIDING-HOOD.

ONCE upon a time there lived on the
borders of a great forest a woodman
and his wife who had one little
daughter, a sweet, kind child, whom
every one loved. She was the joy of
her mother's heart, and to please her,
the good woman made her a little
scarlet cloak and hood, and the child
looked so pretty in it that everybody
called her Little Red Riding-Hood.
One day her mother told her she
meant to send her to her grandmother
-a very old woman who lived in the
heart of the wood-to take her some
fresh butter and new-laid eggs and a
nice cake. Little Red Riding-Hood
was very pleased to be sent on this
errand, for she liked to do kind things,












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RED RIDING HOUD IPRIPAURIG FOR HER JOURNEY.


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LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD GATHERING FLOWERS.






Red Riding-Hood.
and it was so very long since she had
seen her grandmother that she had
almost forgotten what the dame looked
like.
THE WOLF.
THE sun was shining brightly, but it
was not too warm under the shade of
the old trees, and Red Riding-Hood
sang with glee as she gathered a great
bunch of wild flowers to give to her
grandmother. She sang so sweetly
that a cushat dove flew down from a
tree and followed her. Now, it hap-
pened that a wolf, a very cruel, greedy
creature, heard her song also, and
longed to eat her for his breakfast, but
he knew Hugh, the woodman, was at
work very near, with his great dog, and
he feared they might hear Red Riding-
Hood cry out, if he frightened her,
and then they would kill him. So he
came up to her very gently and said,
"Good day, Little Red Riding-Hood;
where are you going?"





Red Riding-Hood.
"To see my grandmother," said
the child, and take her a present from
mother of eggs and butter and cake."
Where does your grandmamma
live?" asked the wolf.
Quite in the middle of the wood,"
she replied.
Oh! I think I know the house.
Good day, Red Riding-Hood." And
the wolf ran off as fast as he could
go.

AT PLAY IN THE WOOD.
LITTLE Red Riding-Hood was not in
a hurry, and there were many things
to amuse her in the wood. She ran
after the white and yellow butterflies
that danced before her, and sometimes
she caught one, but she always let it
go again, for she never liked to hurt
any creature.
And then there were the merry,
cunning little squirrels to watch, crack-
ing nuts on the branches of the old
trees, and every now and then a rabbit

















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THE WOLF FOLLOWS LIT I'LE RE~D RIDING H-OOD.


















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LITTLE RED RI DIING HOOD CATCHING BIJ TTE RFLIES




Red Riding-Hood.
would hurry away through the tall
ferns, or a great bee come buzzing near
her, and she would stop to watch it
gathering honey from the flowers, and
wild thyme. So she went on very
slowly. By-and-by she saw Hugh, the
woodman. "Where are you going,
Little Red Riding-Hood," said he,
' all alone?"
I am going to my grandmamma's,"
said the child. Good day; I must
make haste now, for it grows late."

GRANDMOTHER AND THE WOLF.
WHILE Little Red Riding-Hood was
at play in the wood, the great wolf
galloped on as fast as he could to the
old woman's house. Grandmother lived
all by herself, but once or twice a-day
a neighbour's child came to tidy her
house and get her food. Now, grand-
mother was very feeble, and often kept
her bed ; and it happened that she was
in bed the day Little Red Riding-Hood





Red Riding-Hood.
went to see her. When the wolf
reached the cottage door he tapped.
"Who is there?" asked the old
dame.
Little Red-Riding Hood, granny,"
said the wolf, trying to speak like the
child.
"Come in, my dear," said the old
lady, who was a little deaf. Pull the
string and the latch will come up."
The wolf did as she told him, went
in, and you may think how frightened
poor grandmother was when she saw
him standing by her bed instead of
Little Red Riding-Hood.

RED RIDING-HOOD AT THE DOOR.
VERY soon the wolf, who was quite
hungry after his run, eat up poor grand-
mother. Indeed, she was not enough
for his breakfast, and so he thought he
would like to eat sweet Red Riding-
Hood also. Therefore he dressed him-
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THE WOLF AT THE GRANDMOTHER'S COTTAGE.


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RED RIDING HOOD AT HER GRANDMOTHER'S DOOR.


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Red Riding-Hood.
bed, and waited for the child to knock
at the door. But he waited a long time.
By and by Little Red Riding-Hood
reached her grandmother's house, and
tapped at the door.
Come in," said the wolf, in a
squeaking voice. Pull the string, and
the latch will come up."
Red Riding-Hood thought grand-
mother must have a cold, she spoke so
hoarsely; but she went in at once, and
there lay her granny, as she thought, in
bed.
If you please, grandmamma,
mother sends you some butter and
eggs," she said.
"Come here, dear," said the wicked
wolf, and let me kiss you," and Red
Riding-Hood obeyed.

THE WOLF AND THE CHILD.
BUT when Red Riding-Hood saw the
wolf she felt frightened. She had
nearly forgotten grandmother, but she
did not think she had been so ugly.





Red Riding-Hood.
Grandmamma," she said, what a
great nose you have."
"All the better to smell with, my
dear," said the wolf.
"And, grandmamma, what large ears
you have."
"All the better to hear with, my
dear."
"Ah grandmamma, and what large
eyes you have."
All the better to see with, my dear,"
said the wolf, showing his teeth, for
he longed to eat the child up.
Oh, grandmamma, and what great
teeth you have! said Red Riding-
Hood.
"All the better to eat you up with,"
growled the wolf, and, jumping out of
bed, he rushed at Red Riding-Hood
and would have eaten her up, but just
at that minute the door flew open and
a great dog tore him down. The wolf
and the dog were still fighting when
Hugh, the woodman, came in and killed
the wicked wolf with his axe.



















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LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD DISCOVERS THE WOLF.



















































DEATH OF THE WOLF.





Red Riding Hood.


DEATH OF THE WOLF.
LITTLE Red Riding-Hood threw her
arms round the woodman Hugh's neck
and kissed him, and thanked him again
and again.
"Oh, you good, kind Hugh," she
said, "how did you know the wolf
was here, in time to save me?"
"Well," said Hugh, when you were
gone by, I remembered that a wolf had
been seen about the wood lately, and I
thought I would just come after you
and see if you were safe. When we
came near grandmother's house Trim
sniffed and ran to the door and
whined, and then he pushed it open-
you had not shut it close-and rushed
in, and I followed him, and between
us we have killed the wolf."
Then Hugh took the child home,
and her mother and father could not
thank him enough for saving Little
Red Riding-Hood.





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PUSS IN BOOTS.

ONCE upon a time there was a miller
who had three sons. When he died he
left his mill to the eldest son, his ass
to the second son, and his cat to the
youngest, who had always been his
favourite.
The two eldest sons resolved to live
together; but they would not let their
brother live with them, because he had
only a cat. So the poor lad was very
sorrowful, and wondered what he should
do to get his bread. While he was
sitting thinking about it, Puss jumped
up on the table, and touched him with
her paw.
My dear master," she said, do
not fret. I will get your living for you.
Only you must buy me a pair of boots
and give me a bag."







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PUSS CONSOLING THIf: MILLER'S SON.

































































PUSS CATCHING THE RABBITS.


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Puss in Boots.


The miller's son had very little
money, but he thought it such a won-
derful thing to hear a cat talk that he
could not refuse her request. So he
took Puss to the shoemaker's, and got
him to make her a very smart pair of
boots, and then he gave her a nice large
bag.
THE RABBIT WARREN.
Now, not far from the mill there was a
rabbit warren, and Puss resolved to
catch some rabbits for dinner. So she
put some lettuce leaves and fine parsley
into her bag, went into the warren, and
held the bag very quietly open, hiding
herself behind it. And little greedy
rabbits, who knew no better, ran into it,
to have a feast. Directly they were
safe in, Puss pulled the string of the
bag, and carried them off to her
master. The miller's son killed them,
and cooked one for dinner; but Puss
took away the other, which was a very
fine one, and hung it up for their next
day's meal.





Puss in Boots.
But although their larder was thus
provided, early the next day Puss took
her bag and went again into the warren,
and in the same manner caught two
more fine young rabbits. But instead
of carrying them home she walked to
the king's palace and knocked at the
door.

PUSS AT THE PALACE.
THE king's porter asked who was
there. "I have brought a present to the
king," said Puss. Please let me see
his majesty."
The porter let her in, and when Puss
came into the king's presence she made
a low bow, and, taking a fine rabbit out
of her bag, said, My Lord Marquis
of Carrabas sends this rabbit to your
majesty with his respects."
I am much obliged to the marquis,"
said the king, and he ordered his head
cook to dress the rabbit for dinner.
By the king's side sat his daughter,
a very beautiful lady. She ordered one















































PUSS MAKES' A PRESENT TO THE KING.


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PUSS CALLS ON THE OGRE.





Puss in Bools.


of the attendants to give Puss a good
cup of cream, which she liked very
much; and she went home and told her
master all she had done. The miller's
son laughed; but every morning Puss
caught a rabbit, and carried it to the
palace with the same message.

THE OGRE.
Now, in that country there lived a
cruel ogre, who used to eat children,
so everybody was afraid of him; but
nobody could kill him, he was such a
giant. One day Puss went to call on
him. He received her civilly, for he
did not care to eat cats, so Puss sat
down, and began to talk:-" I hear,"
she said, great Ogre, that you are so
clever, that you can turn yourself into
any creature you please."
"Yes, so I can," said the ogre.
Dear me," said Puss, how much
I should like to see your ogreship do
it."
Then the ogre, who liked to show





Puss in Boots.
how clever he was, turned himself into
a lion, and roared so loudly that Puss
was quite frightened, and jumped out
of the way. Then he changed back
into an ogre again. Puss praised him
a great deal, and then said, Can
your ogreship become a small animal
as well as a large one? "
Oh, yes," said the vain ogre; and
he changed himself into a little mouse.
Directly Puss saw him in this form
she jumped at him and killed him on
the spot.
THE MARQUIS OF CARRABAS.
THEN Puss ran home and bade her-
master go and bathe in the river, and
he should see what she would do for
him. The miller's son obeyed; and
while he was in the water, Puss took
away all his clothes, and hid them
under a large stone. Now, the king's
carriage came in sight soon after, just
as Puss had expected, for he always
drove in that direction, and directly she
















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PUSS ASKS HELP FOR HIS MASTER.


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PUSS THREATENS THE REAPERS.


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Puss in Boots.


saw it, she began to cry very loudly,
" Help, help, for my Lord the Marquis
of Carrabas." The king put his head
out, and asked what was the matter.
Oh, your majesty," said Puss, "my
master the marquis was bathing, and
some one has taken away his clothes.
He will catch the cramp and be
drowned."
Then the king ordered one of his
attendants to ride back to the palace
and get a suit of his own clothes for
the marquis, "who had so often sent
him gifts," he said. And when they
were brought, Puss took them to her
master, and helped him to dress in
them.

PU88 FRIGHTENS THE REAPERS.
THE miller's son looked quite like a
gentleman in the king's clothes, and
when he went to thank his majesty for
them, the king asked him to get into
the coach and he would drive him
home. Then Puss told the coachman





Puss in Boots.


where to go, and ran on before and came
to some reapers. Reapers," said she,
" if the king asks you whose field this
is, say it belongs to the Marquis of
Carrabas; if you don't say so, you
shall be chopped up as small as mince-
meat."
The reapers were so frightened that
they promised to obey her. And she
ran on and told all the other labourers
on the roa'[ to say the same. So when
the king asked "To whom do these
fine fields belong ? the reapers an-
swered, To the Marquis of Carrabas."
The herdsmen said the same of the
cattle, and the king, turning to the
miller's son, said, My lord, you have
a fine property." But all had belonged
really to the ogre, for it was to his
castle the cunning cat had told the
coachman to drive.

THE CASTLE.
AT last the coach stopped at the Ogre's
castle, and Puss came out, and bo vinr












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THE KING AND PRINCESS VISIT THE MARQUIS.


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MARRIAGE OF THE MARQUIS AND PRINCESS.


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Puss in Boots.
very low, said, "Your majesty and the
princess are welcome to the castle of my
Lord Marquis of Carrabas."
The king was delighted, for it was
indeed a very nice castle, full of riches.
They sat down to a great feast, which
Puss ordered to be served, and the
king was so pleased with the miller's
son and thought him such a good
match for the princess, that he invited
him to court, and in a little while gave
him his daughter for his wife, and
made him a prince.
You may be quite sure that the
miller's son was very grateful to Puss
for his good fortune, and she never
had to catch mice for her dinner any
more, for dainty meat and the best
cream were every day given to Puss in
Boots.


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OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.


Old Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard
To get her poor Dog a bone;
But when she came there
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor Dog had none.

She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back
The poor Dog looked dead.











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OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER DOG.


























































THE DOG LOOKING DEAD.


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Old Mother Hubbard.



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She went to the hatter's
To buy him a hat,
But when she came back
He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber's
To buy him a wig,
But when she came back
He was dancing a jig.





Old Mother H ubbard.







She went to the joiner's
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The poor Dog was laughing.

She took a clean dish
To get him some tripe,
But when she came back
He was'smoking a pipe.















































THE DOG SMOKING A PIPE.










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THE DOG STANDING ON HIS HEAD.


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Old Mother Hubbard.


She went to the ale-house
To get him some beer,
But when she came back
The Dog sat in a chair.

She went to the tavern
For white wine and red,
But when she came back
The Dog stood on his head.





Old Mothey Hubbard.


She went to the fruiterer's
To buy him some fruit,
But when she came back
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor's,
To buy him a coat,
But when she came back
He was riding a goat.











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THE DOG PLAYING THE FLUTE.

















































THE DOG SPINNING.





Old Mother Hubbard


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She went to the sempstress
To buy him some linen,
But when she came back
The Dog was a-spinning.

She went to the hosier's
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back
He was dressed in his clothes.





Old AMo/ker Hubbard.


She went to the cobbler's
To buy him some shoes,
But when she came back
He was reading the news.

The Dame made a curtsey,
The Dog made a bow;
The Dame said, *" Your servant; "
The Dog said, Bow-wow! "




























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THE DOG READING THE NEWS.


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THE DOG MADE A BOW.


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Old Moler Hubbard.


This wonderful Dog
Was Dame Hubbard's delight;
He could sing, he could dance,
He could read, he could write.

So she gave him rich dainties
Whenever he fed,
And erected a monument
When he was dead.



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COCK ROBIN,


Who killed Cock Robin?
I, said the Sparrow,
With my bow and arrow.
I killed Cock Robin.



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THE SPARROW, COCK ROBIN, AND THE FISH.

















































THE LINNET, THE DOVE, AND COCK ROBIN.





Cock Robin.


Who saw him die?
I, said the Fly,
With my little eye.
I saw him die.

Who caught his blood?
I, said the Fish,
With my little dish.
I caught his blood.





Cock Robin.


Who'll carry him to the grave ?
I, said the Kite,
If it's not in the night.
I'll carry him to the grave.

Who'll carry the link?
I, said the Linnet,
I'll fetch it in a minute.
I'll carry the link.







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TIE KITE AND COCK ROBIN.









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THE OWL, THE BEETLE, AND COCK ROBIN.




Cock Robiz.


Who'll make his shroud ?
I, said the Beetle,
With my thread and needle.
I'll make his shroud.

Who'll dig his grave?
I, said the Owl,
With my spade and shovel.
I'll dig his grave.


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Cock Robin.





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Who'll toll the bell?
I, said the Bull,
Because I can pull.
I'll pull the bell.





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THE BULL TOLLING THE BELL
















































TIE OO(K AND THE LARK.


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Cock Robinz.


Who'll be the Parson?
I, said the Rook,
With my little book.
I'll be the Parson.

Who'll be the Clerk?
I, said the Lark,
If it's not in the dark.
I'll be the Clerk.






Cock Robin.


"--.' ," -''. ' ,lk---'CJ_. '-i - ,- ,,



Who'll be chief mourner?
I, said the Dove,
For I mourn for my love.
I'll be chief mourner.

Who'll sing a psalm ?
I, said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush.
I'll sing a psalm.









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THE THRUSH.


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SIGHING AND SOBBING FOR POOR COCK ROBIN.




Cock Robin.


All the birds of the air
. Fell a-sighing and sobbing
When they heard the bell toll
For poor Cock Robin.












JACK & THE BEAN-STALK.

ONCE upon a time there was a poor widow
who lived in a little cottage with her only
son Jack.
Jack was a giddy, thoughtless boy, but
very kind-hearted and affectionate. There
had been a hard winter, and after it the poor
woman had suffered from fever and ague.
Jack did no work as yet, and by degrees they
grew dreadfully poor. The widow saw that
there was no means of keeping Jack and her-
self from starvation but by selling her cow;
so one morning she said to her son, I am
too weak to go myself, Jack, so you must
take the cow to market for me, and sell her."
Jack liked going to market to sell the cow
very much; but as he was on the way, he
met a butcher who had some beautiful beans
in his hand. Jack stopped to look at them,
and the butcher told the boy that they were
of great value, and persuaded him to sell the
















A 9'


JACK SELLS A COW FOR SOME BEANS.













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THE BEAN-STALK GROWS OUT OF SIGHT IN
A NIGHT.


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.ack aind te Bean-sla/k.
cow for them And Jack was so silly as to
consent to this foolish bargain.
When he brought them home to his mother
instead of the money she expected for her
nice cow, she was very vexed and shed many
tears, scolding Jack for his folly. He was
very sorry; but, he said, he might as well
make the best of his bargain, so he put the
seed-beans into the ground close by the side
of the steep hill under shelter of which their
cottage was built, and went to bed. The
next morning when he got up, he found that
the beans had grown, till the bean-stalks
reached right over the top of the hill, and
were lost to his sight. Greatly surprised, he
called his mother, and they both gazed in
silent wonder at the bean-stalk, which was
not only of great height, but was thick enough
to bear Jack's weight.
"I wonder where it goes ?" said Jack to
his mother; I think I will climb up and
see.
His mother wished him not to venture up
this strange ladder, but Jack coaxed her to
give her consent to the attempt, for he was
certain there must be something wonderful
in the bean-stalk.
Jack instantly began to climb, and went





Yack and the Bean-stalk.
up and up on the ladder-like bean till every-
thing he had left behind' him, the cottage, the
village, and even the tall church tower, looked
quite little, and still he did not see the top of
the bean-stalk.
Jack felt a little tired, and thought for a
moment that he would go back again; but he
was a very persevering boy, and he knew
that the way to succeed in anything is not to
give up. So after resting for a moment he
went on, and at last reached the top of the
bean, and found himself in a beautiful country,
finely wooded; and not far from the place
where he had got off the bean-stalk stood a
fine and strong castle.
Jack wondered very much that he had
never heard of or seen this castle before; but
when he reflected on the subject, he saw that
it was as much separated from the village by
the perpendicular rock on which it stood as
if it were in another land.
While Jack was standing looking at the
castle, a very strange-lc.. .ii, woman came
out of the wood and advanced towards him.
Jack took off his hat to the old lady, and
she said, pointing to the castle, Boy, that
castle belongs to you. A wicked giant killed
your father, and took it from your mother;
































































































JACK CLUMBs THE BIEAN-STALK.


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JACK ASKS ABOUT THE CASTLE.





Yack and the Bean-stalk.
try and win it back from the monster who
now has it." As she ceased speaking she
suddenly disappeared, and of course Jack
knew she was a fairy.
He was much surprised; however, he
walked up to the castle door and knocked,
and an old giantess came out. She did not
wait till he spoke, but pulled him in at once,
for she thought he would make a nice supper
for her when her husband was asleep. Just
at that moment, however, she heard the giant's
step approaching, so she put Jack into a press,
and told him to hide there, or the giant would
eat him. As soon as the Ogre came in, he
cried in a terrible voice :
"Fee, fa, fie, fo, fum,
I smell the breath of an Englishman."
"Oh !" said his wife, "there is nobody
here. You only smell a crow that is flying
over the chimney." Then the giant sat down
to dinner, which was .quite ready, and when
he had eaten a whole sheep, he said, Bring
me my hen."
The giantess brought a hen, and put it on
the table before him, and then she went away.
Lay," said the giant to the hen, and she
laid a golden egg. Jack could see quite
plainly through a little hole which he had





ack anid the Bean-stalk.
bored in the door. Three times the giant
said "Lay," and each time the hen laid a
solid gold egg. Then the Ogre, being drowsy,
shut his eyes, and soon snored very loudly.
Directly Jack found that the giant was asleep,
he stole out of the press, .::n.igi up the hen,
ran out of the room, opened the door of the
castle, which the giant had left ajar, and de-
scended the bean-stalk as fast as he could go.
His mother was glad to see him again, and
much surprised at seeing the hen, which laid
them three gold eggs every day. jack's
mother took them to the next town and sold
them, and soon grew quite rich. Some time
afterwards Jack made another journey up the
bean-stalk to the giant's castle; but first he
dyed his hair and disguised himself. The
old woman did not know him again, and
dragged him in as she had done before to eat
him by-and-by; but once more she heard
her husband coming and hid him in the press,
not thinking that it was the same boy who
had stolen the hen. She put him into the
same press, and bade him stay quite still
there, or the giant would eat him.
Then the giant came in, saying :
Fee, fa, fie, fo, fum,
I smell the breath of an Englishman,"


















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E HEN THAT LAYS GOLEN EGGS.













THE HEN THAT LAYS GOLDEN EGGS.









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JACK TAK(Eb THE GIANT', IMONLY BAGS.





(axck and the Bean-stalk.
Oh said his wife, it is only the cow-
herd, who has just been here. We cannot
spare him for your dinner."
Then the giant sat down, and when he
had eaten half an ox, he told his wife to
bring his money-bags to him. She instantly
went and fetched two large bags full of gold;
and then left him to go about her usual
house-work.
The Ogre counted out the gold twice over,
and then put it into the bags. and tied them
up. In a few minutes Jack heard him snore.
He directly crept out of the press, seized the
bags, and hurrying out of the castle, carried
them home quite safely. Jack's mother was
glad to see him safe at home again, and for
a long time she would not let him go up the
bean-stalk; but Jack knew he had not yet
obeyed the fairy's command to win back the
castle, so after a time he set off once more
on this adventure, and tapped again at the
castle door.
The giantess, who was very stupid, did
not know him again, but she stopped a minute
before she took him in. She feared another
robbery; but Jack's fresh cheeks looked so
tempting that she could not resist him, and
so she bade him come in.






7ack and the Bean-stalk.
But at that moment she heard her husband's
step approaching.
Afraid of losing her supper, the Ogress at
once shut Jack in the press; and she had
hardly hidden him when the giant came in,
saying as usual,
"Fee, fa, fie, fo, fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman."
Oh no said his wife, it is only the
shepherd, who has been up with a sheep for
your dinner."
The giant sat down, and when he had
eaten a whole sheep he said, I should like
some music; bring me my harp."
The Ogress went and brought a golden
harp to him, set it on the table, and went
away. Then the Ogre said, Play," to the
harp, and it played so delightfully that Jack
was charmed.
By-and-by, however, the giant snored so
loud that he could not hear the music ; and
Jack quickly stole out, and seizing the harp,
ran away with it. But the harp was a fairy
belonging to the giant, and as Jack ran, it
cried out, Master! Master !" The giant
woke up slowly and rushed after Jack, but
the boy was very nimble and outran him,
You may imagine how fast Jack went down









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JACK TAKES THE TALKING HARP.


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THE GIANT BREAKS HIS NECK.






yack and the Bean-stalk.
the bean-stalk this time, hearing all the while
the tramp of the giant's feet behind him.
Just as he reached the bottom he saw the
Ogre looking down on him.
The next moment his great feet were on
the bean-stalk.
Mother, mother bring me the axe," cried
Jack.
His mother hastened with it, and just as
the giant was half way down the bean-stalk,
Jack succeeded in chopping it in halves ; the
lower half fell; the upper half swung away,
and the giant, losing his hold, fell heavily to
the ground on his head and broke his neck.
The same moment the fairy again stood
beside Jack, and t i..:h1-- the broken bean-
stalk, it turned into a flight of broad, easy
steps.
Go up," she said, "and take possession
of your own home, so long kept from you.
The Ogress is dead, and there is no more
danger. You have been brave and good.
May you be happy."
Jack thanked the fairy very warmly for
her aid, and she again departed to Fairyland,
after explaining to Jack that she had been
the butcher who sold him the beans.











TOM THUMB.


IN the days of good king Arthur there lived
a countryman and his wife who, though they
had plenty to eat and to drink, and a very
comfortable cottage to live in, were not at all
happy.
They had no children, and they both
wished very much for a baby. The wife was
often in tears when her husband was out at
work and she was all alone, because she had
not an infant to take care of and nurse. One
day, as she sat weeping by herself, more than
usually sad, she said aloud, If I only had a
dear little baby, I should not care what it was
like. I should be thankful for one if it were
no .-:'r than my husband'ss thumb."








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THE FARMER'S WIFE CRYING BECAUSE SHE
FIAS NO BABY,


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THE FAIRY QUEEN BRINGING TOM THUMB TO
HIS MOTHER.


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Tomn Thrumb.


Now it happened that the Queen of the
Fairies was passing by, though the poor
woman could not see her, and as she knew
the farmer's wife was kind to the poor and
likely to be a good mother, 'she thought she
would grant her wish.
So about an hour or two afterwards the
woman was much surprised to see standing
by the table a very beautiful lady, dressed
splendidly, with a glittering star on her fore-
head and a wand in her right hand, with a
gem of great brilliancy at the top of it. But
what delighted the woman most of all was a
tiny cradle, made of a walnut shell, lined with
velvet, in which lay the prettiest baby ever
seen, but it was only just as large as a man's
thumb. See," said the fairy, "your wish
is granted. Here is a baby for you. Take
care of it; it is your own." The woman did
not know how to thank the fairy enough; she
was so delighted, and the queen went away
quite pleased at having given so much
happiness.
Before the fairy went away, however, she




Tomn Thu~mb.


gave the woman a little shirt of spider's web
and a doublet of thistle-down for the baby.
When the farmer came home he was very
much pleased. He invited all his friends to
the christening, and the child was named
" Tom," after him, and Thumb," because he
was no bigger than one.
The baby was very well, and merry, and
grew, of course; but still it was very small.
However, at last Tom thought himself
quite a great boy, and begged his mother to
make him a little suit of clothes, and she
made him one; but with a great deal of
trouble, they were so small.
Tom was very often in mischief. He was
so small that his mother used to put him on
the table to play; and once she found him in
the salt-box.
One day she was making a plum-pudding,
and Tom stood by the side of the basin, and
peeped over the edge; but he could not see
into it very well, and while his mother was
gone for some more flour, he drew himself up
on the edge of the basin. Alas! he fell in and
































































TOM FALLS INTO THE PUDDING.


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THE FALL OF THE PUDDING.





Torn Thumbc~.


disappeared in the wet pudding, which for
poor Tom was a huge morass.
Tom would have cried out, but the pudding
stuck his lips together, and his mother not
missing him, stirred him up in the mixture,
and put it and him into the pot. Tom no
sooner felt the hot water than he danced
about like mad; the woman was nearly
frightened out of her wits to see the pudding
come out of the pot and jump about, and she
was glad to give it to a tinker who was pass-
ing that way. The tinker took the pudding
and put it into a cloth, to carry it home to
his family, who seldom tasted such a good
dish.
But by-and-by, as he was climbing over a
stile, he happened to squeeze it, and Tom,
who had made quite an arch over his own
head in the dry pudding by this time, cried
out from the middle of it, Hallo, Pickens "
which so terrified the tinker that he let the
pudding drop in the field and scampered off
as fast as he could. The pudding fell to
pieces in the fall, and Tom, creeping out, went




Tom Thuimb5.


home to his mother, whom he found in great
trouble, because she could not find him.
After this accident, Tom's mother never
let him stay near her while she was cooking,
but she was obliged to take him with her
when she went out milking, for she dared not
trust the little man in the house alone.
A few days after his escape from the
pudding, Tom went, with his mother, into the
fields to milk the cows, and for fear he
should be blown away by the wind, she tied
him to a thistle with a small piece of thread.
Very soon after, a cow eat up the thistle and
swallowed Tom Thumb. His mother was
in sad grief again; but Tom scratched and
kicked in the cow's throat till she was glad
to throw him out of her mouth again, and he
was not at all hurt; but his mother became
very anxious about her small son, who now
gave her a great deal of trouble. Sometimes
he fell into the milk-pail and was nearly
drowned in the milk; once he was nearly
killed by an angry chicken, and another time
had a narrow escape from a cat.














































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THE COW EATS TOM,








































THE EAGLE FLIES AWAY WITH TOM.





Tom Thu1mb.


One day Tom went ploughing with his
father, who gave him a whip made of a bar-
ley straw, to drive the oxen with; but an
eagle, flying by, caught him up in his beak,
and carried him to the top of a great giant's
castle, and dropped him on the leads. The
giant was walking on the battlements and
thought at first that it was a foreign bird
which lay at his feet, but soon seeing that it
was a small man, he picked Tom up with
his finger and thumb, and put the poor
little creature into his great mouth, but the
fairy dwarf scratched the roof of the giant's
mouth, and bit his great tongue, and held
on by his teeth till the ogre, in a passion,
took him out again and threw him over into
the sea, which ran beneath the castle walls.
Here a very large fish swallowed him up
directly.
Tom did not at all like swimming about in
the fish, but by-and-by he felt it drawn
upwards, and guessed at once that it was
caught. And so it was; and being a very
large fish, the fisherman thought it would





Tom Thumib.
make a good present for his beloved King
Arthur. So he took it to the palace and
begged the king to accept it.
King Arthur was pleased with the poor
man's affection, and ordered the fish to be
carried to the kitchen and cooked for his own
dinner. The fisherman took it to the cook,
who admired it very much, but said it was
very heavy. Then he laid it on a table and
began to cut it open. You may imagine how
he jumped with fear and wonder when Tom
Thumb slipped out of the fish
The cook's cries bought the otherservants,
and soon everybody near ran to behold this
wonder-the tiny man who came out of
the fish.
Tom begged for some water to wash him-
self, and when he was clean, the courtiers
thought him so pretty and such a marvel that
they ran to tell the king about him.
Arthur was very much surprised; but
he desired them to send the little man up
after dinner to see him, and the Court tailor
made haste at once to get ready a Court suit


































TOM COMES OUT OF THE FISH.


Le~ ,, --




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